Episode 15 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 15

On the last day of their Scottish road trip, Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper begin at Nairnshire at Auldearn before travelling through Aberdeenshire and heading to auction.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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All right, viewers?

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..with ?200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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On fire! Yes!

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Sold, going, going, gone!

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Are they papier-mache buttocks?

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh..oh!

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Here we go.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the final day of our Highland fling, featuring Charlie Ross

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and Margie Cooper.

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With the result still very much up in the air.

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Well, where are we going now? Round the bend.

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Dealer Margie wasn't always an antiques doyenne, though.

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I remember as a secretary in the old days getting my fingers like this.

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Before that, she sold ices at the local theatre.

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Freddy "Parrot-face" Davies.

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That's showbiz!

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Whilst auctioneer Charlie's first ever job was flogging chickens

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down at the market.

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Now, Miss Cooper.

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And he's not looked back since.

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I've almost The Last Post.

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In fact, he's a natural performer.

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You've got a loud voice.

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I know. Amateur dramatics!

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# What's your best on this?

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# How much is it?

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# That's too much! #

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SHE LAUGHS

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Charlie began with ?200 and after four trips to auction,

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he's managed to increase that to ?305.84.

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Whilst Margie, who also started out with ?200, has made

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over ?100 more with ?429.32.

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So, will she play safe?

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I'll bet you ten quid that you don't buy something for ?100.

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I won't do it!

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I'm not playing, I just want to beat you, Roscoe.

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Charlie and Margie set out in their Sunbeam Rapier from Jedburgh

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in the Borders before travelling the high roads and the low roads of

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bonnie Scotland to reach journey's end at Hamilton, South Lanarkshire.

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Today, they begin in Nairnshire, at Auldearn

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and then head back south again for that climactic auction in Hamilton.

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The village was once the site of a battle

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back in 1645 but in more recent Road Trip history, the key date is 2011.

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Do you ever remember...you probably don't know anything about it,

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there's an old story...

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Yes, Margie's first shop of the day is the very same one that Charlie

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bought his famous Staffordshire elephant in, for just ?8.

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It later sold at auction for ?2,700.

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Still a Road Trip record.

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If you go in there, you will find an elephant.

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Go forth and multiply!

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See you. Buy something for eight quid and sell it for three grand!

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I'm not sure what the chances are of lightning striking twice.

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About on a par with pigs flying, probably,

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but she seems to have this very nice place to herself.

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Oh, that's a nice thing, isn't it?

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Victorian...it's tin,

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which is called Toleware, T-O-L-E, Toleware.

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That's been for logs, a nice bit of decoration, brass bound.

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Probably 1870s, 1880s,

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it's been kicking around for about that length of time.

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But it's ?140!

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Not eight, then?

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No, I don't want to be foolhardy...

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but I really like that.

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Good find, Margie. Now, coat off and get your head around it.

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They're interesting, aren't they?

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I like these... this is a hat sizer.

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Oh, look at that!

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I wouldn't imagine that that was much of a rare find, though.

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Rank is but the guinea's stamp, the man's...the gowd... for a' that.

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Oh, dear, it's quite hard to understand.

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Really brings it to life, doesn't she(?)

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Anything a bit more prosaic?

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Looks like a lady's desk.

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Isn't that pretty?

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So, you pull that out to shield you from the sun or the fire

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and then the screen drops into the bottom.

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Isn't that interesting?

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Mahogany, probably Edwardian, 1910.

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A lovely little drop handle, ?110.

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Yeah, it's looking good here, looking good.

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Margie's definitely about to loosen the purse strings,

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but what of her travelling companion?

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Motoring over to the Moray Firth at Nairn.

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This former fishing port has, since Victorian times,

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been a seaside holiday destination,

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famed for its many hours of sunshine.

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Nairn was very popular with the great Charlie Chaplin,

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who holidayed here on several occasions.

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I wonder how it'll go down with our Charlie?

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Good morning! Good morning, Mr Ross. Oh, how very formal. Call me Charlie.

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And you are? Steve. Steve, lovely to see you.

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Instant antiques will quickly make Charlie forget the shop up the road.

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Especially with Midland man Steve at his side,

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keen to offer up a good catch.

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What about a silver fish?

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I thought it might appeal to a fisherman.

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A bit of jewellery? Looks a bit like a salmon.

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Oh, isn't that beautifully modelled?

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I'll tell you what, I'd be really taking a gamble.

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Margie, my oppo, is a jewellery lady.

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Is she?

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So, it would be quite fun to buy a bit of jewellery and she'd say,

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"What have you bought that for!?"

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It's sort of like a tiepin or...

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Oh, isn't that glorious, it's got a little Cabochon in there.

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What is that?

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Is it a little sapphire? Yes, I think so.

