Episode 12 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 12

Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper begin in the Scottish capital at Edinburgh, then travel through Dunfermline and head to Stirlingshire for an auction at Kinbuck.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each. A classic car.

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And a goal, to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes.

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Sold. Going, going, gone.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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-But it's no mean feat.

-50p!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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They're papier mache!

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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Here we go.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the second leg of our Scottish expedition, in the company of

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Charlie Ross, Margie Cooper, and a 1961 Sunbeam Rapier.

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-My uncle had a Sunbeam Rapier.

-My dad did.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Shouldn't you be in the back-seat with some crisps

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-and a bottle of pop?

-Yeah, I'd be feeling car sick!

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Auctioneer Charlie, from Oxfordshire,

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is a bit of a classic car specialist.

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I like your Bugatti.

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He's also a Road Trip regular.

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-Tenner!

-Right.

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With a reputation for decisive action.

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Seen it, loved it, bought it.

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Dealer and Cheshire girl Margie, however,

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prefers a rather more roundabout approach.

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-SHE SIGHS

-Yeah. Hm.

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I don't particularly like it.

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Not so much "vene, vidi, vici".

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More, "she came, she saw, she dithered".

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-Do you want blood?

-SHE LAUGHS

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Yeah.

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Seems to work, though, because, so far, Margie's tactics

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have paid off handsomely.

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I'm travelling with a genius! MARGIE LAUGHS

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Charlie began with £200 and, after just one auction,

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he's amassed a total of £271.28 to spend today.

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-GAVEL BANGS

-Whilst Margie,

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who also started off with £200, has done even better,

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with £315.10 in her pocket.

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All right, my lover!

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Not that they seem to be taking it at all too seriously.

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Woke up the other night, made a cup of tea in my pyjamas.

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Must get a teapot! MARGIE LAUGHS

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Charlie and Margie set out from Jedburgh in the Borders,

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before travelling the breadth and the length of Scotland,

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to reach journey's end at Hamilton, South Lanarkshire.

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Today, they begin in the capital of Edinburgh,

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and head north to Stirlingshire for an auction at Kinbuck.

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-BOTH:

-# I've got a wonderful feeling

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# Everything's going my way! #

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Oh, my hat's gone! Oh, my hat's gone! Oh, stop!

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MARGIE LAUGHS

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Edinburgh's made those two even giddier, it seems.

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The city is built on seven hills, a bit like Rome.

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And, with over 4,500 listed buildings, you can imagine

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why it's considered one of the best places to live and visit in the UK.

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It has some of the quirkiest antique shops too.

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-Antiques and Curios. Look, it's all outside as well.

-It is.

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Wonderful. Do you think the car's for sale?

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-I'm off to spend me cash.

-Good luck, mate. See you later.

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I might need some.

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Hm. Sounds like he's already spotted something.

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That's nice for the price.

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I'd buy it.

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Straight out of the blocks.

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-Morning, sir.

-Good morning.

-How are you?

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When did you last see the back of your shop?

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Oh, must be two or three years, I think.

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CHARLIE LAUGHS

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Good question, Charlie.

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A chap could spend weeks in here, and only graze the surface.

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Can I have a clamber?

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-It is, I think, Alan, what you'd call an eclectic mix, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Careful, now, we don't want a landslide.

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-Has that got a carriage clock in it?

-Good spot.

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-Just come in yesterday.

-Well, look at that.

-Quite a nice piece.

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It's got its original...

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Came in yesterday, eh? Catnip to collectors.

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How lovely to see it in its original box, with the original key.

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And, look at that.

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It's even got its little, there we go...

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its little door. And it's got a serpentine-shaped brass case.

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No doubt, an English case with a French movement, I imagine.

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-And about 1,900 in date.

-Yeah, yeah.

-Yes.

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Carriage clocks were a French invention in the early 19th century.

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Also known as officers' clocks.

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They were designed for travel,

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and the carrying case was a key component.

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How much is said item?

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-Well, I would think about £100 I'd expect to get for that.

-Would you?

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Yeah, I thought you might say that.

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-The best thing about this is the original case.

-Original box.

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-A bit tatty but someone will love to restore it.

-Yeah.

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I think, if that didn't have its original box, that's a 50-quider.

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But I think that does help considerably.

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May I just leave it on there for the moment

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and give that a bit of thought? Have you got any silver on board?

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-Funny you should ask, Charlie.

-Well, I have a few bits tucked away here.

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This is a veritable Aladdin's cave here.

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Now, these are Edinburgh spoons. They're quite nice.

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I just was looking at the back and seeing that they're Georgian.

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They're Georgian, and Edinburgh.

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They've got the thistle and the castle.

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-And there's six of them.

-Six of them.

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-That's a silver pocket watch.

-Silver pocket watch.

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HE BLOWS There we go.

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London maker. That's turn-of-the-century, isn't it?

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Sterling silver bracelet.

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Yellow decoration on it.

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-Is that Burmese?

-Siamese silver.

-Siamese, is it?

-Yeah.

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-I'm getting very excited here.

-What else has Alan got in there?

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That's got quite a nice Art Nouveau top.

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Gosh, what a lovely top to that. A bit dented, but silver.

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HE BLOWS

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-Birmingham silver. About 1910.

-Yep.

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Hob-nailed cup body to it. In good order, really.

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-How much is your jar?

-Well, it's in pretty poor condition.

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-It's not in great condition.

-£15.

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£15? You know what? I'm really tempted by it.

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But I don't know how much leeway there might be on the clock.

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I don't suppose you'd sell it to me for 60 quid, can you?

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-I think I would, 70, I would.

-Would you sell at 70?

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I think that's an extremely tempting and reasonable offer,

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and I'll shake you by the hand, sir. That's very kind, sir.

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I have to say, I can't stop now, you see, because I get the buying bug.

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I don't suppose it could be a tenner, rather than 15?

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-Let's put that in at a tenner, yeah.

-This is getting better by the minute!

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I thought he might be about to buy just about everything

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in that little suitcase.

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-I think I'm going to have one look at your lamp, if I may.

-Yep.

