Episode 29 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 29

Thomas Plant and Charlie Ross start their journey in Church Stretton, Shropshire stopping at Welshpool, Oswestry and Wrexham before their auction in Minsterley.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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a classic car, and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-Going, going...gone.

-Yes!

-I'm loving that bird.

-The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-Yes!

-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-Don't I look handsome?

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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I'm going now.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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# Yeah! #

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We're back on the road for the fourth leg of our road trip

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with dapper chaps and antiques experts

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Thomas Plant and Charlie Ross.

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No, no, Roscoe, this is rather beautiful, isn't it?

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-It's absolutely gorgeous.

-Do you know where we are?

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We must be very nearly in Wales.

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After running his own auction house for 20 years,

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Charlie's expertise lies in antique furniture and vintage cars,

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not to mention an uncanny ability to charm everyone in his way.

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-HE MIMICS TOMMY COPPER

-I'm looking for some bargains!

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Thomas is also an auctioneer of considerable experience,

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with a particular penchant for jewellery, silver and...hats.

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I'll do the rest of the shop dressed as an American soldier.

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Our pair of charming chappies began the road trip with £200 each.

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-Three auctions later...a chasm is opening up between them.

-CHARLIE SOBS

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-Do you remember how much you've got now?

-Oh, it's so boring, the whole money thing, isn't it?

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Oh, how lovely to hear that.

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-Do you want to give it to me, then?

-Yes, of course. CHARLIE LAUGHS

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I'm very uncomfortable winning, to be honest with you.

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How my heart bleeds!

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Thomas is leading the field by quite a margin.

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He starts this leg with a whopping £485.84.

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Charlie, meanwhile, is somewhat of a straggler,

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kicking off this leg with a rather limp £170.56.

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But right now the sun is shining

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and they have the joys of their 1971 Triumph Spitfire to nip about in.

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This week's road trip is taking us

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over 400 miles from Watchet in Somerset

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up to Shropshire via North Wales

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before looping back down to finish at an auction showdown

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in Bedford, Bedfordshire.

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Today, we're starting our journey in Church Stretton, Shropshire.

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Then we'll skip back and forth over the English/Welsh border

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before returning to Shropshire for an auction in Minsterley.

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Sadly though, our poor experts

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seem to have little idea of where they are.

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-We're in Shropshire.

-I know we're in Shropshire,

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but these hills, what are these hills called?

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Er...they're called the Shropshire Hills, boys.

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First stop is the charming small rural town of Church Stretton.

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Back in 1214, King John granted it a market charter

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and markets have been held here ever since.

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Oh, there's a church here too, and a giant antiques centre.

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-There we are.

-Thank you, my man.

-Oh.

-You wait in the car.

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No, no, no, no! What's wrong?

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-Didn't you like my driving?

-I was absolutely...terrified.

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Not as scared as dealer Terry's probably feeling right now.

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-Look out.

-Hello there.

-Hello there.

-Charlie is the name.

-I'm Terry.

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-Hello. Thomas. Terry, yeah?

-Yeah.

-Pleased to meet you.

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-May we have a look round?

-Yeah, carry on.

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ALL LAUGH

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This antiques market is enormous,

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with three floors housing the wares of up to 60 dealers.

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Surely there'll be something here to tempt the chaps.

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Thomas is diving straight in,

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weighed down by his extremely heavy pockets.

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Having all this money, one feels quite uncomfortable.

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Erm...what am I going to buy?!

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Thomas' opponent, meanwhile, has the opposite problem.

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Don't buy expensive things.

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Keep...cheap.

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So I could really go completely wrong from now on in

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and then lose everything, which I've done before in the past, believe you me.

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-I'm an old master at this.

-Thomas has never won a road trip.

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And...I have no intention of this being his first.

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Eagle-eyed Thomas has already spotted something he likes.

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So this is a spelter figure... in the Art Deco style...

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..of a dancer.

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It has had a little bit of damage or cracking just here.

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Spelter...which has been bronzed to make it look like bronze.

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Such nice movement to her.

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Yeah, I like that very much.

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Spelter is an alloy including zinc

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which was popular in the Art Deco period

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as it was much cheaper to make than bronze.

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The ticket price is £75. Best have a chat with Terry, eh?

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-She's a nice figure.

-She is.

-She has been restored here though.

-Yeah.

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-What...?

-What can I do?

-Yeah. I mean, I've got a figure in mind...

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-because of the restoration.

-Yeah. I'll go and give 'em a ring.

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The figure is owned by a dealer who's not in today.

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-He doesn't look that hopeful.

-All right then. OK.

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-What's the best?

-63.

-63?

-Yeah.

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-Why the three?

-Cos that's what he wants.

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TERRY LAUGHS

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Not 60?

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Erm...

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I can do it for 60 for you, but I can't go any more.

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-Yeah, I'll buy it for 60.

-OK.

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

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-One, two...

-Well, that's one purchase down for Thomas.

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How's our Roscoe getting on?

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Going round one of the biggest antique emporiums for miles around.

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-HE SIGHS

-Nothing I'm looking at is doing it for me.

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How about an early 20th-century

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oak framed screen with cross-stitch tapestry, eh, Charlie?

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I...quite like the peacock.

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Faded a little bit I should imagine from where it was originally.

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But it's priced at £30.

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That's not a lot of money, £30.

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Erm...one could probably think that it might be buyable for 20.

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Hey! Keep your voice down!

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-Someone's lurking!

-Roscoe!

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-Sh!

-Roscoe, I've bought!

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-Come on, let's go.

-I'm sorry, I can't be pushed into these things.

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THOMAS LAUGHS

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Just because you have found something.

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I can't do with it when someone's so smug!

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Why aren't you buying the cross-stitch Berlin Wall-work panel?

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-Why am I not buying it?

-It's only £30.

-I know.

-Why don't you buy that?

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Well...who says I haven't?

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-I'll find Terry.

-HE HUMS

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-Terry.

-How are you?

-Well, I'm having a marvellous time.

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Upstairs is a cross-stitch panel.

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I got in a right muddle, I was going round and round in circles.

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Would it need a phone call to try and tweak it a bit?

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-I can do it for 25. She won't go any more.

-She wouldn't?

-No.