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It's showing a little bit of blue, isn't it?

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What a pretty thing!

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Look at that! We might be able to put a little parcel together. Yes!

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I love a parcel.

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Parcel, eh?

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I get the impression

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those two will have themselves a deal in an instant.

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You've got a Monet up there!

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Yes. Original, no doubt? Oh, yes, a genuine one, genuine fake.

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A genuine fake!

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HE LAUGHS

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But nearby, there's a much more original,

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if slightly tattier, work of art.

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Is that a William Langley?

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I think it's William Langley.

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Prolific painter of coastal scenes,

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William Langley was very fond of the Highlands too,

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so perhaps that canvas is of somewhere on the Moray Firth.

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There's a bit of a drawback, though.

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I think that painting came from someone who was a darts player.

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HE LAUGHS

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And the dart board was next to it

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and unfortunately went through here.

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Oh, yes, it's gone straight through.

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Oh, dear, yeah. So, this is the price...?20.

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No, before negotiation.

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Before negotiations.

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But while he ponders that oil,

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there's something in ink to consider.

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Steve, there's a glass inkwell and it has a very deco,

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angular top to it.

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Stylish thing!

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Do you know what I like about inkwells like that?

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I like putting ink in them

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and just seeing the colour, the blue colour come through.

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Yes.

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That's absolutely beautiful....what date is that? It is Victorian!

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The price, however, is ?240.

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I don't know whether you're able to

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take a derisory offer from an old Englishman.

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If I could buy it for ?100, it would be fab!

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We'll check on it and see what we can do and if we bought it well,

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we may be able to do a very good price for you.

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I'll stay here with my fingers crossed. OK, leave me a minute.

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Thank you. Cue anxious wait, while he consults his ledger.

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What's the answer, Steve? It's probably cost a fortune, has it?

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Erm, well, what is your offer, Charlie?

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If you would sell me that inkwell for ?100, I would say you're

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the most generous man that ever came from Leicestershire to Scotland.

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I'm very generous. Are you happy with that? Yes, I am, that's good.

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That's a great inkwell!

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First deal to Charlie and I think that more could soon follow.

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Back in Auldearn, Margie, having collared proprietor Roger,

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seems to be leading him up the garden path.

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Right, I've seen a couple of things in here.

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First port of call is the practical toleware.

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That's a log bucket, isn't it? Yes, exactly.

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Sort of, what, 1880s? Yes, exactly.

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I think even perhaps slightly earlier.

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Yeah, I like this sort of stuff. Yeah.

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I'm just wondering...

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Well, it's all a worry, isn't it?

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It's all a worry!

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I think that's fast becoming Margie's catchphrase.

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How about a look at the screen?

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Original embroidery.

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I think I could help you slightly on that.

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Probably to 90.

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Yeah.

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I just thought it was cute, but it's got to fetch a little... Mm-hmm.

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How about 80?

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Then you've got a little bit more... Yeah, I like it.

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With Roger keen to help, it's time to get back to the coal hod.

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I could take it under ?100 to 90.

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There's got to be money in it.

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Could we do a deal for the two at 150?

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160 to try and help you along your way.

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Well, I think... I think I've got to make a profit.

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Well, both interesting pieces. They are.

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This is it - interesting, quirky. Yep.

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OK. Thank you so much. Thank YOU very much.

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A good price, but still big bucks.

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Maybe she's keeping her word to Charlie.

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Meanwhile, in Nairn, Charlie's as keen on spending as ever,

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with some glass in his sights.

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Is that ever so cheap?

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What have we got on it? Let's have a look. 50-odd quid.

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It's not massively expensive but you can always make me an offer.

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That's going to make 35 quid at auction.

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Again, it's a similar sort of thing. So your offer?

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You probably don't want to take 20 quid. How about 25?

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I thought 25, you could do... You can't go wrong with it, can you?

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I mean, there is no doubt... 25 quid. 25.

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Running total, ?125.

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And he's still hankering after that little silver salmon

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he threw back earlier.

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If 20 quid would buy me the little fish,

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I would buy it and I would make myself... ?20 is fine with me. Is it?

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Do you ever turn down an offer? You're a most wonderful man!

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Oh, yes, I do turn down offers.

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Can I give you 30 quid for the rest of your shop?

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Worth a try, I suppose.

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But remember that daub with the dart holes? Is it by a known artist?

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I'm absolutely certain that's William Langley's signature.

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The more I look at it - see the "l"? Yes.

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And the "y" that comes sweeping across. Mhm.

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The thing that's particularly unusual about it is the hole in the middle. Yes.

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There might have been a flying saucer over there!

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Well, it's a fiver's worth, really. Go on, have it for a fiver.

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I can't say no. I just don't know what will happen with this. No.