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Not forgotten it then, Charlie?

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Again, rather like this carriage clock.

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A lot of these have been reproduced over the years.

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You've only got to look at the patination, the wear,

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feel the weight, to know that that is a 19th-century lamp.

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And it's got its original Starboard label on it.

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The word, starboard, derives from the old English,

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and literally means, the side on which this ship is steered.

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Because the steering oar used to be affixed

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to the right side of a vessel.

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And mooring at port was on the left. Hence, "port".

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Interested, I'd say.

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-What sort of money is that?

-About 20 quid.

-20 quid, yeah?

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I would give you ten quid for your lamp outside. But I...

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It's a mean offer, it's a rude offer, and I'm not expecting anything.

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I think it might make 20 quid at auction, 15, 20 quid at auction.

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-Let's move it on, yes.

-Are you sure?

-Yes, let's get rid of that.

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

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Fair point, Alan, the shop could get crowded otherwise!

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-Good luck.

-Very good day. And thank you so much.

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It's never hard to imagine what Charlie's mood is

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but, with three lots in the back, I think it's true to say, well...

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Whoops! ..with a spring in his step, he's pleased

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Meanwhile, elsewhere in Edinburgh, Margie has come

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to the city's historic mound,

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not one of the seven hills, by the way,

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to visit a museum entirely dedicated to money.

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The Museum On The Mound is located at the historic former headquarters

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of the Bank Of Scotland.

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Founded in 1695, it's the second oldest surviving bank in the UK.

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-Good morning.

-Hello.

-You're Doug?

-Yes.

-I'm Margie.

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But, of course, money itself is much, much older,

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and can take many different forms.

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Pretty much anything can be money, if you think about it.

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It's just that some things made better money than others.

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It's got to be something that's desirable.

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The earliest form of money we know about are the cowry shells

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which were being used in parts of China, at least 4,000 years ago.

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-Couldn't you just go along the beach and get those?

-Yes and no.

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One afternoon, you'd have a lot of money in your pocket.

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They were being used about 1,000 miles away

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from where they were actually found. In China, they were used inland.

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Where do these beads come from?

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These ones here come from Solomon Islands.

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You can notice there are four different coloured beads here.

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The different beads have a different value,

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based on how easy or hard it is to find that particular shell.

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So, the white shells and black shells are quite easy to find.

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They're the lowest value.

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Then you have the pale orange beads.

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Finally, the reddish orange beads.

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The shells for those could only be found 20 metres down,

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so only the best divers, could hold their breath, swim down 20 metres,

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find the shell, and get up to the surface again.

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-So, he become a rich man if he could do that.

-Probably not.

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-Probably, the person who made the beads then became rich.

-Ah!

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Money, it seems, really does make the world go round.

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Take "buck," for example.

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A slang term for a dollar that may come from buckskin,

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once used as currency.

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The museum holds other examples of the goods that

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were as important as cash north of the border.

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This is a beaver pelt.

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And the beaver pelt was used as currency in Canada

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in the 18th-century.

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Now, it's being used by the colonists when they still had coins,

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but the coins were in such short supply,

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companies like the Hudson's Bay Company,

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which most people would have gone to back then

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to get their supplies, priced everything in beaver pelts.

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Just as we go into a supermarket today.

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So, you would have gone in and it might've be

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one beaver pelt would have got you four knives, or two pounds of sugar.

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Nowadays, of course, paper money is the standard,

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and much of the credit goes to the Bank of Scotland

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because, back in 1696, the Scots invented the modern banknote.

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The Bank of England had been using paper currency

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but not in set denominations.

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You know, you could get a banknote for whatever amount.

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In 1696, Bank of Scotland came along - fives, tens,

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-20s, 50s and 100s.

-And it's still the same today?

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-It's still the same today.

-Oh, it's amazing, isn't it?

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People have been trying to forge banknotes

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since the Bank of Scotland started issuing them.

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But the bank has been fighting back for almost as long.

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So, this is Scotland's oldest surviving banknote

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-from 16th April, 1716.

-That's amazing that it's survived.

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This one was kept to one side

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-because it was evidence in a forgery case.

-Oh.

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This wavy line here is actually deliberate.

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It was an early anti-forgery device.

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The copper printing plate would have been used to print

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two notes at once. And these notes were actually bound into a book,

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a bit like a cheque-book.

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And when the printed note was actually issued,

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the teller would just cut a random wavy line.

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So when you presented your banknote for payment,

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the teller could check the original counterfoil,

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and if they didn't match up, he knew you presented a counterfeit note.

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Clever stuff. Elsewhere in the museum,

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they have a suitable jaw-dropping selection of the latest banknotes.

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Never mind about beads, now you're talking!

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-A million pounds in £20 notes. Number one there.

-Doesn't look much.

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I could get that in the back of our car.

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Well, unfortunately, Margie, it's all a bit worthless

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because of that cancelled notice on every single one. Never mind.

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Perhaps it'll inspire you to add to the small fortune

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you've already accumulated. Now, time to meet up with Charlie

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and motor to another of the city's destination antiques emporia.

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What are you doing taking me down a dark alley?

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-Have you got designs on me?

-I'm trying to find you some antiques.

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I can't believe there's an antique shop here.

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Go around the corner, you'll see.

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Come on, Charlie. Shall I go first?

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Ah! Margie.

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-I might buy one of those.

-No, you can't have a basket.

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Courtyard Antiques consists of two jam-packed floors

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with the accent on vintage.

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Oh, look at his little ears.

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Including costumes, toys, militaria, and much else besides.

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Evening, all.

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That's a beauty.

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Now, Miss Cooper.

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Jacques Cousteau!

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Great for fancy dress.

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Ouf!

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Teddy bears, helmets, globes, boats...

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While Charlie explores the top floor,

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Margie's downstairs with proprietor, Lewis, being sensible.

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-You've got a set of six, not very old.

-Eight.

-Eight, sorry.

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I mean, they're heavy, they're so heavy. Edinburgh crystal?

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-Yes. And I don't think...

-Not much age to that.

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£160.

