Episode 22 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 22

Antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper start this leg of their journey in Sunderland, before making their way through Durham to an auction in North Yorkshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts,

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with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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Going, going...gone.

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I think I've arrived!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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-Yes!

-There'll be worthy winners

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and valiant losers.

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Tails.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Argh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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This week we're on the road with two formidable friends.

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Having won the first leg,

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auctioneer Paul Laidlaw is using his native charm

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to keep him in front.

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Do you know how we cuddle in Scotland?

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-That's how we cuddle in Scotland!

-Crikey!

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Nipping at his heels is antiques dealer David Harper.

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He may be behind...

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Ooh!

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..but he's bargaining hard to take the lead.

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-Some investor would love those.

-They would.

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Especially if I paid a tenner and they paid 20.

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-No.

-That'd be a winner.

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-No, no.

-No.

-No.

-No.

-No.

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No.

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David started with £200 and made a small profit at auction,

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giving him £208.70 to spend today.

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No.

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Paul also started off with £200,

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but has pulled ahead with his impressive profits

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and has £271.56 to flaunt on this leg.

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They're careering around the countryside

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in this bright-red 1968 Triumph Herald,

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and having a marvellous time.

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You keep going for fifth gear. For goodness' sake,

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fifth gear was never invented when this thing was made!

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On this route, our worthy adversaries

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started in Windermere in the English Lake District

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and will clock up almost 600 miles,

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ending the week over the border

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in the Scottish city of Dundee.

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Today they're starting in Sunderland in the Northeast,

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and will make their way to auction

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in the North Yorkshire Town of Northallerton.

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-Quite a revelation - what a lovely beach.

-Absolutely gorgeous.

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Yeah, you're right.

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Achieving city status in 1992,

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Sunderland lies on the coast.

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And the area of Roker has been a popular tourist destination

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since the early 20th century.

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It's also the site of David's first shop.

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Slightly envious!

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-Slightly envious.

-Let me out of here.

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-Good luck, man, yeah.

-You have a great day. Good luck, Paul.

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-Catch you later.

-I'm in.

-He's raring to go.

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-Oh.

-BELL RINGS

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Oh!

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Traditional bell. I love that, don't you? My gosh.

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Giraffes. There's giraffes everywhere.

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Someone here really likes giraffes.

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It's chock-a-block-a-look.

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The shop itself transports you back to another time.

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I mean, talk about Empire days,

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this goes way back, this building,

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I'd imagine, looking at it.

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The structure of the shop now, even with candles burning,

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you feel like you're in circa 1880 and it's just magnificent.

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All credit to the owner,

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who must be in here somewhere...

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-My God, the giraffes keep coming... Hello.

-Good morning.

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-Hello, I'm David.

-Pleased to meet you, I'm David Whitfield.

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Hi, David. Two Davids. That makes life much easier for me,

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because I'm absolutely horrific with names.

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So I won't forget that one.

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Well, I do hope not.

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David's run this shop for around 25 years

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and his kids collected most of the giraffes.

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Well, you need a long neck

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to get a look at a lot of the stuff in this place!

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I don't know musical instruments very well at all,

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but I do know that they can do surprisingly well.

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What's that there? Is it a trumpet or trombone?

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-Are you any good on instruments?

-No.

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This is going to be a laugh then, isn't it?

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They're not blowing their own trumpets - or tubas in this case.

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"Soldier of Pitsea Corps".

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Corps. Ah.

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So we've got a slight military connection here - and Paul Laidlaw.

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And he is the military expert.

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What kind of money can that be?

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35.

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And there's another one.

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Starting a band, David?

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So, I might have a punt at these.

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I think there's a potential profit in them.

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-Can I make you a bid?

-Make me a bid.

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-I'll make you a bid - 30 quid for the pair.

-I can't do it.

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-I wouldn't be making any money.

-OK.

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I tell you what I'll do - buy one, get one free.

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-45 quid the two.

-DAVID LAUGHS

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Deal or no deal?

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-I'll spin you 30 or 40.

-Go on, to a gambling man.

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Good man, have you got a coin?

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Oh, no. On the last leg he won on a coin toss.

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Can he do it again?

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-Are you ready?

-Yep.

-Happy?

-Yep.

-Go.

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Tails.

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It's tails.

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Apparently not.

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40 quid. Thank you very much, David.

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But losing hasn't put him off eyeing up more stuff.

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Hang on a minute. I'm not leaving just yet, David,

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I'm just having a quick look at something.

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It's miniature furniture

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and it's absolutely charming. So what is it?

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Well, it's a miniature chest of drawers.

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But this one, I've got to say, is a bit bonkers,

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because I can see

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that the front four sets of drawers,

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three are blank

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and one opens.

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Oh, my gosh.

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-David?

-Yes?

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Three blank drawers, one opening with a well.

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My son made me laugh the other week, he said,

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"Dad, is that an inkwell?" I said, "No." He said, "What is it?"

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-A moneybox.

-It's a moneybox, yeah.

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So when that goes in, that drops.

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-And your money goes into the bottom.

-Let me try that.

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I'll put it in, it's there. There it is. Close it.

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-Go on.

-HE GASPS

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Beautiful. What kind of money can it be?

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-I'll do it for a fiver is the best I can do.

-I can't...

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You know, I can't chip you on that. Drop-dead gorgeous.

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David may be working out ways to save some pennies...

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..but Paul's been travelling the few miles to Cleadon to spend his...

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Sitting just outside the city,

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this village was first recorded in the 12th century.

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And Paul's travelled to meet Judith at Cleadon Antiques And Gifts.

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May I have a wee look round?

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Spend some money, I hope? Excellent.

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Paul won the first leg,

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but can he whip up a storm at the next auction?

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We have a pot lid.