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It's my gamble. Yes. Loving that for a fiver.

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This is turning into quite a day.

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Four items for Charlie and Margie's not far behind.

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But she's now moved on from Auldearn,

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making her way south and west to the tiny hamlet of Daviot, where the

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main attraction is Torguish House - bed, breakfast and antiques.

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Wow!

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This is rather smart, isn't it?

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Royal Enfield Bullet. This is a Phillip Serrell call.

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He would love it here.

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He certainly would but I'm sure there's a little something with Margie appeal, too.

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Here, quick! Put the fire out!

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I think this is for racing pigeons.

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A clock. ?25.

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Cor, it weighs a tonne.

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There's obviously a big mechanism in there.

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Nobody is going to want a pigeon clock, are they?

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Who's going to want a pigeon clock?

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Well, there are a lot of pigeon fanciers out there

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for a kick-off, Margie.

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Although these devices,

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which record when a ring from the returning pigeon's leg is inserted,

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are fast becoming replaced by a simpler electronic timer

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but then, this is an antiques shop, I suppose.

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Meet the proprietor, Mike.

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Hi. My word, there's some stuff here. Yeah, yeah.

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Lifetime's collecting.

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I'm just trying to figure out what's going to make me a small profit.

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Well, I'll try and help you.

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I'm sure Mike and Margie will be on the same wavelength.

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Are you a whatsit man? A what? Are you good at dropping the price? No!

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I'm a Yorkshireman in Scotland.

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You can't get tighter than that, can you? Blimey!

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And Margie's a Lancashire lass, too. Stand by.

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A little bit of carved bone. What is it? I don't know what it is.

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By the shape of it, it looks like a tusk. Yeah. From a wild boar, or...

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Yeah, it could be something like that, couldn't it? Yeah. Yeah. Exactly, yeah.

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Price - ?35.

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Quite naively carved. It is naive. Yeah. Interesting, though, isn't it?

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Yeah. How much is that? I'll take your ?15. This is getting better.

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Yeah. Mike, it's getting better.

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Right, well, look, can I just think about that? Yeah, course you can.

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These two are getting on fine. Time to talk clocks.

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I'd be off my trolley to buy that, wouldn't I? Well, I did.

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Fancy thinking of buying something that you don't know anything about and that you don't understand.

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I love buying stuff like that. I love buying stuff like that!

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But the question is, is there a market for pigeon clocks?

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There is, surely, at ?15!

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Last of the big spenders! Quite.

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But they've grabbed the clock for a showdown by the crocodile.

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I like that very much. Yes? Yeah. And that's 15? ?15, yeah. Yeah.

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Same as the clock. Yeah. So, two together? A bit cheeky to... Oh!

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I can add 15 to 15 and I get 30.

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You don't get 28? No. It's ?30.

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OK, Mike. Thank you very much. Cheers.

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He is from Yorkshire, Margie. And now they've both bought four items.

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Meanwhile, Charlie is taking a well-earned break

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guiding the trusty Rapier to the outskirts of Inverness

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to see where aviation history was made.

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Richard, is it? Yes. Hello, Charlie. How very nice to meet you. Richard Fresson.

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Opened in 2005, the Highland Aviation Museum is tucked away

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within the grounds of Inverness Airport.

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Staffed by volunteers, it boasts assorted aircraft

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and displays of Scotland's famous RAF stations

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and a section dedicated to captain EE Fresson, a real local hero.

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Now, your father was hugely significant in this area.

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Yes, because he started the Highland Airways

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and they ran from Inverness to Kirkwall and that air route is

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the longest continuous running air route in the world,

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because it ran during World War II, every day. What?

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Where most airlines during the war, they just shut down.

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Well, I should think they did! Kirkwall - where is that?

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In the Orkney Islands.

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Ernest Edmund Fresson joined the Royal Flying Corps

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during World War I and in the '20s offered aeroplane

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joyrides before convincing the Inverness authorities to build

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a runway across a golf course so that Highland Airways could

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run scheduled services to the Northern Isles.

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He had the airmail contract

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and, in 1934, he got the postal contract

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and those two contracts in themselves absorbed the overheads,

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as it were, so that the airfares were not too exorbitant.

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Did he fly it? Oh, he flew...yes, very much.

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He was managing director and chief pilot.

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Inverness Airport was known as RAF Dalcross during World War II

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and the planes in the museum's slightly eccentric collection

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reflect a lot about what's happened since.

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Hello. Hello, Charlie. John, is it? Yes. And this is your baby?

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Yes, I'm the secretary of the museum. You are?

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One of the treasures of the museum is the Lightning,

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a supersonic jet fighter from the Cold War era which pilots

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described as like being saddled to a skyrocket.