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SHE SIGHS

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You really need to see them all, don't you?

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-Oh, 'ecky thump!

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Quite.

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But Lewis also has several decanters,

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any one of which could be included in the deal.

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So, could you sort of do me a parcel with the glasses cheap-ish?

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I can do you a parcel with the glasses,

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it's the cheap bit I'm having a problem with.

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Something tells me this could go on a bit.

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Meanwhile, what's Charlie found?

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It's a folding bagatelle table.

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And you whack your ball.

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If you get it in this hole, you see, you get one.

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And the more difficult they are, the more points you get.

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You have your little balls. Ah.

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Pas de balones.

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Bagatelle, named after the Parisian chateaux of that name,

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is a French invention which is part billiards and part bowling.

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Oh.

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Failed.

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You can also see how pinball and even crazy golf developed from here.

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Oh!

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-Unlucky.

-Not as easy as you think, this.

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Well, he might enjoy playing it,

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but I'm not sure he's convinced it's worth buying.

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-Now, how are things in the slow lane?

-That's a nice example.

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I mean, slate clocks are not the best. But...

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-That's a beautiful one.

-It is. And it's small.

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Although this slate clock is thoroughly British,

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it has a French movement.

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And the fashion for clocks made from slate began on the other

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-side of the Channel.

-What money's that, then?

-120.

-120? Oh...

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-Let's call it...

-They're not easy, are they?

-..80.

-Mm.

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-It does go.

-Have you got the keys?

-Yes.

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CLOCK CHIMES

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Oh, listen to that.

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-65 and I'll buy it.

-I am sure that's what I paid for it.

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I can't believe I'm even interested in a slate clock.

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But it's so pretty. That is so sweet.

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It's got these little Corinthian columns. 68?

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Now you're talking(!)

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Patience, Lewis.

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Our Margie can be a very trying customer.

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Meanwhile, Charlie, for once, is equally at a loss.

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I need some assistance, please.

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I need an injection of definitive decision-making.

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Oh, Lordy, Charlie!

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You've only been with Margie a short while.

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I do hope indecision isn't contagious.

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I'm going to for a walk down the street. I'm going to get

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-some fresh air.

-At least that's decisive.

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It's a lonely old life, really.

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It's a lonely old life when you can't make up your mind.

0:16:030:16:06

But it seems to me having bought not far from here

0:16:070:16:10

that there's a lot of antiques shops here.

0:16:100:16:13

There's another shop there. What a lovely looking shop.

0:16:130:16:16

I'm going to have a look in Bodkin and Farrish. You never know.

0:16:160:16:19

There might be the object of my dreams in there.

0:16:190:16:21

-Greetings.

-Hello there.

-May I look around your shop?

-Please do.

0:16:240:16:27

-Charlie's the name.

-Pleased to meet you. Hugo.

-Hugo!

0:16:270:16:32

Yes. But Bodkin or Farrish?

0:16:320:16:34

Anyway, I think Charlie will perk up in here.

0:16:340:16:37

A real old-fashioned antique shop with plenty of lighting,

0:16:370:16:39

and, of course, furniture.

0:16:390:16:41

Look at that cabinet there. Look at that cabinet. French, do you think?

0:16:410:16:46

It doesn't look English to me. I adore the carving on the doors.

0:16:460:16:51

Exquisite. 1880. £260. Love to buy that for 100.

0:16:510:16:58

I wonder how flexible Hugo is. Hugo! May I borrow you?

0:16:580:17:01

-Yes, sorry.

-I was just looking at your cabinet there.

0:17:010:17:04

The bottom door is sensational. The carving is fabulous.

0:17:040:17:10

-I think it's probably too insulting to offer you...

-Hit me with it.

0:17:100:17:14

-I am uninsultable.

-Are you insultable?

0:17:140:17:17

-I mean, I think that would make at auction about 140 quid.

-Is that all?

0:17:170:17:22

-Golly.

-No, I may well be...

0:17:220:17:24

-Exactly.

-I know what you're saying.

0:17:240:17:26

I don't suppose it's buyable for 100 quid, is it?

0:17:260:17:29

-If it were, I would buy it.

-I think, sadly, it's cost me more.

-Has it?

0:17:290:17:32

Yeah. What would be your, you know, never-to-be-forgotten,

0:17:320:17:36

-show-me-the-door price on that?

-I've had to restore that.

-Have you?

0:17:360:17:40

I think I paid 140. But because of my quiet Sunday, I'll take 150.

0:17:400:17:43

I feel good vibes with Hugo here. But, you know, do I want to gamble?

0:17:430:17:48

You know you probably do, Charlie. But there may be something else.

0:17:480:17:52

How about one of Hugo's fine sideboards?

0:17:520:17:55

Something that took my eye over here was a frame. It's not silver is it?

0:17:550:17:59

No, that's a plated frame.

0:17:590:18:01

-Not a repro, is it?

-No, it's 19...10/20.

0:18:010:18:06

Look at that, Romeo and Juliet. Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou?

0:18:060:18:12

I'm here. "Parting is such sweet sorrow."

0:18:120:18:15

To me, it doesn't matter a tuppenny job that it's not silver, really.

0:18:150:18:19

I quite like the base metal coming through here.

0:18:190:18:22

Adds a depth to the colour. Look at him.

0:18:220:18:25

That all ended rather badly, didn't it, Romeo and Juliet?

0:18:250:18:28

Well, at least the auction's not in Verona, eh?

0:18:280:18:31

-How much is "Parting with sweet sorrow?"

-£60.

-£60.

0:18:310:18:36

-And that'll be a roaring profit on that, I'm convinced.

-Oh, Hugo.

0:18:360:18:41

You wouldn't like to take £40 for that, would you, Hugo?

0:18:410:18:43

-That is what I was about to say.

-£40?

-Yes.

0:18:430:18:46

-I would like to pay £40 for that.

-We have a deal.

-Fab!

0:18:460:18:50

Charlie's back in the saddle, it seems,

0:18:500:18:53

-still hankering after that cabinet as well.

-I don't suppose...

0:18:530:18:56

you don't want to take £100 for your cabinet, do you?

