Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 14

Continuing their road trip across Scotland, Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper begin at Abernyte in Perth and Kinross, before heading to an auction in the Highlands at Dingwall.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-All right, viewers?

-..with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I'm on fire! Yes.

-Sold! Going, going, gone!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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-50p!

-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Are they papier-mache buttocks?!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Oh! Oh!

-There we go!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's day four of our Caledonian caper in a Sunbeam Rapier

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with Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper.

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-We're going even further north, aren't we?

-Aye!

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-We're going up over the Cairngorms.

-Are we really?

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You'll never be seen again!

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Auctioneer and porridge-lover Charlie has enjoyed

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a roller coaster of a week so far...

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Oh!

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This is getting better by the minute.

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His road trip took a funny turn at the last auction

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where just about everything started at £1. But is he bitter?

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I've got here one of Monet's earlier works...

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"poond".

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While dealer and former fashion model Margie has had

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an equally hairy time. Oh, my!

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These are in incredibly good nick.

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Ah, poor old soul.

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Her low point was some Rouge Royale Carlton Ware,

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which made a mere £5, much to Charlie's amusement..

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I just had a bad buy day, didn't I?

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Do you have a migraine or something?

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Margie began with £200 and so far, after three trips to auction,

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she's amassed a total of £221.82.

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You won't get fat on that lot!

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Whilst Charlie, who also started off with £200,

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has managed to make a little bit more,

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with £238.28 to spend today.

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But what on?

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# I like buying Rouge Royale... #

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-Sarky, Charlie!

-# I think it's going to be good. #

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-You are barking mad.

-Woof!

-True!

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Charlie and Margie set off from Jedburgh in the borders

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before travelling the breadth and length of Scotland

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to reach journey's end at Hamilton, South Lanarkshire.

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Today, they begin in Abernyte, in Perth and Kinross,

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and then head far north for an auction in the Highlands

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at Dingwall.

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About halfway between Perth and Dundee,

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Abernyte is tucked away in rich farmland

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that's famous for livestock, fruit and veg.

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And at the huge antiques centre on the outskirts of the village,

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our early starters seem ideally placed for a bumper crop.

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If I may say so, Gladys, it looks a little posh for you.

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You'll nae find things for £4.50 here, my girl.

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-Have I got to go in here with you?

-Yep! Take my arm.

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-I'll lead you to paradise.

-You're putting me off!

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Lordy! Get a load of this!

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-Oh, dear.

-There's no shortage of antiques here,

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all arranged nicely over a huge area too.

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So, just as long as they don't get lost...

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Think I'll go back thataway.

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SHE SIGHS

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I wonder how many items there are in this establishment.

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-Hundreds of thousands.

-There's a bit of a dealer shortage, though,

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so manager Margaret could be essential.

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Could you give me a quick whistle-stop tour?

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-Yes.

-Just so I can get the lie of the land.

-No problem at all.

-Thank you.

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China, furniture, then you have ancient books,

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vintage clothes, vintage bags.

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Obviously, the cabinets with jewellery, etc, silverware.

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-Are you following this, Charlie?

-Round here, we've got ceramics.

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There's something here for everybody.

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Meanwhile, Margie's unearthed something even more valuable.

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Ah!

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A rare breed in one of these places. A dealer!

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Margie, meet Bob.

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-Right. Is that one of those luckenbooths?

-That's right, yeah.

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-Yeah.

-That's quite a modern one.

-It's handsome, isn't it?

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A luckenbooth is a Scottish love token,

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named after the lockable stalls on Edinburgh's Royal Mile

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which once sold them.

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-It's nice, but it is...

-Modern. Brand-new.

-..modern.

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I've actually got a... I just got it today, or yesterday...

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-An old one?

-An old one. Have a look at that one.

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That is a little Scottish stone brooch, with the thistle

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and it's 1903 or something.

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I'm told that the Victorians always had the horseshoe round that way...

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-Right.

-..but then I expect you've heard the story that

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-if you hang a horseshoe up, the luck falls out.

-Oh, really?

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-That's what they say.

-You're not Scottish, so how do you know that?

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I don't think that only applies to Scotland, Margie.

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-How much would that be?

-How much have I got on it? 40 quid?

-Yeah.

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That's way out, for me.

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What do you want to pay, then I'll tell you where to go?

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Those two are getting on famously,

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while Charlie practises the lowest form of wit.

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-HE GASPS

-No(!)

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No. Rouge Royale(!)

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She could lose another 30 quid.

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He wouldn't let it lie, would he?

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-It's so difficult.

-Are you looking for something for 5p?

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-You know...

-Or a bob, Bob.

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That's a nice little thing.

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Don't think you'll find any chips on it.

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-No.

-You can have it for a tenner.

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-Now you're getting to know me, aren't you?

-We all are, Margie.

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And Charlie looks a bit boggled.

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Perhaps the scrutiny is proving too much.

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-They're watching us.

-I know.

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-Should we have a waltz?

-Yeah.

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Oh, do stop it, you two.

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I can't help feeling you're not taking this entirely seriously.

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-This isn't buying anything, is it?

-No!

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I really do think someone should make a start.

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-That's cute.

-Promising. Maybe the waltzing worked.

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Ah! It's a little travelling, folding book-rest, I assume.

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Or it might just be upside down?

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Maybe if you're travelling and you want to take your books with you...

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Nicely made.

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And they fold in.

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And it's a little table as well.

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-Sweet. I like it.

-I wonder what Margaret can do on that?

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I've just seen this little thing.

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So, what could be the best price?

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The best price on that would be 30.

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And that's the end? That's the absolute...?

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-I'm afraid so, yes.

-It's a sweet thing. OK.

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I like it. Thank you.

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-Well done.

-Well done.

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After that little triumph, Margie's left the building,

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which leaves Charlie still on the lookout...for a dealer.

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-Ah, another man in residence here.

-How are you doing?

-Hi. I'm doing well. Charlie's the name.

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-Gavin Morris. Nice to meet you.

-Gavin. Hi. I've been having

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a wonderful time here, but I have to confess, I have spent nothing.

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-Can you alter that for me?

-Go on, Gavin.

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-Ah, what about your... Is this a swagger stick?

-Yeah.

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It's very short, isn't it?

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-It's missing the little...

-Someone's cut the ferrule.

