Episode 24 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 24

Antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper begin their Scottish road trip in New Abbey in Dumfries and Galloway, before heading through Biggar and Moffat to Paisley.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Going, going...gone.

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-Yes!

-I think I've arrived.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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Yes!

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-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-Tails.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Ah! Ah!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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On this road trip it's Scottish wit versus southern grit

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as two learned antiques experts do battle for auction supremacy.

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Paul Laidlaw is digging deep into his Scottish roots to find poetic

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inspiration for their journey.

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I'll tell you who hails from these parts - Robbie Burns.

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The only piece of poetry I remember from school is

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To A Mouse.

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Wee, sleekit, cowran, tim'rous beastie

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O, what a panic's in thy breastie!

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Thou need na come awa sae hasty,

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Wi' bickering brattle!

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For I wad be laith to rin an' chase thee,

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Wi' murd'ring pattle!

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Can you do that in English, Paul?

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I'm sure Robbie Burns would have been proud of that rendition.

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It's the penultimate leg and the pressure is on for David Harper.

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I'm losing the plot here in a big way.

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Whilst Paul Laidlaw is becoming even more

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methodical in his approach in seeking out a bargain.

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How OCD am I becoming?

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David started the trip with £200 and after two auctions, managed to

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grow his seed money to...

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Paul started with the same amount

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but his profits have blossomed to an impressive...

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..putting him way out in the lead.

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It's a damp start to this leg of the road trip

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but they're not letting it dampen their spirits as they cruise

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the Scottish countryside in the red 1968 Triumph Herald.

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On this trip, our Bravehearts started in Windermere

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in the Lake District, travelling 600 miles to the city of Dundee.

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Today, they're starting in New Abbey in Dumfries and Galloway

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before heading north-west for auction in Paisley in Renfrewshire.

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The lovely village of New Abbey's skyline is dominated by

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the wistfully-named Sweetheart Abbey.

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It was founded in 1273 Lady Dervorgilla of Galloway

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in memory of her husband, John Balliol.

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On her death, she was laid to rest with her husband's embalmed heart

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and the monks renamed the abbey in memory of her.

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Today, our experts have their hearts set on one thing - finding a bargain.

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The first stop is Admirable Antiques,

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where both of our experts will be shopping.

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-Dingle-dangle. Hello. Paul.

-I'm Dougie. Good to meet you.

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-David.

-Pleased to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

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With our duo of wheeler dealers shopping in the same place,

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they'll need to get moving to find a bargain first.

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David in particular has quite a bit catching up to do.

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That's quite interesting.

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Oh, OK, so we've got a set of graduating ladles.

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Have we got the full set?

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This is a set of six,

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early 20th century brass kitchen measuring ladles.

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They're marked to measure decilitres and are continental in origin.

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-I think they're more novelty kitchenware, do you agree?

-Yeah.

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-How much could they be?

-£15.

-Yeah.

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I think, maybe, would they make one auction lot?

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I mean, they're not getting me. They're not making me think,

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"God, they are gorgeous, I've got to have them."

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But I think there might be a profit in them if I paid a tenner.

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-12.50.

-Oh, Dougie.

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-Come on.

-Do it for a tenner, Dougie, I'll have them.

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-Right, OK.

-Are you going to do it for a tenner?

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Good man, thank you very much indeed.

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First lot secured for just a tenner.

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Paul's eye has been caught by this Orkney chair.

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It's quite small so probably made for a child.

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The label says, "In need of some restoration."

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This, I suspect,

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is probably 90 year old.

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An interwar period piece.

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It has some age.

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It's not ancient but it's not new.

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And it's also got a ticket price of £295.

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That would be more than half of his budget blown on a single item.

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It's not quite perfect. What can it be?

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(I'm going to try and buy that.)

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I thought you might say that.

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Whilst Dougie calls the dealer for a better price,

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Paul has taken a shine to some silverware.

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He's picked up a silver preserve spoon -

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that's a jam spoon to you and me.

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It's late 19th century and is priced at £14.99.

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On my money, there's a bit of substance on that.

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At rather a charming price.

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I'm going to hang on to that.

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Meanwhile, Dougie is back with a new price for the Orkney chair.

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It's on at 295. He would probably go down 20.

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-It's going to be as tight as that?

-Yes.

-Yeah, yeah, it'll not be for me.

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Thanks very much, though, thanks.

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Bummer, but...well.

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Can't win them all.

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Paul has the money for it but has decided £275 is still too expensive.

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Instead, he's looking at this copper kettle.

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It's from the second quarter of the 19th century

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and has a ticket price of £25.

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He's also happened upon a copper water jug by WAS Benson.

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Benson was one of the most influential

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Arts and Crafts designers of the late 19th century.

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That could be a real find.

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Now, together with the spoon, will Dougie do him a deal for the lot?

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Let me go in at 30 quid.

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You're going to say...

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"Thanks, Paul."

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Since it's you.

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Got a deal, my man.

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Gosh, that was easy enough. First three items of the trip secured.

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Paul seems particularly happy with that.

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I was like, "Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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"Oh, I see a WAS Benson copper jug over there.

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"Wonder if everyone else knows that."

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Paul's eagle eye strikes again.

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But before he goes, he's still got an eye on that Orkney chair.

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It was originally priced at £295

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and the dealer was only prepared to come down a little on it.

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Stand by.

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Dougie, thank you very much indeed.

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As a parting shot, 175 quid for the Scottish chair.

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So, he's looking for £120 discount. It's a big ask.

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Will the dealer take it?

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Cos it's...eh...need repaired.

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Make it 180.

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Thank you, my friend. The man from Del Monte, he say, "Yes."

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That's a nice first haul for Paul,

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spending £210 on the Orkney chair,

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silver spoon and copper jug and kettle.

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David, meanwhile, is still looking for a way to sail into the lead,

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although I don't know if this is going to be his answer.

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It's a handmade model of a 1930s yacht on a mahogany stand.