0:18:560:18:59

-It's a miserable, pathetic offer...

-Give me the 140 I paid for it.

0:18:590:19:04

-No, no. I'm not going to.

-Not brave enough?

-I'm not brave enough.

0:19:040:19:09

It must be the sun. And the busyness.

0:19:090:19:12

And I'll take your £100.

0:19:120:19:14

-What?!

-I'll take it.

-Are you sure?

0:19:140:19:16

You should be quicker than that, sir.

0:19:160:19:19

-Indeed.

-Oh, my goodness me. I've just bought another thing for £100.

0:19:190:19:22

I'm more excited to see how much profit you make.

0:19:220:19:26

That's a very sporting attitude, Hugo.

0:19:270:19:30

Charlie now has five lots, but Margie, on the other hand,

0:19:340:19:37

-still hasn't bought a thing.

-I'm boring myself here.

0:19:370:19:40

So far, Margie's agonised over some glasses, and a slate clock.

0:19:420:19:47

-But there's more.

-This is nice.

-Something familiar, too.

0:19:490:19:52

I wonder where the balls are.

0:19:520:19:54

Are these the balls? These are the balls.

0:19:540:19:57

And you can have a jolly, jolly time playing.

0:19:570:19:59

I don't quite know how it works. Nice thing though. Edwardian.

0:19:590:20:04

Yes, we've heard all that from Charlie.

0:20:040:20:07

In good nick.

0:20:070:20:08

It seems Margie might be a tad more interested in the bagatelle

0:20:080:20:11

than her travelling companion was.

0:20:110:20:14

How much is that?

0:20:140:20:16

-80.

-Yeah? It's all right.

0:20:160:20:18

-Can that be 60 quid?

-No.

-No?

0:20:180:20:21

I don't blame you but I just want the guarantee really, don't I?

0:20:210:20:25

-You did beat me down with the clock.

-How much was it?

-70.

0:20:250:20:28

It was actually 75 but... I'm losing the will.

0:20:280:20:33

I'll buy something, don't worry. I'm getting really close now.

0:20:350:20:39

Well, fingers crossed. Back to the clock, eh?

0:20:410:20:44

Stick with us, viewers.

0:20:440:20:46

-So the clock and the game.

-140.

-We're nearly there, aren't we?

0:20:460:20:51

-You're there. I'm not there yet and you are. 68 each. 136.

-69 each.

0:20:510:20:57

69 each.

0:20:580:21:00

Cool.

0:21:010:21:02

I think Lewis might need to sit down for a bit after that.

0:21:020:21:05

Thank you so much.

0:21:050:21:06

I know I do!

0:21:060:21:08

£138 on two lots for Margie and all in all it's been quite a day.

0:21:080:21:13

No wonder they're feeling a trifle dizzy.

0:21:150:21:18

So night-night.

0:21:190:21:21

Next morning, Charlie accuses Margie of hanging onto her profits.

0:21:230:21:28

-You're not going to spend that 315 quid, are you?

-I am.

-No, you're not.

0:21:280:21:32

SCOTTISH ACCENT: I think I'll spend six poonds on this one.

0:21:320:21:36

And seven poonds 50 on that one.

0:21:360:21:39

And I'll keep the rest in my handbag.

0:21:390:21:42

I don't want to risk it.

0:21:430:21:45

Not something Charlie could be accused of

0:21:450:21:47

because yesterday he spent £230 on a lantern, a picture frame,

0:21:470:21:52

a dressing table jar, a cabinet and a carriage clock, as you do.

0:21:520:21:57

This is getting better by the minute.

0:21:570:21:59

Leaving him with just over £40 in his wallet.

0:21:590:22:03

Whilst Margie was much more cautious,

0:22:030:22:05

buying just a slate clock and a bagatelle game for £138...

0:22:050:22:10

I knew you were going to be trouble the minute you came in.

0:22:100:22:12

..meaning she has £177.10 to spend today.

0:22:120:22:17

Later, they'll be making

0:22:170:22:18

for the auction in Kinbuck,

0:22:180:22:20

but their next stop is still in Edinburgh

0:22:200:22:22

down on the historic dockside by the Firth of Forth at Leith.

0:22:220:22:26

-Look at this. It's enormous.

-Goodness.

0:22:260:22:29

I'll probably never see you again.

0:22:300:22:32

SHE CHUCKLES

0:22:320:22:34

Bye, darling, have a lovely time. Spend all that super cash.

0:22:340:22:37

I wish I'd got more. Looks a serious place.

0:22:370:22:41

-I'm looking for... John.

-Margie. Pleased to meet you.

-I'm pleased to meet you.

0:22:450:22:49

Thanks for letting us come to this amazing place.

0:22:490:22:52

-You're more than welcome.

-So how long have you been here?

0:22:520:22:54

We're in this warehouse 25 years.

0:22:540:22:56

It's not hard to see why this fine establishment,

0:22:560:22:59

located in an old whisky warehouse,

0:22:590:23:01

has recently won an accolade as one of the finest shops in the UK.

0:23:010:23:06

Sure to suit our Margie.

0:23:060:23:08

Poor old Charlie, he'd have loved it in here.

0:23:080:23:10

That's right. But I'm sure she won't rub it in. Not.

0:23:100:23:14

This is a pull-out table from about 1820. This is a Gillows one.

0:23:140:23:19

-And stamped.

-Oh, my word. These stamps are so important.

-Critical.

0:23:190:23:24

Yes, there's quite a bit that's way beyond her reach

0:23:240:23:27

but I'm sure John can guide the way to the more affordable items.

0:23:270:23:30

-Here's something interesting for you.

-Ah, a box. A tin box.

0:23:300:23:35

Biscuit tin.

0:23:350:23:36

The ticket price is £75.

0:23:360:23:39

-40 quid.

-That's all right.

-That's quite smart. Buy that.

0:23:390:23:44

-There's wages left in that.

-Wages left in that. I do like that.

0:23:450:23:50

-OK.

-I haven't said yes yet.

-You have.

0:23:500:23:52

I can tell by the way you replied.