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-The ferrule, yeah.

-Can I look at your swagger stick?

-You can.

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-Suits you, Charlie.

-Suits me, doesn't it?

-It does.

-It's all me.

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-Could be reasonable, Charlie.

-Could it be? Could it be stupid money or...

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-I mean, that's not silver, is it?

-No, I don't think so.

-To be fair, it's plated.

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That's something.

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Anything else on that theme?

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How much is your drum over there? Is that lots of dosh or...?

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-They make them into coffee tables.

-Yeah.

-Probably why you sell them!

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The big ones, yeah. It's a nice drum.

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I like a nice maker's name on one of these things,

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not that they mean anything to me.

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Or a nice crest. That doesn't have either, but it's in good condition.

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I've got to try and buy something at your cheaper end.

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Not going to try to beat the price down then.

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But we're definitely getting warm here.

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Cor, super stool. I think that's probably money, though, isn't it?

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-No, no. It's cheap.

-Is it? Is it really cheap?

-Yeah.

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35.

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-CHARLIE EXHALES

-Could be 25 quid.

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-It's lost a few of its bits, hasn't it?

-A few of its ears have gone, yeah.

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-Priced accordingly, Charlie.

-I like the shape.

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I like the cabriole leg.

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It's not really a bold English cabriole leg,

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-having said that, it's not really a French cabriole, it's an English stool.

-Yep.

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-I'd buy that at a silly price.

-Give me a silly offer.

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It is silly, but don't smack me.

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Do you know what I think that'll make at auction?

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-I think it'll make between 20 and 30 quid.

-OK.

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I'd have to buy it for 15 quid.

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I mean, that's pathetic, but if you could sell at 15 quid,

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I'd give you 15 quid and run.

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OK, Charlie, it's a deal.

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Blast! I wish I'd said ten!

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-Are you happy with that?

-Delighted.

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I think Charlie likes it here.

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Now, what about that old friend?

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I don't think I want your swagger stick, do I?

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-It's...

-It can be reasonable.

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Well, again, I'd have to... You're a man that likes

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-being insulted, aren't you?

-Yeah, I love it.

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I think it'll make 12 or 14...

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I think it's short, I think it's silver-plated,

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it's just a bit of fun and if you could do it for five quid,

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I'd take it away, but if it's cost money, I'm not here to steal...

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Ten.

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It's probably what it'll make, isn't it? Um...

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This is pathetic, but eight quid,

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-then if it makes ten, I'll make £1.

-Go on, then.

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You wish you'd never seen me today!

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-We've had a good week, Charlie.

-Have you had a good week?!

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Seems you picked the right time, Charlie.

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Off the mark for just £23.

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And while Charlie's been finally prying open his wallet,

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Margie's moved on, making her way south towards Perth

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and a bit more shopping.

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Wow! This is novel.

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-Hi.

-I'm John.

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-Hi, John. Margie.

-Nice to meet you.

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Farang is a Thai word meaning someone of European ancestry,

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and it's also this shop, selling arts and crafts from Thailand

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and neighbouring countries.

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Very nice too,

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although it's not something Margie's particularly au fait with.

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-What god is that?

-That's Ganesh.

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-Ganesh.

-That's Ganesh.

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He's good, isn't he?

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Elephants - love elephants.

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There's a mixture here of Southeast Asian, old and new, as well as a few

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items which come from a different continent altogether.

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These are, unusually for me, from North America.

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They're from Gatlinburg in Tennessee, those particular ones.

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-Really?

-They're Native American arrowheads,

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so each of those is going to be 1,000 to 1,500 years old at least.

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Some of them might even be older than that.

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Those might be a little too niche for a

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general sale in Ross and Cromarty. Anything else, John?

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A little set of opium scales.

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Now, those are very affordable.

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A set like that, even with the ivory, that is just a £20 piece.

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Right. And that's opium scales?

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-The scales themselves aren't particularly unusual...

-That's ivory.

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..the ivory pans on them are.

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Not to everyone's taste, Margie, but it is legal under

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the 1947 CITES Agreement to trade ivory from before that year.

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-This is very old.

-Got to be careful.

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Margie can be indecisive at the best of times,

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and feeling a bit out of her depth certainly isn't helping.

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These look interesting.

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These are old Burmese puppet heads on stands.

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Yeah, they're quite good.

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His tongue's moving around.

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Yeah, these were used as puppets in Burma.

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Were they?

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-Yeah.

-What's he made of?

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Wood, all just carved.

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-So they're not brand-new?

-No, they've got some age to them.

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Have they?

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It's hard to tell exactly how old,

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but they're probably about 50 years old.

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They would have been used like Burmese theatre puppets,

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old folk tales and things.

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Do you think they're a bit of fun? What do you think?

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You know?

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Antiques can be very boring.

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Steady on, Margie! Still no decision, though,

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and now she's after an opinion from the auction house.

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Right.

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You don't think so? Not advisable?

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-Yeah.

-Oh, dear.

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CHATTER ON LINE

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Right.

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But not Asian social history?

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That's all very well,

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but I don't see any Scottish antiques in this shop.

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Well, they probably haven't seen a lot of those in Dingwall,

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but it might be a good thing, who knows?

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Good work, John, but now Margie's got to either buy here or wait till tomorrow.

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Right, well, it's down to me to make a decision, isn't it?

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Yes, come on, Margie, you can do it.

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How much is that?

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The best on that... I'd say £12.

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SHE CHUCKLES

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That's a bargain basement price.

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And what about the old puppet heads?

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They were 25, so why don't we say the scales

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and the puppet head for 25?

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That does sound like a very good deal, Margie.

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-So the two for 25?

-Two for 25.

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Oh, for crying out... What am I worrying about? You're a pal.

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Hopefully they'll do well for you.

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Which puppet head are we going to go for?

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Which one do you like, John?

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I think this one in the middle here's quite a good colour.

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I'll have him, then. Done.

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But while Margie and John plump for a puppet...

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..Charlie is heading north up through the Highlands to the

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village of Newtonmore to find out about a uniquely Scottish sport.

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-Hello.

-Hello. I'm Rachel.

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Pleased to meet you. Welcome to the Highland Folk Museum.

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Shinty is a team game that's big in the Highlands

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and quite a few other parts of the world where Scots have migrated to.

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And at Newtonmore, they're very good at it.