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-Not even if I blew her a kiss down the phone?

-No.

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-No, that would probably make her go back to 30.

-THEY LAUGH

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Oh, dear!

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-There is no downside at 25 quid, is there?

-No.

-Put it there, guvnor.

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Phew! Well done, Charlie. One item all sewn up.

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Thomas would like to buy more here, but there's a problem.

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It's another whole room!

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A whole 'nother floor.

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# I'm lost just like a dog without a bone. #

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Where am I?

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Hang on a minute, we're walking round in circles.

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Oh, God!

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I can't get out!

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Meanwhile, Charlie's on a roll.

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-He's found something else to perk him up.

-Cafe au lait. Hm.

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A little very Art Deco looking, almost Christopher Dresser design.

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-Yeah.

-Hot milk in one, coffee in the other and away you go.

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Very, very nice. And I like the...

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They are ebony, aren't they, those handles?

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-I think they're very nice.

-Together they're priced at £40.

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-Yeah.

-I think they'd probably make 30 quid at auction.

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-Which is... I've got nowhere to go.

-No.

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Is it a very nice amenable person that owns these?

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-Are they lovely?

-I can do 'em for 30 quid for the pair,

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-but that's as much as...

-Can you?

-Yeah.

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Could you do me a gesture like...28?

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I mean, that sounds really pathetic

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and you can show me the door if you like,

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-but it's just psychologically...

-28?

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-Yeah.

-Right.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-Fab. Thank you very much indeed.

-OK.

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Sorry to be such a cheese-paring misery.

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Two quid could be the difference at the end of the day,

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-you never know in life.

-You never know.

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Yes, every penny counts, especially when your opponent

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is displaying an intimidating amount of intellectual prowess.

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I have a very short concentration span,

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it lasts for about a minute and...

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Aye up, what's this?

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I think...a pair of tribal carved spears.

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They're not spears, they're...paddles.

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You're right, they're African ceremonial paddles.

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Like that.

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£45 the pair.

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I think I'd have them for 30.

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-There he is!

-Lordy!

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They're tripping over each other in this shop.

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It can be another person.

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-There we are.

-Very convincing.

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Is he there? Is he hiding?

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-I've seen him round the corner, you see.

-No, he's not hiding from you.

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-Well, he might be.

-Because I saw him as I picked these up.

-Yeah.

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-You trying to hide 'em?

-Yes. THEY LAUGH

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-Do you think they'll take 30 for them?

-No.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah.

-Why not?

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Cos they only come in two days ago.

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-You wouldn't phone, Terry, just to ask?

-I'll try.

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-Do you mind?

-No, I'll try.

-Do you mind?

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They might do 'em a bit more, but not a lot.

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They're good though, aren't they? They're good big things.

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Yes, but will the deal come down on the price?

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-35.

-Oh, really?

-Yes.

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-Your lucky day.

-Lucky day?

-Yes.

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I think I've got to have 'em for 35.

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-I think they're cheaper at that, yeah.

-Yeah.

-Definitely.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Both boys have managed to buy two items each in their first shop,

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-but whilst they've been busy, the rain's arrived.

-Oh, no, look!

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The car's got wet! We are going to get wet bottoms!

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-Hood up!

-Hood up.

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Poor old loves. Wet bottoms or not, the road trip moves on.

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Our chaps are heading 31 miles west

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just over the border into Wales to the town of Welshpool

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where Thomas is dropping Charlie off for a spot more shopping.

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Ohh! FE! Look!

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Look at that! Fred Anderson!

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Posh shop!

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There's only one thing I'm going to need in this shop.

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-What's that, some money?

-Your money!

-Go on, out you get! Come on!

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-Thank you, dear. Have a nice visit.

-I will. Bye-bye.

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HE SIGHS

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This is a Roscoe sort of shop!

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Thomas and his money meanwhile are heading north

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and back into England, to the town of Oswestry.

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Bizarrely, he's coming here to learn more about a very Welsh institution.

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I'm looking forward to a lovely Welsh reception,

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full of warmth, humour... and good singing.

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MALE VOICE CHOIR SINGS

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Ah, food for the soul!

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Thomas's destination is the Welsh Guards Museum

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and standing by to meet him is Stan Evans,

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a veteran Welsh Guard himself.

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-Thomas.

-Hello. Stan is it?

-Stan it is, yes. I'm the curator.

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The Welsh Guards were formed not only to protect the Queen,

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standing guard at Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace,

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but also as an infantry regiment to go into the First World War.

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They are the youngest of the guards regiments,

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only coming into being in 1915,

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and straightaway they had to design a uniform

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with a badge to identify themselves.

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Back into the battle of Agincourt,

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the Welshmen, who had no uniforms whatsoever

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were told that on the side of the battle there was a field of leeks.

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"Wear a leek upon your chest and kill those that don't."

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So it really is the oldest badge of uniform.

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This is the uniform they would have worn,

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the buttons would have been Welsh Guards buttons.

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And here we see the leek in the situation it would have been in.

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The Welsh Guards soon distinguished themselves,

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earning 21 battle honours, shown on the colour,

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and two Victoria crosses, one from each World War.

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In the Second World War, one act of bravery

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left behind a very different kind of memorial.

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Corporal Winslade was an infantry section leader then

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and he was responsible for an outpost.

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And they were holding off the Germans

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until the other companies could get to safety.

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And they held for as long as they could

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and, unfortunately, Corporal Winslade was shot through the chest

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and the bullet entered his breast pocket.

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And we can see here his paybook

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and a photograph of his girlfriend and the bullet has penetrated both.

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-Wow!

-Erm...and he was killed instantly.

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During both World Wars and since

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in all British conflicts including Iraq and Afghanistan,

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the Welsh Guards have sustained many casualties,

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but are well-known for their bravery and loyalty to their regiment.

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Back in the UK they are most famous

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for standing the guard at the royal palaces

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wearing the iconic ceremonial uniform.

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And it looks like they may have a new recruit!

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-The red jacket.

-Oh, Thomas, you never miss a chance to dress up, do you?

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Face round to me.

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When you're getting dressed for duties you ask somebody, "Can you give me a pull round?"

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-A pull round?

-This is a pull round.

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-You stand there...

-Yeah.

-..and I do that.

