Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 11

Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper start their Scottish road trip in Jedburgh, before travelling through Powburn and Alnwick towards an auction in Edinburgh.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes!

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-Sold, going, going, gone.

-The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction,

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-but it's no mean feat.

-Oh!

-50p!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Are they papier-mache buttocks?

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Ooh! Oh!

-There we go.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to the start of a brand-new road trip, featuring Margie Cooper,

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Charlie Ross and several reasons to be cheerful.

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-Driving along in my mother country...

-One of us is!

-..of Scotland,

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with a young girl, a sexy car. I think all my dreams have come true.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Charming Charlie from Oxfordshire is an auctioneering legend,

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with a fondness for all things Georgian and the misguided belief

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that he can get a tune out of any musical instrument.

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TUNELESS PARP

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Good sound!

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Really? Margie is a Lancashire lass with antiques in her blood.

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Her granny was a dealer, too, before her

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and she brings a no-nonsense approach to the competition.

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That would be handy for somebody, wouldn't it?

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Give Charlie Ross one of these across his bottom.

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Prepare for whacks, Charlie. But not just yet,

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because with £200 each and a gorgeous 1961 Sunbeam Rapier,

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it looks like these two are in for quite a week.

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-Now it's a pretty special day, today.

-Yes.

-Do you know why?

-Go on.

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-It's my birthday.

-Oh, my... If we weren't travelling, I'd give you a kiss.

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Oh! I think, actually, if I slow down...

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-Aw.

-Ah, who said romance is dead?

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Charlie and Margie set out from Jedburgh, in the Borders,

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before travelling the length and breadth of Scotland

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to reach journey's end at Hamilton, South Lanarkshire.

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Today, they start in Jedburgh, head out towards the North Sea coastline

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and then conclude at an auction in Edinburgh.

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This pretty market town

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is just ten miles from England

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and that's had quite a bearing

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on Jedburgh's history.

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One notable former resident

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was Mary, Queen of Scots.

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The town's motto is, "Earnestly and Successfully",

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so there's no excuse for our two not to strive for bargains here.

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-Do not come in my shop!

-I'm not coming in your shop, goodbye!

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-May you buy well.

-See you later.

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But not too well!

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Right, is anybody here?

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Hello? I'm just going to have a look around, is that all right?

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Oak Tree Antiques is a mixture of genuine antiques,

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reproductions and the odd vintage item.

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Oh, my goodness me!

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Are they papier-mache buttocks?

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Cheeky! But one little complication is that shop-owner Michelle

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is a bit shy, so Margie will have to talk to her daughter Amy.

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Oh, that's gorgeous. Look at that. Isn't that absolutely lovely?

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Gorgeous snuff box.

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Well, It's £250 and I've only got £200.

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I couldn't possibly buy that on the first day of my buying trip.

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That's right up my street, but it's too much money for me.

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Are you allowed to drop the price?

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-Does your mother allow you to...

-Yeah...

-..do me a deal? What sort of deals do you do?

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-MARGIE LAUGHS

-I haven't a clue. I'm no good at this, I'm sorry.

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Oh, I'll tell you! It's £250. How about £50?

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-Behave, Margie!

-I'm only pulling your leg.

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These two can get to know each other better,

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whilst we see where Charlie's got to.

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-Hello.

-Hello, there.

-Good morning, I'm Charlie.

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-My name's Merry.

-Merry! Merry by nature?

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-Ha-ha. Sometimes.

-I hope so.

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I'll bet she's never heard that one before.

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And, anyway, Charlie's merry enough for three.

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£6 for a farthing, that's inflation.

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There's plenty to ponder at Bygones,

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including some very nice paintings,

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although those may be a little too pricey.

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Ooh, that's rather...that's splendidly Scottish, isn't it?

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Which is that, oh, the brooch?

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-No. I think it's a pickle fork, isn't it?

-Oh, right.

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Yes, it's lovely. There we are.

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Well, that couldn't be more Scottish, could it, with the thistle?

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Oh, it is silver, yeah. Birmingham. Isn't that a splendid...object?

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Marvellous. Does that say £30?

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Get your jar of pickles and...

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-eat your pickles. Do you like pickles?

-Yes, I do.

-So do I!

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-You haven't got any, have you?

-No.

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Oh, I could have had a free pickle with every fork.

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Nice thing. Well, I'll ask the question,

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you can only say yes or no.

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Could you take £20 for it?

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-Umm...yes.

-If you...

-Yes, I could take £20 for it.

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What an amazingly pliable girl.

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-I can't think of any reason why I shouldn't buy it.

-OK.

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-May I buy it for £20?

-You certainly can.

-That's the quickest buy I've ever made.

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I've walked through the door, met you, seen it, loved it, bought it.

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That's the way all buying should be.

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I bet old Margie's looking at something,

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thinking, oh, I don't know whether I should. Should I buy it? Should I not? Oh.

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Well, funny you should say that, Charlie...

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Well, it's not going well, is it?

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I think my bottom lip's going to have to come out now.

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Sounds like the "talk to Amy as she talks to her mum" plan

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isn't proving a great success.

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I think I'd much rather talk to the person.

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She has spotted this brass standard lamp, though,

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and also a little Edwardian duplicating set.

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-So, come along, Margie.

-Now what you know about this...

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-old duplicating machine?

-I have not got a clue. I don't know anything.

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It looks very complete. 80-90 years old.

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Yeah, probably.

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And, oh, look, Gestetner. I remember Gestetners.

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I remember, as a secretary, the Gestetners where you...

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it was like a drum. And you typed on this sort of plasticky stuff

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-and it came out.

-And you got fingers like that there.

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Brings it all back, eh?

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The Hungarian inventor of the duplicating machine

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established the Gestetner Cyclograph Company

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in North London, at the start of the 20th century.

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His patents transformed the modern office

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by reproducing copies of documents, quickly and inexpensively.

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-Well, how much is that then? £10?

-£15.

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I think Amy's getting the hang of this.

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-I quite like that. What did you say, £15?

-Yeah.

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Well, maybe if I find something else and we do a little parcel, or something.

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Why not add the lamp, then? Ticket price, £95.

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Yeah...hmm...

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Yeah, it's a nice item.

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Loaded at the...extend...ooh!