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Now, these date to the Victorian era,

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and things that could be bought in such pots

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were pastes and preserves and spreads,

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for consumption.

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And pastes and cosmetics

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for dressing and grooming.

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There are two here.

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One is all of £12 and the other is £9,

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so £21 for the pair.

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I think that's pretty darn fair, if you want them.

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Victorian pots to World War I binoculars,

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and now he's spied a silver box.

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That's a wee charmer, a little silver pocket snuff.

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Look at that.

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What we see all the time - engine turning.

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We see foliate scrollwork.

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What we don't see are lovely little Gothic arches and trefoils

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there's a touch of the Rococo in there with these sea scrolls.

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Ticket price £52. Right, Paul, are you actually going to buy anything?

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May I pop a few things on the counter and have a conversation with you?

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-Right.

-We might buy everything, we might buy nothing, or something,

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but let's just go at it? Do you mind?

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I mean, I could give you a good price on this,

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because I only paid 20 quid for it, although it's got a dear price on!

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-If that would get you a good profit.

-Ooh!

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A great tip on a silver-topped claret jug

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with a hefty ticket price of £485.

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Paul, you could be on to a winner here.

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We saw the pot lids.

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To start with, he's grabbing the pots AND the binoculars.

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Shoplifter!

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He's amassing a hoard.

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Your whip stand there.

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So what are you telling me comes for £75?

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Is it the stand and the whips?

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No, without the whips. The whips are just loaned off my friend.

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I don't know why she has whips!

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THEY LAUGH

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Can she throw parties?

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Oh, naughty!

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Cut to the chase. Everything there -

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give me the bottom line.

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-Be gentle with me.

-I could do these for ten.

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And I could do 20 on those.

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I could do 30 on that.

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Looking good so far.

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And John, who owns the whip stand,

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has also dropped its price to £40.

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So, Paul, one item to go.

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Judith only paid £20 for that silver-topped jug,

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so there's a great opportunity to capitalise on claret here.

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That's the big one that could hurt, but you got that cheap,

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so how much profit do you need

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to be happy with me walking out the door with it?

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Well, if I had a Scottish cuddle,

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-you could have it for 50.

-£50?!

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The ticket says ten times that price!

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I am going to give you a cuddle

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and I'm no' going to haggle any further.

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That's excellent.

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You've been very fair.

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That's no' how we cuddle in Scotland.

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-That's how we cuddle in Scotland!

-What an incredible deal, eh?

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£150 in his first shop,

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for the World War I binoculars,

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two Victorian pots and lids,

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a silver-engraved snuff box,

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the massively discounted claret jug

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and the riding-whip stand.

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And they've only thrown in a military crop for him too.

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There's a lot there to get excited about.

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Maybe a wee bit early in the trip for a coup de grace,

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but poor old David Harper

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is going to weep when he sees what I've bought.

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I didn't want to say too much in the shop,

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I didn't want to over-exude

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because, in a negotiation, that's not wise.

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That is a belter of a silver-mounted cut-glass claret jug,

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conservatively valuable

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at £200-300.

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Magic! HE CHUCKLES

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A successful morning shop, I'd say.

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And back in the car, the bragging begins.

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-How many objects?

-I shall tell you.

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-Yes.

-Three objects.

-Three objects.

-What about you?

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-How did you get on?

-Erm...

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Well, I'll see your three objects and raise you by three objects.

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-You've got six objects?!

-Duh, duh, DUH!

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HE CACKLES

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Oh, lordy!

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Our worthy competitors are en route to Durham.

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Sitting on the River Wear,

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the present city's origins

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date back to the 10th century.

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Founded around the shrine of St Cuthbert,

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one of the most important and popular medieval saints

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in northern England.

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Monks chose Durham as the final resting place for Cuthbert's remains

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and, in the 11th century,

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work started on Durham Cathedral specifically to house his tomb.

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Look at that. Isn't that gorgeous?

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And it's at the Cathedral that our boys part ways once more.

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-I've arrived, though, huh?

-You arrived a long time ago.

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In my book, you arrived a very long time ago.

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-I still love you, you know.

-You're getting a hug tonight.

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-Right, I know where my shop is.

-I'm going that way.

-Enjoy yourself.

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-See you later, buddy.

-See you.

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Despite a tumultuous past,

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Durham Cathedral has survived in all its striking splendour

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for 900 years.

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Now a UNESCO heritage site,

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it's renowned as a grand example of Norman architecture.

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And its remarkable vaulted roof

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is thought to be the first of its kind in Europe.

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Paul's come for a peek between the pews of this magnificent building,

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courtesy of senior steward Gordon Summerbell.

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Tell me, I mean, I know this is a wonderful cathedral,

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and many moons ago I was here,

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but what are its origins?

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This is a really old cathedral, isn't it, relatively speaking?

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Yes, it was built in 1093,

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-it took 40 years to build only.

-Only!

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When you think of the facilities that they had at that time,

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to build a cathedral like this in 40 years is quite remarkable.

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-My word.

-Nowadays you wouldn't get planning permission

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-in 40 years, would you?

-PAUL LAUGHS

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Ha-ha! The Cathedral was finished in 1133,

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but in the 16th century

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turmoil hit the Church.

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Henry VIII sparked the English Reformation

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by breaking away from Catholicism and Rome

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and made the Church of England

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the country's established church.

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Henry dispatched his men

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to break up many of the country's Catholic monasteries,

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including Durham.

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And they came with the strict remit to seize valuables

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and attack all symbols of Catholicism,

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including the tombs of saints.

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Of course, his tomb was a beautifully ornamental tomb until 1539

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when Henry's commissioners came

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and, of course, they brought a goldsmith with them.

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This was a very, very rich shrine

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and the goldsmith took away all the gold and jewels,

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then his instructions were to destroy Cuthbert's bones.