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Oh, lordy!

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Does he look the part? Don't move, Thomas.

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While his opponent stands guard, Charlie's back in Welshpool

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feasting his eyes on the goods of shop owner Ian.

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-Oh, goodness me! This room could have been designed for me, couldn't it?

-Well, I hope it could be.

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Oh, dear, looks a bit out of your budget though, Charlie.

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-So how long have you been here?

-We've been here just over 100 years.

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Look out, here comes the sob story.

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I have to say something straightaway, sir.

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-Looking at your lovely objects, I've come here with a pathetic sort of hundred-odd quid of money.

-Yes.

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-I haven't done well.

-And you could do with a change of luck?

-I could do with a bolster.

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Or rather, something small that you can afford.

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-More feminine.

-It is.

-Very, very nice.

-He's looking at you.

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OK, so always too big.

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-Those are quite interesting.

-The water buffalo?

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-Yes.

-Aren't they lovely.

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They're all right, but they're a bit out of the bracket.

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-You're not going to sell those to me for 100 quid?

-No, I can't afford to.

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-And they are a true pair, aren't they?

-They're a true pair.

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The sort of thing that's, you know, saleable nowadays.

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-Yes.

-I like those.

-Yeah.

-I'm going to do an exact sum in a minutes.

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Canny Charlie's fallen for a pair of wooden Chinese water buffalo carved in the early 20th century,

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but the ticket price on them is way over what he can afford, at £245.

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-I've only got about 110 quid.

-You've got about 110 quid to spare.

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-I can't buy those, can I?

-The buffalo cost 140.

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I could probably charge you 155, but it's out of your bracket, unfortunately,

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it's out of your bracket.

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-Yeah. But I mean...

-Oh, crikey!

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I'm...I'm thinking a little bit now.

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I did buy with them a very nice mahogany tripod table for 200,

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which I got 500 for.

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There appears to be a glimmer of hope, and now Charlie spots something else.

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He has had a leg off. Are you aware?

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Oh, golly! Do you think I'll be lumbered with them now if I don't sell them to you?

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-What did you say was your offer?

-110.

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-110.

-Chancer!

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£110... I will sell them to you.

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-And I will wish you the very best of luck with them.

-Are you sure?

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-I will wish you the very best of luck with them.

-You, sir, are a gentleman and a scholar!

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-Ooh, you want money?

-I want my money.

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-90. 100. And ten.

-And ten.

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-Thank you very much.

-I've still got a fiver.

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-Yeah, and I tell you what I'm going to do.

-What are you going to do?

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I need those to be lucky for you to win.

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-Yeah.

-That's for you and that's for luck towards the auction.

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When I was selling the chickens and the cows and what have you,

0:17:010:17:04

we always used to give the biggest buyer of the day

0:17:040:17:06

-a bit of lucky money.

-Well, you're definitely my biggest buyer today.

0:17:060:17:09

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

-Charlie, you are a very lucky man indeed.

0:17:090:17:13

By Ian giving you back that £10,

0:17:130:17:15

you got the water buffalo for a snip at £100.

0:17:150:17:19

Ridiculous!

0:17:190:17:20

It's the end of the day and time for our experts to have a well-needed little lie down.

0:17:200:17:25

Sleep tight.

0:17:250:17:27

Day two, and our devilish duo are comparing the size of their wallets...again!

0:17:280:17:33

-I mean, you went shopping yesterday and you've still got over £400 left?

-Just under.

0:17:330:17:38

CHARLIE LAUGHS How much have you got left?

0:17:380:17:42

-I've got...£17.61, I think. Or £17.57.

-Wonderful! Wonderful!

-Or £17.56.

0:17:420:17:47

-You've really done well!

-I'm not sure about the pence.

0:17:470:17:50

Every penny helps, Charlie.

0:17:500:17:52

So to recap, Charlie has spent £153 on three items -

0:17:520:17:56

a cafe au lait set, a screen with cross-stitch needlework

0:17:560:18:02

and a pair of Chinese carved water buffalo.

0:18:020:18:04

That means he has £17.56 left in his coffers.

0:18:040:18:09

Thomas, on the other hand, has parted with £95

0:18:090:18:12

on an Art Deco figure and a pair of African ceremonial paddles.

0:18:120:18:15

Which still leaves him with a magnificent £390.84

0:18:150:18:20

to play to play about with.

0:18:200:18:23

Our chaps have motored back into Wales

0:18:230:18:25

and are heading for the large town of Wrexham.

0:18:250:18:28

Impoverished Charlie is dropping tycoon Thomas off at his next shop, hoping he'll spend big.

0:18:290:18:35

-Got all your money in your pocket?

-Yeah, and it's bulging. CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:18:350:18:39

-And buy something nice.

-Bye-bye.

0:18:390:18:42

Bryn-Y-Grog Emporium houses the wares of over 50 dealers

0:18:420:18:46

and one of them standing by to help Thomas.

0:18:460:18:49

-Good morning.

-Thomas?

-That's right.

-Hello, Thomas.

-It's Brian?

-Brian.

0:18:490:18:53

-I hope you find something to buy, I'm sure you will.

-I think I will.

0:18:530:18:56

-I'm sure I will. It looks massive!

-Massive it is, and with a healthy wallet

0:18:560:19:01

surely finding a treasure here should be no problem for our expert.

0:19:010:19:05

-They're proper antiques.

-So what's your tactics today, Thomas?

0:19:050:19:09

My tactics are to buy...quality.

0:19:090:19:13

Concentrate.

0:19:130:19:15

Don't buy a resin panel, which is what this is.

0:19:150:19:18

Don't spuff it all on one item.

0:19:200:19:24

Did you say spuff it?!

0:19:240:19:26

Retro Mysterons ray gun with light beams and...

0:19:260:19:31

And voice changer.

0:19:310:19:33

Roscoe, this is Plant, your merciless Mysteron!

0:19:330:19:37

How many children put their lips round there? Disgusting!

0:19:380:19:41

-Yuck!

-I'm going to start doing some buying now. I've had a good look.

0:19:410:19:45

What I'm looking at here is an onyx cigarette set.

0:19:500:19:53

I'm not really interested in the lighter, but there's just marvellous colours to it.

0:19:530:19:58

I think this is spelter, but it's quite well painted, actually.