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It's called a pond yacht and it's ticketed at £75.

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Dougie, I'm just going to throw something at you.

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As I'm looking round, there's a yacht there.

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If it's 20 quid, it might be something.

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But you just have a look at it and come back to me.

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And if it's anywhere near there, I'll have a better look. Is that OK?

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That was an interesting way of offering £20 for it.

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Is this a new negotiating tactic from David?

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He's planting the seed into dealer Dougie's mind but will he go for it?

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Could cruelly be described as a "mug's eyeful" in this game.

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If you think it's fantastic, you're a mug. So it's a mug's eyeful.

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I'm not altogether sure I understand that.

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I know it's been really hard but I've got a major amount

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of catching up to do. Major amount.

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Could it possibly be that £20?

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-I know it's horrible, it's a horrible bid.

-25.

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Shall we go for a spin? 20 or 25? Shall we?

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Here we go - David's old negotiating tactic's back again.

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You want heads? OK.

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Huh, is this going to be another lucky coin toss?

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25, thank you.

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Lady Luck seems to have been otherwise engaged for David

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but he still seems extremely confident about his buys.

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Two purchases. Both with - I'm going to put my head on a line -

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absolutely guaranteed built-in profit.

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And that's what we're trying to do - make some profit.

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Indeed. But you're still quite a long way behind.

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This is the start of the big comeback, Laidlaw.

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Those are big words. Could David catch up with Paul?

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He is considering one final purchase at this shop -

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an eye-catching clay bust of Scotland's most famous poet,

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Robert Burns. It says Burns, but I don't see it myself.

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I'd love to reveal Robbie Burns.

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I'd love to make a bit of money out of Robbie Burns.

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It would be fantastic.

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He doesn't look much like Burns to me. What do you think?

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And is it worth the £120 asking price?

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Can it be horribly cheap?

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-How horrible?

-20 quid.

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-30.

-Oh, come on, Dougie.

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-30.

-I'm going to spin you. I'm going to spin you.

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-Oh, lordy, he's not really going to do this again, is he?

-Are you ready?

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Yeah.

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David pays £20 for heads but £25 if it's tails.

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-You want tails, do you?

-Yeah.

-How about heads?

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-OK.

-Marvellous, thank you very much.

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It looks like his luck has changed.

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And with that, David's first shop is complete, a total of £55 spent

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on the measuring ladles, the model yacht, and that bust.

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Paul has made his way to the town of Lockerbie on the search

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for more bargains.

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He's visiting Cobwebs of Lockerbie,

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a dealership specialising in second-hand and antique furniture.

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It's treasure trove of antique gems.

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-Hello, there.

-Hello, Paul.

-How are you?

-I'm Irene.

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-Eileen or Irene?

-Irene.

-My mother's name, a great name.

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Pleased to meet you, Irene.

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He's turning the charm on straight away. What is he like?

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There's a lot to choose from here

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and Paul is taking his usual systematic approach to browsing.

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I can't possibly go around clockwise but anti-clockwise...

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oh, no, dearie me.

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No, no, no, start here.

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How OCD am I becoming?

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Paul's looking for something that will make a big-auction impact.

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Full of nice things but it's finding the nice thing that's...wow.

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I see an awful lot of browsing but no buying.

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These books seem to have caught his attention.

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It's three volumes of Robert Freke Gould's

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History Of Freemasonry, priced at £75.

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They look well presented and date from around 1910.

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They look splendid.

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Might be the only books in the sale.

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And they look like they should be worth £200 or £300.

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They're not uncommon.

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Anyone of any status at all in the Masons is at some stage

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going to buy or be bought that standard history.

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Paul has left the books for the moment and is continuing to browse.

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There's no sign yet that he's about to buy.

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That's charming, isn't it?

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It's a child's toy horse from around 1900, priced at £48.

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David Harper would buy that, wouldn't he?

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I think many of my compadres would buy that.

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-Oh, would I buy that?

-Probably, if the price was right.

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I guess it's down to whether you can get a decent discount from Irene.

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Give you 20 quid for the horse. In a bit of a state.

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-Unfortunately, I've paid a good bit more than that for it.

-OK.

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I understand that. If it's not 20, what is it?

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-Is it much more than that?

-30.

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30 quid?

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And what's your last offer?

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See, the books - don't peg me as a Mason, by the way -

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-can I just seal that one right now?

-That's fine.

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Are they 30 quid as well?

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You're chancing it.

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Irene's certainly got the measure of Paul but is she feeling generous?

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-Go on, I'll do it at 30.

-Excellent!

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Another decisive shop for Paul.

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£60 spent on a child's wooden horse and the three books.

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David has left New Abbey and is on his way to Eskdalemuir.

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He's visiting an extraordinary temple that seems at odds

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with its surroundings, and thousands of miles from its homeland.

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Samye Ling was the first Tibetan Buddhist Centre

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to be established in the West.

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Today, David's meeting nun Annie.

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-Hello.

-Hello. I'm Annie, you're David.

-David Harper.

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Fantastic. I mean, what a place to find in Scotland.

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Yes, it is a bit surprising, isn't it? Maybe you should see around it.

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-Can I show you the temple?

-Yes, will you?

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Samye Ling is home to around 16 monks, nuns and volunteers.

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It gets its name from Samye, the first monastery to open in Tibet

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and "ling" meaning "place."

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In the late '60s, two Tibetan monks came to the site to study English

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and began building Samye Ling into what it is today.

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I don't know about you but David Harper looks quite at home.

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This grand victory stupa is a shrine dedicated to honouring the dead.

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It's quite a dramatic building, isn't it?

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I mean, it really is a great symbol. Noticeable.

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It's certainly noticeable. You'll find stupas in many Buddhist places.

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On a visit to Scotland in 1993, the Dalai Lama came to Samye Ling.

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It was he who chose the specific site for the stupa's construction.

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It's quite something to have the Dalai Lama visit your monastery.