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But when he opened the coffin,

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he found that the body was whole, covered with skin and tissue

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and, of course, superstition being as it was in those days,

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he was terrified.

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And the commissioners themselves decided that they would do it,

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but likewise, they didn't want to touch it either,

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so they gave the coffin back to the monks

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and told them to take it away at Henry's pleasure.

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-And they never heard from Henry again.

-That is some deal.

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So I didn't realise not even saints' remains

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were safe from the Reformation,

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but those that were instructed to carry out those deeds

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were still overawed by what they saw

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and what they believed the repercussions could be,

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-or the import of those remains.

-In those days, yes.

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-So they survive here to this day.

-Yes.

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Durham Cathedral also houses the tomb

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of the seventh century monk and scholar the Venerable Bede.

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Bede's work is still valued

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in the understanding of early British history

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and he was the first to use the AD dating system.

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But a lesser-known story is how his remains came to rest in Durham.

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Bede, of course, was...

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His bones were stolen by one of the monks in Durham.

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In the year 1022 the monks went over to the monastery in Jarrow

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where Bede was buried

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and they prayed all night at the tomb of Bede

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and, the next morning, when the monks came downstairs,

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they found that Bede's bones had vanished

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and one of our monks in Durham called Alfred Westow, he stole them

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and brought them into Durham.

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And they're still here.

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That was the tourist industry of the day.

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You had the bones of a holy man

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and the bones of a saint

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and the pilgrims came.

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I didn't expect such a great yarn!

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It has to be said. Well told.

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-I am indebted to you, what a wonderful visit.

-Thank you, Paul.

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Thanks very much.

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From one Durham institution to another -

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the indoor market.

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Housed in a restored Victorian hall,

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this place has been trading since 1851.

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There are over 50 stalls,

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selling everything from fish to footwear.

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But our David is only looking for something he can turn into profits

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and has come straight to Mike,

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who's been here for 20 years.

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-There we are.

-1925.

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-Yeah.

-Nice dish.

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OK, let's have a look at that, then.

0:17:030:17:06

-I hope it's going to be an absolute stonking bargain.

-Well, we'll see.

0:17:060:17:11

He's got a smile on his face, I don't like the look of that at all.

0:17:110:17:14

So that is absolutely gorgeous.

0:17:140:17:16

So we've got stamp, Mappin & Webb, very upmarket,

0:17:160:17:19

very good quality.

0:17:190:17:20

Known as a tazza, Italian for stemmed cup,

0:17:200:17:24

which is often used to describe objects

0:17:240:17:27

with a shallow bowl shape.

0:17:270:17:29

I love the shape of it, that is almost Grecian, isn't it?

0:17:300:17:32

-Really nice, yes.

-Or Roman maybe, in its influence.

0:17:320:17:35

Sounds like David's falling for it,

0:17:350:17:37

but how much is he willing to pay?

0:17:370:17:39

I could make you a bid and I don't think I'm going to buy it.

0:17:410:17:44

-Do you want me to make a bid?

-You can, yes, if you like.

0:17:440:17:46

OK, I'd have a go at 40 quid. This is not going to be a flyer.

0:17:460:17:51

No-one can criticise it for being anything other

0:17:510:17:53

than fantastic quality and drop-dead gorgeous,

0:17:530:17:55

it's not going to make 200 quid, is it?

0:17:550:17:57

50 might buy it. Seeing it's you.

0:17:570:18:00

It's got to be 40.

0:18:000:18:01

I know I'm being hard, I know I am.

0:18:010:18:04

45.

0:18:040:18:05

-There might be a trickle of profit.

-You'll make a profit on that.

0:18:060:18:10

-Do you think I will?

-You will.

-There's a trickle there.

0:18:100:18:13

He doesn't seem bowled over with this purchase,

0:18:130:18:16

but he's now got three items under his belt.

0:18:160:18:20

And back in the Triumph with Paul,

0:18:210:18:23

they've come to the end of an exhausting day of antique antics.

0:18:230:18:27

Night-night.

0:18:280:18:30

It's the start of a new day on the road.

0:18:320:18:35

This trip is amazing,

0:18:370:18:38

because when you get in a little car with someone

0:18:380:18:40

and you spend an awful lot of time in such a close proximity,

0:18:400:18:43

you get to know them pretty quickly, don't you?

0:18:430:18:46

Yeah, you're really starting to grate.

0:18:460:18:49

It's like the Honeymoon Period, it's been a year now, Paul,

0:18:490:18:51

and to be honest with you, I'm thinking about moving on.

0:18:510:18:54

-I want you to know this.

-Yeah.

-It's not me, it's you.

0:18:540:18:58

-DAVID LAUGHS

-Now, now, fellas.

0:18:580:19:01

Yesterday David parted with £90 and bought three items.

0:19:010:19:04

The early-20th-century tubas,

0:19:060:19:08

the 19th-century novelty money box,

0:19:080:19:11

and the silver Mappin & Webb tazza,

0:19:110:19:15

giving him £118.70 to flash today.

0:19:150:19:19

Paul went on a spending spree,

0:19:190:19:22

picking up the silver-topped claret jug,

0:19:220:19:25

a Victorian snuff box,

0:19:250:19:27

two Victorian pot lids and pots,

0:19:270:19:30

a set of First World War binoculars,

0:19:300:19:33

and a Victorian riding whip stand,

0:19:330:19:35

complete with a military crop.

0:19:350:19:37

He clocked up a bill of £150,

0:19:380:19:41

leaving £121.56 in cash.

0:19:410:19:44

This morning they're driving across Durham

0:19:480:19:50

towards a taste of the Orient.

0:19:500:19:52

Oh, gosh, that was a quick arrival!

0:19:540:19:55

That was braking, that.