0:19:580:20:02

It's got a bit of age to it.

0:20:020:20:04

It's the kind of thing which you buy for a tenner and it's going to make £25.

0:20:040:20:09

Yeah, it's not a bad looking thing. There's so much stuff!

0:20:090:20:12

So, that's a contender. Now, what's this with a ticket price of £38?

0:20:120:20:17

-It's a deed box.

-This deed box dates from the early 20th century

0:20:190:20:23

and would've been used to hold important documents

0:20:230:20:26

such as house deeds or bonds and other available items.

0:20:260:20:29

It would have been double-locked with two keys

0:20:290:20:31

and kept in a strong room in the bank or solicitors.

0:20:310:20:34

-38 quid. That's no money, it's quite good.

-Safe/deed box?

0:20:340:20:38

-Yeah, the deed box.

-Time to see if Brian can do a deal.

0:20:380:20:41

Do you know if they've got the keys?

0:20:410:20:44

-Er...no. Sorry, as is.

-As is?

-Yeah.

0:20:440:20:48

-I quite like that. It's quite fun.

-Well, the paint's pleasant on it,

0:20:480:20:51

there's enough of the gilding left to decorate it quite nicely.

0:20:510:20:54

-Yeah, it's quite a good fun thing, a good decorative lot.

-Yeah.

0:20:540:20:58

I quite like that. That's quite good fun.

0:20:580:21:00

So, it's got £38 on it, how about £28?

0:21:000:21:03

5? 25?

0:21:030:21:06

-Yes, why not.

-We'll have that for sure.

-OK.

-At 25 that's great.

0:21:060:21:11

-We'll definitely have that. That's brilliant.

-A good deal indeed!

0:21:110:21:15

Now, what about that green onyx ashtray?

0:21:150:21:18

-I think that is delightful! Have a look at it.

-It's nice.

0:21:180:21:21

-Yeah, that's good. The pheasant's very good, isn't it?

-The pheasant's brilliant, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:21:210:21:27

-Would they mind if I just gave them a tenner for that?

-Oh, gosh, no.

0:21:270:21:29

-The quality.

-That's nice.

-Yeah.

0:21:290:21:32

And people can use it to put little cuff links in or something.

0:21:320:21:35

-Yeah. So we'll say £8 for that.

-Oh, perfect. Perfect. That's great.

0:21:350:21:38

-25 and eight so that's...

-£33.

-£33. Yeah.

0:21:380:21:43

Last of the big spenders, eh?

0:21:430:21:45

While Thomas has been shopping, Charlie is en route two miles west

0:21:450:21:49

to a rather large country house.

0:21:490:21:52

This is the longest drive up to a house I think I've ever been on.

0:21:520:21:55

I've been driving for hours!

0:21:550:21:57

But what a sight to greet one at the end.

0:21:570:22:00

Charlie's come to Erddig House,

0:22:000:22:03

widely recognised as one of Britain's finest historic houses

0:22:030:22:06

and now owned by the National Trust.

0:22:060:22:08

-Poised to show Charlie around is curator Graham Clark.

-Thank you.

0:22:080:22:13

Erddig House was inherited by the Yorke family

0:22:130:22:16

in the mid-18th century,

0:22:160:22:18

who continued to live here for the next 200 years.

0:22:180:22:22

But although the house appears to be steeped in all the trappings of the aristocracy,

0:22:220:22:27

there's an unusual story here of the family and servants who shared these rooms.

0:22:270:22:33

Cos this is all about the servants, really, isn't it?

0:22:340:22:36

-It is, yes.

-The history of the house?

-That's right.

0:22:360:22:38

And at the end of the room there we have a door to the servery,

0:22:380:22:42

which would have been the door for the servants to come in.

0:22:420:22:45

Although the Yorkes inherited the house,

0:22:450:22:47

they were not hugely wealthy and began losing money from the start.

0:22:470:22:52

As a result, they couldn't afford to pay their servants the usual going rate,

0:22:520:22:56

so instead they opted to pay them in kind,

0:22:560:22:59

in order to keep their loyalty, by treating them like family.

0:22:590:23:03

There weren't any back stairs that were segregated -

0:23:030:23:06

another feature of the house.

0:23:060:23:08

The servants rubbed up well against the family.

0:23:080:23:11

-So you'd bump into servants all the time.

-Yeah.

0:23:120:23:14

This is their version of the dining room, the servants hall.

0:23:140:23:17

You would have had your meals in here.

0:23:170:23:19

You'd have the butler at one end and the housekeeper at the other.

0:23:190:23:22

Heads of the respective staff.

0:23:220:23:23

And here we have portraits, oil paintings, of the servants.

0:23:230:23:26

Almost unheard of, isn't it?

0:23:260:23:29

The paintings were commissioned by Philip Yorke I

0:23:310:23:34

in the 1790s and it was he who also wrote the poems

0:23:340:23:38

included in the paintings about each of the servants.

0:23:380:23:42

Who have we got here?

0:23:420:23:44

This is dear old Jane Ebbrell who worked for 70 years for the Yorkes.

0:23:440:23:48

-70 years!

-No retirement age then.

0:23:480:23:50

But we know the Yorkes housed her in her own cottage

0:23:500:23:53

on the estate and gave her the lovely job title

0:23:530:23:56

of "spider-brusher" when her days as housekeeper was done.

0:23:560:23:59

She was still allowed on the estate but didn't have anything to do.

0:23:590:24:02

A really interesting character here is Thomas Rogers.

0:24:020:24:06

He was carpenter-joiner here.

0:24:060:24:08

He was saved from the press gang for the Napoleonic wars

0:24:080:24:10

by the squire, who paid a ransom...

0:24:100:24:12

-To keep his servant!

-..to keep him here.

0:24:120:24:16

I'd like to come in here and listen to the old conversation.

0:24:170:24:21

Philip Yorke's tradition of honouring the servants

0:24:210:24:24

was to continue in the family right up to the 20th century.

0:24:240:24:27

Here we are in the servant passage and we have the successors

0:24:270:24:30

to those early oil paintings with photographs of the servants.

0:24:300:24:33

This is a lovely, touching story.