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In fact, their shinty side have been the league

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champions for the last three seasons.

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The rules of shinty became formalised during Victorian

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times, although the game itself is ancient.

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When did it all begin, historically?

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It came from Ireland, originally, with the monks

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and with Christianity.

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And it grew through the centuries to become training for the clans.

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There could be 150-a-side...

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What?!

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Teams playing, clan against clan.

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So it's a very, very old sport.

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Very old.

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I'm just looking at the club. Are they called clubs?

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Camans.

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Caman comes from Gaelic, which means crooked.

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Shinty is a close relative of the Irish game of hurling

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and a forebear of ice hockey -

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sports which share a reputation of being a bit on the dangerous side.

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This is an early caman.

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Do you want to feel the weight of that?

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It looks like a caveman's club,

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it doesn't look like a sporting implement.

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This is more like the size of thing you would play with,

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with the two equal sides.

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Is there a particular wood that it would be made out of?

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Yes, ash was the most popular.

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How big are the balls?

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Here we have some "leathers", they're called.

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-Yeah?

-This one dates back to 1914, and was used...

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Hard, isn't it?

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Very hard. Yeah.

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There's cork inside, wound round with thread.

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-Wool?

-Wool, yes.

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This is the more modern one, this is what they play with today.

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Yeah. It's a pretty hefty thing.

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If that hits you, it's not going to do you any good, is it?

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-It can be very painful.

-It must go at some speed?

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It can go up 100mph.

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-100mph?

-Yes.

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That's hugely dangerous! Do you wear a face guard?

0:15:590:16:01

No, they don't wear face guards at all.

0:16:010:16:03

I'd love to see somebody playing it.

0:16:030:16:05

Would you like to try it?

0:16:050:16:07

Absolutely! I'm up for anything!

0:16:070:16:09

Blimey, Charlie, you just be careful out there.

0:16:120:16:15

I've been sent out here for a lesson.

0:16:150:16:18

-Welcome.

-Thank you very much.

0:16:180:16:20

-And you are?

-John.

0:16:200:16:22

John. Nice to meet you, John.

0:16:220:16:25

Here you've got the shinty stick.

0:16:250:16:27

I have one here for you.

0:16:270:16:28

The basics of the game are quite easy to follow.

0:16:280:16:32

It's to hit the ball - I'll hit the ball to you, and stop the ball.

0:16:320:16:37

Now you stop the ball with your two feet.

0:16:370:16:39

Hit it back, I'll demonstrate.

0:16:390:16:41

-With your feet?!

-Yeah. Basically, two foot.

0:16:410:16:45

Two feet always, push it to the side and hit.

0:16:450:16:48

Was that good? Was I a natural?

0:16:490:16:51

That was natural - you're a natural.

0:16:510:16:53

The third important thing is, when you get the ball and you stop

0:16:530:16:56

it, it's important that the ball arrives in the back of the net.

0:16:560:16:59

It can be there all day, but if it's not in the back of the net - no win.

0:16:590:17:04

Well, at least no-one is likely to get very hurt in a penalty shoot out.

0:17:040:17:09

With Charlie on the spot, even the goalie's probably safe.

0:17:090:17:12

I must say, that goal looks a bit narrow. And he looks enormous.

0:17:120:17:15

OK, I'm left-handed, like yourself,

0:17:150:17:17

so I'm hoping that I'll be able to strike the ball.

0:17:170:17:21

I'm sure you will. Cor blimey O'Reilly!

0:17:210:17:25

Like falling off a log, isn't it, for you?

0:17:250:17:28

-Charlie, it's your turn now.

-Are you ready for me, Jamie?

0:17:280:17:32

Here it comes.

0:17:320:17:34

Oh, dear, that was pathetic, wasn't it?

0:17:340:17:37

Oh!

0:17:390:17:40

Thank you!

0:17:400:17:42

-Very good.

-It's a goal!

0:17:440:17:46

Perhaps there's something in this talk of his Scottish roots after all!

0:17:460:17:51

Just don't expect Margie to put up with a blow-by-blow account, Charlie.

0:17:550:17:59

Nighty-night.

0:17:590:18:00

Next morning, Charlie Ross is a man with a clan.

0:18:040:18:08

-We're very near my home seat.

-Really?

0:18:080:18:10

We're near Ross.

0:18:100:18:12

You sort of feel comfortable up here?

0:18:120:18:14

I do, I really, really feel as if I...

0:18:140:18:16

Back with your "ain folk".

0:18:160:18:18

Well, let's hope we see a bit more spending in these wide open

0:18:190:18:23

spaces, cos yesterday they were both very careful with their cash.

0:18:230:18:28

Margie managed just £55 on three auction lots...

0:18:280:18:31

Are you looking for something for 5p?

0:18:310:18:33

You know...

0:18:330:18:34

..leaving her with £166.82 in her pocket,

0:18:340:18:39

whilst Charlie spent even less,

0:18:390:18:41

managing a measly £23 on two auction lots...

0:18:410:18:45

-Are you happy with that?

-Delighted.

0:18:450:18:47

..leaving him with over £200 to spend today.

0:18:470:18:50

Later, they'll be making for an auction at Dingwall,

0:18:500:18:53

but first, at their furthest point north, they're going to buy there.

0:18:530:18:57

Could be interesting.

0:18:570:18:59

THEY HUM

0:18:590:19:02

In about 1005, King Macbeth, yes,

0:19:060:19:10

the one the Bard based his tragedy on, was born in Dingwall.

0:19:100:19:15

It's also been the stomping ground of the once-powerful

0:19:150:19:18

Earls of Ross. In fact,

0:19:180:19:20

local football team Ross County have a stag mascot called Rosco.

0:19:200:19:24

Charlie should look him up.

0:19:240:19:26

-Good.

-Antiques shop.

-Hey, this looks all right.

0:19:260:19:29

Objet d'Art is a relatively new antiques shop which appears

0:19:290:19:33

to be thriving.

0:19:330:19:34

They've recently added a 30-foot shipping container to

0:19:340:19:37

fit in extra stock...and Charlie.

0:19:370:19:40

What on earth is this?

0:19:400:19:43

Oh, my goodness gracious me.

0:19:430:19:45

Studio art pottery.

0:19:450:19:46

Unusual. Quite nice.