0:23:520:23:54

You can see how he's successful, can't you?

0:23:540:23:57

Something tells me our John isn't a man to dither with.

0:23:570:24:00

-A pen stand.

-Onyx?

0:24:000:24:03

It's going to be £50 to you. Would it sell for you?

0:24:030:24:08

-Not sold on that.

-OK.

0:24:080:24:10

-Carlton Ware. That's unusual.

-You can have that for £30.

0:24:100:24:14

Actually, £40 and I'll throw in another piece.

0:24:140:24:18

-How much would those be? 35?

-£40 for both. That's a fair price.

0:24:180:24:23

It is a fair price.

0:24:230:24:24

No deal as yet though but this is shaping up well.

0:24:240:24:28

Margie arrived with almost £170 and I think John will make sure

0:24:280:24:31

she spends a fair part of it, quickly too.

0:24:310:24:35

This is an interesting piece. It's for dealing cards.

0:24:350:24:39

Four decks of cards. It could be blackjack, something like that.

0:24:390:24:43

It deals them out singly. It's got all the information.

0:24:430:24:45

-That's good. That's really good.

-Made in Paris.

0:24:450:24:49

I'm really excited about that.

0:24:490:24:51

The ticket price is £25.

0:24:510:24:53

-You can have that for £20. Do you really like it?

-I do.

0:24:530:24:57

-£20, you want it.

-£20. A deal. Shall we shake hands on that?

-OK.

0:24:570:25:02

Thank you.

0:25:020:25:04

Fast work. Now let's get back to that Carlton Ware.

0:25:040:25:08

-35 quid best.

-Right.

-£35?

-Yes. That's that done.

0:25:080:25:14

So how much have I spent?

0:25:150:25:17

£55 actually, not including the biscuit tin,

0:25:170:25:20

but do we have a deal on that as well?

0:25:200:25:22

Could it just ease a bit and I'll buy it?

0:25:230:25:26

-How much did I quote you?

-40.

0:25:260:25:28

-That's it.

-Not 38?

-No. No 38. It's £40.

-Got to be £40?

0:25:280:25:34

It's Monday morning, it's 9:30, I have a long week ahead of me.

0:25:360:25:41

-Will you please leave now?

-Give me the money!

0:25:410:25:45

I like this chap.

0:25:450:25:46

-Five of those are yours.

-OK. There's your change.

-A Scottish fiver.

0:25:460:25:51

With £95 spent, Margie's shopping is finally complete.

0:25:510:25:55

But where's Charlie?

0:25:550:25:56

Well, he's finally headed out of the capital.

0:25:580:26:01

Travelling north from Edinburgh

0:26:010:26:04

to Dunfermline.

0:26:040:26:05

Dun-shopping more like!

0:26:060:26:08

Look at this. I couldn't be in a more perfect place.

0:26:080:26:13

I think I've died and gone to heaven.

0:26:130:26:16

Actually he's on his way to see a unique museum

0:26:160:26:19

dedicated to the humble bus.

0:26:190:26:22

-Good morning.

-Good morning, Charlie.

-Is it Eddie?

0:26:220:26:24

-It's Eddie. How do you do?

-This is extraordinary.

0:26:240:26:27

I never thought I'd come into the middle of Scotland and find so many buses.

0:26:270:26:32

-How many buses have you got?

-180 on the site.

-180?

-180, yes.

0:26:320:26:37

-Are they all owned by you?

-No, they're individually owned.

0:26:370:26:40

If I have a bus and I want to put it in here, I pay you a rent, do I?

0:26:400:26:44

-That's basically it, yes.

-Splendid.

0:26:440:26:46

The Scottish Vintage Bus Museum

0:26:460:26:49

is the largest of its kind in the world.

0:26:490:26:52

Like many of the best institutions,

0:26:520:26:54

it owes its existence to enthusiasts and their valuable spare time.

0:26:540:26:59

What a wonderful view from up here.

0:26:590:27:01

All right in the summer but can you imagine

0:27:010:27:04

sitting here in the middle of winter? A Scottish winter?

0:27:040:27:07

I don't think so.

0:27:070:27:09

Basically everyone here just loves buses.

0:27:090:27:12

-This is what date?

-This is 1928.

0:27:120:27:15

This is one of the oldest buses we have on the site.

0:27:150:27:18

It's one of the first generation Glasgow double-deckers.

0:27:180:27:21

During the Second World War it was actually converted into an ambulance.

0:27:210:27:26

The roof was taken off. It ran about in London

0:27:260:27:29

and then it was discovered as a caravan in a field in Kent.

0:27:290:27:33

-Have you got anybody here who used to drive buses?

-I did.

-Did you?

0:27:330:27:37

-Whereabouts?

-In Edinburgh.

-For how long?

0:27:370:27:41

-Ten years I was driving in Edinburgh.

-Enjoyable?

0:27:410:27:44

Absolutely loved it.

0:27:440:27:46

"Bus", an abbreviation of "omnibus", meaning carriage for all,

0:27:480:27:52

applied to horse-drawn carriages before engine-powered vehicles.

0:27:520:27:57

The word "clippy", however, is uniquely British.

0:27:570:28:01

This is the old style bus,

0:28:040:28:06

the typical double-decker with the rear entrance

0:28:060:28:09

with the conductor or conductress, commonly known as a clippy.

0:28:090:28:13

-Because they clipped the tickets?

-Clipped the tickets, exactly that.

0:28:130:28:17

-You've got one?

-I've got an old ticket machine. So there you go.

0:28:170:28:20

-May I put it on?

-Absolutely. All you have to do is turn the handle.

0:28:200:28:26

-And there's your ticket.

-I've got a ticket.

0:28:260:28:28

That will be thrupence, please, sir.

0:28:280:28:30

Charlie, as a fan of all vintage vehicles, is clearly enjoying this experience

0:28:300:28:34

but it's all about to get even better.

0:28:340:28:37

-So am I going to be entrusted with this big beast?

-You are indeed.

0:28:370:28:39

You're going to be driving this huge monster, yes.

0:28:390:28:42

Of course the driver needs to be appropriately dressed.