0:19:550:19:59

Well, see you later, darling. See you in Darlington later.

0:19:590:20:03

-What are we turning into? This is really worrying.

-Enjoy, brother!

0:20:030:20:07

See you, have a good day.

0:20:070:20:10

It's onward for Paul, but as an Oriental enthusiast, David

0:20:100:20:14

is in for the treat of the trip at Durham University's Oriental Museum.

0:20:140:20:19

And one of the greatest collections of Chinese

0:20:240:20:26

antiques in the country is watched over by curator Craig Barclay.

0:20:260:20:31

-David Harper. Nice to meet you, Craig.

-Welcome to the Oriental Museum.

0:20:310:20:34

Honestly, I can't begin to tell you what it's like for me to be here.

0:20:340:20:39

This is just... This is a snapshot of heaven.

0:20:390:20:41

This slice of heaven owes its existence to British politician

0:20:450:20:49

and diplomat Malcolm MacDonald.

0:20:490:20:51

The son of former Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald,

0:20:510:20:55

Malcolm was himself a member of the Cabinet before taking up imperial

0:20:550:20:59

posts, and later was appointed Chancellor of Durham University.

0:20:590:21:03

Passionate about education and antiques, Malcolm started

0:21:090:21:12

donating his extensive collection to the university in the 1950s.

0:21:120:21:17

And David has been given permission to handle the first item

0:21:170:21:20

he acquired, a ceramic Ming Dynasty lion dog.

0:21:200:21:24

This is going to be a special moment.

0:21:250:21:28

So, circa 1350 to circa 1650. This is the Ming Dynasty.

0:21:280:21:33

-Later in, but, yes.

-OK, so late Ming.

-Absolutely Ming.

0:21:330:21:37

It is a fantastically evocative piece, and I suppose the reason I

0:21:370:21:42

like it is because it represents the beginning of a collector's journey.

0:21:420:21:47

It is not an expensive object at all.

0:21:470:21:49

They made these in the thousands of them, millions over many years.

0:21:490:21:52

-But it is still gorgeous.

-It's still gorgeous, yes.

0:21:520:21:56

Mmm, almost want to kiss it. Is that really wrong?

0:21:560:21:59

-I'm afraid that would be a step too far.

-It probably would be.

0:21:590:22:02

I won't do that! But let me just have one last stroke.

0:22:020:22:05

Malcolm's legacy lies not only in this impressive collection,

0:22:050:22:09

but also in his central role in the decolonisation

0:22:090:22:12

of the British Empire and the shaping of the Commonwealth.

0:22:120:22:16

But he was no ordinary diplomat.

0:22:170:22:21

When he was in southeast Asia, what he liked to do was strip out of

0:22:210:22:25

his suit, put on a kilt, jump into a canoe and paddle himself upriver.

0:22:250:22:30

One of the reasons that he did this is he made a very, very good friend.

0:22:300:22:35

And the friend that he made was a man in Sarawak by the name of Temenggong Koh.

0:22:350:22:40

And Temenggong Koh was a collector. He collected two things.

0:22:400:22:45

He collected Chinese porcelain,

0:22:450:22:48

but also, as the chief of the Iban tribe, he collected heads.

0:22:480:22:53

His close relationship with Koh led to an unconventional gift

0:22:550:22:59

that now forms part of the museum's collection.

0:22:590:23:02

-This is Temenggong Koh's actual sword.

-This is the head-taker?

0:23:040:23:09

This is the head-taker.

0:23:090:23:11

-My gosh.

-And it dates from the mid-20th century.

0:23:110:23:16

I know it is an awful question, but it's a question I need answering.

0:23:160:23:20

-I wonder how many heads that has taken?

-I don't know.

0:23:200:23:23

I can give you a clue, though.

0:23:230:23:26

Amongst the Iban, it was practice when you took a head

0:23:260:23:30

to place a black band tattooed on the back of your hand.

0:23:300:23:33

-Like, just a line?

-Black line.

-Yeah.

0:23:330:23:36

-Temenggong Koh's hands were tattooed black.

-No!

0:23:360:23:39

He was a war leader in a time of war.

0:23:390:23:41

Now a historic museum piece,

0:23:450:23:47

these two enthusiasts are taking a closer look.

0:23:470:23:50

We have got the human hair, then we've got the bone handle, profusely carved.

0:23:500:23:55

I have a feeling that that is a piece of furniture.

0:23:550:23:58

This is recycling, here.

0:23:580:24:00

And then just before the blade, the little protector here,

0:24:000:24:04

that to me is...

0:24:040:24:06

It's a coin.

0:24:060:24:07

And they've discovered something new about the sword's intricate construction.

0:24:070:24:12

This is absolutely the pinnacle of my journey so far, because you

0:24:120:24:18

and I together, just by chatting and looking at this object, we have

0:24:180:24:21

discovered something that we did not know could possibly be there -

0:24:210:24:25

part of a chair leg. And even you did not know that that was a coin.

0:24:250:24:30

I will confess that I had always looked at it as simply

0:24:300:24:34

being a copper alloy ring, but as you say, if you look at it really

0:24:340:24:38

closely, you can see there are letters on that copper alloy ring.

0:24:380:24:41

And, yeah, you're absolutely right, it's a coin.

0:24:410:24:43

That's brilliant. It couldn't get any better, could it?

0:24:430:24:46

-It's made my day.

-It's made my day. My gosh!

-Thank you for that.

0:24:460:24:49

Thank you, marvellous!

0:24:490:24:50

Another giant leap in knowledge, and all thanks to our David.

0:24:520:24:55

Meanwhile, back in the Triumph, Paul is en route to his next shop.

0:24:590:25:03

Half of me wishes that I find nothing.