0:24:330:24:35

It's Lucy Hitchman and Lucy was the nurse

0:24:350:24:38

and Ernest Jones was the groom. They met most days,

0:24:380:24:41

when they took the young lads for a pony trip around the garden.

0:24:410:24:46

-Inevitably, as these things happen, they fell in love.

-How exciting.

0:24:460:24:50

He was much below her station.

0:24:500:24:52

People advised them not to court, but they got married.

0:24:520:24:55

-With the family's blessing?

-Family's blessing.

0:24:550:24:58

Commemorated in verse. If I just finish off the poem,

0:24:580:25:01

"We trust the attachment here begun

0:25:010:25:03

"May last while life its course shall run."

0:25:030:25:05

But perhaps the most important photograph

0:25:050:25:08

we have at Erddig is this 1912 group photograph

0:25:080:25:10

of the principal servants, all holding a tool of their trade.

0:25:100:25:14

You'll see William Gittings has a saw. He's the carpenter.

0:25:140:25:17

The butler has a bottle of claret.

0:25:170:25:20

Most importantly, the family have put themselves

0:25:200:25:23

in the photograph behind their servants.

0:25:230:25:26

Wonderful. We've got the cook, here.

0:25:260:25:28

-Holding some sort of game bird.

-That's right. Brace of pheasants.

0:25:280:25:31

-Which will be prepared in the kitchen.

-Cooked up in the pot.

0:25:310:25:34

-Shall we?

-Marvellous.

0:25:340:25:36

A wonderful room, isn't it?

0:25:380:25:39

One of the largest rooms in the house, which shows its importance.

0:25:390:25:43

One has the sense of it being a very happy home.

0:25:430:25:46

The relationship between the family and the servants -

0:25:460:25:50

everybody must have got on.

0:25:500:25:52

It feels like a home, although it's enormous, it feels like a home.

0:25:520:25:56

And I want to meet the servants that were here and ask them

0:25:560:25:59

how they were treated. And hopefully get the right answer.

0:25:590:26:03

-Are you treated well here?

-All the time!

-Good!

0:26:030:26:06

-Thank you so much, Graham.

-Thank you to meet you.

-It's been wonderful.

0:26:060:26:09

What a fascinating visit for Charlie.

0:26:090:26:12

If only he was on equal footing with sparring partner Thomas Plant.

0:26:120:26:17

Our chaps have reconvened in the Spitfire and are now

0:26:170:26:21

journeying to Ruthin in Denbighshire where a shop awaits Charlie.

0:26:210:26:25

-I am going shopping and you're going shopping.

-I am going shopping.

0:26:260:26:29

And you've still got a lot of money. Still got a lot of money.

0:26:290:26:31

-I've got very, very little.

-I've got a lot of money

0:26:310:26:34

and I'll probably still have a lot by the time I've finished.

0:26:340:26:36

-Unless I see something amazing.

-Thomas! Go big!

0:26:360:26:39

Oh, will you stop banging on about the money?

0:26:390:26:42

Ah, the county town of Ruthin.

0:26:430:26:45

In the 15th century, a rebellion against King Henry IV

0:26:450:26:49

left the town ravaged and burnt to the ground,

0:26:490:26:52

but luckily for our experts, it rose from the ashes.

0:26:520:26:55

-Are you going to take this car on?

-Yes, I am.

0:26:550:26:58

-While I spend the rest of my money.

-You've done so well.

0:26:580:27:01

-I'll leave it ticking over for you, sir.

-Leave it ticking.

0:27:010:27:04

I've got profit to make.

0:27:040:27:06

HE GROANS

0:27:060:27:08

When's your coach getting here, sir? THEY LAUGH

0:27:080:27:12

Roscoe, you'll be fine.

0:27:120:27:14

Charlie, stop sulking.

0:27:140:27:16

While Thomas heads off, Charlie has a surprise in store.

0:27:160:27:20

Someone he knows from the antiques trade.

0:27:200:27:22

-Hello!

-It's you! How are you, Andy?

-Very well. Long time no see.

0:27:220:27:25

I didn't know you were here.

0:27:250:27:28

-Is this your establishment?

-It certainly is, yes.

0:27:280:27:30

We've finally come in off the road.

0:27:300:27:33

-Every time I see you, you're at a fair.

-That's right.

0:27:330:27:36

-I think I've spent money with you over the years.

-Once or twice.

0:27:360:27:39

-But not a lot!

-HE LAUGHS

0:27:390:27:41

-I've got a confession to make.

-You're skint?

0:27:410:27:43

This is what I've got left.

0:27:430:27:45

-HE GROANS

-£17.56.

0:27:480:27:53

I've got something that might interest you that's just come in.

0:27:530:27:57

-Unusual.

-You know I like a bit of unusual.

0:27:580:28:01

-Something very, very small.

-Is it delicate, Andy?

0:28:010:28:05

-No, it's not delicate.

-I wonder what it could be.

0:28:050:28:08

Before we find out, let's see where Thomas has got to.

0:28:090:28:13

He's heading through the beautiful Welsh countryside to his last shop

0:28:130:28:17

in Denbigh, handily called Denbighshire Antiques.

0:28:170:28:21

-Hello. Thomas.

-Nice to meet you.

-What's your name?

-Paul.

0:28:230:28:27

-You've got a lot here, haven't you?

-Yeah.

0:28:270:28:30

-I plan to spend a bit of money with you, if that's all right.

-Hope so.

0:28:300:28:33

Right. Are we going wild or playing sensible?

0:28:360:28:40

Roscoe wants me to buy furniture, cos it's quite expensive

0:28:400:28:43

and one could lose money on furniture.

0:28:430:28:45

So if I bought a bit of furniture, I think Roscoe would be dancing a jig.

0:28:450:28:50

Come on, Planter, get buying.

0:28:510:28:54

I've seen something I quite like.

0:28:540:28:56

This is a terracotta garden urn.

0:28:580:29:02

Obviously, it comes in bits. This lifts off, like that.

0:29:020:29:06

And that goes down like that. That's the base.

0:29:060:29:09

This is where the plant would go.

0:29:090:29:11

It should have been one of a pair, but look at these lovely petals here.

0:29:110:29:15

Probably 1920s.

0:29:150:29:17

What a thing for somebody's garden.

