Episode 23 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 23

Antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper begin the third day of their road trip in Hexham, Northumberland, before heading across the border for an auction in Dumfries.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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With £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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Going, going, gone.

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I think I've arrived!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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Yes!

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There'll be worthy winners, and valiant losers.

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Tails.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Argh! Argh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's Scotland versus England on the third leg of the road trip,

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with Englishman David Harper and Scots-born Paul Laidlaw.

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When negotiating a bargain, savvy southerner David

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likes to leave it to Lady Luck to decide.

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What do you want? Heads?

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Tails.

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Whereas canny Caledonian Paul's buying habits

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can only be described as, well...

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Quirky, and I'm not ashamed.

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OK, I feel slightly dirty.

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David started the week with £200, but two auctions later

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managed to increase his loot to £214.60.

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Not much to live on!

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Paul started with the same amount

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but his pockets have bulged

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to an impressive £369.40.

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Better!

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It's another glorious day in the British countryside!

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Actually, they're battling the elements

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in this red 1968 Triumph Herald.

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-A moment ago we were in our sunglasses.

-Yes.

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It was OK, sort of warmish, wasn't it?

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-Bracing!

-Bracing, but doable.

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-Now, suddenly, we've gone to November.

-Indeed!

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But this is a time-travelling machine, isn't it?

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THEY LAUGH

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On this route, our fearless compadres

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started in Windermere in the Lake District,

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travelling a 600-mile journey to the city of Dundee.

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Today they're starting in Hexham in Northumberland,

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before heading north-west across the Scottish border

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for auction in Dumfries.

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Located just a few miles south of Hadrian's Wall,

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the charming market town of Hexham was once a key border town.

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It has played scene to many battles

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between the Scots and the English.

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Today it's host to another one,

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with auction riches and reputations at stake.

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-Oh, here we are, Paul.

-Hexham, I presume?

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First day's shopping. THEY LAUGH

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-Are you raring to go?

-Good luck, my man.

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-I'll see you later.

-Have a good one.

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Such good sportsmanship, chaps.

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Paul is popping into the family-run Ashbourne House Antiques

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to bag the first bargain of the trip.

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-I better introduce myself, I'm Paul.

-Oh, hello, I'm Beryl.

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-Good to see you, and this is yours?

-Yes, it is, indeed.

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This place has a lot of antique militaria,

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much from the First and Second World Wars.

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As a keen collector, that should be right up Paul's street.

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A lamp...

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This doesn't look military to me.

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I love this.

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This is superb. Look, I've got to say it, a horrible word,

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"quirky".

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Look, I said it. And I'm not ashamed.

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OK, I feel slightly dirty.

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That's a Wee Willie Winkie-style chamber stick, is it not?

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It's a little portable candlestick to get one from chamber to chamber

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in the dark hours of the night.

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We have light switches for that sort of thing nowadays!

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It's battery-operated and possibly from the 1940s,

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made from Bakelite plastic.

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It's ticketed at £26.

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A bit of a problem,

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a little breakage.

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Never buy anything you're going to have two apologise for.

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Golden rule.

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But I'm still tempted.

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It's great, isn't it?

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I don't know!

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It might give me sleepness nights if I had to sell that at auction!

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Something a bit more weighty has caught Paul's eye.

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It's a late 19th, or early 20th century

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marine navigational sextant, or quadrant.

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Seafarers would use one

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to measure the angle between two objects in the sky

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and plot their exact position at sea.

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It's a good thing. It's a good thing, look at that.

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Mmm, but good enough for its £200 ticket price?

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If it's going to be two, I can't buy it.

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What about 180?

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It's not enough. I'll tell you what I want to do,

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I want to try and buy something else from you.

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-I've picked that up.

-I know it's damaged.

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What a shame, but isn't it just crazy? Love it.

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-A straight 20 would be OK.

-Ah, no, no, no.

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So I want to give you, so you know where I stand,

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I want to give you £10 for that and 150 for that,

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but we're not striking a deal now.

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-That's where I stand, OK?

-Indeed we're not, no.

-Right!

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Beryl doesn't seem to be budging.

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Paul is wandering around,

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but isn't particularly keen on much else.

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Is this a tactic to soften Beryl up for his final offer?

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It could be a good strategy, this.

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Are you going to give me that sexton for 150 quid, then?

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160 for the sexton and the Bakelite.

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It's a wee candlestick for a bit of frivolity

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and the sextant is as it is. I know exactly what we're talking about

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and I'm happy to take a punt at it.

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160?

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-Go on, then.

-Thanks, Beryl!

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Loving your work!

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The wandering around seems to have worked.

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Beryl seems happy with the price and Paul's secured his first piece

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and that Wee Willie Winkie for £160.

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Marvellous!

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Meanwhile, David has arrived at the nearby Malcolm Eglin Antiques.

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This must be Malcolm. Hello, Malcolm.

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-Hello, Malcolm, David Harper.

-Nice to see you.

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-I love those trousers.

-I borrowed them for this morning.

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Did you really?

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It would have been ironic if I'd put mine on, wouldn't it?

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THEY LAUGH

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I brought a change, just in case!

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-Did you?

-No, I'm teasing.

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Malcolm's a man prepared for any eventuality,

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but is he prepared for David's hard bargaining?

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His shop is family-owned

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and has a nice homely feel to it.

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This is really how antique shops are going

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and this is how they should be presented.

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It gives you an idea

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of how an object might look in your house,

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rather than just piling stuff in.

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It's so well done, everything's clean and fresh

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and you could feel it in your own home.

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David is £155 behind Paul

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so needs something impressive on this trip to bridge the gap.

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So, as ever, he has set his eyes to the Orient for inspiration.

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This 19th-century Chinese games board

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looks like it's made from lacquered wood and papier-mache.