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Yes, it was wonderful. Very nice.

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Each day the nuns and monks light up to 1,000 candles

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in the Butterlamp House.

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The illumination is seen as a symbol of transforming an everyday mind

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into one capable of enlightenment.

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-So, here we are.

-My gosh. It's very atmospheric. Oh, it's warm.

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It's lovely and warm, yes.

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Everyday we light at least 108 candles

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and on special days we offer all 1,000 candles.

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It must be a great communal job.

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How long does it take to light 1,000 candles?

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Well, if there are a lot of people, it doesn't take very long at all.

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That's a very good answer.

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But the most visually arresting part of Samye Ling

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is the magnificent shrine room.

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-Oh, my goodness gracious.

-So, here we are.

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I have got to say, I love colour.

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Yes, you've definitely come to the right place.

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What would this part of the temple be?

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This is our main shrine room where we do prayers and meditation.

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Tibetan Buddhism's very rich, as you can see by the colours.

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But also in the rituals,

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so there's a great abundance of different things that we do here.

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Buddhism began over 2,500 years ago

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when Prince Siddhartha Gautama believed he'd found

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spiritual enlightenment through a profound

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understanding of the causes of human suffering.

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Upon this realisation he became known as Buddha - the awakened one.

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-And this is he.

-This is how he's usually depicted.

-OK.

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So there's Buddha himself in the centre and behind there's

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a kind of frieze and that shows what we call the 12 deeds of the Buddha.

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So, events from his life.

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Meditation is a key part of Buddhist life.

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Could you prepare me for meditation?

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I could explain one of two things, according to my understanding

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-and then you could try them.

-I would love to.

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The nuns and monks have two meditation sessions per day,

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each lasting one hour.

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-So...

-Yes, you sit down. We cross our legs.

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-Usually, we sit with our palms one on top of the other.

-OK.

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The back straight.

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But quite relaxed.

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And then gradually, when you're ready,

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just follow the movement of the breath, in and out.

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David looks quite the part sitting there.

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I think we should leave him to enjoy his meditation.

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But later, David picks up Paul and the two turn in for the night.

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Nighty-night.

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It's the start of a new day and after a good night's kip,

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someone's feeling optimistic.

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Well, I've got to tell you something, Paul. It's in the bag.

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PAUL LAUGHS

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What's that? Your packed lunch?

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Ha-ha(!) Yesterday, David spent £55 on the measuring ladles,

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a yacht and a clay bust of Robert Burns, leaving him £217.24 today.

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Paul parted with considerably more - £270 on a silver spoon,

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a copper kettle, a copper jug, the Orkney chair, a toy horse,

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and three books on Freemasonry,

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leaving him £194.90.

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Today the boys are shopping just outside the historical market town

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of Biggar in South Lanarkshire.

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They're starting in the same shop together - Sunnyside Antiques.

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-Are you in a hurry?

-Of course I'm in a hurry!

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-It's cold. It's wet. Why don't we get in?

-You're panicking, admit it.

0:18:150:18:18

Where do we go?

0:18:180:18:19

Someone's keen to get in first.

0:18:190:18:22

Where...? That's somebody's house!

0:18:220:18:25

-There's a shed!

-I'm sorry. I don't know what I'm doing.

0:18:250:18:29

-Hello there.

-Hello.

0:18:320:18:34

-Nice to see you. I'm Mark.

-Yes, you are.

0:18:340:18:37

-Hello, Mark. I'm David.

-Hi, David. I'm Mark.

-Nice to see you.

0:18:370:18:40

Pleasantries dispensed with, it's time to bag a bargain.

0:18:400:18:43

With our two go-getters squeezed into the same small shop together,

0:18:430:18:48

they're trying to out-manoeuvre each other to find the bargains first.

0:18:480:18:52

It looks like David's got the lead on Paul.

0:18:520:18:55

-Good shape to it, hasn't it?

-No, that's...

-It's nice.

0:18:550:19:00

What sort of money, Mark?

0:19:000:19:01

-It is 235.

-Right.

0:19:010:19:03

You've got what? 30 quid?

0:19:030:19:05

BOTH LAUGH

0:19:050:19:07

That would blow David's budget.

0:19:090:19:10

Paul, meanwhile, is looking for something to increase his lead.

0:19:100:19:14

I've got to ask, Mark, you've got nothing military kicking about,

0:19:140:19:17

have you? I know everyone probably...

0:19:170:19:19

I haven't at the moment, no, I'm sorry.

0:19:190:19:21

-Some Masonic pieces.

-Do tell.

0:19:210:19:25

Down there in that bottom cabinet.

0:19:250:19:28

This Masonic jewel could complement the books he bought yesterday.

0:19:280:19:33

I would have to sell this on its own.

0:19:330:19:36

£30. No tremendous money in it.

0:19:360:19:38

Meanwhile, David's mind is still on his big comeback,

0:19:380:19:42

ensuring every purchase makes a profit.

0:19:420:19:44

And the age for that?

0:19:460:19:47

I would say probably...

0:19:470:19:50

-Yeah, it's pretty fresh, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-It's nice, though.

0:19:500:19:53

It's a silver-plated wine bottle pourer.

0:19:530:19:56

Is it cheap, cheap, Mark?

0:19:570:19:59

Er...it's 25.

0:19:590:20:01

-Lots of work in it.

-Yeah.

-It's silver wire.

0:20:010:20:05

Erm... I do like that.

0:20:050:20:06

And may be difficult to age precisely

0:20:060:20:09

as there are no marks on it.

0:20:090:20:11

It's very cleverly made, isn't it? It's wicker, isn't it?

0:20:110:20:14

It is. But in a white metal.

0:20:140:20:16

Gosh. If that was silver, that's several hundreds of pounds' worth.

0:20:160:20:20

What's the absolute, absolute depth on that for me?

0:20:200:20:23

Bear in mind Laidlaw is all ears.

0:20:230:20:26

BOTH LAUGH

0:20:260:20:28

Have you got a pen?