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it has that extending baton, which is nice.

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Uh, converted to electricity. Ha-ha.

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Converted to electricity!

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Great expert! Oil went in there.

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It must have been terribly smelly, can you imagine?

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OK, Margie. I think Amy's ready.

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Well, I'm buying the old duplicating set.

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So can we do the two together? A bit cheap? Can we do £50 for the two?

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Go on, £50.

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-Ah, you see, Amy's coming round. So we've got the two for £50.

-Yes.

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-Fine, thank you very much, Amy.

-Thank you.

-A deal.

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Well, I think they both did awfully well.

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Meanwhile, elsewhere in Jedburgh, Charlie's back in that cabinet.

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Nice little things in here.

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-You've got a gold chain there but I don't know...

-Mm-hmm.

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-I don't suppose you know what it weighs?

-It weighs about 8g.

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8g, fantastic value, isn't it? To be able to get a gold chain for £50.

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You wouldn't buy that in Bond Street for 50 quid, would you?

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It does sound like a good deal.

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Maybe later because Merry's also got a good little snuffbox. Price, £30.

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-There we are.

-Thank you. 19th-century papier-mache.

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-Yes.

-And quite collectable.

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-The first half of the 19th century, I think, isn't it?

-I don't know.

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Yeah, I would think that's 1830-1840, probably.

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I'm sure that is tortoiseshell under there, isn't it? It's so difficult,

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running a thumb over it, whether it's actually tortoiseshell

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that's inset in there, or whether it's a piece of simulated,

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a bit like some sort of early plastic.

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It's what they called faux-tortoiseshell.

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But it's like Bakelite.

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If it is real tortoiseshell, it's legal to trade

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under the CITES Agreement, as it was made before 1947.

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If I could buy something like that, it would have to be, sort of, 15 quid.

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I think it would make £20-£24 at auction.

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-Well...

-What do you think?

-..I think, as it's you.

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-Oh, as it's me!

-Uh, yes, I'll say yes.

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-Does it show you a profit?

-It will do, yes.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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If it shows you a profit, then I'm happy.

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Well, that means I've bought two objects and spent only £35.

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-Well done.

-Well, it's better than nothing, isn't it?

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But as he takes his leave, he's thinking more about the item he didn't buy, it seems.

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What about that gold chain? Did she say it was nearly 8g?

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I think it is actually £11 or £12 a gram, at the moment.

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Eight elevens are £88. Less the commission, £70

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and she wants £50.

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Hold on, I'll ask her.

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I may have made a boo-boo here.

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-Merry?

-Oh! Hello!

-I didn't get far outside.

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Did you say you'd weighed that gold chain?

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-I had, yes.

-Where are the scales?

-There we are.

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7.9...is that grams?

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Yep. It's a take it or leave it price, isn't it?

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It would be too cheeky to ask if there was trade price, wouldn't it?

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I think so.

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-I'm going to have it, please.

-OK.

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HE SINGS A good job I didn't go down the street too far.

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When have I ever gone into a shop and paid the asking price?

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Now.

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At £50, Charlie may have well have got a bargain.

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And I think he really is off...this time.

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Now Margie's moved on too,

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making her way from Jedburgh across the border to the town of Powburn.

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It's a large antique centre so there's sure to be plenty of choice.

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This is a sweet little child's rocker. Isn't that cute?

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But could there be a little too much choice?

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Luckily, Beryl is on hand to help.

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Which is your bit?

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Well, I've got little bits all over the place.

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Oh yeah?! I think those Prattware mugs are Beryl's, £110 the pair.

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-Yeah, it's nice.

-That one's damaged, but that one's good.

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So you've just bought this?

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Well, I haven't bought them, I've just brought it down here

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because it was a nice piece.

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-It's a nice thing, isn't it?

-Lovely condition.

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Don't often do porcelain but I must say, I quite like that.

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And this is how badly cracked?

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Just got a crack down the...

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-Just there, it's quite bad though.

-Yes.

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Probably what...middle 19th century?

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Lovely decoration on the front.

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Prattware is...popular and collectable.

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How much would the two be?

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If you wanted to buy the one, I could throw the other one in for you.

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You'd throw that in? Right, OK.

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I'd do them both for 80. I think it's a good buy.

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-But it's a big chunk of my money.

-Is it?

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How much would the broken one be? You don't want to be stuck...

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I was going to give it you with the other one.

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What about 60 for the two?

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-I don't think you can...

-Go wrong.

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..go wrong there. Bargain of the day.

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I'll put them in the office.

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Bit of a gem, our Beryl.

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You put them on your desk and I'll spend a little bit longer.

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-Yes.

-And that's very kind of you.

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Meanwhile, Charlie seems to have found his way to Margie's old stomping ground.

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-Hello.

-Is it Amy?

-Yeah.

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-Have you had Margie with you?

-Yes, I have.

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-May I have a quick look round?

-Yeah, no problem.

-Thank you.

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I'm sure he'll find that Margie has left him plenty to ponder.

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Beware though, Charlie,

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because Amy's starting to get the hang of this dealing lark.

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-Look at that! Do you know how old that is? Have a guess.

-I don't know.

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-You don't know?

-No.

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Well, I can tell you it's about 1820.

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That's even older than I am. It's mahogany...

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-Brass handles with wonderful... can you see those lion masks?

-Yeah.

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Aren't they fab? Absolutely brilliant.

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And I think they're probably original handles.

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In fact, I'm certain they're original handles.

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And the linings of the drawers...

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..are cedar, I think.

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I don't think they're oak. No, I think it's cedar lining,

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which is rather lovely.

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How much is it? 110...Hmm.

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-Nice label.

-I would buy that chest of drawers at a price.

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Well, go on then, buy it, Charlie.

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Are you here to negotiate? Have you got permission to negotiate here?

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-Yes.

-Who owns the shop?

-My mum.

-Your mum?

-Yes.

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What would you do, run off to mum with a price, if I offer you one?

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-It would be very cheeky.

-What would you offer?

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May I try and offer a cheeky price?

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You can show me the door and you can ask mum to come and chase me

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with a frying pan if she doesn't think it's fair.

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-50 quid.

-I'll do 60.

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Quick work, Amy.

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What?! Without speaking to Mum?