0:19:460:19:49

All the usual suspects are here, as well as one distinct speciality.

0:19:490:19:54

Taxidermy is my particular field.

0:19:540:19:56

-That's very specialist, isn't it?

-It is.

0:19:560:19:59

-That's been well done, hasn't it?

-Yes, indeed.

0:19:590:20:01

-Sell a lot of stags' heads.

-Do you?

-Yes.

0:20:010:20:04

Well, you would here, wouldn't you?

0:20:040:20:06

A little "deer" for a hat stand.

0:20:060:20:08

But while Margie admires William's creatures, Charlie's crept back in.

0:20:080:20:13

Looks like he's found something too.

0:20:130:20:15

Would I normally look at a biscuit barrel? No, I would not.

0:20:150:20:19

But...when a biscuit barrel is like that, you can

0:20:190:20:24

definitely say it is the Rolls-Royce of all biscuit barrels.

0:20:240:20:29

It is £75, which I think is hugely competitive.

0:20:290:20:35

Is the glass damaged?

0:20:350:20:38

Cos at that price, if the glass is damaged, we have une probleme.

0:20:380:20:43

There is a bit of a crack in it there.

0:20:430:20:46

Everything's got a price.

0:20:480:20:50

We could try William - you never know.

0:20:500:20:53

William, I was tempted by the price,

0:20:530:20:55

until I saw this and I thought, "Oh, crumbs."

0:20:550:20:59

-Yes.

-At auction, it could make £30-£40.

0:20:590:21:03

I could do 30 on that, sir.

0:21:030:21:05

And at that, there will most certainly be

0:21:050:21:08

something in it for you.

0:21:080:21:10

There was something in this cabinet as well...

0:21:100:21:13

-What were you looking at?

-..that took my eye.

0:21:130:21:15

I love the Arts and Crafts look of this box.

0:21:150:21:18

Yes. I just love the hinges, I love the work around the base.

0:21:180:21:22

That's a fair bit of silver.

0:21:220:21:23

It is a fair bit of silver in there,

0:21:230:21:26

and the other attraction, to me anyway, is that it's Irish silver.

0:21:260:21:30

-Ah!

-I think that will put a slight premium.

0:21:300:21:34

I think, at auction, it might make something around the £100 mark.

0:21:340:21:37

-Yes.

-I don't know where you can be on it.

0:21:370:21:40

Well, I could do 100 on that.

0:21:400:21:42

-I'm going to carry on looking around and I'm going to bear those two in mind.

-Fine.

0:21:420:21:46

And between you and me,

0:21:460:21:48

I'd be quite surprised if I walked out of here without them.

0:21:480:21:50

Charlie seems smitten with those, and he can certainly afford them.

0:21:500:21:54

But what about them birds? Going "cheep"?

0:21:540:21:56

You've got some interesting stuff.

0:21:560:21:58

Yes. Yes. This is particularly interesting.

0:21:580:22:01

These are little flower crafts.

0:22:010:22:03

Yes. Made out of seed.

0:22:030:22:05

It's made out of seeds and leaves.

0:22:050:22:07

I think that's extraordinary.

0:22:070:22:08

Seeds and grasses.

0:22:080:22:10

These are very nice, but I'm a bit scared they're a bit modern.

0:22:100:22:14

Eh, yeah - but I think they will sell.

0:22:140:22:16

-15.

-15!

0:22:160:22:19

Another bargain-basement price.

0:22:190:22:21

They look all right, don't they?

0:22:210:22:23

You're being very kind.

0:22:230:22:24

Not at all.

0:22:240:22:25

Those are sweet, aren't they?

0:22:260:22:29

I'm not sure that Margie could spend big money even if she wanted to,

0:22:290:22:33

so careful has she become.

0:22:330:22:35

Not something we could say about Charlie though.

0:22:350:22:37

A Victorian inlay rosewood table, with no price on it whatsoever.

0:22:370:22:42

I can only assume it's free.

0:22:420:22:44

Unfortunately not!

0:22:440:22:46

Unfortunately not.

0:22:460:22:48

It's missing its gallery on the bottom.

0:22:480:22:51

There's a label here, and that's...

0:22:510:22:54

What are we looking at?

0:22:540:22:55

We're looking at £90, but there's room for negotiation.

0:22:550:22:59

It's a great bit of rosewood.

0:22:590:23:01

It's beautiful and beautifully inlaid.

0:23:010:23:03

Edwardian. It's 1900, 1910 perhaps.

0:23:030:23:06

It might be just late Victorian,

0:23:060:23:07

what they call the Sheraton Revival period.

0:23:070:23:10

-Look at this inlay here.

-It's gorgeous.

0:23:100:23:13

Look at the swags and floral rosette. It's just beautiful.

0:23:130:23:16

There's satinwood, boxwood.

0:23:160:23:18

Couldn't be 50 quid, could it? To an old man?

0:23:180:23:21

Yes.

0:23:210:23:23

Blimey, you said that a bit sharpish.

0:23:230:23:25

I think we might be about to get down to a deal on the other items as well.

0:23:250:23:29

I love the cigarette box. I think it would make about £100 at auction.

0:23:290:23:34

In an ideal world, I would want to pay £100 for the cigarette box

0:23:340:23:39

and the biscuit barrel.

0:23:390:23:42

If we said 110 for the pair...that puts you back in the ascendancy.

0:23:420:23:49

150 for your table, your biscuit barrel and your whatsit.

0:23:490:23:54

Almost there, I reckon.

0:23:540:23:56

-I think if you're buying the three pieces...

-Do I get a bulk discount?

-I can do 150 for you.

0:23:560:24:01

I think that's kind of you. And I've even got money!

0:24:010:24:04

So, £150, but what went where?

0:24:040:24:10

I'm quite happy with the biscuit barrel at 30.

0:24:100:24:12

Let's call the table 40,

0:24:120:24:14

and let's call the silver box 80, which is £150.

0:24:140:24:18

And there should be a profit there.

0:24:200:24:22

Back inside, Margie's made another find.

0:24:230:24:25

That's nice. Papier-mache - just pressed paper.

0:24:270:24:31

The ticket price is £65.

0:24:310:24:33

Very popular, but damaged.

0:24:330:24:35

Looks like William's needed...again.

0:24:360:24:39

It's a shame about that, isn't it?