0:25:060:25:10

The other half, eternally the treasure hunter and optimist,

0:25:100:25:15

is hoping that I find something that is going to make the headlines.

0:25:150:25:20

Always got your head in the game, eh, Paul?

0:25:200:25:23

He's making his way to Coxhoe in County Durham.

0:25:230:25:27

With a history that goes back as far as the Bronze Age, the

0:25:290:25:32

present village grew up with mining in the 18th and 19th centuries.

0:25:320:25:36

So, can Paul dig deep and find yet another gem in Nursery Antiques?

0:25:390:25:44

Hello there!

0:25:440:25:45

-Ah, morning, Paul.

-Hi, I'm Paul.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:25:450:25:48

-Good to see you. You are?

-Len.

-Len, what a pleasure.

-Thank you.

0:25:480:25:51

-May I have a wee wander round?

-You certainly can.

0:25:510:25:53

If you want any help, just give me a shout.

0:25:530:25:56

With six items to his name already, the pressure's off,

0:25:580:26:01

unless something else can tempt him.

0:26:010:26:03

If it's not expensive, and I suspect it's not going to be,

0:26:060:26:09

sitting down there, that wee tea set doesn't have a price on it.

0:26:090:26:12

Right. I mean, I could do that for, what, £12.

0:26:120:26:16

I'm glad you're in the right ballpark.

0:26:170:26:19

He's interested in this 19th century doll's tea set.

0:26:190:26:23

A wee bit more than... To be honest with you, it's no' money.

0:26:240:26:27

-Can I just bid you...

-Yeah, sure.

-..parting shot...

0:26:270:26:30

a fiver?

0:26:300:26:31

Um, eight and it's yours.

0:26:330:26:36

That's a deal then.

0:26:370:26:38

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Sweet.

0:26:380:26:40

It may be for dolls, but he is not playing around,

0:26:400:26:43

and has added the tea set to his bulging bundle of antiques.

0:26:430:26:46

And back on the road,

0:26:490:26:51

Paul is only too well aware of his shopping excess.

0:26:510:26:54

-Maniac!

-You are a maniac, all right.

0:26:540:26:57

Can you do me a favour and just come with me and punch me

0:26:570:27:01

-when I pick things up?

-Oh, would you mind?

0:27:010:27:03

I've been dreaming about that for the last couple of days!

0:27:030:27:06

Oh, you silly boys! At least they're still laughing.

0:27:060:27:09

They are now heading to Darlington.

0:27:100:27:12

With the historic market town at its centre, Darlington is

0:27:140:27:17

famed for being the terminus of the world's first passenger railway.

0:27:170:27:21

-There you go, welcome to sunny Darlington.

-Sunny indeed.

0:27:230:27:25

It's absolutely fabulous.

0:27:250:27:27

-Paul, good luck. All the best.

-All the best! I'll see you soon, yeah?

0:27:270:27:31

-I'll see you later.

-Last shop of the day.

-OK, cheerio.

0:27:310:27:34

Paul's final chance to buy is Blackwell Antiques & Curios.

0:27:340:27:38

-Hello.

-Paul.

-How are you doing?

-How are we doing?

0:27:390:27:42

-Gordon, pleased to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you.

-A fellow Scotsman.

0:27:420:27:45

-May I have a wee look around...

-Please do.

-..and see if we can...?

0:27:450:27:47

I will leave you to your devices and we will be over here.

0:27:470:27:50

Meanwhile, David's last shop is in what was a house for rail workers.

0:27:500:27:55

-Tony.

-Hello, young David.

-Well...

0:27:550:27:58

It is now owned by Tony, who started his career in the railways

0:27:580:28:01

before becoming an artist and moving into antiques.

0:28:010:28:04

I'm looking for general sale stuff, but something a bit sort of quirky.

0:28:040:28:11

Here we go, that's a bit quirky.

0:28:110:28:13

That's... I mean, that's absolutely superb.

0:28:130:28:16

That is a cigarette box made out of Bakelite.

0:28:160:28:19

It's bang on Art Deco, circa 1930.

0:28:190:28:22

It could just be...

0:28:220:28:24

-It could be made into a jewellery box, but it's got the look.

-Yeah.

0:28:240:28:27

It's also got a ticket price of £30.

0:28:270:28:30

I'd love to pay £10 for it.

0:28:300:28:33

TONY LAUGHS

0:28:330:28:35

-What happened then?

-How many Gs in jugular?!

0:28:350:28:38

-Yeah, that one sure packed a punch.

-I tell you what we'll do.

0:28:400:28:45

Do it for £15. Go on.

0:28:450:28:47

You don't fancy having a bit of a gamble, do you?

0:28:470:28:50

-David, I've lost ten in a row!

-You haven't? You've lost ten spins?

0:28:500:28:54

-I've lost ten in a row.

-Let's have another go.

0:28:540:28:57

Huh! Any excuse to flip a coin, eh, David?

0:28:570:28:59

-You can call. Call.

-Heads.

0:28:590:29:02

Tony, has your bad luck broken?

0:29:020:29:06

-Tony, it hasn't.

-Eh?!

-It's tails.

0:29:090:29:12

Turn it round. Oh, Tony. Oh!

0:29:130:29:18

# Don't cry for me Argentina... #

0:29:200:29:24

I didn't know you had it in you, Harper!

0:29:240:29:26

-OK, let me give you some money for that.

-Right.

0:29:260:29:29

-And then I'll continue looking, cos you never know.

-OK, David. Yes.

0:29:290:29:32

All right, leave that there, that's mine.

0:29:320:29:34

David's got one item and counting, but Paul is struggling.

0:29:340:29:38

With the profitable claret jug on his side,

0:29:400:29:42

not even militaria can tempt him to part with more cash.

0:29:420:29:46

I'm afraid it's going to be a flying visit, my friend.