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Now is it true that they were quite a dangerous aircraft?

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Fuel leaks? There was a very high loss rate. Was there?

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It was a flying fuel leak. Flying fuel leak!

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And when it landed and it was put in a hangar,

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they always had to put dustbins underneath to catch fuel,

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because if the aircraft cooled down, it contracted

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and it had leaks all over the place. John, may I get in? Yes, certainly.

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It's a bit of a tight fit, so good luck to you. You might lose your dignity getting in here.

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I'm not sure I ever had any dignity. You've got to be a small person to fly one of these.

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Very small. They didn't call them jockeys for nothing.

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The Lightning, which could travel at 1,200 mph or a mile every three seconds -

0:16:470:16:51

just imagine how brave you'd have to be to do that - was

0:16:510:16:54

used by the RAF to intercept enemy aircraft.

0:16:540:16:58

And this is the old joystick. That's the joystick.

0:16:580:17:01

Different switches on there for trimming the aircraft

0:17:010:17:04

and for firing the cannon or the missiles, so you've got them there.

0:17:040:17:08

Just firing the cannon. Yes. I've got him! Yes.

0:17:080:17:11

Another gem is the front 54 feet of the Nimrod MR2,

0:17:130:17:18

a maritime patrol aircraft designed to operate for long durations

0:17:180:17:22

on the lookout for ships and submarines.

0:17:220:17:25

This is the most complicated thing I've ever seen in my life.

0:17:250:17:29

The Nimrods flew for over 40 years and were only retired in 2011,

0:17:290:17:34

although this one feels a bit like something out of Dr Strangelove.

0:17:340:17:38

These two little buttons here, C and N -

0:17:380:17:42

pilots will tell you that stands for "coffee, no sugar"!

0:17:420:17:45

But in actual fact, it stands for Conventional and Nuclear weapons.

0:17:450:17:50

That's in red. I'm not surprised, really. Yes.

0:17:500:17:52

Ready, captain? OK, so let's start the engines. Vroom! Vroom! Vroom!

0:17:520:17:56

And now as we accelerate - broom! Dagga-dagga-dagga-dagga!

0:17:560:18:00

Nah, I can't keep a straight face doing that!

0:18:010:18:05

I know the feeling, John. Well, night-night, then.

0:18:050:18:08

Next morning, Charlie attempts his very own spying mission.

0:18:120:18:16

Stone? No.

0:18:160:18:18

Metal? No.

0:18:180:18:21

You'll have to wait and see, won't you? Terracotta?

0:18:210:18:25

Well, there's plenty for them both to keep quiet about after

0:18:250:18:29

what can best be described as an orgy of spending on day one.

0:18:290:18:32

Can I give you 30 quid for the rest of your shop?

0:18:320:18:35

Charlie splashed out ?150 on four auction lots,

0:18:350:18:38

leaving him with just over ?155 in his poche.

0:18:380:18:41

Whilst Margie spent even more,

0:18:440:18:47

forking out ?190, also on four lots...

0:18:470:18:50

I'd be off my trolley to buy that, wouldn't I?

0:18:500:18:52

..leaving her with almost ?240 to spend today.

0:18:520:18:55

Thank you so much. Thank you very much.

0:18:550:18:57

Later, they'll be making for the final auction in Hamilton,

0:18:570:19:01

but their next stop is in Aberdeenshire at Inverurie.

0:19:010:19:05

This market town once had a serious postage problem,

0:19:070:19:10

with letters being mistakenly delivered to Inveraray in Argyll.

0:19:100:19:15

They solved it in 1866 by putting an "ie" on the end instead of a "y".

0:19:150:19:20

Got it? Rich pickings!

0:19:200:19:21

Charlie is here for the car-boot sale. Goodbye, my darling!

0:19:230:19:27

Parting is such sweet sorrow.

0:19:270:19:30

Can't wait to get out, frankly!

0:19:300:19:33

On closer inspection, it seems just as well

0:19:330:19:35

that Charlie did plenty of shopping yesterday.

0:19:350:19:38

Cuddly toys. Records.

0:19:380:19:42

Bars of soap. Ladies' underwear.

0:19:420:19:45

There's nothing here for me to buy.

0:19:450:19:49

Now, now, Charlie.

0:19:490:19:50

There must be something here that will appeal

0:19:500:19:52

to the auction goers of Hamilton.

0:19:520:19:54

Mr and Mrs Dactyl and their son Terry.

0:19:540:19:58

No. Some early Doulton figures, for example - or some glass.

0:19:580:20:02

That's a nice piece of... Vasart. Yes, that is Scottish glass.

0:20:020:20:05

A good Scottish glass.

0:20:050:20:07

A good Scottish glass in a really nice pink.