0:29:170:29:20

I don't know if it'll sell well, but it's got a chance.

0:29:200:29:23

Right time of year, I have to say. Right. Let's go and find Paul.

0:29:230:29:26

It has £110 on the ticket but let's face it, our Thomas can afford it.

0:29:260:29:32

I'm not a great expert in garden statuary.

0:29:320:29:34

-Is it something which you'd be prepared to do a deal on?

-Yeah.

0:29:340:29:39

-But not a million miles from where it is, to be honest.

-Oh, really?

0:29:390:29:43

-I see this at a figure.

-At?

-£70.

0:29:430:29:47

-I couldn't sell that at 70.

-What could you sell at?

0:29:470:29:50

-90 would be the money.

-Come on. What about 75?

0:29:500:29:54

Reluctantly, I'll take 80.

0:29:550:29:58

75. Cos you know I want to try and make a profit.

0:29:580:30:01

-I think you'll be making more of a profit than what I did.

-Oh, come on!

0:30:010:30:05

-You said this came to you well.

-It did.

0:30:050:30:07

-But I still feel you'd make more of a profit than what I did.

-Well...

0:30:070:30:10

75, and you've got a deal? You're a star. You're an absolute star.

0:30:100:30:13

I can't believe it!

0:30:130:30:15

Mr Cautious has finally splashed his cash. Well done!

0:30:150:30:20

Now, if you recall,

0:30:200:30:22

Andy was about to pick out something unusual for our Charlie.

0:30:220:30:25

-Have you still got your eyes closed?

-Yeah.

-There we are.

0:30:250:30:28

Open your eyes. Very, very unusual.

0:30:300:30:34

Isn't that wonderful?

0:30:340:30:37

It's a needle case.

0:30:370:30:39

-I would think round about... BOTH: 1920s.

-Spot on!

0:30:390:30:42

Looks like Thomas Plant. He has a hat, you know.

0:30:420:30:45

The needle case is made of celluloid, an early form of plastic,

0:30:450:30:49

that was often used instead of ivory because it was cheaper.

0:30:490:30:52

-We take that off and out comes the thread.

-Look at that!

0:30:520:30:57

-This isn't all, is it?

-This could be yours...

0:30:570:31:01

-Could it?

-..for a £10 note.

0:31:010:31:03

And you'd still have a fiver to spend.

0:31:030:31:06

-I'd still have £7.56 to spend.

-As much as that?

0:31:060:31:09

-Oh, Lord! Today is my lucky day!

-HE LAUGHS

0:31:090:31:11

-Thank you, Lord, for sending Andy! I shall have it, sir.

-Deal is set.

0:31:130:31:19

Never has shopping been made so easy. It's marvellous.

0:31:190:31:22

That went well, didn't it?

0:31:220:31:25

Can Andy help Charlie find anything for his remaining pennies?

0:31:250:31:28

-Where's your bargain basement bit? Do you have one?

-Not really.

0:31:280:31:32

I don't want an American nit comb! Do I need a nit comb?

0:31:320:31:37

-What about a stone gargoyley thingy?

-He's grotesque, isn't he?

0:31:370:31:43

-These things look quite cheap in here. £5 here and £6 there.

-Yes.

0:31:430:31:48

There's a pin cushion in the form of what looks like a pheasant, there.

0:31:480:31:52

There we go. A little pewter pin cushion.

0:31:540:31:58

Could we do this for seven quid?

0:31:580:32:01

I think you probably could cos it's priced up at four!

0:32:010:32:04

No, it's not, never!

0:32:040:32:05

That's the one with the broken leg.

0:32:050:32:08

The one without a broken leg hasn't got any price at all.

0:32:080:32:11

It's priceless, sir. I've got £7.56.

0:32:110:32:16

You've spent your money, sir.

0:32:160:32:18

That was the easiest shopping I've ever done in my life.

0:32:180:32:21

-Deal done, sir.

-Deal done, well, I'll give you my money.

0:32:220:32:25

That's a tenner for that, sir.

0:32:250:32:27

-And all I have in the world for this, sir.

-£7...

0:32:270:32:30

-56p.

-Jill, we'll be having egg and chips for tea tonight.

0:32:300:32:34

Yes, yes. And I won't be.

0:32:340:32:38

Ah, poor old Roscoe. So, with all our expert shopping done and dusted,

0:32:380:32:42

it's time to reconvene.

0:32:420:32:43

It's the moment to reveal all to each other, and Charlie's up first.

0:32:430:32:48

Oh, Roscoe!

0:32:480:32:51

Look at this!

0:32:510:32:53

You have bought a pair of Chinese carved

0:32:530:32:58

water buffalo with figures on.

0:32:580:33:01

Look at that. On the stands as well!

0:33:010:33:03

They could do £300.

0:33:030:33:05

-You could wipe me off...

-Thomas!

0:33:050:33:07

You could destroy me now! £100?

0:33:070:33:09

110 and he gave me £10 luck money back.

0:33:100:33:13

-So, £100? Those are really good.

-They're good, aren't they?

0:33:130:33:16

Oh, do I detect the green-eyed monster there, Thomas?

0:33:160:33:20

We saw that. How much was that?

0:33:200:33:22

-That was £25.

-Oh, Rosc! Profit, profit.

0:33:220:33:27

-And can I, what is this hideous ivorene...?

-Have a look at that.

0:33:270:33:31

-No, no, it's wonderful.

-Ah, and it comes off.

0:33:310:33:33

-It's a little necessaire.

-Oh, a little necessaire.

0:33:330:33:36

-Look.

-Oh, I love it!

0:33:360:33:38

That's divided them.

0:33:380:33:40

Excite me.

0:33:400:33:42

-CHARLIE SINGS

-# Dee-dee, dee-dee... #

0:33:420:33:43

-There we are.

-Oh, that's a good form.

-That's beautiful.

-That's a good form.

0:33:430:33:47

Good thing, isn't it? She's got a good look to her.

0:33:470:33:50

-May I handle her?

-Of course you can touch her.

0:33:500:33:52

Who's that modelled after?

0:33:520:33:54

I don't know. It's like a Lorenzl piece, yeah.

0:33:540:33:56

Has the foot been off?

0:33:560:33:58

It's got a crack on it, yeah, that's why it was only £60.