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It may have been made for export around the 1880s

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and has a ticket price of £165.

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But David will want a discount -

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of course!

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165 on the ticket, how would it be at 110?

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-Yeah, I mean, it's nice, it's nice.

-Where do you want to be with it?

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Oh, I daren't say.

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If you daren't say, don't say.

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It's not like you to be bashful, David.

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There is a photo on the wall, however,

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that I think is quite priceless.

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Look, please, can I not go anywhere without seeing this character?

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No, you cannot.

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He gets everywhere!

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Yeah, well, somebody's got to keep an eye on you lot.

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David's back at the games set again.

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He's certainly keen on it.

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He's ready to make a new offer, I fancy.

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For me to get out of it...

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-90.

-Yeah, it's...

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There's got to be a profit in there, David.

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It couldn't be 60?

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I'll tell you what, shake on 80.

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-I'll do it at 70.

-Couldn't.

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I'm not going to lose on it, sorry.

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I know, I know. I'm being mercenary,

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only because I have to be for this one.

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Because he's blinking thrashing me, Malcolm,

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that's what he's doing, thrashing me.

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-MOURNFUL MUSIC

-OK, here we go.

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It looks like he's playing the sympathy card.

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-Come on, 75.

-Good man, thank you very much.

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-Good man.

-No problem.

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It worked! Is this a new negotiating tactic from David?

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Another string to his bow?

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First item bagged, which is just as well,

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as Paul is on his way.

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-Well, about time, Laidlaw!

-Compadre!

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The sun is shining

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-and here comes... a groin strain.

-Whey-hey!

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THEY LAUGH

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Wait a minute, David, have you stolen something?

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Am I technically a getaway driver?

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Hang on!

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-And...yes!

-Boot it!

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Oh, crikey! Batman's job's safe.

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Paul's driving David 12 miles

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to the village of Mickley in Northumberland.

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-Here you go!

-Thank you very much indeed. This is my treat for the day.

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I am looking forward to hearing how this goes. I envy you, this one.

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-Do you?

-Yeah.

-Cracking, have a good shop.

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-Enjoy, I know you will.

-I will. See you later, Paul.

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-See you later.

-Bye.

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David is visiting the exquisite Cherryburn House,

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the birthplace of 18th century naturalist

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and trailblazing print artist Thomas Bewick.

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David's meeting Emily Bryce from the National Trust.

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-You must be Emily.

-Hi. Nice to meet you.

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Thank you very much and I see you've just been admiring

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that wonderful northeastern view there.

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Yeah, it's really something quite special,

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particularly on a day like today.

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Thomas Bewick spent his formative years at the Cherryburn farmhouse.

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It's here he developed a passion for ornithology

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which, together with his artistic flair,

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enabled him to make precise drawings of the wildlife around him.

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Aged 14, Bewick became an engraver in Newcastle,

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but this museum at Cherryburn still retains examples of his work.

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It's a first edition

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of The History Of British Birds, which was Bewick's second major work.

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And this is the Land Birds version of it.

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He also did a Water Birds book.

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You can get to see lots of very intricate images

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of the birds themselves.

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During the day, Bewick engraved business signs,

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but in the evenings he would work on great illustrations

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that would reveal his true creative craftsmanship.

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He started off doing drawings from stuffed birds

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but what he decided was that, actually,

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the stuffed birds, they were never posed in natural poses,

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so he didn't like that. He used to ask people

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when they would go shooting or kill a bird,

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to either post one to him,

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or he got them from a whole range of sources,

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so he was getting them through the post.

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Bewick developed a method of using engraving machinery

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to create complex printed images.

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This is a replica of the printing press

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that would have featured at Bewick's workshop in Newcastle.

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It's operated by historic printing adviser Christopher Bacon.

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This is the original wood-engraved block

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made by Thomas Bewick, and it's from the picture you've been looking at.

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What's interesting about it is you can see that

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the block has been relieved to different levels.

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This was all part of his technique.

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It meant that the lower levels would actually ink more lightly

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and the higher levels would take more ink,

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and they'd get the pressure first when the platen comes down.

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This was a completely new innovation.

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Till this point, most printing plates had been flat,

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and if you wanted an engraving,

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it would need to be done on a copper plate.

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But Bewick combined the skills he learned as an engraver

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to create something special.

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-There you can see the detail.

-Oh, my golly gosh.

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Thank you very much indeed!

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Bewick revolutionised print art in Georgian England,

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and Cherryburn House offers a snapshot

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of the 18th-century rural life

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of perhaps Northumberland's greatest artist.

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Whilst David is in Mickley,

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Paul has driven to the seaside town of Whitley Bay

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to take in some bracing sea air.

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The town was simply known as Whitley until the 1880s,

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but constant confusion with the town of Whitby in North Yorkshire

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led to a re-christening with the simple addition of the word "bay".

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One place that has kept the old name, though,

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is Whitley Jewellery and Antiques,

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and that's where Paul is.

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It's parky out there, I'll tell you!

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-Nice to meet you.

-You are...?

-Philip.

-Good to see you.

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-I'm Paul.

-And Linda.

-Linda, how are you?

-I'm fine, thanks, Paul.

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Good to see you.

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Formalities out of the way,

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Paul likes to make his way around each shop clockwise.

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Or is that anticlockwise?!

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Now I've deviated, haven't I?

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I was clockwise and now I've gone there.

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That's all wrong.

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It's how you miss stuff.

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Easy mistake to make, I guess.

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Paul's going for a deep rummage.

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His eagle eyes have spotted something, though,

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shining on the floor.

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How bizarre.

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I've never seen the likes.

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Tweedledum, Tweedledee

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and one with the Queen of Hearts' pages.