0:20:070:20:09

How much is your vase? ?100.

0:20:090:20:11

Come and go, as they say.

0:20:110:20:13

Come and go means if you're really good at haggling,

0:20:130:20:15

you might get it a little bit cheaper.

0:20:150:20:17

If you're not good, then it will be 90.

0:20:170:20:20

I'm such a good haggler, I'm rude.

0:20:200:20:23

I'm actually ruder myself, I'll let you have it for 90.

0:20:230:20:27

And if you really, really push me, it'll be 80.

0:20:270:20:30

That dropped quickly. I think Charlie's on to something here.

0:20:300:20:34

I like the way you're coming down at such speed.

0:20:340:20:36

If I go and have a bacon butty, it might be about 30 quid.

0:20:360:20:40

Oh, no, it won't be 30 quid. How about 60? Can you make 60?

0:20:400:20:44

No, it will make 45 quid at auction, wouldn't it? 50 quid.

0:20:440:20:49

There he goes again.

0:20:490:20:51

Hello, madam. How much is that worth?

0:20:510:20:53

Is it worth ?45? To buy? Yeah.

0:20:530:20:57

Then sell on? Yes. No.

0:20:570:20:59

I only paid her five quid to turn up and say that.

0:20:590:21:03

Lordy, Phil doesn't stand a chance.

0:21:030:21:06

Look me in the eye. Did it cost more than 30 quid?

0:21:060:21:09

Did it cost? No, it didn't.

0:21:090:21:11

What did you pay for it?

0:21:110:21:13

I think I bought it for ?6.

0:21:130:21:15

Not sure that was wise either, Phil.

0:21:150:21:17

Please take 30 quid from an old man. It would be lovely.

0:21:170:21:20

Cos I think I will make a profit on it. 40 quid.

0:21:200:21:23

I'm going to say, thank you very much, sir. OK.

0:21:230:21:26

We got within the tenner of each other, that was pretty good.

0:21:260:21:29

It was pretty cool work.

0:21:290:21:32

What about 35? Just ?5 adrift now.

0:21:320:21:35

If I buy it for 30 quid, I think

0:21:350:21:37

it will make ?45, I'm going to make four quid profit on that.

0:21:370:21:42

Go on, then, ?30. Phew. Finally.

0:21:420:21:47

For you...a dirty 30.

0:21:470:21:51

Now, after that tortuous tussle, let's see what Margie's been up to.

0:21:510:22:00

Located in a fine old steading - that's Scottish for barn -

0:22:010:22:04

Glass Antiques has plenty of choice.

0:22:040:22:07

Ah!

0:22:070:22:09

My word. Hi! Hello. This looks nice.

0:22:090:22:13

But leader Margie is tending towards the cautious.

0:22:130:22:16

I've got four pieces, haven't I?

0:22:160:22:18

I needn't actually buy anything else now.

0:22:180:22:21

I'm a bit worried that he might have bought something a bit special.

0:22:210:22:25

He's looking a bit smug.

0:22:250:22:26

Now, don't get wound up, Margie, get even.

0:22:260:22:29

That's Charlie Ross. He's gone to a boot sale, I reckon.

0:22:290:22:32

I reckon that that's what he's up to at the moment.

0:22:320:22:35

There we go. Bye, Charlie.

0:22:350:22:38

Waving his stick. He's so much like him.

0:22:390:22:42

Meanwhile back at the car-boot sale,

0:22:440:22:46

real Charlie's got his eye on a nautical item.

0:22:460:22:49

It's a pond yacht. A yacht, in other words, for sailing on a pond.

0:22:490:22:53

Sadly, it's got a broken rudder bow.

0:22:530:22:56

Oh, that's a shame.

0:22:560:22:58

That's 30 quid. I'm open to offers.

0:22:580:23:00

Watch out, Michael, our Charlie's a hard bargainer today.

0:23:000:23:03

You're open to offers? Yeah. Is that because she's run aground?

0:23:030:23:06

No. She hit an iceberg, I think, hasn't she?

0:23:060:23:09

She's no' the Titanic, but she's got a broken rudder.

0:23:090:23:11

Nothing a bit of glue won't put right.

0:23:110:23:15

I don't suppose you'd be tempted by a fiver, would you? No.

0:23:150:23:18

I'll take 15.

0:23:180:23:20

I'd go up to ten.

0:23:200:23:22

11.

0:23:220:23:23

It's got to be ten.

0:23:230:23:25

At 11, I think I'll walk down the street.

0:23:250:23:28

At ten, I'll get on me pond. Oh, you're breaking my heart.

0:23:280:23:32

Being a Scotsman, a tenner, it's a deal.

0:23:320:23:34

I've broken a Scotsman's heart. That's very kind of you, sir.