0:33:580:34:01

Are these spears or are they paddles?

0:34:010:34:04

(Paddles.) £35.

0:34:040:34:06

They don't look very old to me.

0:34:060:34:08

-I said they weren't, they're sort of 1920s.

-But they're fun.

0:34:080:34:11

That I love, the shape of that is fabulous. That's very good.

0:34:110:34:15

-Did you buy that for less than £100?

-Oh, yeah.

0:34:150:34:17

Oh, creepy, creepy boy.

0:34:170:34:21

-What was it, 75 notes?

-Exactly, £75!

-Yeah, but that's lovely.

0:34:210:34:25

And it's such a good saleable thing.

0:34:250:34:27

You did spend more than me, congratulations!

0:34:270:34:30

I told you I'd spend more than you!

0:34:300:34:31

All very cordial, but let's see what they really think.

0:34:310:34:35

I must say, this time, I'd rather have my lots than Thomas's.

0:34:350:34:38

There's a pair of water buffalo on Charlie's table

0:34:380:34:41

which are magnificent.

0:34:410:34:43

Very jealous. These could be the ones which he beats me with.

0:34:440:34:48

His figure after he thinks Lorenzl, Priest, whoever,

0:34:480:34:52

is nice, but that broken foot, I think, is relevant.

0:34:520:34:56

I can't stand that clown. I can't stand it.

0:34:560:34:59

I'd like to think I'm going to claw back 100 or so, and then

0:34:590:35:03

we'll be 2-2 going to the last one and that'll be quite exciting.

0:35:030:35:08

Thomas and Charlie kicked off this leg in Church Stretton, Shropshire,

0:35:080:35:12

then meandered back and forth over the English-Welsh border.

0:35:120:35:15

Now, they're returning to Shropshire

0:35:150:35:17

for an evening auction in Minsterley.

0:35:170:35:19

-Look at that, Roscoe!

-Oh, I feel like a condemned man already.

0:35:210:35:25

Oh, shut up! We've got the water buffalo, haven't we? Honestly!

0:35:250:35:30

Come on, get in!

0:35:300:35:31

The auction venue ce soir is Hendersons, a busy

0:35:310:35:35

and fast-growing family-run business owned by auctioneer Phil Griffiths.

0:35:350:35:40

So, what does he think of our experts' choices?

0:35:400:35:42

The terracotta garden urn is my favourite.

0:35:420:35:44

I think people are going to really like it.

0:35:440:35:47

Commercial, be nice to have a pair,

0:35:470:35:49

but, erm, yeah, I think, probably,

0:35:490:35:51

I can see that making 120 to 150.

0:35:510:35:54

The market in Chinese antiques at the moment is very good,

0:35:540:35:57

so I think probably they could be around 100 to 150.

0:35:570:36:01

Again, you know, they could even do a little bit better than that.

0:36:010:36:06

Charlie started this leg with £170.56,

0:36:060:36:10

and spent every single penny on five auction lots.

0:36:100:36:13

Thomas kicked off with £485.84,

0:36:140:36:19

and spent £203, also on five auction lots.

0:36:190:36:22

Now, where have those cheeky chappies got to?

0:36:230:36:27

Ay 'up!

0:36:270:36:28

I say, they look almost presentable.

0:36:280:36:30

What a good idea this was of yours!

0:36:320:36:34

Well, it's an evening auction, isn't it?

0:36:340:36:36

Are you modelling yourself on James Bond? You look dapper like Sean Connery.

0:36:360:36:39

"The name's Bond. Charlie Bond."

0:36:390:36:42

More like Basildon Bond!

0:36:420:36:44

Yeah, no time to waste.

0:36:440:36:46

The auction's about to begin,

0:36:460:36:47

and first up it's Charlie's cross-stitch panel.

0:36:470:36:51

What shall we say, £50-60? Start with 30. 30? 20. 20's bid.

0:36:510:36:56

-We've got 20, that's quite good for me.

-26? 28, 30 now.

-Oh!

0:36:560:37:02

All done at £30.

0:37:020:37:04

It's a well-needed profit for Charlie, albeit a small one.

0:37:040:37:08

How can I be excited? It's washed its face.

0:37:080:37:11

Thomas's deed box is up next.

0:37:110:37:13

What shall we say for it? 50 or 60?

0:37:130:37:14

-30, then. 30 is bid, 32, 35.

-Look at the lady in the front row.

0:37:140:37:19

Thomas, you're a genius! Look!

0:37:190:37:22

-50. At £50.

-She must be a Swallow.

0:37:220:37:24

-Thomas, I'm learning from a master.

-No further interest.

0:37:240:37:28

Are we all done with it at £50? Selling at 50, then.

0:37:280:37:31

An excellent profit for Thomas.

0:37:310:37:33

The boy can do no wrong.

0:37:330:37:35

-I actually am a bit in shock.

-It's phenomenal.

0:37:350:37:38

Don't be down-hearted, Charlie. It's the first of the two pheasants.

0:37:380:37:42

Now your pin-cushion.

0:37:420:37:44

-Starting with 10, 10 is bid. £10 bid. At 12, 14.

-Taking off!

0:37:440:37:48

£14 in the front row, at £14. Are we all done with this lot?

0:37:480:37:52

Selling, then, at 14.

0:37:520:37:54

Mr Auctioneer, you are the business!

0:37:540:37:57

An excellent profit, Charlie.

0:37:570:38:00

Seldom can a man have been so excited by £14.

0:38:000:38:03

It's Thomas's pheasant now. Will it fly as well?

0:38:030:38:07

Start me, 30? 30? 20, 20's bid.

0:38:070:38:10

-22. 25.

-I don't want to be greedy.

0:38:100:38:14

Those pheasants have done well, haven't they?

0:38:140:38:17

Another profit for Thomas.

0:38:170:38:18

Anyone for coffee?

0:38:190:38:21

-Start with £10, then.

-Ooh, 10!

0:38:210:38:24

10 is bid.

0:38:240:38:25

At £10 on the front row.

0:38:250:38:26

12, 14.

0:38:260:38:29

Come on, madam. Give the lady a nudge. Madam, cafe au lait!

0:38:290:38:32

-18, keep going, madam.

-Roscoe will give you a big kiss.