0:20:280:20:29

A pen? What's he up to now?

0:20:290:20:32

Secret negotiations, Paul Laidlaw.

0:20:320:20:35

Well, at least he's not flipping a coin again.

0:20:350:20:38

And remember, you can't pay for things with an IOU.

0:20:380:20:41

"Please help me. I'm in big trouble. Will you take £10?" The chancer.

0:20:440:20:49

And Mark's taking it.

0:20:510:20:53

Mark, you are an absolute gentleman. Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:530:20:56

-Good luck.

-HE LAUGHS

0:20:560:20:58

Just destroy that evidence.

0:20:580:20:59

That worked a treat, then. And he's managed to knock another £8

0:20:590:21:03

off Mark's best price.

0:21:030:21:04

That is an absolute stonker. It's gorgeous quality. Love it.

0:21:040:21:10

Let's hope the buyers at auction love it just as much.

0:21:100:21:13

Paul is looking at some costume jewellery.

0:21:140:21:18

-Is that a job lot...?

-I can do as a job lot, if you'd like. Erm...

0:21:180:21:25

-25.

-25 quid the lot. How much are they?

0:21:250:21:27

I'll do those for ten.

0:21:270:21:29

-Good man.

-Good.

-No harm done. Good job.

0:21:310:21:34

£10 for a silver brooch and bangle,

0:21:340:21:36

which will make up a nice silvery lot with the spoon from yesterday.

0:21:360:21:40

I'll just shove them in my pocket.

0:21:400:21:43

Having completed his shopping,

0:21:430:21:45

Paul is off to Wanlockhead in Dumfries and Galloway.

0:21:450:21:48

Yesterday, David visited somewhere you wouldn't

0:21:490:21:52

expect to find in Scotland and today it's Paul's turn.

0:21:520:21:57

Gold panning is usually associated with North America,

0:21:570:22:00

but was also a big industry in parts of Scotland.

0:22:000:22:03

Unbeknown to many, there's still gold in the hills.

0:22:030:22:07

Paul's headed to the Museum of Lead Mining and is meeting retired

0:22:070:22:11

gold panner Charlie Smart to hear about the gold beneath his feet.

0:22:110:22:17

-Is it Charlie?

-It is, Paul, yes.

0:22:170:22:19

Great to see you!

0:22:190:22:21

-It's lovely to meet you.

-Likewise.

0:22:210:22:23

-I have been looking forward to this.

-Good.

0:22:230:22:26

Who knew there was gold to be found in southern Scotland?

0:22:260:22:30

In the 16th century, the Lowther Hills were the focus of a gold rush.

0:22:300:22:34

People travelled from far and wide as word spread that there

0:22:340:22:38

was gold in the hills or flowing through the Mennock Water.

0:22:380:22:42

One speculator mined the area for three years

0:22:420:22:45

and extracted gold worth £100,000 -

0:22:450:22:48

that's more than £24m in today's money.

0:22:480:22:52

I see, behind you, some glittery stuff. What's all this?

0:22:530:22:56

This is our gold display.

0:22:560:22:58

-All this gold here...

-No!

-..is Mennock gold.

0:22:580:23:03

I expected dust. They're like breakfast cereals.

0:23:030:23:06

Oh, yes. Yeah.

0:23:060:23:07

-This...

-Wow!

0:23:070:23:09

This, actually, this nugget, that is actually

0:23:090:23:12

a model of the biggest nugget that's been found in the Mennock.

0:23:120:23:17

-You would know about that.

-That you would.

0:23:170:23:20

-In 1878?

-Yes.

-Wow!

0:23:200:23:24

This one here is the biggest one that's been found, probably,

0:23:240:23:28

since the war...and that's 4.8 grams.

0:23:280:23:33

Very healthy.

0:23:330:23:34

I can show you what a friend of mine has found

0:23:340:23:38

-and what she's had done with it.

-Right.

0:23:380:23:41

No! She went to the jewellers and bought that.

0:23:420:23:45

No. This is all... She's had all this made...

0:23:450:23:49

from gold which is panned in this area,

0:23:490:23:53

except that one and that is an Alaskan nugget.

0:23:530:23:57

But if you look at that, you can see the difference in the colours.

0:23:570:24:01

Why a difference in colours?

0:24:010:24:04

It's the purity of the gold.

0:24:040:24:07

The gold in this area is around 22 carat.

0:24:070:24:11

It can vary in quite short distances of river,

0:24:110:24:16

but it is exceptionally good gold.

0:24:160:24:19

It was inevitable, was it now,

0:24:190:24:20

that Scottish gold would be better than other people's?

0:24:200:24:23

Well, that's true.

0:24:230:24:24

BOTH LAUGH

0:24:240:24:25

Gold panners would use a variety of methods to extract

0:24:250:24:29

gold from the riverbed.

0:24:290:24:31

This reproduction of a rocker pan would involve loading it with

0:24:310:24:34

gravel from the riverbed and rocking it back and forth

0:24:340:24:38

until the gold dropped through.

0:24:380:24:40

Then at the end of the day, just gather the gold out of the end.

0:24:410:24:46

-Easy as that, he says.

-Yeah.

0:24:460:24:48

My...word.

0:24:480:24:50

I mean, I will be delighted to show you panning

0:24:500:24:52

if you want to come with me.

0:24:520:24:54

Charlie, you're not going to have to offer twice.

0:24:540:24:56

Right. Come on then.

0:24:560:24:58

Gold still runs through the rivers to this day.

0:24:580:25:02

Charlie has given Paul some waders to squeeze into.

0:25:020:25:06

I need a hand getting them off!

0:25:060:25:09

And we're off down to the Mennock Water to see how it's done.

0:25:090:25:13

Where do you want me?

0:25:130:25:14

-Well, if you want to stand here.

-In there? Is that all right?

0:25:140:25:18

-You're all right there.

-I don't want to muddy your water.