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He wasn't expecting that.

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Blimey, that's knocked me backwards a bit.

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What would Mum say if we met halfway at 55...

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I'll ask her.

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-Could you ask her?

-Yeah.

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Tell her I'm not being rude,

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I'm just trying to buy it to sell it at auction.

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-If it's no good, it's no good.

-That's fine, 55.

-What?!

-55.

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Have you got Mum...she's sort of... oh, she's lurking in the background.

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-Thank you, Mum. Are you happy with 55?

-Yes.

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That's fab, that's half price.

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Amy's certainly learned a thing or two today

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and Charlie now has four lots for a total of £140.

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Margie's got her mugs reserved,

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but now she's been tempted by another of Beryl's goodies...a footstool.

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That is nice. Late Victorian, it's very nice.

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And that's in good nick.

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-Yeah. What have I got on it?

-You've got...

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-55. The embroidery's nice on it.

-Yeah.

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If you wanted to spend some money, I could do that one for 30.

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Almost half price.

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It is, it's very nice, that. I like that very much.

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You haven't got a pair anywhere?

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I'll go and whittle you one up.

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-Pairs of footstools do really well.

-Yeah.

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Time for a dither.

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-So I buy the two Prattware mugs that were what?

-60.

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And I'll buy that for?

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30.

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That's the absolute end of this conversation.

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LAUGHTER

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Oh God, do you want blood?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah, I know.

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But if you could ease it a bit, we'll shake hands.

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What if I say 80? I couldn't go any more.

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You're having that for free.

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Right, thank you very much.

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Thank you.

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But while Margie's been bargaining with Beryl...

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Charlie's grabbed the Rapier and moved on.

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All right, viewers? Steady on.

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Travelling from Jedburgh via Powburn to Alnwick.

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In a very good mood too...

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Even by his standards.

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I would like to put it on record now,

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just how much I'm in love with Margie.

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She is attractive.

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She's fun.

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She must be hugely intelligent because she laughs at my jokes.

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Charlie's come to Alnwick, just around the corner

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from its famous castle to see a unique garden.

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Capability Brown built the first garden on this site

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for the Duke of Northumberland, back in 1750.

0:16:030:16:07

But it fell into disrepair until just a few years ago,

0:16:070:16:10

a new one was planned.

0:16:100:16:12

Regular viewers may feel they've been here before,

0:16:130:16:17

but Charlie's come to learn about the lethal side of horticulture.

0:16:170:16:20

-Trevor. Charlie.

-Welcome to the Poison Garden.

0:16:220:16:25

I'm a bit worried when you say that.

0:16:250:16:27

Especially when you see the coffin.

0:16:270:16:29

Has anybody ever ended up in the coffin?

0:16:290:16:31

Not that I'm aware of, but you never know, there's always a first time.

0:16:310:16:34

Is everything in here poisonous?

0:16:340:16:36

Everything in this part of the garden is very poisonous,

0:16:360:16:38

so watch you don't touch anything or stand too close to anything, because you never know.

0:16:380:16:42

-Are you being serious?

-He most certainly is.

0:16:420:16:44

Everyone who works here wears gloves and not surprisingly,

0:16:440:16:47

children love the place.

0:16:470:16:50

The gardens were started by the Duchess of Northumberland?

0:16:500:16:52

She wanted to create a quirky, modern, contemporary garden.

0:16:520:16:56

And so she had a fascination with poisonous plants and death.

0:16:560:17:00

Goodness.

0:17:000:17:02

Well, it takes all sorts and it's certainly educational to

0:17:020:17:05

discover just how many common plants can be very, very deadly.

0:17:050:17:09

I can remember foxgloves. I think there were some in my mother's garden.

0:17:090:17:12

That's right, very, very common cottage garden plants, really.

0:17:120:17:15

But the whole plant is deadly poisonous.

0:17:150:17:18

It does have a good side because the large

0:17:180:17:20

leaves are used for treating people that have had heart attacks.

0:17:200:17:24

They make a drug from it, but if you take too much, you can

0:17:240:17:27

-kill people very, very easily. Even things like Rosemary...

-Rosemary?!

0:17:270:17:31

I eat it.

0:17:310:17:33

Rosemary and lamb go very well together and yet in mediaeval times

0:17:330:17:36

-especially, pregnant women used to eat lots of rosemary to abort...

-Really?!

0:17:360:17:41

Even today, pregnant women are warned not to eat a lot of rosemary.

0:17:410:17:45

Other plants in the garden are less likely to be confused with anything

0:17:450:17:49

remotely tasty or healthy like nux vomica, or strychnine.

0:17:490:17:56

And Ricinus communis with its bright red flowers,

0:17:560:17:59

which only requires a dose the size of a few grains of salt

0:17:590:18:02

to kill an adult human.

0:18:020:18:03

Is there any antidote to it?

0:18:030:18:04

-There's not that I'm aware of.

-That's it?

-That it, yes.

0:18:040:18:07

-How frightening.

-But a very attractive plant.

-Lovely.

0:18:070:18:10

Often called the castor oil plant.

0:18:100:18:12

But castor oil doesn't come from it?

0:18:120:18:13

No way.

0:18:130:18:15

It was ricin in the tip of an umbrella that killed

0:18:150:18:19

Bulgarian dissident, Georgi Markov, on Waterloo Bridge.

0:18:190:18:23

And elsewhere at Alnwick, they have aconitum,

0:18:230:18:26

a.k.a. wolfsbane, monkshood and the queen of poisons.

0:18:260:18:31

A notorious killer since the days of the ancient Greeks.

0:18:310:18:34

Recently, about three years ago, there was a case where

0:18:340:18:37

a young lady decided she wanted to get rid of her ex-lover

0:18:370:18:41

so she broke into his house and took the seeds of this

0:18:410:18:44

and dropped the seeds into his curry, which was in the fridge.

0:18:440:18:48

When he and his new girlfriend came home, they sat down to eat dinner

0:18:480:18:51

and unfortunately he didn't survive.

0:18:510:18:53

Can you buy a plant like that in a garden centre?

0:18:530:18:55

You can go along to any garden centre this time of the year and buy this plant, yes.

0:18:550:18:59

-Do they sell them with a health warning?