0:24:390:24:41

Yes, it's a lovely...

0:24:410:24:43

-Lovely colour.

-Yes. Lot of work gone into that.

0:24:430:24:47

It's got a little bit of wear and tear and damage, hasn't it?

0:24:470:24:51

Some idiot's used it!

0:24:510:24:53

Well, yes. Yes. Yes. Probably a long time ago.

0:24:530:24:56

It's mid-Victorian, which is lovely.

0:24:580:25:01

Beautifully hand-painted as well.

0:25:010:25:03

-That's so nice.

-35?

0:25:030:25:05

Increases your advantage on him.

0:25:090:25:11

So is that the absolute...?

0:25:110:25:12

I could do £30 on that for you.

0:25:120:25:14

And that's the end? So 25's out of the question?

0:25:140:25:17

I think 25 would be out of the question on that one.

0:25:170:25:20

I'm almost capitulating.

0:25:200:25:22

Well, capitulate and that will be a wonderful purchase.

0:25:220:25:27

Yes, I like that.

0:25:270:25:28

Thank you very much.

0:25:280:25:30

Another good deal for Margie, although with the auction

0:25:300:25:32

just around the corner, I wonder how those lots will fare.

0:25:320:25:36

But now it's time to take the short drive east

0:25:370:25:40

from Dingwall to Fortrose, on the Black Isle.

0:25:400:25:43

-It sounds fabulous, doesn't it? The Black Isle.

-Aye.

0:25:430:25:46

Aye, famous for its ruined 13th-century cathedral,

0:25:460:25:50

Fortrose also features an antiques shop of that name.

0:25:500:25:53

I've got enough money to do what I need to do.

0:25:530:25:57

Goodbye, my lovely.

0:25:570:25:59

Good afternoon. Charlie's the name.

0:26:030:26:05

Hello, Charlie. I'm Patricia.

0:26:050:26:06

-Patricia. Nice to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

0:26:060:26:08

I think Charlie's a bit disappointed to have come here last.

0:26:110:26:15

Sold, sold - lots of sold stickers.

0:26:150:26:17

Very good sign to see sold stickers in a shop.

0:26:170:26:21

There are quite a few things still for sale that he'd happily snap up,

0:26:210:26:25

but he's looking for an item he can combine

0:26:250:26:28

with one of his other purchases, to make a joint lot.

0:26:280:26:30

My goodness me!

0:26:320:26:34

A Victorian spear. It's what I would call a pike, I think.

0:26:340:26:38

Well, I suppose a pike could go with a swagger stick,

0:26:380:26:41

but there might be a better match here.

0:26:410:26:44

You haven't got a biscuit barrel of any sort, have you?

0:26:440:26:47

Only the Wedgwood one.

0:26:470:26:48

Oh, the plated Wedgwood one?

0:26:480:26:50

It's probably quite expanseive, is it?

0:26:500:26:52

Not sure what I've got on the ticket.

0:26:520:26:55

Typical Wedgwood colouring,

0:26:550:26:57

but I think Wedgwood's a little bit old-fashioned.

0:26:570:27:01

What's that going to make at auction?

0:27:010:27:03

There's another cut glass...

0:27:030:27:05

That looks a bit more like it.

0:27:060:27:08

Would that fit with the one you've got?

0:27:080:27:10

I think it would rather. Lovely shape - pineapple shape.

0:27:100:27:13

It's not expensive, is it?

0:27:130:27:15

He said...

0:27:150:27:17

hoping that it might be even cheaper.

0:27:170:27:19

£18. How much could that be?

0:27:190:27:22

15.

0:27:220:27:23

-Ah.

-Ah.

0:27:230:27:25

That's all right. You don't want to sell me that for a tenner, do you?

0:27:250:27:29

Nice thing.

0:27:290:27:30

Would it be nit-picking to say £12?

0:27:310:27:34

Go on - 12.

0:27:340:27:36

-Yes.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

0:27:360:27:38

I like it. I really like it, it's proper quality.

0:27:380:27:40

That's sweet of you. Thank you. I'm sorry I haven't spent more money with you.

0:27:400:27:45

I won't be retiring today.

0:27:450:27:46

Quite. And now that Charlie's shopping is complete...

0:27:470:27:51

..let's see what Margie's up to,

0:27:520:27:55

just outside of Fortrose in Rosemarkie...

0:27:550:27:58

..where she's come to the Groam House Museum

0:28:000:28:02

to view a remarkable collection of art

0:28:020:28:05

by the local inhabitants of the area.

0:28:050:28:07

-Eric.

-How do you do?

-I'm Margie Cooper.

0:28:070:28:10

The museum was established to house

0:28:100:28:12

and preserve the village's 15 carved stones,

0:28:120:28:16

that were created by the Picts during the 8th and 9th centuries.

0:28:160:28:20

They were the native people of northern Scotland

0:28:200:28:23

in the time of the Romans and the time after the Romans.

0:28:230:28:26

Because the Romans never conquered this area,

0:28:260:28:28

they survived as an independent group of people.

0:28:280:28:31

For many hundreds of years,

0:28:310:28:32

these remarkable artefacts were not in the least bit treasured.

0:28:320:28:37

Indeed, the Picts themselves -

0:28:370:28:39

so-called by the Romans because of their painted bodies -

0:28:390:28:42

were unfairly disregarded as a bunch of violent and uncultured savages.

0:28:420:28:47

This is a very fanciful 16th-century drawing

0:28:470:28:49

of what somebody thought a Pict looked like.

0:28:490:28:52

And unfortunately, this has coloured opinion for too long.

0:28:520:28:56

How could absolute barbarians be producing

0:28:560:28:58

such wonderful sculpture as we see here?

0:28:580:29:01

The Rosemarkie stones are believed to have once been

0:29:010:29:04

part of an important early monastery,

0:29:040:29:06

which dates from the first influx of Christianity to Scotland.

0:29:060:29:10

The Rosemarkie Cross slab is our centrepiece.

0:29:100:29:12

It's a very complex piece of work, because it's a fusion

0:29:120:29:17

of Pictish art traditions with Christian art traditions.

0:29:170:29:21

We can recognise obvious Christian symbolism -

0:29:210:29:24

there's a cross on each side,

0:29:240:29:26

but on the other side is a collection of Pictish symbols.