0:25:180:25:21

Gold is very heavy

0:25:210:25:22

and will always sink deep to the bottom of the riverbed.

0:25:220:25:25

Panners have to dig deep into the bedrock, or sand layer,

0:25:250:25:29

as that's where the gold will be.

0:25:290:25:31

The idea is to shake it back and forth,

0:25:310:25:34

so the gold falls to the bottom of the pan.

0:25:340:25:37

If done correctly, and with a bit of luck, you could strike...

0:25:370:25:41

MUSIC: "Gold" by Spandau Ballet

0:25:410:25:44

Oh, my word!

0:25:440:25:46

HE LAUGHS

0:25:460:25:48

-The first one you did!

-Aye.

0:25:480:25:50

-There's gold in them thar hills, Charlie!

-There certainly is.

-What?!

0:25:510:25:54

NARRATOR LAUGHS

0:25:540:25:56

It's a genuine, but miniscule, flake of pure gold. Extraordinary.

0:25:560:26:01

Paul's eyes sure have lit up.

0:26:010:26:02

Wow!

0:26:030:26:05

Should we be keeping this to ourselves?

0:26:050:26:07

BOTH LAUGH

0:26:070:26:09

It seemed too easy, but will it be as easy for Paul?

0:26:090:26:14

Any great big nuggets?

0:26:140:26:16

Right. So there's no fortunes being wasted in there, so I can just...

0:26:160:26:20

Just empty that back in the river.

0:26:200:26:21

NARRATOR LAUGHS

0:26:210:26:23

Paul's been shaking the pan for ages, but no sign of any gold yet.

0:26:230:26:27

I'm getting worried. I'm running out of sand!

0:26:280:26:31

-You've got one bit.

-Is that a wee bit there?

-Yeah.

0:26:310:26:34

Oh, my word.

0:26:340:26:35

Laidlaw's gold.

0:26:350:26:37

Hardly enough to retire on though, but it's pure Scottish gold.

0:26:370:26:41

That was too easy.

0:26:420:26:44

Mind you, I say it was easy. The back was going, the wrists were going.

0:26:440:26:47

It was all falling apart there.

0:26:470:26:49

I was putting on a really brave face,

0:26:490:26:51

but it was all worth it for those, frankly, boulders of gold.

0:26:510:26:55

Boulders? I think you need your eyes tested.

0:26:550:26:58

I'm getting gold rush fever.

0:26:580:27:00

Ha! That'll explain it.

0:27:000:27:02

Charlie...

0:27:020:27:04

that's a pretty serious experience you just gave there.

0:27:040:27:06

-You are a good man.

-I'm glad you've enjoyed it, Paul.

0:27:060:27:10

Whilst Paul considers what to do with his newfound gold wealth,

0:27:100:27:13

David has made his way along to Moffat in Dumfries and Galloway.

0:27:130:27:18

He's checking out the family-run Lothlorien Emporium.

0:27:190:27:24

As it's his final shop,

0:27:240:27:25

David really needs to find something that will put him out in the lead.

0:27:250:27:29

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hello. Are you Jean, actually?

0:27:330:27:37

-I'm Linda.

-Linda.

0:27:370:27:38

-Yes.

-I wonder where I got Jean from. I've no idea.

0:27:380:27:41

-Hello.

-Nice to meet you.

-Hello, Linda. I'm David. Nice to see you.

0:27:410:27:44

Whoops!

0:27:440:27:46

Getting the owner's name wrong won't bode well for getting a discount.

0:27:460:27:50

This family-run shop sells an eclectic mix of items,

0:27:500:27:53

including furniture, silverware and antique toys.

0:27:530:27:56

Surely he can find a bargain here?

0:27:560:27:59

This is like...

0:27:590:28:01

last chance saloon again, isn't it?

0:28:010:28:03

The final opportunity to buy something really...powerful.

0:28:030:28:07

David's big comeback continues as he looks for something to deliver

0:28:080:28:12

that knockout blow.

0:28:120:28:13

Could these early 20th century hickory Shafter golf clubs

0:28:150:28:19

get him out of the bunker and back on to the green?

0:28:190:28:22

They're priced at £5 each.

0:28:220:28:23

I'm no expert in golf clubs,

0:28:250:28:26

but I would think they must be...

0:28:260:28:31

oh, 1930s. Would you...? Would you think, Linda?

0:28:310:28:35

-1910.

-You think 1910? A bit earlier?

0:28:350:28:39

It's Linda's husband Derek.

0:28:390:28:40

He seems to know a little bit about them.

0:28:400:28:42

Hi, Derek. Well, you might know more about these golf clubs than me.

0:28:420:28:45

Talk to me about them.

0:28:450:28:47

Not too much, but I know that, usually in Scotland,

0:28:470:28:49

most of the time, it's the names on the clubs that they look for.

0:28:490:28:53

Carnoustie. That one's Carnoustie.

0:28:530:28:55

Oh, that one's Glasgow. That's a Glasgow maker.

0:28:550:28:58

That one's from Glasgow, yes.

0:28:580:28:59

I tell you, the guy that buys these, or the woman who buys these,

0:28:590:29:02

they're not going to use them.

0:29:020:29:04

They're not going to go and play golf with them

0:29:040:29:06

cos they're probably not going to do very well.

0:29:060:29:08

Derek is offering something additional that may

0:29:080:29:11

complement the golf clubs and create an interesting little golfing lot.

0:29:110:29:15

OK. So, that is something...

0:29:160:29:18

Do we have a brand on there?

0:29:180:29:21

Just says golfing lighter.

0:29:230:29:25

-It's pretty new. It's maybe 1980s, isn't it?

-It doesn't say.

0:29:250:29:29

1980S? Hardly an antique.

0:29:290:29:31

I'm losing the plot here in a big way. In a big way.

0:29:310:29:34

You certainly are.

0:29:340:29:35

I'm going to be very cheeky and offer you 20 quid...