0:38:320:38:36

Go on, Roscoe will give you a kiss, there we are.

0:38:360:38:39

On the front row and selling at 22, all done.

0:38:390:38:42

Charlie's first loss,

0:38:440:38:45

especially after the auction house takes its commission.

0:38:450:38:48

Congratulations, madam, and thank you. From the bottom of my heart.

0:38:480:38:53

Now, will Thomas's paddles take him up the creek?

0:38:530:38:56

Starting with 30, 20, then. 20 is bid, 22, 25, 28.

0:38:560:39:00

At £30 in the doorway.

0:39:000:39:02

At £30, is there any further interest...?

0:39:020:39:04

-First loss of the day.

-£30. Are we all done at 30?

0:39:040:39:07

-That's your first loss of the day.

-It is, isn't it?

0:39:090:39:12

Yes, it is, but you're still winning by a country mile, Thomas.

0:39:120:39:15

My heart bleeds for you.

0:39:150:39:17

-It doesn't at all!

-It does, Thomas.

-Go away.

0:39:170:39:20

Charlie loved it, Thomas hated it.

0:39:210:39:23

What will the bidders think of the wee little needle case?

0:39:230:39:27

Start me at £10. 10 is bid, 12, 14, 16.

0:39:270:39:30

There's a man bidding round the corner going like the clappers!

0:39:300:39:34

-25.

-Look at that, Roscoe. 25.

0:39:340:39:36

30 now. 32. 34, 36.

0:39:360:39:40

-Thomas!

-Roscoe!

-You hated this, Thomas!

0:39:400:39:43

You're going to win, you're going to thrash me!

0:39:430:39:45

44.

0:39:450:39:47

46. At £46.

0:39:470:39:49

There is a God!

0:39:490:39:51

48. 50.

0:39:510:39:53

-I hate it!

-At £50, then.

0:39:530:39:55

-Is that all?

-I can't believe...!

0:39:550:39:58

A stonking profit for Charlie. There is hope yet.

0:39:580:40:02

-Put it there.

-It's renewed my faith in my, er...

0:40:020:40:05

I can't stand it! I can't stand it!

0:40:050:40:09

Thomas's garden urn is up next.

0:40:090:40:12

What will we say for this? I think perhaps £100 to start it.

0:40:120:40:14

50 to go, 50 is bid.

0:40:140:40:16

5, 60, 5, 70, 5, 80.

0:40:160:40:20

Getting better.

0:40:200:40:21

-90. At £90, 5.

-Oh, it's going well now.

0:40:210:40:24

-95.

-It's a good profit.

-Are we all done?

0:40:240:40:26

Sold, 95.

0:40:260:40:28

A tidy profit for Thomas.

0:40:280:40:30

-A working profit.

-Can't complain.

-No, better than not buying it.

0:40:300:40:35

Now it's Charlie's big hope.

0:40:350:40:37

He needs his water buffalo to make a large profit

0:40:370:40:40

to stand any chance of catching up with Thomas.

0:40:400:40:43

50 to go. 50 is bid.

0:40:430:40:45

5, 60, 5, 70, 5.

0:40:450:40:48

At £75. I've 80 now, 5.

0:40:480:40:53

At £85, 90, 5. 110.

0:40:530:40:58

110, 120.

0:40:580:41:00

At 130.

0:41:000:41:02

At 130, 140.

0:41:020:41:04

Getting there, getting there. We need a lot more than 140.

0:41:040:41:07

-Selling at 140.

-Oh, Roscoe, profit!

0:41:070:41:10

Oh, dear. It's a profit, but nowhere near what Charlie was hoping for.

0:41:100:41:15

I'm well chuffed.

0:41:150:41:17

I wanted £250 for those, Thomas.

0:41:170:41:20

Charlie's only chance is for Thomas to make a devastating loss

0:41:200:41:25

on the last lot of the day, his Art Deco figure.

0:41:250:41:28

-3,600.

-Start me at £100.

0:41:280:41:32

50 to go, 40 is bid. I have 45, 50. At £50 now.

0:41:320:41:38

The dealer, I know, is bidding for this.

0:41:380:41:41

70 now, 5. £80, 85 now, on the front row. 90 is bid.

0:41:410:41:46

That's 30 quid less 10, 15...

0:41:460:41:50

100, and 10.

0:41:500:41:52

Now you're going, now you're going.

0:41:520:41:53

-130.

-Good effort.

-130.

-Yes!

0:41:530:41:58

-Oh, God, Thomas! Thomas!

-That's a good profit.

0:41:580:42:01

Very sporting of you, Charlie. A resounding profit for Thomas.

0:42:010:42:05

-Well done, old bean.

-Well done.

0:42:050:42:07

Congratulations. We both made profits.

0:42:070:42:09

I think that's not bad, I think you've done jolly well.

0:42:090:42:12

I'm getting better. Another 15 legs, I'll have you.

0:42:120:42:15

So, Charlie started this leg with £170.56

0:42:170:42:20

and has made a profit of £39.36 after auction costs.

0:42:200:42:25

That leaves him with £209.92 to carry forward.

0:42:250:42:29

Thomas began this leg with £485.84 and made a slightly larger profit

0:42:310:42:36

of £67.60, meaning he beat Charlie yet again.

0:42:360:42:42

Our planter has £553.44 to spend on the last leg.

0:42:420:42:47

Phew!

0:42:470:42:49

Well done, Thomas. Where would Sir like to go this evening?

0:42:490:42:51

-Well, are you going to drive me?

-The casino?

-The casino!

0:42:510:42:55

Marvellous! Oh, well...

0:42:560:42:58

-You're back over that £200.

-Thank heaven for small mercies! It's dark!

0:42:590:43:04

-The night is yet young!

-Oh, stop talking in that way!

0:43:040:43:08

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip Thomas meets his match.

0:43:100:43:13

If you don't give me the money I'll show you the door.

0:43:130:43:16

And Charlie tries a new approach.

0:43:160:43:18

This is my lucky day!

0:43:180:43:20

Melt into my arms!

0:43:200:43:22

Thomas Plant and Charlie Ross start their journey in Church Stretton, Shropshire stopping at Welshpool, Oswestry and Wrexham before their auction in Minsterley.