0:23:340:23:37

Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

0:23:370:23:39

Oh, I'm going to call her Marjorie.

0:23:390:23:42

HMS Marjorie, and we'll sail away.

0:23:420:23:45

While Charlie weighs anchor, for his somewhat indecisive opponent,

0:23:450:23:49

the end is in sight - well, two ends actually.

0:23:490:23:52

These are quite nice. Bookends. Very nice.

0:23:520:23:55

Nice having that on the bottom.

0:23:550:23:58

They're ?40.

0:23:580:24:00

I could do those for 30.

0:24:000:24:03

Art Deco, it's very in, isn't it?

0:24:030:24:06

They're not damaged at all, are they? No.

0:24:060:24:08

They'd look good in a Deco house.

0:24:100:24:12

I just thought those were rather nice.

0:24:120:24:14

Small, but nice.

0:24:140:24:17

30's the best on that. You couldn't drop them at all? No. You like them.

0:24:170:24:22

25 wouldn't buy them? No, they are literally just in stock as well.

0:24:220:24:28

Lynne's firmly holding her ground.

0:24:280:24:30

I would like to buy them, but I don't think I can stretch to 30.

0:24:300:24:33

Unfortunately. Can we not part friends and go half between? 28?

0:24:330:24:39

Yeah. OK.

0:24:390:24:41

Oh, we've done it. I don't want to be a bully, but I also want to win.

0:24:410:24:45

I don't blame you.

0:24:450:24:47

And as a parting gift, a little Charlie.

0:24:470:24:51

Hey! That's perfect.

0:24:510:24:53

Oh, what a nice thing. That's very kind.

0:24:530:24:56

Hey, he's round his car boot and he'll be looking for me

0:24:560:25:00

turning up with the car.

0:25:000:25:01

"Margie, I'm here."

0:25:010:25:03

But titter ye not, Margie,

0:25:040:25:06

because just outside Inverurie, in his spare time

0:25:060:25:10

the only toy quick shopper Charlie resembles is Action Man.

0:25:100:25:14

I'm going to have such fun.

0:25:140:25:16

MUSIC: "Slow Ride" by Foghat

0:25:160:25:19

Brake on the left. I won't need the brake.

0:25:300:25:32

Yeah! Ho!

0:25:420:25:44

Oh!

0:25:440:25:45

I've got the hang of this!

0:25:450:25:47

About time.

0:25:470:25:50

But while Charlie's been establishing his very own

0:25:500:25:53

league of obscure sports, Margie's motored south from Huntly

0:25:530:25:57

to the foothills of the Grampians to explore a fairy-tale castle.

0:25:570:26:01

Look at that.

0:26:010:26:03

Hello. Bill. Hiya, how do you do? Margie Cooper.

0:26:050:26:08

Are you going to show me around? Yes, I'll show you around the castle.

0:26:080:26:11

Craigievar is one of Scotland's best preserved tower houses,

0:26:110:26:15

a magnificent seven-storey structure that

0:26:150:26:18

was completed in 1626 and has changed very little since.

0:26:180:26:22

They haven't gone that way, have they? Well, they haven't.

0:26:220:26:25

They've just gone that way. Yes.

0:26:250:26:27

It's one of the very few and I think that's why it's so prized

0:26:270:26:31

because they never added bits on to the side, but they went up the way.

0:26:310:26:36

The castle was built by one William Forbes,

0:26:360:26:39

an Aberdonian merchant who, after acquiring

0:26:390:26:42

a fortune in the Baltic, returned to create this confection

0:26:420:26:46

on top of an older medieval tower.

0:26:460:26:49

Craigievar then remained in the Forbes family

0:26:490:26:52

until the Scottish National Trust took it over in 1963.

0:26:520:26:55

We've had it 50 years.

0:26:550:26:58

But when we got it, we basically got it as is,

0:26:580:27:01

so nothing was taken up, nothing was put in.

0:27:010:27:04

They just walked out? Yes.

0:27:040:27:06

There's still much in the great hall that

0:27:060:27:08

dates from the early 17th century,

0:27:080:27:10

including this magnificent oak table and the fine plaster work ceilings.

0:27:100:27:14

In the ladies' withdrawing room,

0:27:150:27:17

there's yet another beautiful ceiling

0:27:170:27:19

as well as a trademark piece of furniture, the Craigievar table.

0:27:190:27:23

Baroque, curvaceous gaming table with folding legs.

0:27:240:27:30

The reason we've got this is

0:27:300:27:32

when the laird was sitting out, he may have had a bit of a gut going on.

0:27:320:27:37

So there's a utility to the design.

0:27:380:27:41

The castle was becoming recognised as an architectural gem

0:27:410:27:44

by the early 19th century,

0:27:440:27:46

with prestigious visitors like Sir Walter Scott

0:27:460:27:49

and even Queen Victoria herself beating a path to Craigievar.