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These brass plaques

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feature the characters from the original novel

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Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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and are probably late 19th or early 20th century.

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They're too far gone, aren't they? Polished to oblivion.

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Someone's had a right good go at cleaning these

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and it's taken a bit of the shine off them.

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Is there any money on the brass plaques? Are they dear

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or are they not dear?

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Well, we've got them marked up at £25 each.

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-So they're dear in my book!

-You think they're dear?

-I do.

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See if they were sharp? They're worth a punt.

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Paul looks like he's deep in thought about Tweedledum and Tweedledee.

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Are they really worth £50?

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And can he do a deal?

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I do want to buy them, to be honest with you.

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I want to buy something,

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but I'm not a gambler

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-and I'm going to make you a puny wee offer...

-Right.

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..of a tenner.

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-Each?

-No.

-Oh!

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He drives a hard bargain.

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-I'll see what I can do for you.

-Look at all that damage.

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Shall we go in the middle? 15?

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-I'm offering you a tenner.

-Ah, Paul...

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Do you know what you need to do next time?

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Not have them buried in the corner,

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as though you'd given up all hope of getting anything for them!

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That is sending me a subliminal message.

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That'll be lovely. You can have them for ten.

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You, my friend, are a good man.

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Thanks very much!

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Thank you.

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Can there be a better pair of mascots

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than Tweedledum and Tweedledee to join our wanderers' road trip?

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Having avoided any white rabbits,

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Paul's picked up David

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and the two seek shelter for the evening,

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so night-night.

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It's the start of a new day on the road.

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-So, you've got a lot of shopping to do today.

-I do.

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I'm excited. I'm raring to go.

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I just want to get on the ground and get buying.

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THEY CHUCKLE

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-The evil laugh is out.

-Just as I had suspected,

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he's fallen for my plan!

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Oh, Lordy.

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Yesterday, David splashed out £75 on a 19th-century Chinese games board,

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leaving him £139.60.

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Paul pushed the boat out,

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spending £170 on the marine navigational aid,

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a Bakelite chamber stick

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and two brass plaques,

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leaving him £199.40 today.

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This morning,

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the boys are off to the historic coastal borough of Tynemouth.

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They're heading straight to Tynemouth Market,

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a place that's just about big enough for the two of them.

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OK, left or right?

0:17:310:17:33

There's nothing that way. You go that way!

0:17:330:17:36

PAUL LAUGHS

0:17:360:17:38

-Oh, David!

-You! You!

0:17:380:17:40

It's meant in jest.

0:17:400:17:42

Look at all that!

0:17:420:17:44

-Good luck!

-See you later.

0:17:440:17:46

Get on with it, then!

0:17:460:17:48

Tynemouth Market is based

0:17:480:17:50

at Tynemouth's magnificent railway station.

0:17:500:17:54

It's the working railway station for the Tyne and Wear Metro

0:17:560:18:00

but, at weekends, it transforms into a bustling marketplace.

0:18:000:18:03

They sell just about everything imaginable here.

0:18:030:18:06

Cracking pair of boots, eh?

0:18:060:18:08

-It was a fine man - a gentleman - that wore those.

-Oh, yes.

0:18:080:18:12

Gee whizz, can you imagine?

0:18:120:18:14

But with so many stalls to choose from,

0:18:170:18:20

it's a race to see who bags the best bargains first.

0:18:200:18:23

I've not got time to think about what David's up to.

0:18:230:18:26

He'll be a man on a mission, a machine,

0:18:260:18:28

a bargain-hunting Terminator.

0:18:280:18:31

Our David, though, is no Terminator.

0:18:310:18:34

He's actually a pussycat.

0:18:340:18:36

But he IS on a mission.

0:18:360:18:38

1959. Paul will remember that. He would have been... How old is he now?

0:18:380:18:41

Paul's 75... He would, I suppose, just be getting married in '59(!)

0:18:410:18:44

-He looks good, but he's had a few operations.

-Ho-ho-ho!

0:18:440:18:48

I didn't think he was as young as that(!)

0:18:480:18:50

Speaking of things of a fair age,

0:18:500:18:53

David's picked up a silver lady's parasol handle

0:18:530:18:56

in the form of a swan.

0:18:560:18:57

-It's a novelty thing but missing the eye is a major problem.

-It is.

0:18:570:19:01

Gosh, that would have been a very fine piece of kit,

0:19:010:19:04

so made for a lady of quite some substance.

0:19:040:19:07

It's hallmarked 1901, but has a bit of damage.

0:19:070:19:09

Silver can sell quite well

0:19:090:19:11

but is it worth the £50 dealer Chris is asking for it?

0:19:110:19:15

I can't do it. I'd like to own it

0:19:150:19:17

because it's an item of quality.

0:19:170:19:19

-It has a little bit of damage.

-It's got damage.

0:19:190:19:22

What's the price that you'd like to buy it at?

0:19:220:19:25

-I'd love it at a tenner but I'm not going to get it, am I?

-No.

-OK.

0:19:250:19:28

Anywhere near?

0:19:280:19:29

Um... I think the bottom would have to be 30.

0:19:290:19:33

Make it 20 and I'll have it.

0:19:340:19:37

Let's do some business.

0:19:370:19:38

25.

0:19:380:19:40

Spin you for it?

0:19:400:19:42

-20 or 25?

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:19:420:19:45

Oh, Lordy!

0:19:450:19:47

He's not going to try this old trick again, is he?

0:19:470:19:50

If he wins, he gets it for 20.

0:19:500:19:52

Lose, and it's 25.

0:19:520:19:54

-OK, what do you want?

-Heads.

-Heads?

0:19:540:19:56

Tails.

0:19:580:19:59

Huh! Fluke!

0:19:590:20:02

And for just £20, let's hope he's even luckier at the auction.