0:28:420:28:45

So you must have the appropriate uniform.

0:28:450:28:48

-Oh, I look forward to wearing it.

-Thank you.

0:28:480:28:51

Very dapper.

0:28:580:29:00

Careful, Charlie. Easy does it.

0:29:060:29:09

Marvellous.

0:29:110:29:13

We'll get you as a bus driver yet. Easy.

0:29:150:29:17

I feel strangely at home.

0:29:190:29:21

So whenever a bus driver needs a holiday...

0:29:230:29:25

And there you are, you're a fully fledged bus driver.

0:29:270:29:30

-Did you enjoy that?

-Thank you very much indeed. I loved it.

0:29:300:29:34

Ah, Cupar. That reminds me.

0:29:350:29:36

It's now time to take a look at what they've bought.

0:29:360:29:39

-I have a double reveal for you.

-Right, a double reveal.

-One here.

0:29:390:29:42

-Yes?

-And one there. Izzy-whizzy, let's get busy.

0:29:420:29:46

-Ah!

-Ooh.

0:29:470:29:50

Go round the front and have a butcher's.

0:29:500:29:53

Now then, that's not English. No, it isn't. What is it?

0:29:530:29:57

-French, I think.

-Or Dutch?

-I think it's French.

0:29:570:30:00

-It's walnut.

-How unusual.

0:30:000:30:01

What I quite liked about it... Look. It's quite a nice thing, isn't it?

0:30:010:30:05

That's a lovely little thing.

0:30:050:30:07

-I think you've cracked it there.

-Oh, Margie!

0:30:070:30:10

Good start, Charlie. She's impressed.

0:30:100:30:12

Ship's lantern.

0:30:120:30:14

-I just liked it. It hasn't...

-What does it say?

0:30:140:30:18

-Starboard. That cost a tenner.

-A tenner?

-A tenner.

0:30:180:30:22

-Ooh!

-Ah! You've come to my territory.

-Just for you I've got some silver.

0:30:220:30:26

-Do you want to pick it up and look at it? How old is it?

-I think it's 1904.

0:30:260:30:31

-It is, yes.

-What's it worth? What would it make at auction?

0:30:310:30:34

-You're the expert.

-I think that's going to make between 40 and 60.

0:30:340:30:37

Ten.

0:30:370:30:39

HE CACKLES

0:30:390:30:42

He's enjoying this.

0:30:420:30:43

-Oh, a little carriage clock.

-Yes.

0:30:430:30:46

The only reason I bought that is because it's in its original case.

0:30:460:30:49

-Its original key and it's a serpentine front.

-That's amazing.

0:30:490:30:54

Margie's turn.

0:30:540:30:55

-Come on.

-Right, here we go. Ready?

-Come on.

0:30:550:30:58

HE LAUGHS

0:30:580:31:00

I know where you bought it!

0:31:000:31:02

-These are for scoring.

-Hang on! Your clock's chiming.

0:31:030:31:08

The balls are the key there because they're an odd size and you can't get them.

0:31:090:31:12

-I love this. Is this a biscuit tin?

-Yes, it is.

0:31:120:31:16

-Is it a McVitie & Price?

-No, it isn't. Victoria.

0:31:160:31:20

The key to this is the condition, isn't it?

0:31:200:31:22

Look at the paintwork on it.

0:31:220:31:25

Now, safe bet or gamble?

0:31:250:31:27

-This is my favourite.

-Now that's something, that's French.

-It is.

0:31:270:31:31

It's a card shoe for dealing cards, for blackjack.

0:31:310:31:35

-Oh, my goodness! From a casino?

-Look how nicely made it is.

0:31:350:31:39

I don't think I've ever seen one of those.

0:31:390:31:41

Decks of cards in there and the croupier brings them out like that.

0:31:410:31:45

-What, like that?

-Like that!

0:31:450:31:47

-20 quid.

-I think that's probably your best buy.

0:31:470:31:51

All good so far.

0:31:510:31:52

-Am I allowed to be rude about one of your purchases?

-My Carlton Ware?

0:31:520:31:56

-Ghastly. Absolutely ghastly.

-How dare you?

0:31:560:32:00

-I've been nice about your things.

-Do you know why I think it's ghastly?

0:32:000:32:04

-Because I once bought some.

-And got stuck with it?

-I absolutely did.

0:32:040:32:08

Right, let's go. Off into the sunshine.

0:32:080:32:11

Now what did they really think?

0:32:110:32:14

That bit of silver! He's definitely going to make £40 profit, definitely, on that.

0:32:140:32:19

It's gorgeous. Art Nouveau silver. Lovely.

0:32:190:32:21

The Carlton Ware is ghastly. Yesterday's antiques, Margie.

0:32:210:32:25

Frankly, if they make 15, you'll be a lucky girl.

0:32:250:32:28

I think he's done really well and I think he's going to get me on the second auction.

0:32:280:32:33

I think I've got the edge.

0:32:330:32:34

I'm rather thinking after this time I'll have my nose in front.

0:32:340:32:37

After starting out in the capital,

0:32:390:32:41

today's encounter will conclude

0:32:410:32:43

in rural Stirlingshire

0:32:430:32:45

at the hamlet of Kinbuck.

0:32:450:32:46

-Hey, it's been raining.

-It has been raining.

-We don't like that.

0:32:460:32:50

-I do not. And if it rains on my head we are pulling in.

-I've got a hanky.

0:32:500:32:54

-Do you want to tie it round your head?

-Is that me?

-A scarf?

0:32:540:32:58

No, it wouldn't be you, darling.

0:32:580:33:00

-Here we are.

-This is when you begin to wish you had bought some galvanised buckets.

0:33:030:33:08

Is that yours over there, the yellow ladders?

0:33:080:33:11

THEY LAUGH

0:33:110:33:12

-I hope they've got our things.

-It's a real cat, there's a real cat there.

0:33:140:33:18

Hasn't got a lot number on it, has it?

0:33:180:33:20

Ha-ha. Robertsons have been established in Kinbuck for a very long time

0:33:200:33:25

so they should be well placed to handle what Charlie and Margie have come up with.