0:27:490:27:53

William, the 8th Baronet, with his bonnet

0:27:530:27:55

and badger sporran, certainly helped to put the old place

0:27:550:27:58

on the tourist trail,

0:27:580:28:00

but an earlier laird had already acquired a fair bit of notoriety.

0:28:000:28:04

This is Red Sir John, he's the second baronet.

0:28:040:28:08

He looks a bit...dodgy.

0:28:080:28:10

He will follow you around the room. His eyes are following me.

0:28:100:28:13

Sometimes in the morning when you open the blinds,

0:28:130:28:15

and he's watching you, you know?

0:28:150:28:18

You rush about this room a bit and get back out.

0:28:180:28:21

Up on the fourth floor is the Blue Room, which is reckoned to be

0:28:210:28:24

haunted by the fearsome ghost of Red Sir John.

0:28:240:28:27

But anyone looking for an encounter with ghosts would be

0:28:270:28:31

better off visiting the nursery just around the corner.

0:28:310:28:34

One of our guides, someone's tugging away at his sleeve,

0:28:340:28:38

and he turns... Watch your sleeves.

0:28:380:28:39

And he turns and there's no-one there.

0:28:390:28:42

But one of the people on the tour actually seen the sleeve

0:28:430:28:47

getting tugged as well. Oh, my goodness.

0:28:470:28:49

So, one of our new guides, they were in here and he had

0:28:490:28:52

six in the party, took four upstairs, came back, they had lagged behind.

0:28:520:28:56

But when he asked them at the end of the tour, they said, "We heard

0:28:560:28:59

"a noise in the nursery," and they seen a child running across the floor.

0:28:590:29:03

And they were pale and shaken.

0:29:030:29:05

I'm sure the chill at the top of the house probably doesn't help.

0:29:090:29:12

Craigievar has never had electric light.

0:29:120:29:15

And what heating there is looks after the building

0:29:150:29:17

instead of humans.

0:29:170:29:18

Still, all that climbing must keep you hale and hearty.

0:29:180:29:21

We're actually up here now. That's the Long Gallery there.

0:29:210:29:25

So that just goes right along the length of the building. Fabulous.

0:29:250:29:29

Has that been used for films or anything?

0:29:290:29:31

Allegedly, Walt Disney based his motif on Craigievar.

0:29:310:29:35

The Disney castle.

0:29:350:29:37

This one's far better, I've got to say.

0:29:370:29:40

Now, let's have a look at what they've bought.

0:29:400:29:43

Fantasia or Mickey Mouse?

0:29:430:29:45

Have you had a good time...? Oh, my goodness! An early reveal!

0:29:450:29:48

Oh.

0:29:480:29:50

Well, that's gorgeous. Isn't it? I love it.

0:29:500:29:53

That is absolutely wonderful, and rather early.

0:29:530:29:56

That was 80 quid.

0:29:560:29:58

It was 104. I just really like toleware. Yeah, I love that.

0:29:580:30:02

Very nice thing. Distressed, but I can live with that.

0:30:020:30:05

Well, it is an antique, Charlie.

0:30:050:30:07

I don't know what the heck this is.

0:30:070:30:09

What is this? It's a pigeon clock.

0:30:090:30:12

Oh, a pigeon clock!

0:30:120:30:14

How exciting.

0:30:140:30:15

What an earth is a pigeon clock worth?

0:30:150:30:17

Well, that's it. 35 quid. 15.

0:30:170:30:20

?15? Yes. Do you get a free pigeon?

0:30:200:30:22

I just thought it was a bit of fun.

0:30:220:30:24

Easy-peasy. Art Deco bookends.

0:30:240:30:27

Why is one taller than the other?

0:30:270:30:29

I didn't notice that.

0:30:290:30:32

No, no, don't panic. I can tell you. No, stop!

0:30:320:30:34

Because one's on its side!

0:30:340:30:36

Well done!

0:30:360:30:37

Marvellous. Look.

0:30:370:30:39

That's rather nice. That talks to me.

0:30:390:30:40

We needn't do it now, but we pull the sides out, down it goes.

0:30:400:30:44

Only thing about that, I love it, is anybody going to buy it

0:30:440:30:48

because it's useless? Steady on.

0:30:480:30:50

What did you pay for it? ?80.

0:30:500:30:52

I think that's borderline.

0:30:520:30:54

Time for Charlie's little car boot.

0:30:540:30:56

Prepare to be thrilled.

0:30:560:30:58

Oh, my goodness me.

0:30:580:30:59

What have you bought?

0:30:590:31:01

Just go around the front and feast your eyes to begin with.