0:29:480:29:50

That's all right, that's all right.

0:29:500:29:53

Although you should know,

0:29:530:29:54

I have bought more things than sense would dictate already!

0:29:540:30:00

Laidlaw is out of the game,

0:30:020:30:03

but David's warming up with these brass sovereign scales.

0:30:030:30:07

Right, this little object was absolutely vital to anybody

0:30:070:30:12

that dealt in gold but also that used gold to purchase,

0:30:120:30:15

because, there's your half sovereign and your full sovereign.

0:30:150:30:18

They have to weigh a certain weight. A real necessity.

0:30:180:30:22

Ticket price is £38. Now, Harper, go easy!

0:30:220:30:26

-Some investor will love those.

-They would.

0:30:270:30:30

-Especially if I paid a tenner and they paid 20.

-No.

0:30:300:30:33

-No.

-That would be a winner.

-No, no.

-No?

-No.

-No.

-No.

0:30:330:30:37

-No.

-They are just not easy to find.

0:30:370:30:40

After carefully weighing it up, the scales go back in the cabinet.

0:30:400:30:45

-I can half them for you and we can say £19...

-Can't do it.

0:30:450:30:49

-Honestly, I can't.

-This is the real world, unfortunately.

0:30:490:30:54

Oh, I don't like the real world!

0:30:540:30:56

Like it or not, David, your tenner's going nowhere.

0:30:560:31:00

How about if we go 12 on the scales?

0:31:000:31:04

-What do you reckon?

-That was the... That's...

0:31:040:31:07

You shouldn't be eating butter!

0:31:070:31:09

HE LAUGHS

0:31:090:31:10

What do we reckon?

0:31:100:31:12

-13.

-Done.

-Right, go on.

-Thank you very much.

-At last.

0:31:160:31:20

The scales have tipped for David and he's walking away with two items.

0:31:200:31:24

But how does it stack up against Paul's treasure trove?

0:31:240:31:28

Time for a grand unveiling.

0:31:300:31:31

Oh! OK, well, of course,

0:31:330:31:36

we've got to have something with a military connection.

0:31:360:31:40

I mean, that is just a given. I like that, the claret. Silver plate.

0:31:400:31:43

-No!

-Pewter, polished pewter?

-No!

-It's not silver. It's not, it's not!

0:31:430:31:49

PAUL GIGGLES

0:31:490:31:50

Seriously? Oh, my gosh! Sexy, good crystal body.

0:31:500:31:54

That's a really good bit of kit.

0:31:540:31:56

Oh, he's impressed.

0:31:560:31:58

-That's going to make you some profit.

-I hope so.

0:31:580:32:01

-Can I grab that silver...?

-Yeah, go for it.

0:32:010:32:03

That is rather nice.

0:32:030:32:05

A little snuffbox, 1882.

0:32:050:32:09

-Decoration is contemporary to the box.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:32:090:32:12

-What's that, 30 to 50, 40 to 60?

-I think that's 40 to 60, yeah.

0:32:120:32:16

-40 to 60. What did you pay for that?

-30, I paid.

-Bang on.

-So it should be all right.

0:32:160:32:20

Paul, I think you've got a nice, nice collection there.

0:32:200:32:22

But the best item, the one that is going to make you, I think,

0:32:220:32:26

quite a lot of money, is the claret.

0:32:260:32:28

Well found for the claret, by the way. Seriously, well found.

0:32:280:32:32

-OK.

-It's a tough act to follow, but go on, David,

0:32:320:32:35

show him what you've got.

0:32:350:32:37

PAUL LAUGHS

0:32:370:32:39

I always said you were full of wind! THEY LAUGH

0:32:390:32:41

Are you a wind instrument man?

0:32:410:32:43

-No!

-Never mind.

-You know what's intriguing me?

-Yes?

0:32:430:32:47

-An engraving here. How's about... It's Sally Ann.

-I think maybe...

0:32:470:32:51

-It's Sally Ann. No, it is, it tells you there!

-Does it?

0:32:510:32:54

-What does it say?

-It's Sally Ann!

-Oh, it says the Salvation Army.

0:32:540:32:57

-Excellent. Should have noticed that.

-Magic.

0:32:570:32:59

-It's good, isn't it?

-It's magic!

-That works for me.

0:32:590:33:01

-Now, is that silver? Bonbon dish.

-Yes, it is.

-OK, well, I think it is very elegant.

0:33:010:33:07

-Mappin & Webb.

-Yes.

-George V.

0:33:070:33:10

-It's delicious.

-Thank you.

-Its form is super...

0:33:120:33:16

-It's all right, isn't it?

-..you know, after the antique.

0:33:160:33:19

So far, so good, but can Paul find his way around the money box?

0:33:190:33:23

-Um...

-Can you just open that drawer?

-Oh, it's a false pair of drawers.

0:33:230:33:28

Ink?

0:33:280:33:30

-No?

-No. It's a trick. Are you ready? Just stay there.

0:33:300:33:34

You're going to put an old penny in there. It's a money box!

0:33:340:33:37

Close the drawer. Open the drawer.

0:33:370:33:40

-Ohhh! I love that!

-Stunning beyond belief.

-A belting good thing!

0:33:410:33:47

For a little box, it's getting a big reaction.

0:33:470:33:51

Could it do 120? Yeah.

0:33:510:33:53

HE CHUCKLES

0:33:530:33:55

-£5 note.

-Dancer! What a belting good purchase!

0:33:550:33:59

-Nice thing, isn't it?

-That's a cracking thing. I love that.

0:33:590:34:02

Shall we go and enjoy the sun and have a drink outside?

0:34:020:34:05

I'm up for that. Well done, my man, by the way.

0:34:050:34:07

Thank you, but well done, you, too.