0:29:260:29:29

Those wishing to learn more about the Picts

0:29:290:29:31

have found the greatest difficulty

0:29:310:29:33

in penetrating their long-extinct language.

0:29:330:29:36

But such answers as can be unearthed

0:29:360:29:38

are surely hidden in the stones themselves.

0:29:380:29:41

I actually prefer this side,

0:29:410:29:42

because we've got a conjunction of things here.

0:29:420:29:44

We have, again, Christian symbolism -

0:29:440:29:47

very easy to identity, set inside a very complex patter of key work.

0:29:470:29:51

But above that, this is the bit that's purely Pictish,

0:29:510:29:54

this is the bit we can really see

0:29:540:29:56

there was an important Pictish influence here.

0:29:560:29:59

It has a number of symbols on it.

0:29:590:30:01

The easiest one is this very large crescent shape here,

0:30:010:30:04

with what looks like a V across it, a big V.

0:30:040:30:08

And that crescent is highly ornamented with knotwork

0:30:080:30:11

-and with animals.

-All meaning something?

0:30:110:30:13

Well, the problem is we don't really know what they mean.

0:30:130:30:16

Are you ever going to know?

0:30:160:30:17

Well, we think it is some form of language,

0:30:170:30:19

they're telling you something.

0:30:190:30:21

-The most likely thing is that it's people's names.

-Ah.

0:30:210:30:26

So they may well be telling you that this is somebody,

0:30:260:30:30

the son of somebody - commemorating him

0:30:300:30:32

either cos he's dead or he erected the stone.

0:30:320:30:34

It's a monument about people.

0:30:340:30:36

The Picts were rediscovered during the 19th century,

0:30:360:30:40

and their sculptures, including those at Rosemarkie, restored.

0:30:400:30:44

A glance at some of the work at the museum

0:30:440:30:46

confirms the influence of early medieval Pictish

0:30:460:30:49

and Celtic design on the Arts and Crafts movement, for example.

0:30:490:30:53

In Ireland, there was a Celtic revival,

0:30:530:30:56

and eventually in Scotland in the 19th century,

0:30:560:30:58

various scholars started looking at the stones again,

0:30:580:31:02

and in 1903, there was this amazing publication here,

0:31:020:31:06

it's called The Early Christian Monuments Of Scotland.

0:31:060:31:09

Two men, Allen and Anderson - Allen was the main person,

0:31:090:31:12

he went round the country, looking at as many monuments

0:31:120:31:16

as he could find, drawing them and copying them.

0:31:160:31:19

So this book was very important in bringing, to a wider public,

0:31:190:31:23

the existence of these stones.

0:31:230:31:25

Although the academics continue to move at a snail's pace

0:31:250:31:28

in unlocking the secrets of Pictish art,

0:31:280:31:31

its influence continues into the 20th and 21st centuries,

0:31:310:31:35

as can be seen in several pieces of jewellery the museum's acquired.

0:31:350:31:40

This piece here, this crescent here, that is almost certainly developed

0:31:400:31:45

from the crescent symbol that we have on the Rosemarkie Cross slab.

0:31:450:31:50

So this was made in Iona by a silversmith,

0:31:500:31:54

so we like this bit, cos it is actually a piece of art

0:31:540:31:58

directly inspired from the Rosemarkie Cross slab.

0:31:580:32:01

Well, I think we can say with some certainty that our two have

0:32:010:32:05

bought very little to compare with any of these.

0:32:050:32:08

But let's take a look anyway.

0:32:080:32:10

-You ready?

-Wooh...

0:32:100:32:13

I say!

0:32:150:32:16

A small stool in the form of a 17th-century refectory table.

0:32:160:32:20

Not a book stand, then?

0:32:200:32:22

-It's nicely made, isn't it?

-I thought it was rather sweet.

0:32:220:32:25

-And it was £30.

-I think there'll be a profit lurking in there.

0:32:250:32:28

-Papier-mache.

-Saw that.

0:32:280:32:30

-Mid-Victorian.

-Saw that. But it's very nice.

0:32:300:32:32

Yeah. The gallow is lovely, isn't it?

0:32:320:32:35

We've got a lovely still life on there, which could be

0:32:350:32:38

-Dutch, 17th century.

-I don't think so.

0:32:380:32:41

No, no, no, but it's in that style.

0:32:410:32:43

-Little scales.

-Yeah, opium scales.

0:32:430:32:45

Those are ivory pans, which is quite unusual.

0:32:450:32:48

-That's quite unusual. 30 quid?

-£12.50.

0:32:480:32:52

You have done it again.

0:32:530:32:55

What's this? I don't know what this is.

0:32:550:32:57

This is a bit of a mystery.

0:32:570:32:59

-It's a Burmese puppet head.

-Hmm.

0:32:590:33:02

I think he's about to be rude.

0:33:020:33:04

What do you think of it so far?

0:33:040:33:06

Rubbish!

0:33:060:33:08

It's a nice mix, isn't it?

0:33:080:33:09

You have something for every taste.

0:33:090:33:12

Now for act two.

0:33:120:33:13

-Ooh! My word!

-Followed by...

0:33:130:33:16

-that!

-Oh, my goodness.

0:33:160:33:18

-You've made mine look like a charity shop.

-True.

0:33:180:33:22

Harsh, but fair.

0:33:220:33:23

-This is pretty.

-Don't look at it too carefully.

0:33:230:33:27

-Ah!

-It's got a lot of damage here. The other thing is...

0:33:270:33:30

Where's the damage?

0:33:300:33:32

Here. But it's a nice cabriole leg.

0:33:320:33:35

-They always sell.

-Yeah.

-Footstools always sell.

-Yeah.

0:33:350:33:38

-That's my favourite lot.

-Yeah. Lovely.

0:33:380:33:40

I thought that had a sort of Pugin Arts and Crafts look about it.

0:33:400:33:45

Yeah, it's...

0:33:450:33:46

-I took the insides out...

-Yeah.

-..and weighed it,

0:33:460:33:49

but it's 11 ounces of silver.

0:33:490:33:51

It's been a fabulous thing.

0:33:510:33:53

Faint praise, if every I heard it.

0:33:530:33:55

What about his table?

0:33:550:33:56

That is rosewood, which puts it into a different class.

0:33:560:34:01

-It's a typical Edwardian...