0:33:250:33:30

Let's hear what auctioneer Kate Robertson makes of it all.

0:33:300:33:33

Carlton Ware, very run-of-the-mill, mediocre. We get them all the time.

0:33:330:33:37

I don't expect it to make any more than £15.

0:33:370:33:40

Normally slate clocks are big and cumbersome

0:33:400:33:42

and very heavy to move around.

0:33:420:33:44

That slate clock's the right size and it's nice and neat and clean.

0:33:440:33:47

The one that I think will do the best is the carriage clock.

0:33:470:33:50

These clocks normally make £120-£150.

0:33:500:33:54

Charlie began with £271.28

0:33:550:33:57

and he spent £230 of it on five auction lots.

0:33:570:34:02

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank YOU very much indeed.

0:34:020:34:05

Margie started out with £315.10 and she spent £233,

0:34:050:34:09

also on five auction lots.

0:34:090:34:12

SHE LAUGHS

0:34:130:34:15

So Kate's got her gavel and she's ready to go.

0:34:150:34:19

First we have Charlie's starboard lamp.

0:34:200:34:23

That will see some excitement.

0:34:230:34:24

Let's go. Are you ready? So, Charlie?

0:34:240:34:28

£20. 20. Thank you, sir.

0:34:280:34:31

£20 bid. Come on. This is a nice one. £20. Advance on 20. Come on.

0:34:310:34:35

The ship's lantern. 22 down and 24. 26. 28.

0:34:350:34:39

£28. Wee bit more. 28. 30.

0:34:390:34:42

32. £32. Advance on 32 now. We're finished on 32. All in for £32.

0:34:420:34:48

-There is a happy bunny.

-Thank you very much.

0:34:490:34:52

Lamp profit, profit lamp. Ha-ha!

0:34:520:34:56

Ladies and gentlemen, place your bids for Margie's card shoe.

0:34:560:35:00

-Falls under the...

-Looks good in a casino.

-Well done.

-I love casinos.

0:35:000:35:05

-Do you? Rien ne va plus.

-Ah, rien ne va plus.

0:35:050:35:09

-Faites vos jeux.

-Merci.

0:35:090:35:12

-God, I've set him off.

-FRENCH ACCENT: I don't mind if I do.

0:35:120:35:16

This is quite a smart piece now. A dealing shoe.

0:35:160:35:19

-We don't have many of those in here.

-I bet they don't.

-£40?

0:35:190:35:23

40 on the dealing shoe. Come on. 40. 30 then. £30 on the dealing shoe.

0:35:230:35:28

Come on. 20. 20 on the dealing shoe. Come on. £20 on the dealing shoe.

0:35:280:35:32

-20. 22. 24.

-There you are. Look at this.

0:35:320:35:36

30. 32. 34. 36. 38. 40.

0:35:360:35:41

Advance on 40. Thank you. 45. £45 here. Advance on 45 now.

0:35:410:35:46

We finish on £45. All out on 45.

0:35:460:35:50

-Why is there a big cat on your lap?

-A pussycat.

-Dr Strangelove.

0:35:500:35:54

Hey, you brought me luck.

0:35:540:35:56

Every cat likes a winner and Margie, remember, has a comfortable lead.

0:35:560:36:01

It wasn't the cat that bought it, was it?

0:36:010:36:04

Can Margie do as well with a biscuit tin?

0:36:040:36:07

An Edwardian novelty biscuit tin in the shape of a book.

0:36:070:36:10

-It's Gourmets Delight.

-Isn't that lovely? Gourmets Delight.

0:36:100:36:14

What shall we bid for this one then? £20? 20 on the biscuit tin. £20.

0:36:140:36:19

Go on. Go on.

0:36:190:36:21

£15. Ten. £10. Advance on ten.

0:36:210:36:24

-Hang on, Margie, they need to work on this.

-A wee bit more.

0:36:240:36:28

Advance on £10. Advance on ten. They are collectable. £10.

0:36:280:36:30

Don't laugh, Margie.

0:36:300:36:32

Advance on ten. The biscuit tin. Come on. Advance on ten.

0:36:320:36:35

£10 it goes then.

0:36:350:36:37

Oh, Margie.

0:36:370:36:39

Margie's first loss for some time.

0:36:390:36:41

Now for Charlie's big gamble, the French cabinet.

0:36:420:36:45

HE GROANS

0:36:450:36:47

-I was foolish to spend 100 quid on something like that.

-Shush.

0:36:490:36:54

Quite attractive You can have that in any room in your house, I think.

0:36:540:36:57

So let's go with that one. £100. £100 on the cabinet. 100. £80.

0:36:570:37:02

80 on the cabinet. £80. Thank you. 80 bid. Advance on 80.

0:37:020:37:06

-Advance on 80. Thank you. 85.

-There you go.

-90. 95. 100. £100 here.

0:37:060:37:12

Advance on 100. More now. Advance on 100.

0:37:120:37:15

Advance on £100. 110.

0:37:150:37:18

120. 130. 140. 140 to my right.

0:37:180:37:22

Advance on 140. Finished at 140. All out at 140.

0:37:220:37:27

-Thank you.

-Well done.

0:37:290:37:31

He got away with that, I'd say.

0:37:320:37:36

-What we got next?

-My heart's going like the clappers.

0:37:360:37:39

What about the frame he bought at the same shop?

0:37:390:37:42

Come on, Mrs Adam, I want to see your hand shooting up this time.

0:37:420:37:46

Wee romantic that you are. Let's go. £30.

0:37:460:37:49

£30. 30. Come on. 20, then.

0:37:490:37:52

20 to start it. 20. 22. 24. 26. 28. 30. 32. 34.

0:37:520:37:59

Getting there, getting there.

0:37:590:38:01

38 with you. £40. 40. Advance on 40.

0:38:010:38:05

Come on. Advance on £40 now. Romeo and Juliet and all that. 45.

0:38:050:38:10

-She's bunged you a fiver.

-Advance on £45. Are we finished at 45?