-No.

0:18:590:19:01

-Do they not?!

-No.

0:19:010:19:03

But not everything growing in this section of the garden is

0:19:070:19:10

likely to cause such gruesome results.

0:19:100:19:13

They take a keen interest in the mood-altering side of plants also.

0:19:130:19:17

And that pagoda-looking cage, is that cannabis?

0:19:170:19:22

That is cannabis, yes.

0:19:220:19:23

-We have a licence from the Home Office to grow cannabis.

-Do you?

0:19:230:19:26

But we use it as an educational tool, obviously!

0:19:260:19:28

I'm sure you do, I'm sure you do, Trevor.

0:19:280:19:31

We have a more interesting plant here.

0:19:310:19:33

This is datura, often called the angel's trumpet because these pods

0:19:330:19:38

will open up into great big white trumpet-shaped flowers.

0:19:380:19:42

And these were very popular in Victorian times where

0:19:420:19:45

Victorian ladies would have them growing on their tea tables,

0:19:450:19:48

invite their Victorian lady friends to come round for tea

0:19:480:19:51

and just tap a little bit of pollen into the teapot and serve tea.

0:19:510:19:54

And those ladies then used to loosen up slightly

0:19:540:19:57

and tell more intimate secrets about their life.

0:19:570:19:59

LAUGHTER

0:19:590:20:01

-And it's called what?

-Datura.

-Datura.

0:20:010:20:03

Could you spell that for me?

0:20:030:20:05

So, anyone receiving an invitation to tea at Charlie's house

0:20:050:20:08

in future, had better look out for unusual flower arrangements.

0:20:080:20:12

Come on, Charlie, stop messing about.

0:20:120:20:15

Charlie?

0:20:150:20:16

I'm sure he'll make a full recovery.

0:20:190:20:21

Yay! All clear, matron.

0:20:230:20:25

Night-night.

0:20:250:20:27

Next morning, surprise surprise, Charlie's flirting again.

0:20:320:20:36

I don't care what happens at the auction.

0:20:360:20:38

I just want you to drive me around Scotland for the rest of my life.

0:20:380:20:41

GEARS CRUNCH

0:20:410:20:42

Good lord - that's reverse, by the way.

0:20:420:20:44

Oh, Lordy.

0:20:440:20:46

Margie set off in overdrive yesterday,

0:20:460:20:48

splashing out £130 on a standard lamp, a duplicating set,

0:20:480:20:52

some Prattware mugs and a footstool, as you do.

0:20:520:20:55

-Do you want blood?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:20:550:20:57

Leaving her with £70 to spend today while Charlie went even further

0:20:570:21:02

and faster, weighing in with £140 for the gold chain...

0:21:020:21:05

Da-da-da-da-da-da-da...

0:21:050:21:07

..a snuffbox,

0:21:070:21:09

a thistle pickle fork and a Georgian chest of drawers.

0:21:090:21:12

Thank you, Mum!

0:21:120:21:14

Leaving just £60 in his wallet.

0:21:140:21:17

Later they'll be making for the auction in Edinburgh,

0:21:170:21:19

but our first stop is still in England.

0:21:190:21:22

The village of Ford.

0:21:220:21:24

Bubbly, anyone?

0:21:270:21:28

Champagne bar, it says.

0:21:280:21:29

-Hey!

-See you later.

0:21:290:21:33

And you drive carefully.

0:21:330:21:36

Bye!

0:21:360:21:37

I'll be drunk when you see me.

0:21:370:21:39

How exactly is she going to tell the difference, Charlie?

0:21:410:21:45

-Morning.

-Good morning, Charlie.

0:21:470:21:49

-Is it Keith?

-It is, Keith.

0:21:490:21:51

Thank you very much for having us along today.

0:21:510:21:53

-What a wonderful part of the world.

-Isn't it?

0:21:530:21:56

We've got the most amazing views here as well, and there they are.

0:21:560:21:58

-That's looking out onto the Cheviots.

-Splendid.

0:21:580:22:01

Well, I'm going to have a look round, if I may?

0:22:010:22:03

And I'll give you a call if there's something I can't resist.

0:22:030:22:06

I think Charlie's really going to like the old dairy.

0:22:060:22:08

But will it warm to him?

0:22:100:22:12

Because let's face it, with only £60 left in his pocket,

0:22:120:22:15

he's hardly a rich man.

0:22:150:22:16

How Art Nouveau is that?

0:22:190:22:21

Aneroid barometer, in an oak case.

0:22:210:22:25

I thought it said 195.

0:22:280:22:31

It says 795.

0:22:310:22:33

That's a fabulous thing.

0:22:330:22:35

But it's not in my price range.

0:22:360:22:38

Euphemistically put.

0:22:380:22:40

But I'm sure he can come up with something that will get

0:22:400:22:42

noticed that the auction.

0:22:420:22:45

IN A SCOTTISH ACCENT: Berwick Rangers, 4. Rest of the World, 0.

0:22:450:22:50

Noticed, Charlie, not thumped.

0:22:500:22:52

Arts And Crafts candlesticks.

0:22:520:22:54

I thought they were brand-new, but they've got some age.

0:22:540:22:57

And aren't they stylish?

0:22:570:22:59

And with a ticket price of £38, they are certainly affordable.

0:22:590:23:04

Are they from 1910, 1920?

0:23:040:23:07

Don't think they're earlier than that.

0:23:070:23:10

Made of mahogany, but they've got this wonderful twisted stem

0:23:100:23:13

to them which I think is delightful.

0:23:130:23:16

And they're practical things.

0:23:160:23:18

The great thing about something like this is somebody can

0:23:180:23:20

look at them, love them, but use them.

0:23:200:23:22

They'd be great on a mahogany dining table with candles in them.

0:23:220:23:25

Little candlelit supper.

0:23:250:23:27

Me and Margie and a pair of Art Nouveau candlesticks.

0:23:270:23:31

Luurv. I feel lurrv coming on.

0:23:310:23:34

Let's not get carried away, shall we, Charlie?

0:23:340:23:37

Better have a word with Keith first.

0:23:370:23:39

Those I would buy at a price...

0:23:390:23:41

Well, we usually say 10%. But go on, make me an offer,

0:23:410:23:47

see what we can do.