0:20:020:20:06

First purchase, first stall - this is what I like.

0:20:060:20:10

Paul, meanwhile, is on the other side of the concourse

0:20:100:20:13

and he's being called towards some vintage phones.

0:20:130:20:17

I mean, I'm a man for my vintage technology and instruments.

0:20:170:20:20

These are style icons, are they not?

0:20:200:20:24

A bit like yourself, Paul,

0:20:240:20:26

but are they stylish enough

0:20:260:20:27

to pay dealer David £48 for them?

0:20:270:20:30

They look magic!

0:20:300:20:33

They look absolutely spectacular.

0:20:330:20:35

Clearly, you have worked on these, these are good to go,

0:20:350:20:38

-plug them in and you're away.

-Yes.

0:20:380:20:39

Could you sell me one of these at a knockdown price?

0:20:390:20:44

It depends on what the knockdown price is.

0:20:440:20:47

I don't know. What am I going to buy for 25 quid? Anything?

0:20:470:20:51

No, I'm afraid not.

0:20:510:20:53

The red and ivory?

0:20:530:20:56

I've got that at 48.

0:20:560:20:59

And I would take 38.

0:20:590:21:01

Is there any way on God's Earth you'd take 30 quid for it?

0:21:030:21:07

It's a one-off, so I'd agree to do that.

0:21:070:21:10

-You're a good man. I like your style in every regard.

-Thank you.

0:21:100:21:14

-Thank you. I'll give you some money.

-OK.

0:21:140:21:16

Whilst Paul secures his first item of the day,

0:21:160:21:20

David is still struggling to find something he likes.

0:21:200:21:23

So much choice - and, potentially, so little time.

0:21:230:21:26

He knows he needs to buy carefully

0:21:280:21:30

if he wants to close the £155 lead Paul has on him.

0:21:300:21:36

Speaking of which,

0:21:360:21:38

Paul is eyeing up these watchmaker's glasses, priced at £40.

0:21:380:21:42

Now, if you have a broken glass on an old watch,

0:21:420:21:46

it's nearly impossible to ever find a replacement.

0:21:460:21:50

An interesting thing, innit?

0:21:500:21:53

-You got much money on that?

-We try to get about 40 for it.

0:21:530:21:56

Have you been trying for long, is the question!

0:21:560:21:58

-I've had it about two years.

-No!

0:21:580:22:01

HE LAUGHS

0:22:010:22:03

Let me have another wee look at it, yeah?

0:22:030:22:06

The set comes with several rubber tools

0:22:060:22:09

and glasses to repair many different types of watches,

0:22:090:22:12

however, there is a part missing.

0:22:120:22:14

Could dealer David take another offer?

0:22:160:22:19

It's like a mandrel that's missing.

0:22:190:22:22

Bid you a tenner for it?

0:22:220:22:24

Take it off your hands two years later.

0:22:240:22:27

-15.

-Take the money and run.

-15.

0:22:270:22:29

-Tenner?

-I'll meet you halfway - 12?

-Deal.

0:22:290:22:32

Cheers, my man. Thanks for that.

0:22:320:22:35

The watch glasses join the phone,

0:22:350:22:37

making up a £42 haul for Paul.

0:22:370:22:40

David, however, is still wandering around

0:22:420:22:45

but can't see anything else he fancies.

0:22:450:22:47

But with just two items against Paul's five,

0:22:470:22:51

and with one more shop to go,

0:22:510:22:53

he really needs to start buying.

0:22:530:22:56

But it looks like he's decided it's not to be.

0:22:560:22:59

Paul, having completed his shopping, is heading north,

0:23:030:23:07

up the coast to the former mining town of Ashington.

0:23:070:23:11

Woodhorn Museum records the rich mining history of the town,

0:23:130:23:17

but that's not the reason he's here today.

0:23:170:23:20

Paul has come to hear about one of the key turning points

0:23:200:23:22

of the Second World War -

0:23:220:23:24

the capture of the German coding machine, Enigma.

0:23:240:23:28

Whilst the Enigma isn't here,

0:23:300:23:32

Paul is meeting Charles Baker-Cresswell.

0:23:320:23:35

His father captured the first Enigma machines

0:23:350:23:38

seized during the war.

0:23:380:23:40

-Is it Charles?

-It's Charles.

-Pleased to meet you, I'm Paul.

0:23:400:23:43

Great.

0:23:430:23:44

Britain required more than a million tonnes of imported material per week

0:23:440:23:50

in order to survive the war.

0:23:500:23:52

Charles's father, AJ Baker-Cresswell,

0:23:520:23:57

was commanding officer of HMS Bulldog.

0:23:570:24:00

During the war, he ensured the safe passage of merchant ships

0:24:020:24:06

supplying essential materials and food for the war effort.

0:24:060:24:11

My word, he cuts quite a fine dash in his naval uniform.

0:24:110:24:16

He does. He was a good-looking man.

0:24:160:24:18

So this would be, I assume,

0:24:180:24:20

-towards the tail end of the First World War?

-Yes, I would think so.

0:24:200:24:23

On 9th May 1941,

0:24:260:24:28

their convoy was fired upon

0:24:280:24:30

by German U-boat 110.

0:24:300:24:33

They returned fire,

0:24:330:24:35

crippling the German U-boat,

0:24:350:24:37

forcing them to abandon ship and surrender.

0:24:370:24:40

Crucially, the U-boat stayed afloat,

0:24:400:24:43

giving Commander Baker-Cresswell's crew

0:24:430:24:46

a rare chance to get their hands on the elusive Enigma machine.

0:24:460:24:50

And there is a photograph taken by my father

0:24:510:24:55

from the bridge. That is HMS Bulldog,

0:24:550:24:58

that's U 110,

0:24:580:25:00

those are the British sailors on the U-boat.