0:29:350:29:39

for the lot...as a cheeky little lot number.

0:29:390:29:44

-Do you reckon?

-I think that would be all right.

0:29:440:29:46

-Should we say yes...without even asking him?

-No.

0:29:460:29:49

Perfect. Sorry, Derek, the deal's been done.

0:29:490:29:52

The deal might be done, but Derek is back with two other items

0:29:520:29:55

to throw in as part of the lot.

0:29:550:29:57

Oh, look at that.

0:29:580:30:00

And we have the golf Go For the Green authentic golf action game.

0:30:000:30:04

It's a 1,500-piece golf jigsaw and a board game from the 1970s.

0:30:040:30:10

-Thank you, you two.

-You're welcome.

-Linda, you've been absolutely gorgeous.

0:30:100:30:13

-And Derek, thank you very much. Very helpful.

-You're welcome.

-Really appreciate it, thank you.

0:30:130:30:18

What a very funky auction lot, eh?

0:30:180:30:21

Funky?! What is he talking about?

0:30:210:30:24

That's probably my biggest earner!

0:30:240:30:26

-I bet you that's the biggest earner.

-Well, we shall soon see.

0:30:260:30:31

Four early 19th century golf clubs,

0:30:310:30:33

a novelty golf lighter, a jigsaw and a board game, all for just £20.

0:30:330:30:38

A fabulous shot, and I think you will find

0:30:380:30:41

that was almost professional.

0:30:410:30:43

Professional amateur, perhaps.

0:30:430:30:45

With the shopping now complete, it's time to reveal who bought what.

0:30:470:30:51

-Shall I go first?

-Yeah, let's.

-Are you ready?

-This is it.

0:30:510:30:54

OK, get ready, this...

0:30:540:30:56

..is the item.

0:30:570:30:59

BOTH LAUGH

0:30:590:31:02

-Oh, man!

-Do you remember him?

-I do remember him.

-Do you remember him?

-Yeah.

0:31:040:31:09

Erm, OK, how much did the Scottish bard cost you?

0:31:090:31:14

-The Scottish bard...

-So down to the nitty-gritty.

0:31:140:31:17

-What did it cost me? £20.

-Does it look anything like him?

0:31:170:31:21

Of course it looks like him.

0:31:210:31:23

-It looks nothing like him!

-Ha-ha-ha!

0:31:240:31:26

Right, that's... going to make you a profit.

0:31:260:31:30

A profit, maybe,

0:31:300:31:31

but it looks more like Robbie Williams than Robbie Burns.

0:31:310:31:35

-Is there any age to the pond yacht, or model yacht?

-It's no great age.

0:31:350:31:39

-20 or 30 years of age.

-OK.

-1930s in its style.

0:31:390:31:42

It's a really handsome hull.

0:31:420:31:45

-That is a nice thing.

-It is, yes.

0:31:450:31:47

What does the opposition think of David's golf clubs?

0:31:480:31:52

I can see why you bought hickory-shafted irons and a wood, OK?

0:31:520:31:58

-With the lighter.

-The lighter, I actually really like that.

0:31:580:32:00

-Yeah, and - hello, with a jigsaw...

-This is the bit I don't like.

0:32:000:32:04

-..and a game.

-I don't think they bring anything to the party.

0:32:040:32:06

It's golf-related. I'm building an interesting lot, Paul.

0:32:060:32:11

-It's an interesting lot.

-OK.

0:32:110:32:13

But is it more interesting than Paul's?

0:32:130:32:15

-Orkney chair.

-It's a lovely chair.

-I love those.

0:32:150:32:18

Isn't that a belting good thing?

0:32:180:32:21

-That's a nice chair.

-I think I got a bargain.

0:32:210:32:25

-How much will you make on that?

-I think it's worth 200, 250.

0:32:250:32:28

-OK, very interesting.

-There's a wee bit in it.

-It's a nice piece.

0:32:280:32:31

Talk to me about the copper. It's a nice shape.

0:32:310:32:34

Designed by... DAVID GASPS

0:32:340:32:35

-Not Dresser?

-As good. WAS Benson.

-Is it marked?

0:32:350:32:41

-Nope.

-Are you sure? You might want to check the handle.

0:32:410:32:45

Oh...

0:32:450:32:46

Gee, Gods Almichty! I missed it. Read the handle, behold.

0:32:480:32:54

DAVID GASPS, PAUL LAUGHS

0:32:540:32:57

-It's well spotted, a lovely design.

-Benson's patent.

-Lovely design.

0:32:570:33:01

Well, you were in the same shop and walked right past it, David.

0:33:010:33:04

-It's been another good, fun journey.

-Yeah. Oh, it's definitely been that!

0:33:040:33:10

It's not over yet. We want to know what you really think.

0:33:100:33:13

The Benson jug, I got a bit carried away with the Benson name.

0:33:130:33:16

He's a great name, there's no doubt about it. And well found, Laidlaw.

0:33:160:33:20

The chair, that's a very, very good chair.

0:33:200:33:24

It could sell for 120, it really could.

0:33:240:33:26

However, knowing Paul Laidlaw, it may well make 280. Who knows?

0:33:260:33:32

That's the danger one, but it could make him £100.

0:33:320:33:35

I wouldnae have bought anything Mr Harper bought!

0:33:350:33:39

However, the only one that's really guaranteed to do him quite well

0:33:390:33:44

is the yacht, that's a smart thing, very decorative, a good thing

0:33:440:33:49

and a hell of a price. So, yeah, he'll do all right.

0:33:490:33:53

Look, we just don't know. It'll be a nail-biter. Magic.

0:33:530:33:56

After shopping in the Southern Lowlands, it's up to the

0:33:580:34:02

central belt of Scotland for auction in Paisley in Renfrewshire.

0:34:020:34:06

Paisley is the largest town in Scotland.

0:34:080:34:10

The Abbey has been a place of worship since the 12th century

0:34:100:34:14

and it's believed William Wallace was educated here as a boy.