0:23:470:23:48

-I'd like to pay £25 for them.

-Hmm.

0:23:480:23:51

Probably a bit mean,

0:23:510:23:52

but I think they'll probably make between 30 and 40 quid at auction.

0:23:520:23:56

-Yeah.

-And that would give me a chance.

0:23:560:23:59

Could I tweak you up a little bit?

0:23:590:24:01

Could I get you up another couple of pounds, say 28,

0:24:010:24:05

so we are taking £10 off for you?

0:24:050:24:08

I think that's extremely fair.

0:24:080:24:10

£28 I think... what can you buy at £28 these days?

0:24:100:24:15

-A wonderful pair of candlesticks. I'm going to have those.

-Good.

0:24:150:24:19

And thank you, very much indeed.

0:24:190:24:21

That was all very convivial, wasn't it?

0:24:210:24:23

And straightaway, Charlie's spotted something else.

0:24:230:24:26

I think that is so stylish.

0:24:260:24:28

Art Nouveau, it's such a stylish Art Nouveau jug.

0:24:280:24:31

I think it's really charming. But it's got no price on it.

0:24:310:24:35

If it was ever so cheap, I would buy it.

0:24:350:24:37

Time for the dealer to be consulted.

0:24:370:24:40

I'd be intrigued to find out is who JS&S are.

0:24:400:24:43

Well, Joseph Sankey and Sons of Bilston in the Black Country...actually.

0:24:430:24:48

For the purposes of auction, I've got five lots.

0:24:480:24:52

I would have to put them with the candlesticks.

0:24:520:24:54

I don't think that's too bad, they both have an Art Nouveau influence.

0:24:540:24:57

This is pure Art Nouveau. Those are more Arts And Crafts movement.

0:24:570:25:01

How does £10 sound?

0:25:010:25:04

I couldn't really resist that, could I?

0:25:040:25:08

There's not a lot of downside, is there? Tenner!

0:25:080:25:10

Right.

0:25:100:25:12

Deal.

0:25:130:25:15

But while Charlie's been completing his collection,

0:25:150:25:17

Margie's made for the North Sea coast.

0:25:170:25:20

Motoring over from Ford to Bamburgh.

0:25:210:25:25

This is the birthplace of Grace Darling, the lighthouse

0:25:250:25:28

keeper's daughter whose remarkable act of bravery saved nine lives.

0:25:280:25:32

In the Bamburgh churchyard there's an elaborate cenotaph

0:25:340:25:37

carved from Northumberland stone,

0:25:370:25:40

which was built to honour their Victorian heroine.

0:25:400:25:42

It all happened in the early hours of 7th September 1838,

0:25:450:25:48

when Grace and her father William

0:25:480:25:50

set out from the Longstone lighthouse in a violent storm

0:25:500:25:55

to rescue survivors of the SS Forfarshire from the rocks it had foundered upon.

0:25:550:26:01

100 years later, a museum was opened in Bamburgh

0:26:040:26:07

to commemorate the events of that incredible night.

0:26:070:26:10

And Margie's here to learn more about Grace's story.

0:26:100:26:13

-Good morning, Virginia.

-Good morning.

0:26:130:26:16

I've been really looking forward to this visit.

0:26:160:26:18

-Well, it's lovely to see you and this is Grace.

-This is Grace.

0:26:180:26:21

Grace Darling, what a fabulous name.

0:26:210:26:23

After the rescue, it seemed that everyone

0:26:230:26:25

wanted to know about Grace and artists clamoured to paint

0:26:250:26:29

her picture while poets and playwrights extolled her heroism.

0:26:290:26:33

-She was a pop star?

-Very much.

0:26:330:26:35

She was the pinup of her day.

0:26:350:26:37

She had offers of marriage from people who had never met her.

0:26:370:26:41

And she really did become the darling of everybody's heart.

0:26:410:26:46

Shy Grace shrank from all that attention, much of which was

0:26:460:26:50

due to her father's even more heroic actions that night.

0:26:500:26:54

Her celebrity still became an industry,

0:26:540:26:56

with the family coble boat a key exhibit.

0:26:560:27:00

# Grace Darling...

0:27:000:27:02

# All the way. #

0:27:020:27:04

And here we have Grace's coble.

0:27:040:27:06

The coble.

0:27:060:27:07

Just a phenomenal boat.

0:27:070:27:09

You can see how large it is for one girl.

0:27:090:27:12

I imagined it to be smaller. How could she row that?

0:27:120:27:15

Well, she would have had a lot of strength

0:27:150:27:17

-and an awful lot of adrenaline going through.

-5'2"?

0:27:170:27:19

5'2", yes. Not much to her.

0:27:190:27:22

-Are those the original oars, Virginia?

-Yes, they are.

0:27:220:27:24

And we would also have the mast, but that has disappeared somewhere.

0:27:240:27:29

One of Grace's relatives started selling off pieces of oar,

0:27:290:27:33

so we don't have all the original oars.

0:27:330:27:35

But also we think the mast went the same sort of way.

0:27:350:27:38

People would collect just about anything Grace had owned or

0:27:380:27:42

touched, as a keepsake to treasure.

0:27:420:27:44

Grace was asked by just about anybody

0:27:440:27:47

and everybody for little bits of her, literally.

0:27:470:27:50

So a scrap of hair, a piece of the dress she wore,

0:27:500:27:53

so we've got two examples here.

0:27:530:27:55

Of course, when people received these, and Grace almost never said no,

0:27:550:27:58

people would have framed them up, put them proudly on display

0:27:580:28:02

and say, "I have a bit of Grace Darling". This is fabulous.

0:28:020:28:05

The Duke of Northumberland became Grace's patron and he gave

0:28:050:28:10

her a variety of different gifts, including this book.

0:28:100:28:12

The Notes In The Study of Holy Scriptures.

0:28:120:28:16

Grace was brought up very much as a Christian girl.

0:28:160:28:19

-She would have been really interested in this.

-She'd never have owned that, would she?

0:28:190:28:23

She would never have owned that without the rescue, no.

0:28:230:28:25

-And finally...

-Look at that.

-..Grace Darling chocolates.

0:28:250:28:28

I love this object because it tells us

0:28:280:28:30

-so much about the way Grace is seen today.