0:34:070:34:10

Right, boys, give us the lowdown. Who got the upper hand?

0:34:100:34:13

First auction, I thought I'd got it. I really did. I thought my pieces were better.

0:34:130:34:17

But, you know, you've got to believe in your own stuff.

0:34:170:34:19

And I've got to tell you, I think,

0:34:190:34:21

take out the claret jug of Paul's, destroy that, I'd get him.

0:34:210:34:26

Introduce the claret jug, I think if it is going to go Paul's way,

0:34:260:34:30

he's got to kill me with claret.

0:34:300:34:32

So, Paul, when push comes to shove, have you got the edge?

0:34:320:34:35

At the risk of jinxing the whole affair...

0:34:370:34:40

um, I should win that auction.

0:34:400:34:43

The claret jug should do 250 to 350.

0:34:430:34:46

There you go, I said it!

0:34:470:34:49

Yes, you did! Onwards to auction, fellas, where all will be revealed.

0:34:510:34:55

Paul, I have got a prediction for today.

0:34:570:34:59

I predict that I am going to be beaten up...by a claret jug.

0:34:590:35:03

The new Cluedo - Professor Laidlaw,

0:35:030:35:05

with a claret jug, in the auction room.

0:35:050:35:07

THEY LAUGH

0:35:070:35:09

They are heading to the North Yorkshire town of Northallerton.

0:35:090:35:13

Granted a market town status by Royal Charter over 800 years

0:35:140:35:18

ago, trading is still an important part of life in Northallerton.

0:35:180:35:22

And our experts will be trying their luck in today's general

0:35:240:35:27

sale at Northallerton Auctions, held in the cattle market.

0:35:270:35:30

Looks rather nice. I hope we don't leave with a couple of cows, Paul.

0:35:320:35:35

Look at those pens!

0:35:350:35:37

While the boys get in amongst the pens, auctioneer Timothy -

0:35:370:35:41

great name - Pennington talks shop.

0:35:410:35:43

I think my favourite of the items that's come in today is the silver-top claret jug.

0:35:440:35:49

Very rare that you get a good claret jug in, particularly one that's

0:35:490:35:52

silver-topped, and I do think that will do well here today.

0:35:520:35:55

I think the money box is very interesting.

0:35:550:35:57

I would anticipate it's going to do somewhere in the region of £20-£40.

0:35:570:36:01

It's got a little bit of damage on it, but it is a nice, quirky piece.

0:36:010:36:06

Paul spent £158 and is offering up five lots.

0:36:060:36:11

David is also presenting five lots at a total cost of £113.

0:36:120:36:17

Let the games begin!

0:36:170:36:20

We are starting with David's musical piece of plumbing.

0:36:210:36:25

-Ten bid, at £10 bid...

-Ohh, paid 40.

-15, 20...

0:36:250:36:30

Taking big bid increments.

0:36:300:36:32

-30, 30 bid, five...

-Come on, you're getting there.

0:36:320:36:35

-Try eight, madam.

-Go on!

-At £35, bid at 35...

-No, no!

-38, is it?

0:36:350:36:39

-Going to sell at 35...

-No, no!

0:36:390:36:41

GAVEL BANGS

0:36:410:36:42

It has hit a bum note with a £5 loss.

0:36:420:36:46

Why didn't you bid on those?

0:36:460:36:49

Yeah, what's your problem?!

0:36:490:36:51

That's no way to behave! Maybe Paul can whip him into shape.

0:36:530:36:56

At £10, bid at ten, for the good crop stand.

0:36:580:37:01

-15, 20, 20 against you...

-No, it's not going to make 20 quid.

0:37:010:37:05

-It can't make 20 quid.

-25, 30... 30 bid out at the top now.

0:37:050:37:10

-Come on, bid.

-OK...

-I'll give you a couple of quid.

0:37:100:37:13

Oh, sorry, Paul, I just missed that, mate! Sorry about that(!)

0:37:130:37:17

Ha! The friendship's going to pot, as is their cash, with another loss.

0:37:170:37:21

Good job you didn't bid on that one anyway. Well done.

0:37:230:37:25

That was a good decision.

0:37:250:37:26

Paul's militaria did him proud at the last auction.

0:37:280:37:31

Can he do it again?

0:37:310:37:33

Ten bid. Little money at ten bid.

0:37:330:37:35

-12, 15, 18, 20...

-Here we go.

-22.

-Oh!

-22, try another one.

0:37:350:37:42

22, 22 bid and selling at 22...

0:37:420:37:46

GAVEL BANGS

0:37:460:37:47

It's bombed, as all but 4p of that profit

0:37:470:37:50

will be eaten up by auction house costs.

0:37:500:37:54

At least you've made a bit of profit on paper.

0:37:540:37:56

You're the first one today to make a profit on paper!

0:37:560:37:59

Can David's next piece help balance the books?

0:37:590:38:02

-Five bid...

-Oh, here we go.

0:38:020:38:05

-Eight, ten, ten against you.

-..Bid there.

0:38:050:38:08

-Come on. Any more?

-At ten bid, 12...

-No, go on!

0:38:080:38:12

All finished then at £12...

0:38:120:38:14

No more gold sovereigns for you, I'm afraid, David.

0:38:150:38:18

I wouldn't say there's a feverish atmosphere in the salesroom.

0:38:180:38:22

For the next lot, Paul has combined his Victorian pots

0:38:240:38:27

and lids with his doll's tea set.

0:38:270:38:30

£10 straight in. Ten bid.

0:38:310:38:33

At £10 bid, at ten bid...

0:38:330:38:35

12, 14, 16...

0:38:350:38:38

All out in the ring now.

0:38:380:38:39

18, 20, 20 bid. At 20 bid up top now.

0:38:390:38:44

At 20 bid, at 20 bid and selling at £20...