0:34:140:34:18

Whilst our Bravehearts have made it to Paisley,

0:34:180:34:21

the red Triumph hasn't. It broke down en route,

0:34:210:34:23

so we've given them a new one.

0:34:230:34:26

This time, a 1965 MG Midget.

0:34:260:34:28

-The old car has gone to classic car heaven.

-Seriously?

0:34:290:34:34

-Or at least part of it has.

-What part of it?

0:34:340:34:37

The important bit - the bit that makes it go!

0:34:370:34:39

It was probably all that weight of Paul's gold.

0:34:390:34:42

The auctioneers are a merger of two family-run firms who have

0:34:440:34:48

been in the business since 1848.

0:34:480:34:50

Auctioneer Stephen Maxwell is at the podium today and unsurprisingly,

0:34:500:34:55

he too has some concerns about that bust of Robert Burns.

0:34:550:34:59

It was brought in to me, I had no idea who the statue was of.

0:35:010:35:04

And indeed, most of our customers have all come and ask me,

0:35:040:35:07

who is the subject of the bust?

0:35:070:35:10

So I don't think it's going to do particularly well.

0:35:100:35:13

The nicest item today would be the antique Orkney child's chair.

0:35:130:35:16

Should sell well. They're always very popular items.

0:35:160:35:19

The condition's not great,

0:35:190:35:20

but there's been a lot of interest so far

0:35:200:35:22

and should do well in the auction.

0:35:220:35:24

The Edwardian horse child's toy, again,

0:35:240:35:28

child's antique toys - always a popular field.

0:35:280:35:31

David started this leg with £272.24 and has gone on to spend

0:35:310:35:36

a paltry £85 on five auction lots.

0:35:360:35:40

Paul, meanwhile, began with £464.90

0:35:430:35:47

and has parted with a laudable £280, also for five lots.

0:35:470:35:51

The buyers are waiting, so let the auction begin.

0:35:530:35:56

First up are Paul's silver spoon, brooch and bangle.

0:35:570:36:01

-Can we say £20 for the lot?

-No, let's say a fiver.

0:36:010:36:05

All silver, start me at ten then.

0:36:050:36:06

Nice and cheap. Thank you, ten I'm bid.

0:36:060:36:08

-£12. 15, 18.

-No, no!

-20, and two. 25, 28.

0:36:080:36:13

The bid's with the gentleman, £30.

0:36:130:36:16

You're out. The bid's now at the back with the gentleman,

0:36:160:36:18

selling at £30.

0:36:180:36:20

A few pounds' profit, but after costs, there won't be much left.

0:36:200:36:25

It would be fabulous if it had made a tenner.

0:36:250:36:27

Next, will David's wine bottle pourer deliver him profits?

0:36:280:36:33

-Straight in, £20 there for the wine bottle holder.

-Come on!

0:36:330:36:36

-£22 with the lady. 25.

-Come on!

-28.

0:36:360:36:39

It's with the lady, in the room at 28.

0:36:390:36:41

-Come on!

-Any advance, all done? We're selling then, at £28.

0:36:410:36:45

David more than doubled his money on that. He's off to a great start.

0:36:450:36:49

-It's all right, it's all right.

-It's a good result.

-It's all right.

0:36:490:36:52

David was very impressed earlier by Paul's copper Benson jug,

0:36:520:36:56

but will it and the kettle impress the Paisley bidders?

0:36:560:37:00

-Ten to get started. Thank you, sir. £10, I have.

-£10, ridiculous.

0:37:000:37:04

To my left. Do we have 12? 12 bid.

0:37:040:37:06

-15?

-No.

-18?

-No!

-No? With the gent at the back, 18 has it.

0:37:060:37:10

Are we all done at £18?

0:37:100:37:13

Paul had hoped for a big profit from that, but after costs,

0:37:130:37:17

he breaks even again.

0:37:170:37:19

That was Benson. I love Benson's stuff.

0:37:190:37:23

I used to. He's dead to me now.

0:37:240:37:27

Next, it's time to measure up David's brass kitchen ladles.

0:37:270:37:30

-Can we say £30?

-Oh, yeah.

-Don't say £30.

-I think 30 would be good.

0:37:300:37:33

So, start me at £20. Your measures at £20.

0:37:330:37:36

-£20, take them.

-It's not happening.

0:37:360:37:37

-They're worth that, aren't they?

-£15, then, to get me started.

0:37:370:37:41

-No, it's wishful thinking.

-£15, seven of them, £10, then.

0:37:410:37:44

Ten, thank you, I'm bid ten there. 12 at the door.

0:37:440:37:46

-No, the gent at the door has it. 12, 15?

-Fabulous. That's it!

0:37:460:37:50

-You're out. The gent to my right has it.

-Come on.

0:37:500:37:53

-Come on!

-Are we all done at £18?

0:37:530:37:55

A good result for David.

0:37:550:37:57

His brass ladles have outshone Paul's Benson jug.

0:37:570:38:01

Benson - Smenson! Rubbish!

0:38:010:38:05

So far, Paul isn't making much headway.

0:38:050:38:07

Could he get ahead with the Freemasonry books?

0:38:070:38:11

£20, then. Come on, for three.

0:38:110:38:13

20, thank you, madam. 20 I'm bid with the lady.

0:38:130:38:15

22 with the gentleman, and five, 28, 30, and two, 35.

0:38:150:38:19

-No, no, no!

-38, 40, and two.

0:38:190:38:22

You're out. With the gentleman at £42.

0:38:220:38:25

-Are we all done at 42?

-It's not enough.

-45, new bidder. 48.

0:38:250:38:28

-No, no.

-Madam?

-Keep going.

0:38:280:38:31

-With the gentleman to my left here at £50.

-Don't weaken.

0:38:310:38:33

-Five?

-No.

-You're out. With the gentleman. We're selling at £55.

0:38:330:38:38

-Wasn't it worth it?

-No!