-Look at that lovely picture.

0:28:300:28:34

Don't you think it's lovely? Have you noticed the colour of her hair?

0:28:340:28:38

-And the colour of her eyes?

-Yes.

0:28:380:28:40

Well, she's suddenly gone blonde and white.

0:28:400:28:42

-Making her into a bit of a glamour girl.

-Well, quite.

0:28:420:28:45

Sadly, Grace was to die from TB just four years later, at the age of 26.

0:28:470:28:53

But she was the first woman to be awarded a silver medal

0:28:540:28:57

by the fledgling RNLI.

0:28:570:29:00

And the museum provides a link between what Grace

0:29:000:29:03

and her father achieved and the bravery of volunteers today.

0:29:030:29:07

We've got so many volunteer crew doing so many wonderful things,

0:29:070:29:10

day in, day out, and modern-day Graces.

0:29:100:29:13

-I bet you didn't know 8% of our crews are girls these days.

-Really?

0:29:130:29:16

# Grace Darling all the way. #

0:29:160:29:20

Now, remember how Charlie completed his shopping a little earlier?

0:29:220:29:26

So, whilst his co-driver has been exploring Bamburgh,

0:29:260:29:30

he's headed for the coast,

0:29:300:29:32

journeying from Ford

0:29:320:29:34

back into Scotland and Coldingham.

0:29:340:29:36

There's a very fine ruined monastery just outside the village,

0:29:400:29:44

bits of which the date from 660.

0:29:440:29:47

That Charlie has another bit of Coldingham in mind. The beach.

0:29:470:29:51

Oh, Lord, here goes.

0:29:510:29:52

Margie, I've finished my shopping. Do you fancy joining a hunk for a dip?

0:29:560:30:02

Unfortunately for Charlie,

0:30:060:30:07

the surf most definitely isn't up today.

0:30:070:30:11

At least he won't be troubling the Coast Guard. Go on, up you go!

0:30:110:30:14

Oh, dear. Elsewhere in the village, Margie still has a bit of shopping.

0:30:160:30:21

-Hello, I'm Jane.

-Margie.

-If you need any help, just ask.

0:30:230:30:26

Thank you very much indeed.

0:30:260:30:27

That's sounded full of promise, didn't it?

0:30:270:30:30

-Well, things haven't exactly turned out that way.

-Nice silvery bits.

0:30:300:30:34

-Well, they are silver plate. We never have real silver.

-Right.

0:30:340:30:39

-And there's a couple of bureaus there.

-Bureaus?

0:30:390:30:42

Yes, I'm a bit off furniture at the moment.

0:30:420:30:47

-This is a nice jug. But it's got a crack in it, hasn't it?

-Lordy.

0:30:470:30:51

And there's also that ship sign which is rather nice,

0:30:510:30:54

-but whether that's antique or not, I don't know.

-No, it's not.

0:30:540:30:57

It came off a pub.

0:30:570:30:59

I tell you what, Jane, you get 10 out of 10 for effort.

0:30:590:31:02

-Patience, too, I'd say.

-Nowhere near for me. Am I being fussy, or what?

0:31:030:31:09

Just buy something, Margie.

0:31:090:31:11

You've got lots of jugs and things, haven't you?

0:31:110:31:14

A real porcelain person, aren't you?

0:31:140:31:16

-What about this Highlander?

-Oh, yes.

0:31:160:31:19

-Again, he might be a reproduction.

-Yes, I think he probably is.

0:31:190:31:23

The price is £20.

0:31:230:31:25

It's quite a nice thing cos the colour's good on it.

0:31:250:31:28

Well, Charlie bagged something with a Scottish theme yesterday.

0:31:280:31:31

He's got a big chunk off his hat. Oh, dear, his feather's come off!

0:31:310:31:34

-It has, yes.

-Could that be an absolute knockdown?

0:31:340:31:38

-So I don't leave with nothing.

-Yes.

0:31:380:31:41

-Yes.

-What are you looking for?

0:31:410:31:44

-It's got to be five quid.

-OK.

-OK. We've bought.

-We'll do that.

0:31:470:31:51

-We've bought.

-Phew!

0:31:530:31:55

With that struggle safely over,

0:31:550:31:57

it's now time to take a look at what they bought.

0:31:570:31:59

-Happy with your purchases?

-Some and some. How was it for you?

-Not bad.

0:31:590:32:04

-Let's start.

-Oh, start, good grief! What have you got there?

0:32:040:32:08

You've got a brass standard lamp.

0:32:080:32:10

-With a nice big...

-I like the bulb.

-Right, seen it?

-Yes, I have.

0:32:100:32:15

-Because the wind is going to blow it.

-That's absolutely fine.

0:32:150:32:19

Come on, let's... Oh!

0:32:190:32:22

What about her mugs, Charlie?

0:32:220:32:24

You've been dealing in Prattware.

0:32:240:32:26

Do you know, this is something I'm often accused of.

0:32:260:32:29

-Yesterday's antiques.

-They are.

-Aren't they?

0:32:290:32:33

They're just unfashionable now, aren't they?

0:32:330:32:35

-That's fun and quirky. If that was cheap, it'll sell for £25-£30.

-£15.

0:32:350:32:40

That's fine.

0:32:400:32:42

He could test Charlie's approbation.

0:32:420:32:45

-There's a story here.

-There needs to be a story behind that.

0:32:450:32:48

It needs to be made of gold, really.

0:32:480:32:50

My last call was a little bit sort of, you know...

0:32:500:32:52

-Was that the best thing in the shop?

-It was a bric-a-brac.

0:32:520:32:55

And she was so sweet, she was so persistent

0:32:550:32:57

and she just kept offering and offering.

0:32:570:32:59

I hope she gave you a discount on this £20 asking price.

0:32:590:33:02

I paid a fiver. I thought his plume was missing,

0:33:020:33:05

but when I came out, his head's been off.

0:33:050:33:06

-But are going to Scotland.

-We are.

0:33:060:33:08

Right, Margie, let me show you my absolutely stunning purchases.

0:33:080:33:13

-Ah! Oh, my word.

-What do you think?

-Yes, those are lovely.

0:33:130:33:17

Those are fab, I really like those.