0:38:440:38:48

GAVEL BANGS

0:38:480:38:50

It's a £2 profit, but after costs, he'll have made a loss.

0:38:500:38:54

-Did you buy that?

-Yes!

-But it wasn't mine!

0:38:540:38:57

-It was his. You can send them back, you know.

-It was nice.

0:38:570:39:00

-Behave, Harper! Your Bakelite box is up next.

-Five bid.

0:39:000:39:06

-At £5 bid...

-Go on, go on.

-All out, take seven.

0:39:060:39:10

Seven, nine, 11, 13, 15, 18...

0:39:100:39:15

-18 with me, at £18...

-Go on, go on, go on!

0:39:150:39:18

-20, 20 against you. 21, is it, madam?

-Go on!

0:39:180:39:22

20 bid and selling at 20...

0:39:220:39:26

Cor, things are looking up! He's just doubled his money.

0:39:260:39:30

That's 100%. There's nothing wrong with a 100% margin.

0:39:300:39:35

Can his money box help pile up pennies?

0:39:360:39:40

Five bid, at £5 bid, at five, ten, 15...

0:39:400:39:43

-Well done, good taste.

-..20, five, 30...

0:39:430:39:47

-All out in the ring now, at 30 I am bid. At 30 I am bid...

-Is that you?

0:39:470:39:52

Are you all done and finished then at £30?

0:39:520:39:55

Harper's pulling ahead in this auction, thanks to his new friend.

0:39:570:40:01

-It's a bargain.

-I've got two of yours.

-A beautiful thing.

0:40:010:40:04

Well done. You've got good taste.

0:40:040:40:05

Fibber.

0:40:060:40:07

Perhaps Paul can pull it back by flashing his silverware.

0:40:070:40:11

40 bid. At 40 bid. Five.

0:40:110:40:14

-Ooh.

-And 50. Five. And 60.

0:40:140:40:17

-Five. And 70.

-Oh, they like their silver.

0:40:170:40:20

-They like their silver.

-Two. And five. 75 with me.

0:40:200:40:23

-They like their silver.

-At £75 only bid.

0:40:230:40:25

At 75 bid, and selling at 75.

0:40:250:40:28

A sterling £45 profit puts Paul back in front.

0:40:290:40:34

Seriously, well done.

0:40:340:40:35

-Thank you.

-Well done.

-Well, you've got silver up next, haven't you?

0:40:350:40:39

Can David's silver offering follow suit?

0:40:400:40:43

-At 20 only bid. All out in the ring now.

-It's a nice little thing, that.

0:40:430:40:46

-Five. 30. 35. 35 with me.

-Come on!

0:40:460:40:51

-At 35. At 35. 40.

-No, go on!

-40 bid. I'll take two.

0:40:510:40:56

-At 40 only bid. At £40.

-No!

-40 bid against you. 42.

0:40:560:41:00

45. 45.

0:41:000:41:02

-It should be 90 quid!

-48.

0:41:020:41:05

48, I'm bid. At 48 bid. I'm going to sell, then, at 48.

0:41:050:41:10

Unfortunately, David is yet again beaten by costs.

0:41:110:41:15

Oh!

0:41:150:41:17

Why didn't you bid on that one? That was a lovely...

0:41:170:41:19

PAUL LAUGHS

0:41:190:41:21

Have they saved the best for last?

0:41:210:41:24

It's the highly anticipated silver claret jug that Paul picked up

0:41:240:41:28

for a pittance.

0:41:280:41:29

-He's got nothing on the books.

-£100 straight in. 100 bid.

0:41:290:41:32

-Mm.

-£100 bid. 110.

0:41:320:41:35

It's already double what he paid.

0:41:350:41:38

-140.

-Yeah.

-150, 160.

0:41:380:41:41

All out in the ring, now. At 160 I'm bid. At 160 only bid.

0:41:410:41:45

-I'll take five - where? 165. At 165 all out in the ring now.

-So cheap.

0:41:450:41:50

At 165 are you all done and finished, then, at 165?

0:41:500:41:54

Paul, congratulations. And I sincerely mean it.

0:41:540:41:58

PAUL LAUGHS

0:41:580:42:01

Argh! Argh! Argh! Argh!

0:42:010:42:03

Hand-crushing Harper knew it would wipe him out,

0:42:030:42:06

and it has, giving victory to Laidlaw once again.

0:42:060:42:10

David Harper started this leg with £208.70.

0:42:120:42:16

During this trip to auction, he made a profit of £5.90.

0:42:160:42:20

HE LAUGHS

0:42:200:42:21

Giving him £214.60 to carry forward.

0:42:210:42:24

Paul Laidlaw started with £271.56, and has racked up impressive

0:42:270:42:31

profits of £97.84 after auction costs,

0:42:310:42:37

giving him a very healthy £369.40 to flaunt on the next leg.

0:42:370:42:43

Well done.

0:42:430:42:44

So is it legal for me to swear at this point, or not?

0:42:440:42:47

You can swear but you can't touch the face. You can't hit me.

0:42:470:42:50

I can hit you there!

0:42:500:42:52

THEY LAUGH

0:42:520:42:53

Well done.

0:42:530:42:55

-Are you ready?

-As ever!

-Come on, then.

0:42:550:42:58

CAR REVS

0:42:590:43:01

-Look at that.

-PAUL LAUGHS

0:43:010:43:04

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Paul finds his wonderland.

0:43:040:43:08

How bizarre.

0:43:090:43:11

Never seen the likes.

0:43:110:43:12

-And David leaves it to Lady luck.

-OK, what do you want?

-Heads.

-Heads.

0:43:120:43:16

Antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper start this leg of their journey in Sunderland, before making their way through Durham to an auction in the North Yorkshire town of Northallerton.