0:25:000:25:03

She's down at the stern already.

0:25:030:25:05

She's down at the stern and a Lieutenant Balme,

0:25:050:25:08

who was a young man of 19 then,

0:25:080:25:10

he went down the hole in the U-boat

0:25:100:25:13

and the whole lot went down and started passing stuff up.

0:25:130:25:17

Everything, anything,

0:25:170:25:19

-including the encoding machine.

-My word.

0:25:190:25:22

-Knowing that at any point this thing could go under.

-Yeah.

0:25:220:25:25

-My word, the bravery.

-Yeah.

0:25:250:25:28

Once in their hands, though,

0:25:280:25:30

code-breakers worked to understand the machine.

0:25:300:25:32

Within a few months, they were finally able

0:25:320:25:36

to decipher top-secret German military instructions.

0:25:360:25:39

By capturing this Enigma machine from 110,

0:25:390:25:42

it resulted in the saving of countless lives

0:25:420:25:45

-because we had broken the Enigma code.

-Yes.

0:25:450:25:48

And we knew what the Germans were up to. Wow.

0:25:480:25:50

Historians believe the capture and cracking of the Enigma code

0:25:500:25:54

shortened the war by two years,

0:25:540:25:56

saving many lives.

0:25:560:25:58

But the Enigma machine wasn't the only treasure

0:25:580:26:01

Baker-Cresswell's crew found that day.

0:26:010:26:03

This is the chronometer that my father got out.

0:26:030:26:06

Being a navigator, he was interested.

0:26:060:26:09

This is the actual ship's chronometer from U 110?

0:26:090:26:13

Absolutely.

0:26:130:26:15

And there is the German sea eagle.

0:26:150:26:19

Ownership mark of the Kriegsmarine.

0:26:190:26:21

And here's the sextant,

0:26:210:26:22

which my father also took star shots from the Bulldog with

0:26:220:26:27

that same night.

0:26:270:26:28

-My word. Would you believe I bought one of these yesterday?

-Did you?

0:26:280:26:31

Albeit not a Kriegsmarine example.

0:26:310:26:34

Well, I hope it works well.

0:26:360:26:38

Addison Joe Baker-Cresswell

0:26:380:26:41

played a pivotal role in turning the war around.

0:26:410:26:45

Living well into his 90s, a true British hero.

0:26:450:26:49

May I thank you sincerely for treating me to that.

0:26:510:26:55

Whilst Paul hears about an amazing piece of history,

0:27:030:27:07

David is still hunting for a bargain.

0:27:070:27:09

He's popped along to the leafy suburbs of Jesmond,

0:27:090:27:12

north of Newcastle city centre.

0:27:120:27:15

He's now at the Fern Avenue Antiques Centre,

0:27:150:27:19

his final shop of this trip.

0:27:190:27:21

But with only £119 left and just two items in the bag,

0:27:230:27:27

he really needs to do some buying.

0:27:270:27:30

-Hello there.

-Hi.

-David Harper.

-I'm Neil, nice to meet you.

0:27:300:27:34

Great to meet you, too. What's your position here?

0:27:340:27:37

-I'm sort of general manager.

-OK.

0:27:370:27:40

-OK. Top salesman.

-Yes.

0:27:400:27:42

-Right, OK.

-Hopefully today.

0:27:420:27:44

Oh, I see. I like that. Keenness.

0:27:440:27:46

This shop has a range of goods from around 12 different dealers.

0:27:460:27:52

Oh, gosh, there's so much to look at.

0:27:520:27:55

What's this?

0:27:550:27:57

What is that?

0:27:570:27:59

David's picked up a cast-iron figure of a horse-drawn carriage.

0:28:000:28:04

So, what we have here, then, is a child's toy

0:28:060:28:09

purporting to be from the very late 19th century,

0:28:090:28:14

circa 1900, which, if I was really confident it was from that period,

0:28:140:28:18

that would be the cheapest thing I've bought on this road trip so far,

0:28:180:28:22

at 20 quid, but it's a funky, funky monkey.

0:28:220:28:25

They're not monkeys, they're horses.

0:28:250:28:29

Funky perhaps, but tricky to date precisely.

0:28:290:28:32

Can you make a call and bid them a tenner? Just for a bit of fun?

0:28:320:28:35

I'll go and see.

0:28:350:28:37

If I could own that for a tenner...

0:28:370:28:39

It's really chancy.

0:28:390:28:41

It's the kind of thing, in auction, that could surprise you.

0:28:410:28:44

Good fun it may be,

0:28:440:28:46

but can you get a few pounds off?

0:28:460:28:48

Neil has called the dealer to find out.

0:28:480:28:51

-Come on, Neil.

-Very best he can do would be £15, David.

0:28:510:28:57

-£15? I've got to buy something, Neil. Thank you very much.

-Good.

0:28:570:29:00

That's good. OK.

0:29:000:29:02

A nice addition to David's collection,

0:29:020:29:05

but let's hope he won't be flogging a dead horse with this at auction.

0:29:050:29:08

He's not stopping there, though.

0:29:080:29:11

DISCO MUSIC PLAYS

0:29:110:29:13

I quite like that.

0:29:150:29:17

Really? I'm sure somewhere there's a disco missing its table.

0:29:170:29:21

This one has a ticket price of £40.

0:29:210:29:24

-It's a bit greasy.

-Well, they do say GREASE is the word.

0:29:240:29:27

God only knows what this thing has seen.

0:29:270:29:30

Lots of flared trousers and cravats, I guess.

0:29:300:29:33

See, this is a 20th-century thing, obviously,

0:29:330:29:36

but it's got that kind of bejazzle look, hasn't it?

0:29:360:29:39

Bejazzled? What is he on about?