0:33:170:33:20

-What are they worth?

-60 quid.

0:33:200:33:23

Yeah, cost £28.

0:33:230:33:24

-How good is that?

-There's a profit.

0:33:240:33:26

-I

-bought something because we're going to Scotland, a bit of silver.

0:33:260:33:29

This is a very light...

0:33:290:33:31

Yes, it is, I'm looking forward to being shot down in flames

0:33:310:33:34

-with this because this is your...

-It's part of a necklace, really.

0:33:340:33:38

It's eight grams. So I thought it's worth 80 quid.

0:33:380:33:43

-It's not worth 80 quid.

-Well, it cost 50 quid.

-Oh, you'll make a few quid.

0:33:430:33:47

-It'll make something.

-Between 15 and 20 quid.

-Here's my coup de grace.

0:33:470:33:51

-And what a nice thing it is.

-I shouldn't have bought it, should I?

0:33:510:33:54

Well, I wouldn't have touched it with a barge pole, personally.

0:33:540:33:57

-It's what they call brown furniture.

-But it's small, it's compact.

0:33:570:34:01

It's got original handles. It's about 1820.

0:34:010:34:04

-It needs some TLC.

-It does.

0:34:040:34:07

-How much did you pay?

-55.

0:34:070:34:09

Oh, goodness gracious. 200-year-old Georgian.

0:34:090:34:12

-Unbelievably cheap.

-Georgian furniture.

0:34:120:34:15

-Yeah, that's why I walked past it personally.

-OK, honey, come on.

0:34:150:34:19

But what did they really think?

0:34:190:34:22

Not particularly worried about Charlie's purchases.

0:34:220:34:26

But neither am I very optimistic about my purchases either.

0:34:260:34:31

I love the Prattware mugs.

0:34:310:34:33

But one's got a crack and Prattware is a bit passe nowadays

0:34:330:34:36

and they cost £55.

0:34:360:34:38

I think they could be her Achilles heel.

0:34:380:34:41

His candlesticks are nice and they are cheap and very stylish.

0:34:410:34:44

She really liked my candlesticks, didn't she?

0:34:440:34:48

She's got more money left in her purse, but candlesticks to the fore!

0:34:480:34:54

After setting out at Jedburgh,

0:34:540:34:55

today's opening encounter will conclude in Scotland's capital city.

0:34:550:34:59

Well, not actually in the centre, but in Leith,

0:35:010:35:04

which serves as Edinburgh's port on the Firth of Forth.

0:35:040:35:07

Famous for shipbuilding,

0:35:070:35:09

they also wrote the rules of golf here back in 1744.

0:35:090:35:12

Plus, the sun is shining on Leith.

0:35:120:35:15

There's a song in that, you know.

0:35:150:35:16

# Sunshine on Leith... #

0:35:160:35:20

This is where you're going to make a fortune, young lady.

0:35:200:35:24

How to turn 200 quid into half a million.

0:35:250:35:29

Welcome to Ramsay Cornish,

0:35:290:35:31

where Leithers have gathered to inspect the wares while

0:35:310:35:35

auctioneer Martin Cornish seems to have a soft spot for the Sunbeam.

0:35:350:35:40

-You've got lovely leather seats and upholstery.

-Who, Margie?

0:35:400:35:43

Charlie began with £200 and he's spent almost all of it,

0:35:440:35:48

a total of £178 on five auction lots.

0:35:480:35:51

-A tenner.

-Right.

0:35:510:35:53

Whilst Margie, who also started out with £200, has spent a little less,

0:35:530:35:58

parting with £135, also on five auction lots.

0:35:580:36:02

The auction approaches

0:36:020:36:04

and there's something Charlie needs to get off his chest.

0:36:040:36:07

I ought to warn you, if I lose money on anything, I tend to cry.

0:36:070:36:12

Up first, Margie's duplicating set.

0:36:130:36:16

If I make a fiver, I'll be very happy.

0:36:160:36:19

What, profit? Or a fiver in total?

0:36:190:36:22

I think it might be a fiver in total.

0:36:220:36:24

£30, 20 for this.

0:36:240:36:26

20 for the duplicating set. 20 I'm bid.

0:36:260:36:30

20 I'm bid for it. At £20 I'm bid. 25, 30.

0:36:300:36:35

At £30. Last call at 30.

0:36:350:36:37

# Double your money And try to get rich... #

0:36:390:36:42

Good start, Margie.

0:36:420:36:45

I'm travelling with a genius.

0:36:450:36:47

Time for Charlie's very Scottish-looking pickle fork.

0:36:480:36:51

-I hope you don't get in a pickle with it.

-Ha-ha-ha.

0:36:510:36:56

£10 to start it.

0:36:560:36:57

A little pickle fork. 10 I'm bid. 12, 14, 16.

0:36:570:37:00

18, 20. 22, 24, 26.

0:37:000:37:04

-At 26. On my right, last call.

-That will do.

-£20.

0:37:040:37:09

There'll be no tears yet, then.

0:37:090:37:11

It's not the sort of profits you're used to, but in my humble way...

0:37:110:37:15

-You've made six pounds.

-Not after commission.

0:37:150:37:18

What about the chain he almost overlooked?

0:37:180:37:21

30 to start it. 20.

0:37:210:37:24

20 I'm bid. 25, 35, 40. £40.

0:37:240:37:29

-There's a phone bid coming in. 45. 50.

-There you go.

0:37:300:37:35

-55, 60.

-Getting there. Need a bit more.

0:37:360:37:40

At 60.

0:37:400:37:42

Standing at the back at £60. Last call at 60.

0:37:420:37:46

-It's away.

-It's about right.

-Oh!

0:37:460:37:48

A profit, but a little less than he hoped for.

0:37:480:37:51

Is it lilac or has it gone in with the...something red?

0:37:510:37:55

Steady on, Charlie.

0:37:550:37:57

Let's see how Margie's footstool fares.

0:37:570:38:00

I've got a bit of a feeling about your stool.

0:38:000:38:03

Have you really? Tell me.

0:38:030:38:04

It's mixed. I think it's either going to make 15 quid or 65 quid.

0:38:040:38:10

30 for this to start it quickly.

0:38:100:38:12

-He knows his values, doesn't he?