-I have sold many of those in my time.

0:34:010:34:04

-I bet you have.

-It's going to make...I reckon about 145.

0:34:040:34:07

-What, £14.50?!

-No, no, no!

0:34:070:34:11

If that makes £100, I'll take you out for a slap-up dinner.

0:34:110:34:14

-If we're going to have a bet...

-I think it'll make £45.

0:34:140:34:16

-Well, I'll say 85.

-You're on.

0:34:160:34:19

-Right.

-Come on.

-And you're going to have to pay for my dinner.

0:34:190:34:22

Love to!

0:34:220:34:24

But what did they really think?

0:34:240:34:26

She bigged-up my items again.

0:34:260:34:28

She thought the table was fabulous.

0:34:280:34:30

She's living in the '80s, like me.

0:34:300:34:33

I think he's going to make his money on his stool

0:34:330:34:35

and on his lovely octagonal rosewood table.

0:34:350:34:38

Those are dead certs.

0:34:380:34:40

It's a mixed bag, my dear, it's a mixed bag.

0:34:400:34:42

The bust on the stand is absolutely ghastly!

0:34:420:34:48

After starting out in Abernyte,

0:34:480:34:50

today's tussle will conclude almost 150 miles to the north,

0:34:500:34:54

at an auction in the county of Ross and Cromarty, at Dingwall.

0:34:540:34:58

-Have you seen where we are?

-Isn't it fantastic?

0:34:590:35:02

We're in the middle of a forest.

0:35:020:35:04

Have you got a rug?

0:35:040:35:05

Should we just pull in and have a little romantic picnic in the woods?

0:35:050:35:09

Instead of sitting in that auction room, cringing.

0:35:090:35:12

Welcome to Dingwall and Highland, where, in the heart

0:35:120:35:15

of the country, they shift a lot more heifer than Hepplewhite.

0:35:150:35:19

Let's hear what auctioneer Paul Spencer makes

0:35:190:35:22

of what our two have herded in.

0:35:220:35:24

The bird pictures - not the most sellable item I've ever seen.

0:35:240:35:27

I'd be surprised if we get anything more than £5 for those.

0:35:270:35:31

The rosewood occasional table - it should make about £150 to £180.

0:35:310:35:35

The miniature fruitwood refectory table's possibly

0:35:350:35:38

my favourite item in the sale today,

0:35:380:35:40

and I would be hoping £40 to £60 for that.

0:35:400:35:43

Charlie began with £238.28p,

0:35:430:35:45

and he's spent £185 of it on five auction lots.

0:35:450:35:50

Whilst Margie started out with £221.82,

0:35:520:35:56

and she's parted with exactly £100, also on five lots.

0:35:560:36:00

OK, gavels-a-go! Or are they?

0:36:020:36:05

-He's not got a normal gavel, just a long stick.

-I know.

0:36:050:36:08

Look at him!

0:36:080:36:10

He's quite vicious with that stick.

0:36:100:36:12

I think he's lost the end off it.

0:36:120:36:14

Charlie's swagger stick - any sergeant-majors out there?

0:36:140:36:18

£20? 20. Ten.

0:36:180:36:21

Ten bid. 12. 15. 18.

0:36:210:36:24

20. 22.

0:36:240:36:25

25. 28. 30. At 30. At 30.

0:36:250:36:29

At 30. At 30... Five!

0:36:290:36:32

40. At 45.

0:36:320:36:34

50. At 50. At 50.

0:36:340:36:37

At 50...at £50.

0:36:370:36:39

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:36:390:36:43

Wow! This bodes very well indeed.

0:36:430:36:46

What impeccable taste they have here in Scotland.

0:36:460:36:49

Any chance of Margie's birds taking off?

0:36:490:36:53

I don't think much of the cataloguing.

0:36:530:36:55

-"Two bird pictures composted from seeds and mosses."

-It doesn't say...

0:36:550:36:58

-It says composed!

-Oh, sorry!

0:36:580:37:02

£30. 30.

0:37:020:37:03

£10.

0:37:030:37:05

Five. Bid. At five. At five. Eight.

0:37:050:37:07

10. 12.

0:37:070:37:09

15. 18. 20.

0:37:090:37:11

-Result.

-At 22. 25.

0:37:110:37:14

-28.

-What a result!

-28. 28. 28.

-28!

0:37:140:37:16

-I've got out of jail now.

-At 28. 30.

0:37:160:37:19

Five. At 35. 35. 40.

0:37:190:37:22

Five. At 45. 45. 45. 45. 45. 45.

0:37:220:37:26

At 45. 45. 45. 45.

0:37:260:37:28

275.

0:37:280:37:30

Paul's doing a great job.

0:37:300:37:32

Now for Charlie's wee stool.

0:37:320:37:35

£100. 100.

0:37:350:37:37

£30. Bid.

0:37:370:37:39

At 30. At 30. At 30. At 30. At 30. At 30.

0:37:390:37:42

Five. 40. Five. 50.

0:37:420:37:45

-At 50. At 50.

-50!

-Yes!

0:37:450:37:47

At 50. At £50.

0:37:470:37:49

-Sold.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:37:490:37:52

Another huge profit.

0:37:520:37:53

That's what you can get when the auctioneer aims high.

0:37:530:37:57

But Charlie's biscuit barrels could be a trickier prospect.

0:37:570:38:00

And we'll say £40. 40.

0:38:000:38:03

20 bid. At 20. At 20. At 20. At 20.

0:38:030:38:05

At 20. At 20. At 20. At 22.

0:38:050:38:08

25. 28.

0:38:080:38:09

-30.

-We need to go on. Come on.

-At 30. At 30.

-Oh, my God.

0:38:090:38:12

-At 30. At 30.

-Oh, dear.

-I've sunk.

0:38:120:38:15

-I've sunk.

-32. At 35.

0:38:150:38:18

38. At 38. 38. 38. 38. 38.

0:38:180:38:21

38.

0:38:210:38:23

89.

0:38:230:38:24

Rosco!

0:38:240:38:26

Crumbs, it was almost a lot worse though.

0:38:260:38:30

What have the following things in common...

0:38:300:38:32

Burmese puppet heads and Rouge Royale?

0:38:320:38:37

They're both unsaleable.

0:38:370:38:40

We'll see. But at least it'll have a novelty value.