0:29:390:29:42

-Bid him 20 quid. Please.

-I will.

-I'm sorry.

0:29:420:29:45

First of all, say I'm very sorry...

0:29:450:29:47

-Yes.

-..for being horrible.

0:29:470:29:50

No, no. No, no. Don't worry.

0:29:500:29:52

All right. Bid him 20.

0:29:520:29:53

That'll be bonkers if I buy that.

0:29:560:29:58

He's very, very, very sorry but it has to be 40.

0:29:580:30:02

-Really?

-Yes.

0:30:020:30:03

-He's very, very, very sorry?

-VERY, very, very sorry.

-Is he?

0:30:030:30:08

If I was even sorrier, he wouldn't come down a bit more?

0:30:080:30:11

-No.

-No?

0:30:110:30:12

It looks like it's not to be.

0:30:120:30:15

David wants a better discount than that.

0:30:150:30:18

Whilst he mulls it over,

0:30:180:30:20

he's spotted a large brass bowl,

0:30:200:30:23

possibly 19th century, North African, for burning charcoal.

0:30:230:30:27

It has a ticket price for £75.

0:30:290:30:32

What can that be?

0:30:320:30:34

Um...£40 would be the best we could do on that.

0:30:340:30:38

40 quid?

0:30:380:30:41

Neil's offering him a whopping £35 discount on that.

0:30:410:30:45

It's got the exotic, hasn't it? It's got the exotic feel,

0:30:460:30:50

which is fantastic. I think I'm going to have to have it.

0:30:500:30:53

-I've got to have it. £40.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:30:530:30:57

Purchase number two.

0:30:570:30:58

Two purchases in the bag

0:30:580:31:00

but David still has THAT table on his mind

0:31:000:31:04

and has asked Neil to offer the dealer £30 for it.

0:31:040:31:08

-He won't come down below 40.

-Seriously?

-Yeah.

0:31:080:31:13

All right. If you were in my shoes, Neil,

0:31:130:31:15

would you take a chance?

0:31:150:31:16

I would take a chance.

0:31:160:31:18

-Shall I take a chance?

-Yes.

-Neil, I'm going to take a chance.

0:31:180:31:21

-Thanks a lot.

-Thank you.

-That's a quirky bunch of purchases!

0:31:210:31:24

Quirky bunch. Thank you very much indeed.

0:31:240:31:27

It certainly is.

0:31:270:31:28

£95 conceivably well spent on three items.

0:31:280:31:31

And as the shops close on the final day,

0:31:350:31:37

it's time for our fellows to reveal their wares.

0:31:370:31:41

I think it's my turn to go first.

0:31:410:31:43

-Voila!

-Yeah, I'll tell you what.

0:31:430:31:46

I'd walk up to your stall at a fair.

0:31:460:31:48

-Is that cast iron?

-It's cast iron.

0:31:480:31:51

It looks substantial.

0:31:510:31:52

It's a cast-iron, late-19th-century-style piece.

0:31:520:31:57

You're hoping it'll make 40 to 80 quid again.

0:31:570:31:59

-That's what I'm hoping for.

-What did you pay for it?

-£15.

0:31:590:32:02

-Now...

-One, two, three, four...

0:32:020:32:04

Have you lost something, David?

0:32:040:32:06

I was looking down at my fifth item thinking,

0:32:090:32:11

"Someone's put this old, manky table there," but it's mine.

0:32:110:32:14

Yes, it is. In all its glory(!)

0:32:140:32:17

Think 1980s discotheque.

0:32:170:32:20

It's broken and oxidised and ghastly.

0:32:220:32:26

I know, it's great, isn't it? It's 20th-century funk.

0:32:260:32:29

-It's something that rhymes with "funk".

-Junk? A bit harsh, perhaps.

0:32:290:32:33

Come on, how much did you pay for it?

0:32:330:32:35

-Oh, my Lord, 40 quid.

-Behave yourself.

0:32:350:32:38

-You paid four quid for it.

-I paid £40 for it.

0:32:380:32:41

I couldn't help it, Paul, it's different.

0:32:410:32:44

It's different from sellable.

0:32:440:32:46

I get the feeling Paul doesn't like it.

0:32:460:32:50

OK, move on.

0:32:500:32:51

-Oh...

-That looks rubbish, doesn't it?

0:32:540:32:56

No. I love the colours.

0:32:560:32:58

-Isn't it magic?

-I love the colours.

0:32:580:33:00

That's what would draw me to it. A plain red one or a cream one

0:33:000:33:04

in a general auction... I've no idea.

0:33:040:33:07

20 to 40? 20 to 30?

0:33:070:33:08

-I think it's 30 to 50.

-Yeah.

0:33:080:33:11

-So we're in agreement.

-Yeah.

0:33:110:33:12

I paid 30 quid for it.

0:33:120:33:14

What's in there?

0:33:140:33:16

That is a 19th-century marine sextant.

0:33:160:33:18

-Oh, my gosh.

-Navigation aid.

0:33:180:33:21

-That's your one, isn't it?

-That's the one.

0:33:210:33:24

-Paid 150 squids for that.

-OK. Well, you know...

0:33:240:33:26

I hope it makes 250.

0:33:260:33:28

I think it's got every chance. That's good. That's your star lot.

0:33:280:33:31

So, I think a very, very interesting table

0:33:310:33:35

-yet again.

-I've got another good spread.

0:33:350:33:38

-Paul, I look forward to Dumfries.

-You joking?

0:33:380:33:41

Indeed. But first, I want to hear

0:33:410:33:43

what they really think about each other's lots.

0:33:430:33:47

Biggest scary number has got to be the sextant.

0:33:470:33:49

That could be very meaty.

0:33:490:33:52

And it's quite worrying.