-35, 40.

0:38:120:38:14

-45, 50, 55, 60. At £60.

-60!

0:38:140:38:19

You have it in the back.

0:38:190:38:21

Do you know, I've met some rich women in my time,

0:38:210:38:24

but you are the richest. You're doubling up on everything.

0:38:240:38:28

Yes, perhaps she will need that hanky, Charlie.

0:38:280:38:31

-Are you getting a bit miffed on the quiet?

-I'm British.

0:38:310:38:35

I'm not really happy unless I'm losing.

0:38:350:38:38

Chin up, Charlie, it's your snuffbox next.

0:38:380:38:41

-£10 to start it, little snuffbox.

-Should fetch 30, shouldn't it?

0:38:410:38:45

10 I'm bid, 12. 14, 16, 18.

0:38:450:38:49

-20.

-Good man.

-22.

-He's bidding.

-You'll get it, keep going. 26.

0:38:490:38:54

26, 28. At 28.

0:38:540:38:58

-In the back at 28.

-Well done.

-Did you hear what he said?

-What?

0:38:580:39:03

He said it'd better be worth it.

0:39:030:39:05

Almost double your money there, Charlie.

0:39:050:39:07

Although it will be less after auction costs.

0:39:070:39:10

What about Margie's old-fashioned mugs?

0:39:100:39:13

-Look, he's got the telephone ready. The telephone is ready.

-Where?

0:39:130:39:17

-There.

-50 to start them quickly. 50 I'm bid.

0:39:170:39:20

55, 60, five, 70, 75, 80.

0:39:200:39:25

85, 90, 95, 100.

0:39:250:39:27

At £100. On commission with me at £100 now.

0:39:290:39:33

Last call at 100.

0:39:330:39:36

-Oh, Margie.

-There's a definite pattern forming here.

0:39:360:39:40

She's doubled again.

0:39:400:39:42

Terrific.

0:39:420:39:43

Now for Charlie's lovely bit of Georgian. His biggest buy.

0:39:440:39:49

-Do we have faith in English furniture?

-Yes, it'll make 95 quid.

0:39:490:39:53

I need it to make a little bit more than £95.

0:39:530:39:57

50 to start it quickly? 50 I'm bid, 55,

0:39:570:40:01

60. 65, 70, 75, 80. 85, 90.

0:40:010:40:06

95, 100. 110. 110 in the back.

0:40:060:40:10

At £110 in the back. At 110.

0:40:100:40:14

-You have it, 110.

-Well done, my friend.

-Plant one.

0:40:150:40:19

Charlie's day is definitely perking up now. Yet another double.

0:40:210:40:25

-Steady, sir.

-Do you think we could come here for our next sale?

0:40:250:40:28

Can Margie's great run extend to her lamp?

0:40:280:40:32

20 for that lot to start it quickly. 20 I'm bid, 25.

0:40:320:40:36

-There's a lady bidding already.

-40, 45, 50, 55, 60.

0:40:360:40:40

-65, 70, 75, 80.

-Oh, she's going for it.

-85.

0:40:400:40:45

Lady's bid down at the front at 85. The last call at 85.

0:40:450:40:51

-Well done.

-Hang on, I'm going to reciprocate. Put your cheek out.

0:40:510:40:55

I think Margie will almost certainly triumph today.

0:40:570:41:00

I'm enjoying myself.

0:41:000:41:01

-Are you enjoying yourself?

-I'm not surprised you are,

0:41:010:41:04

-you've made so much money.

-You've done all right.

-I have.

0:41:040:41:08

How about a Scotsman minus his wee feather, of course?

0:41:080:41:12

# Oh, flower of Scotland

0:41:120:41:15

# When will we see your likes again? #

0:41:150:41:19

-His little kilt and socks.

-Fantastic, look at him.

0:41:190:41:21

Nice 19th-century Staffordshire flatback figure.

0:41:210:41:24

30, 20 for him? 20 I'm bid.

0:41:240:41:27

-20 I'm bid for the Staffordshire.

-It's all I can hope.

-20 quid?

-At £30.

0:41:270:41:32

Last call at £30. At 30.

0:41:320:41:36

You have it, 30.

0:41:360:41:38

Never mind double, she's several times better off with him.

0:41:380:41:42

Finally, Charlie's candlesticks and jug.

0:41:420:41:45

Here you go, here you go.

0:41:450:41:47

That's a nice little set, that.

0:41:480:41:51

50 to start them quickly. 50 I'm bid.

0:41:510:41:53

50 I'm bid for the set. At £50.

0:41:530:41:55

-55, 60, 65, 70. 75, 80.

-No way!

0:41:550:41:59

-At £80. At £80.

-Not bad, not bad. I'd like a little more.

0:41:590:42:05

At 80, you have it on commission, 80.

0:42:050:42:07

Another good result,

0:42:070:42:08

but Margie's consistent profits have put her on top.

0:42:080:42:12

Miss Cooper, Gladys to her friends,

0:42:120:42:15

I congratulate you, you've been brilliant.

0:42:150:42:18

-Thank you, and so have you.

-We've had fun.

-We've done well.

-We made money.

0:42:180:42:22

-Gosh, I can't believe it.

-Shall we go for a swim?

0:42:220:42:25

Charlie began with £200 and after paying auction costs,

0:42:280:42:32

he's made a profit of £71.28.

0:42:320:42:35

So he now has £271.28 to spend next time.

0:42:350:42:40

Margie also started off with £200, but her Prattware really paid off.

0:42:410:42:46

So that after paying auction costs, she made a profit of £115.10,

0:42:460:42:51

leaving her with £315.10 and all the bragging rights.

0:42:510:42:57

-I say, have I won the day?

-You certainly have.

0:42:570:43:00

-I don't want to keep rubbing it in.

-Just get in that car!

0:43:000:43:03

Onward and upward.

0:43:040:43:06

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Margie get a personal shopper.

0:43:080:43:12

-I do like that.

-OK.

-I haven't said yes yet.

-You have.

0:43:120:43:15

-While Charlie could do with a Sherpa.

-Can I have a clamber?

0:43:160:43:20

On the first day of their Scottish road trip, Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper start in Jedburgh before travelling through Powburn and Alnwick towards an auction in Edinburgh.