0:38:100:38:17

Well done.

0:38:170:38:18

More blessed relief for Charlie.

0:38:180:38:21

This is purgatory.

0:38:210:38:24

It's not what you call comfortable, is it?

0:38:250:38:27

Time for the clock that Margie agonised over for so long.

0:38:270:38:32

-I declare myself worried about your clock.

-Gee, thanks.

0:38:320:38:37

I didn't want to be rude when you unveiled it

0:38:370:38:40

but when I went to bed last night I thought,

0:38:400:38:42

"What has the old bag done?"

0:38:420:38:44

Let's go for £50, please. 50 on the clock. It's a nice one. 50. 40 then.

0:38:450:38:49

Come on. £40 on the slate clock. 40. It's a nice size.

0:38:490:38:53

-£30 on the slate clock. 30. 30 bid. 32. 34.

-Here we go, here we go.

0:38:530:38:58

This man's got bid-itis.

0:38:580:39:01

£40. 45? £45? Advance on 45 now.

0:39:010:39:05

Finished on 45.

0:39:050:39:08

Damn and blast it.

0:39:080:39:09

To put it mildly.

0:39:090:39:11

I just had a bad buying day, didn't I?

0:39:120:39:15

Did you have a migraine or something?

0:39:150:39:17

Margie's Carlton Ware next.

0:39:170:39:19

Something tells me this won't go well.

0:39:190:39:21

I'm praying for you.

0:39:210:39:23

A Carlton Rouge Royale two-branch candleholder and ashtray. £10. Ten.

0:39:230:39:28

-£10. Come on.

-We'll take it to the next auction!

0:39:280:39:31

-Need a free pair of tights with these.

-Thank you, five bid.

0:39:310:39:36

-Advance on five. Advance on £5.

-It is unsaleable, this stuff.

0:39:360:39:39

-I have first-hand knowledge.

-At £5. Ewan.

0:39:390:39:42

That confirms Margie's luck's just run out.

0:39:420:39:46

The candlesticks were all right, the candelabra thing.

0:39:460:39:49

Calling it a candelabra is pushing it a bit!

0:39:490:39:53

She was a big fan of Charlie's bargain jar.

0:39:530:39:56

OK, £20. 20. £20?

0:39:560:39:59

Thank you, Gavin. £20 bid. The man's on 20.

0:39:590:40:03

22. 24. 26. 28.

0:40:030:40:06

£28. 30.

0:40:060:40:09

£30 here. Advance on 30 now. Advance on £30.

0:40:090:40:13

That's OK. Nice little profit.

0:40:130:40:16

-We finish on £30.

-Well done.

0:40:160:40:19

Charlie's quietly creeping ahead here.

0:40:210:40:24

-A little cocky now.

-I'm so unused to winning anything in my life.

0:40:240:40:30

This has come as a bit of a golden day really.

0:40:300:40:33

Can Margie's bagatelle get her back in the game? She needs snookers.

0:40:330:40:38

-This is a definite profit.

-There's no doubt about this.

-No doubt.

0:40:380:40:42

Cast-iron success.

0:40:420:40:44

-£100. 100. £100.

-She's obviously got faith in this. She's interested.

-80.

0:40:440:40:50

£80. Come on. 80. 60 then. £60 on the bagatelle.

0:40:500:40:55

60. £50. 50. Come on.

0:40:550:40:58

£50. My goodness. You're not in the mood tonight, are you?

0:40:580:41:01

-Shall I keep going for you? £50. 40 then. £40.

-God, this is terrible.

0:41:010:41:06

£40. Thank you. 40 bid. Advance on 40. Advance on £40. Advance on 40.

0:41:060:41:12

We finish on £40. Stuart.

0:41:120:41:15

-40.

-Dear me.

0:41:150:41:17

-Oh, crumbs, it's not been your best, has it?

-It's been a shocker.

0:41:170:41:21

I just hope that whoever bought it knows the rules.

0:41:210:41:24

-I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

-If I were you, I'd cry.

0:41:240:41:29

Will Charlie's carriage clock hand him yet more profits, I wonder?

0:41:300:41:34

-This is it, Marge.

-This is it. The final countdown.

0:41:340:41:39

£100. £100 on the carriage clock.

0:41:390:41:41

-At least you're asking for 100.

-80 then.

0:41:410:41:43

£80 for the carriage clock. £80.

0:41:430:41:46

How often do we get them in this condition? £80.

0:41:460:41:49

50. £50 for the carriage clock. 50. Thank you. Advance on 50 now.

0:41:500:41:55

-Advance on 50.

-Come on, team.

0:41:550:41:57

60. 65. 70. 75. 80.

0:41:570:42:01

£80. Advance on 80. Advance an £80. At £80 now.

0:42:010:42:06

Did you see him? "God, that was cheap, wasn't it?"

0:42:060:42:10

Not bad but it hardly justified the gamble.

0:42:100:42:13

I'm not spending more than five quid on anything else ever again now. Come on.

0:42:130:42:18

Never mind. His steady profits plus Margie's big losses

0:42:180:42:22

mean that Charlie is the winner today.

0:42:220:42:24

Margie started out with £315.10.

0:42:240:42:29

And after paying auction costs she made a loss of £114.10,

0:42:290:42:34

leaving her about where she started with £201.

0:42:340:42:38

While Charlie began with £271.28,

0:42:380:42:41

and after paying auction costs he has made a profit of £38.14,

0:42:410:42:47

leaving him with £309.42 to spend next time. Well done, my boy.

0:42:470:42:52

-Well done. The boy did well.

-Thank you, darling. Here we go.

0:42:520:42:57

HORN BEEPS

0:42:570:42:59

Marvellous.

0:42:590:43:01

Next on Antiques Road Trip, Charlie tees off.

0:43:040:43:07

Will you get back in the car, please?

0:43:070:43:09

And Margie's told to clear off.

0:43:090:43:12

-I feel awful now.

-Sling your hook.

0:43:120:43:14

Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper begin in the Scottish capital at Edinburgh, then travel through Dunfermline and head to Stirlingshire for an auction at Kinbuck.