0:33:520:33:54

The two things I preferred the most

0:33:540:33:57

were the Alice In Wonderland plates. In terrible condition,

0:33:570:34:00

but pretty rare too, so they may be a surprise.

0:34:000:34:03

For me, it's all about the table.

0:34:030:34:06

HE CHUCKLES

0:34:060:34:08

The table is a hole in his fortunes,

0:34:080:34:11

no two ways about it.

0:34:110:34:13

The silver parasol handle -

0:34:130:34:15

it's a smart thing, it's silver.

0:34:150:34:17

It could make him a decent profit.

0:34:170:34:20

I personally like the Chinese games box.

0:34:200:34:24

You can't call this one. It's a good offering.

0:34:240:34:27

It's going to be an interesting sale.

0:34:270:34:29

You're right. So let's get on with it.

0:34:290:34:32

After shopping in England, the boys are heading across the Pennines

0:34:340:34:37

and up to Scotland and Dumfries

0:34:370:34:39

for today's auction.

0:34:390:34:40

Located near the mouth of the River Nith

0:34:430:34:46

into the Solway Firth,

0:34:460:34:48

Dumfries has a strong connection with Robert Burns.

0:34:480:34:52

It's where the Scots poet spent the final years of his life.

0:34:520:34:55

Our very own wee, sleekit cow'rin tim'rous beasties

0:34:570:35:02

have finally arrived at Thomson Roddick Scottish Auctions.

0:35:020:35:06

It's the scene of today's auction showdown.

0:35:060:35:09

Oh, he's going to take the sign out!

0:35:090:35:12

-Thank you very much.

-I expect nothing less, Driver.

-We have landed.

0:35:120:35:15

This family-owned auction house

0:35:170:35:19

was founded in 1880

0:35:190:35:21

and fifth-generation auctioneer Sybil Thomson

0:35:210:35:24

will be at the podium today.

0:35:240:35:27

She has some thoughts, though, on the boys' lots,

0:35:270:35:30

particularly the sextant.

0:35:300:35:32

The sextant's interesting. Unfortunately,

0:35:320:35:34

we believe it's actually a quadrant rather than a sextant.

0:35:340:35:38

A quadrant's a quarter of a circle, and a sextant's a sixth of a circle.

0:35:380:35:43

The umbrella handle has got lovely decoration

0:35:430:35:46

and I think it'll hopefully do quite well.

0:35:460:35:48

It's a very glitzy-looking mirrored table,

0:35:480:35:51

but maybe slightly out of fashion in the present market,

0:35:510:35:54

but you never know, with changing tastes...

0:35:540:35:56

It looks very much like something

0:35:560:35:58

that came out of a 1970s nightclub in Blackpool, or somewhere.

0:35:580:36:02

David started this leg with £214.60

0:36:030:36:06

and has gone on to spend £190

0:36:060:36:09

on five auction lots.

0:36:090:36:11

Paul, meanwhile, kicked off with £369.40,

0:36:130:36:17

and has parted with £212,

0:36:170:36:20

also for five lots.

0:36:200:36:21

So, let the auction begin.

0:36:230:36:26

First up, it's game on for David's Chinese games board.

0:36:260:36:32

-Give me a starter at £32. 32.

-Off and running.

0:36:320:36:35

35. 38.

0:36:350:36:36

40. 42. 45.

0:36:360:36:39

-Oh, David Harper.

-48. 50. 55.

0:36:390:36:41

60. 65. 70.

0:36:410:36:43

-75. Any advance?

-Come on.

0:36:430:36:46

£75. 914.

0:36:460:36:48

That's exactly what he paid for it.

0:36:480:36:51

But after costs, it works out at a loss for David.

0:36:510:36:55

That's what I'm here for - to make you look good.

0:36:550:36:58

You're my fall guy.

0:36:580:37:00

Next, it's high time for Paul's watch glasses.

0:37:000:37:05

Start straight in at 10 bid. 10 bid, 10 bid. 12.

0:37:050:37:08

-15. 18.

-Oh, more than that.

-22. 25.

0:37:080:37:12

-No, no more.

-28. 30.

0:37:120:37:14

-£30.

-It's horrible.

-Any advance on £30?

0:37:140:37:18

A great result for Paul's watch glasses -

0:37:180:37:21

more than doubling his money.

0:37:210:37:22

Not bad, that, Paul. Well done.

0:37:220:37:24

Next, will Paul's slightly damaged Bakelite lamp

0:37:270:37:32

hold its own in the cold light of day?

0:37:320:37:35

£10? 10 bid. 10 bid.

0:37:350:37:37

-Damn.

-12.

0:37:370:37:39

15. 18. 20.

0:37:390:37:41

22. 25.

0:37:410:37:42

25. Any advance on 25?

0:37:420:37:46

25!

0:37:460:37:47

The Bakelite has done incredibly well,

0:37:470:37:51

delivering £15 profit.

0:37:510:37:53

Seriously, well done.

0:37:530:37:55

It's time for Paul's retro telephone.

0:37:550:37:59

Start at 18 bid. 18.

0:37:590:38:01

20. 22. 25. 28.

0:38:010:38:04

30. £30.

0:38:040:38:06

-Gentleman on my left. At 32.

-No!

-32. 35.

0:38:060:38:10

That is insane.

0:38:100:38:12

£35...

0:38:120:38:14

A profit, but after costs there won't be much left for Paul.

0:38:140:38:18

-Just get out of that.

-You've gone red.

0:38:180:38:22

David's second item for auction

0:38:220:38:25

is the copper and brass charcoal-burner.

0:38:250:38:28

10 bid. 12. 12.

0:38:280:38:30

15. 18. 20.

0:38:300:38:32

22. 25. 28.

0:38:320:38:34

-30.