0:38:400:38:43

30.

0:38:430:38:45

-£10.

-Five.

-£5, surely.

-Two.

0:38:450:38:48

-Five bid. At five.

-One.

-At eight.

0:38:480:38:51

10. 12.

0:38:510:38:52

-15.

-Oh, don't make a profit on this.

0:38:520:38:56

Please don't make a profit on this.

0:38:560:38:58

25. 28.

0:38:580:39:00

30. Five.

0:39:000:39:02

At 35. 35. 35. 35. 35. 35.

0:39:020:39:05

-I don't believe it.

-At 35. 35. 35.

0:39:050:39:07

I don't believe it.

0:39:070:39:08

40. New bidder.

0:39:080:39:11

-At 40.

-40!

-At 40. At 40.

0:39:110:39:13

At 40. At 40. At 40. At 40.

0:39:130:39:15

-73.

-I should have bought five!

0:39:150:39:18

Never mind. Got the gear?

0:39:180:39:21

-She certainly got a profit.

-Glad I came now.

0:39:210:39:24

Will her opium scales weigh in with more?

0:39:240:39:27

I'll just sell you the scales, you can get your own opium.

0:39:270:39:29

£70. 70.

0:39:290:39:31

30. Bid.

0:39:310:39:33

At 30. At 30. At 30. At 30. At 30.

0:39:330:39:35

Five. 40.

0:39:350:39:37

Five. 50. Five.

0:39:370:39:39

At 55. 55. 55. 55. 55.

0:39:390:39:42

-Yes!

-237.

0:39:420:39:45

It seems that Dingwall likes a novelty.

0:39:450:39:49

Charlie's table's up next, but do they know it?

0:39:490:39:52

Enormous print for Margie's things and my table is in tiny, tiny print.

0:39:520:39:56

-It's only one.

-Only people with very good eyesight can see that

0:39:560:40:00

the table's even in the auction.

0:40:000:40:01

-£100. 100.

-He's asking for 100.

-£50 bid.

0:40:010:40:05

At 50. At 50. At 50.

0:40:050:40:06

-Hold it up, man. Hold it up.

-55.

0:40:060:40:08

-Yes, madam.

-60. Five. 65. 65.

0:40:080:40:11

At 65. 65. 65. 65.

0:40:110:40:14

-70.

-Push! Push!

-At 70. At 70.

-Now we're going. Come on.

0:40:140:40:17

At 70. At 70. At £70.

0:40:170:40:20

Number 89.

0:40:200:40:22

A lot less than the auctioneer had hoped for.

0:40:220:40:25

Tell me, Margie, what is your secret of your success?

0:40:250:40:30

Is it just pure luck or is there any skill involved?

0:40:300:40:33

It's not all over yet.

0:40:330:40:35

Yes, but her little table,

0:40:350:40:37

the auctioneer's favourite, should do fine.

0:40:370:40:40

£30. 20 bid. At 22.

0:40:400:40:43

25. 28.

0:40:430:40:44

30. Five.

0:40:440:40:46

40. Five.

0:40:460:40:47

At 45. 45. 45. 45.

0:40:470:40:50

-£45 it goes at.

-That's all right.

-At 45.

0:40:500:40:53

That's disappointing.

0:40:530:40:55

Someone's bagged a bargain.

0:40:550:40:57

-Now, what about her practical papier-mache?

-£100. 100.

0:40:570:41:02

50. Bid. At 50.

0:41:020:41:04

-At 50. At 50.

-He's got it at 50?! You only paid 30.

0:41:040:41:07

At 50. Five. 60. Five.

0:41:070:41:10

70. Five. 80. Five.

0:41:100:41:13

90. At 95.

0:41:130:41:15

100. 110.

0:41:150:41:17

120. 130. 140.

0:41:170:41:19

150. 160.

0:41:190:41:21

170. 180.

0:41:210:41:23

190. At 190.

0:41:230:41:25

At 190. At 190. At 190.

0:41:250:41:27

£190 it goes then. At 190.

0:41:270:41:29

-44.

-Thank you!

0:41:290:41:32

A round of applause and a whacking great profit. Well done.

0:41:320:41:37

I was really quite enjoying my road trip until that minute.

0:41:370:41:39

Margie's way out in the lead,

0:41:390:41:41

but Charlie's risky silver box gives him one last chance.

0:41:410:41:46

£100. 100. 50.

0:41:460:41:48

Bid. At 50. At 50. At 50.

0:41:480:41:51

-Five. 60. Five. 70.

-Come on.

0:41:510:41:54

-We're not even scrap value yet.

-Five. 90.

0:41:540:41:57

Five. 100. At 100. 100.

0:41:570:42:00

-It scraps at more than this.

-At 100. £100 it goes then. At £100.

0:42:000:42:05

-Oh, it's 11oz of silver.

-It's a bit tired.

0:42:050:42:09

That disappointment leaves Charlie firmly in second place.

0:42:090:42:13

Margie, I have to say, I'm working with a pro.

0:42:130:42:17

A fine auction all-round, but Margie's tray means that

0:42:190:42:22

she's the winner today.

0:42:220:42:24

Charlie started out with £238.28,

0:42:240:42:28

and after paying auction costs, he's made a profit of £67.56,

0:42:280:42:33

leaving him with £305.84 to spend next time.

0:42:330:42:37

Whilst Margie began with £221.82,

0:42:380:42:42

and after paying auction costs,

0:42:420:42:44

she made a profit of £207.50,

0:42:440:42:48

leaving her with £429.32 and a healthy lead.

0:42:480:42:53

Well done, girl.

0:42:530:42:54

Take you away before your head gets even bigger.

0:42:540:42:57

-Hang on.

-There you are, my dear.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:570:43:01

A pleasure, as always...

0:43:010:43:03

to be thrashed by you.

0:43:030:43:05

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Charlie makes friends...

0:43:070:43:11

-Hello, madam. How much is that worth? £45?

-No.

0:43:110:43:15

..but Margie fails to influence...

0:43:150:43:17

I'm a Yorkshireman in Scotland.

0:43:170:43:19

You can't get tighter than that, can you?

0:43:190:43:21

Continuing their road trip across Scotland, antiques experts Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper begin at Abernyte in Perth and Kinross, before heading to an auction in the Highlands at Dingwall.