0:38:380:38:40

A great result for Paul.

0:38:400:38:42

After a lacklustre start, he's beginning to catch up.

0:38:420:38:46

-The Laidlaw is coming back.

-Oooh!

0:38:460:38:51

Next, it's time to find out what the bidders think

0:38:510:38:54

of David's clay model of Robbie Burns.

0:38:540:38:58

£20, then? £20, thank you, sir. I have £20.

0:38:580:39:01

-Good taste.

-Any advance at 20? Do we have 22?

0:39:010:39:05

-It's with the gentleman at 22.

-Come on.

-Are we all done?

-No!

0:39:050:39:08

-22, thank you, sir at the back.

-Yes!

-25?

0:39:080:39:11

You're out? That was very quick.

0:39:110:39:12

Still the same gentleman, then, at £25.

0:39:120:39:15

David had high hopes for that,

0:39:150:39:17

but high hopes haven't led to high profits.

0:39:170:39:20

A fiver profit on our Robbie Burns. It's ridiculous!

0:39:200:39:24

Will David's pond yacht sail him into the lead?

0:39:260:39:29

Start me at 20, then? At £20? £20 bid. And two, 25, 28? You're out.

0:39:290:39:35

The bid's to my left at £28. At £30, and two.

0:39:350:39:39

-35. 38.

-Come on. Come on.

0:39:390:39:42

-No, the bid's to my left at 30.

-Come on, no.

-Are you bidding, sir?

0:39:420:39:45

£40, new bidder.

0:39:450:39:46

-42.

-Everybody'll have a bite of that.

-45?

-Come on.

0:39:460:39:50

-48, 50, and five.

-Yes.

-I told you.

-60, and five?

0:39:500:39:56

-Yes.

-No, the bid's to my left with the gentleman at £65.

0:39:560:40:00

That is a remarkable £40 profit. Well, he did well there.

0:40:000:40:04

I've got one more item.

0:40:040:40:05

Yeah, and you're not going to do very well with that!

0:40:050:40:08

You've had your moment of glory there, mate!

0:40:090:40:12

Next, Paul's toy horse is under starter's orders.

0:40:120:40:16

Starting on commission at £30, and two.

0:40:160:40:19

-35, 38, 40, and two.

-No.

-45. It's your bid, sir, to my left.

0:40:190:40:24

48, it's a lady, £50, and five.

0:40:240:40:27

-60, and five.

-No.

0:40:270:40:29

No, it's now with the lady, we're selling to the room at £65?

0:40:290:40:33

Gone.

0:40:330:40:34

The horse has bolted,

0:40:340:40:35

and significantly boosted Paul's profits.

0:40:350:40:39

I have to say, this is neck and neck.

0:40:390:40:42

And my big spend's still to come.

0:40:420:40:46

Ready to tee off is David's final lot - the golfing set.

0:40:460:40:49

-£20, then, to get me started at 20? £20 I'm bid.

-Come on.

0:40:490:40:54

-With the gentleman here at 20, I have 22 at the back.

-How dare you!

0:40:540:40:57

-25, 28, £30. 32?

-Come on.

-You're out?

0:40:570:41:02

-At the very back.

-Come on.

-What is happening here?

0:41:020:41:05

-Are we all done at £32? Gone.

-More than enough, drop that hammer.

0:41:050:41:09

It's another little profit, it's another little profit.

0:41:090:41:12

A proverbial hole-in-one for David, collecting a tidy £12 profit.

0:41:120:41:17

It all comes down to the last lot - Paul's Orkney chair.

0:41:170:41:21

It was a big purchase, but can it deliver an even bigger profit?

0:41:210:41:25

£55, I have here, £60. 65, 70, and five.

0:41:250:41:30

£80, and five, at 90.

0:41:300:41:33

It's now with the gentleman here, 95.

0:41:330:41:35

-It's going to go up from here.

-£100, and ten.

0:41:350:41:37

120, 130, 140, 150, 160.

0:41:370:41:43

-170, 180.

-Stop, stop!

-You're out, the same gent has it.

0:41:430:41:47

-Stop, stop, stop.

-Oh!

-Are we all done?

0:41:470:41:49

We're selling, fair warning, £180...

0:41:490:41:51

It was a big buy and it hasn't paid off for Paul.

0:41:520:41:55

After costs, he'll make a loss on it.

0:41:550:41:57

-Big brave man, I like you.

-Come on, let's go.

0:42:000:42:03

Auction over, it's time to do the sums.

0:42:030:42:07

Paul started with £464.90 and after costs,

0:42:070:42:11

made a lamentable profit of just £5.36,

0:42:110:42:15

ending the leg with £470.26.

0:42:150:42:21

David, however, started with £272.24

0:42:210:42:24

and after auction costs,

0:42:240:42:27

he made an impressive profit of £52.76,

0:42:270:42:30

winning the auction and the leg.

0:42:300:42:33

His total now stands at £325.

0:42:330:42:38

-You smug boy!

-Do winners drive? Do winners...?

0:42:380:42:44

On this trip,

0:42:440:42:45

David managed to pull the rug out from his opponent

0:42:450:42:48

by shortening the gap and taking the auction glory,

0:42:480:42:51

but Paul's still in the overall lead

0:42:510:42:54

so it will all come down to the final auction.

0:42:540:42:57

How exciting!

0:42:570:42:58

Oh, she feels good.

0:42:580:43:00

Oh, everything feels good for you right now!

0:43:000:43:03

Next on Antiques Road Trip, with the last auction approaching,

0:43:030:43:07

it's all to play for. David's going large...

0:43:070:43:11

Here we go. It's a big lump.

0:43:110:43:14

..but is Paul losing it at the last?

0:43:140:43:17

I'm losing my mojo.

0:43:170:43:19

Antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and David Harper begin their Scottish road trip in New Abbey in Dumfries and Galloway, before heading through Biggar and Moffat to an auction in Paisley, Renfrewshire.