-Bobbing along. Bobbing along.

-32.

0:38:340:38:37

35. 38. 40.

0:38:370:38:40

-42.

-Yes.

-At 45.

0:38:400:38:42

At £45...

0:38:420:38:46

Again, after costs,

0:38:460:38:48

David's just about broken even.

0:38:480:38:50

I made a fiver, didn't I?

0:38:500:38:52

-On paper.

-Before charges.

0:38:520:38:54

Horrible Paul.

0:38:540:38:56

PAUL CHUCKLES

0:38:560:38:59

Will Paul's Alice In Wonderland brass plaques

0:39:000:39:03

work wonders for his profits?

0:39:030:39:06

20 bid. 20 bid. 22.

0:39:060:39:08

-Come on, then.

-Oh!

-25. 28.

0:39:080:39:11

30. 32.

0:39:110:39:12

35. 38. 40.

0:39:120:39:14

42. 45. 48.

0:39:140:39:17

50. 55. The bid's with the lady at 55.

0:39:170:39:21

£55... And your number is...?

0:39:210:39:24

An incredible profit for Paul.

0:39:240:39:27

-Unbelievable!

-What?!

0:39:270:39:30

-Unbelievable.

-Another discerning purchase.

0:39:300:39:32

I know.

0:39:320:39:34

So far, David has started with a canter.

0:39:360:39:39

Could his toy carriage gallop into the lead?

0:39:390:39:42

Give me a starter at £45.

0:39:420:39:44

48. 50.

0:39:440:39:45

55. 60. 65.

0:39:450:39:47

70. 75.

0:39:470:39:49

75. It's on commission.

0:39:490:39:51

-Come on, Dobbs.

-You're all at 75.

0:39:510:39:53

Anyone else going on? At £75...

0:39:530:39:57

A triumph for David,

0:39:590:40:01

who's been just about breaking even thus far.

0:40:010:40:04

-Well done, man. Well done.

-Get in there.

-Good buy.

0:40:040:40:07

-Thank you.

-15 to 75?!

-Lovely.

0:40:070:40:10

-Get in.

-I need that so badly.

0:40:100:40:12

It's time for Paul's sextant.

0:40:120:40:14

Or is that a quadrant?

0:40:140:40:16

Starter at £100. 100.

0:40:160:40:19

110. 120.

0:40:190:40:21

130. 140.

0:40:210:40:22

-150. 160.

-Well done.

0:40:220:40:25

170. 180. 190.

0:40:250:40:27

200. New bidder. 210.

0:40:270:40:30

220. 230.

0:40:300:40:33

-It's made its money now.

-Any advance on £230...?

0:40:330:40:36

With £80 profit, Paul will be very happy with that.

0:40:360:40:42

-It feels good.

-Seriously.

-Cheers, man.

-Seriously.

0:40:420:40:45

Get in!

0:40:450:40:47

Agh! Agh!

0:40:470:40:48

Next up is David's swan parasol handle.

0:40:480:40:52

-20 bid everywhere.

-Everywhere. Sea of hands.

0:40:520:40:55

30. 32. 35. 38. 40.

0:40:550:40:59

-Come on.

-42.

-Come on, baby.

0:40:590:41:00

-45. 45. 48.

-Go on.

0:41:000:41:04

50. 55. 60. 65.

0:41:040:41:06

-She's getting there.

-On my left at £65...

0:41:060:41:10

A very nice £45 profit for David.

0:41:100:41:13

-Last one to go.

-You're up.

-I'm up.

0:41:130:41:16

I could go down.

0:41:160:41:18

-You could.

-I could.

-Could? Will!

0:41:180:41:21

It's all down to that final lot -

0:41:210:41:24

David's mirrored table.

0:41:240:41:27

20 bid. 22.

0:41:270:41:28

-25.

-What's happening?

-28. 30.

0:41:280:41:31

-This can't be your lot.

-35. 38. 40.

0:41:310:41:34

-Oh!

-Go on!

0:41:340:41:36

42. Can I tempt anybody else?

0:41:360:41:38

42. At £42...

0:41:380:41:42

Everyone thought it would bomb and although, after costs, it's a loss,

0:41:420:41:47

it's a lot less than they had thought.

0:41:470:41:49

Pass me a piece of that humble pie!

0:41:490:41:52

Well... No, you were right, because I've made a slight loss.

0:41:520:41:56

You got out of it!

0:41:560:41:58

Unbelievable.

0:41:580:41:59

David started this leg with £214.60.

0:41:590:42:04

After auction costs,

0:42:040:42:06

he made a profit of £57.64,

0:42:060:42:09

ending the leg with a total of £272.24.

0:42:090:42:16

Paul, meanwhile, started with £369.40

0:42:170:42:21

but after costs made a profit of £95.50,

0:42:210:42:25

thereby winning this leg of the road trip

0:42:250:42:28

with £464.90.

0:42:280:42:31

Sunlight. Give me sunshine!

0:42:340:42:37

And a warm glow from within as well, given those results, my man.

0:42:370:42:40

-A warmer glow for you! But well done. Well done.

-Thank you.

0:42:400:42:43

What's wrong with that...

0:42:430:42:46

-Three down...two to go.

-There's still time.

0:42:460:42:48

I don't want this one to end.

0:42:480:42:50

Which way are you going? That's the way out.

0:42:500:42:53

Onwards and upwards, chaps.

0:42:530:42:55

Path of least resistance.

0:42:550:42:57

This leg is going to be mine!

0:42:570:43:00

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:000:43:02

Paul tries to get into the mind of his opponent...

0:43:020:43:05

David Harper would buy that.

0:43:050:43:07

..whilst David's luck begins to change.

0:43:070:43:10

This is the start of the big comeback, Laidlaw.

0:43:100:43:15