0:31:010:31:04

Is there something else? My final purchase.

0:31:040:31:07

A pond yacht. Do you like it? I can't see it.

0:31:070:31:10

Do you like it? Oh, they do really well.

0:31:100:31:12

What's it worth? Oh, gosh. What's it worth?

0:31:120:31:15

60, 70 quid. What did it cost? 30 quid. A tenner.

0:31:150:31:19

Plus ?1.50 for the glue to repair it.

0:31:190:31:22

I got rather dumb with this.

0:31:220:31:24

How much was that?

0:31:240:31:26

Oh, what did you pay? He was asking 240 and I bought it for 100 quid.

0:31:260:31:31

You've gone a bit daft with that. I'm old.

0:31:310:31:33

Now, look at the signature on that.

0:31:330:31:35

William Langley. do you know William Langley? You obviously do.

0:31:350:31:38

I do, I've sold pictures by William Langley.

0:31:380:31:40

But I bought it purely because we're online at the saleroom

0:31:400:31:43

and someone might look up William Langley

0:31:430:31:46

and pay more than the fiver that I paid for it.

0:31:460:31:49

Well done. A fiver? Fiver.

0:31:490:31:51

And I like to think it's going down to the wire,

0:31:510:31:53

but I think you're going to do me.

0:31:530:31:55

Well done. Now, what did they really think?

0:31:550:32:00

Not that thrilled with the rest of it. But his painting, oh, dear.

0:32:000:32:04

It's been a fab trip. We've had huge fun.

0:32:040:32:08

No, he's a great guy and I had a great time.

0:32:080:32:11

Oh, dear.

0:32:110:32:13

Aw, what a lovely couple.

0:32:130:32:15

After starting out in the Highlands at Auldearn,

0:32:150:32:18

the final episode of our road trip will conclude at a deciding

0:32:180:32:21

auction in the Lowlands at Hamilton.

0:32:210:32:24

Couldn't we just keep going?

0:32:240:32:26

Couldn't we just pretend isn't not got to end?

0:32:260:32:28

It's over. I've had such a wonderful...

0:32:280:32:30

What do you mean it's over?!

0:32:300:32:31

It's been a long time since a girl said to me,

0:32:310:32:34

"I'm sorry, Charlie, it's over."

0:32:340:32:37

Welcome to Hamilton, where Harry Lauder used to sing in

0:32:370:32:40

the coal mines and the local football team are the only

0:32:400:32:43

professional British club to have originated from a school side.

0:32:430:32:47

Breathe in.

0:32:470:32:48

There we go. Gladys Cooper, this is your denouement.

0:32:480:32:52

Courtesy of the Smellie family, who established

0:32:520:32:56

the Hamilton Auction Market in 1874.

0:32:560:32:59

Don't you get smart with me, young girl.

0:32:590:33:02

You do look a bit like Queen Victoria.

0:33:020:33:04

Charlie began with ?305.84 and he spent ?191.50 on five auction lots.

0:33:060:33:12

Whilst Margie started out with ?429.32

0:33:150:33:18

and she's parted with ?218, also on five lots.

0:33:180:33:22

Time for auctioneer Andrew Smellie.

0:33:230:33:25

And stand by.

0:33:270:33:29

I wonder what the last William Langley made here?

0:33:290:33:31

Three quid.

0:33:320:33:34

Charlie's artistic ex-dart board.

0:33:340:33:37

50 for this. 20 then.

0:33:370:33:40

Ten to get started. Ten about. Ten. 12.

0:33:400:33:44

14. 16. 18. 20. Two.

0:33:440:33:48

24. 26. 28. 30.

0:33:480:33:52

30. A bit more.

0:33:520:33:54

Five. 40. Five. William Langley. 50. Five. 60.

0:33:540:34:01

Five.

0:34:010:34:02

70. Five. 80.

0:34:020:34:05

Five. 90. Five.

0:34:050:34:08

95. 100. Five. 105. Are we all finished here?

0:34:080:34:14

105. Well done, my friend.

0:34:140:34:18

Put it there.

0:34:180:34:20

Carry on like that, Charlie, and you could win this.

0:34:200:34:23

You've caught me up already.

0:34:230:34:25

Margie's clock next, and it seems there are pigeon fanciers about.

0:34:250:34:29

Five minutes they've been here.

0:34:290:34:31

A pigeon club.

0:34:310:34:32

Eh, a pigeon club!

0:34:320:34:34

Nice lot there now. Don't let it go cheap-cheap.

0:34:340:34:36

50 for it.

0:34:360:34:38

30.

0:34:380:34:40

30, I'm bid.

0:34:400:34:42

30 quid straight in.

0:34:420:34:44

Five. 40. Five. 50. 50 quid!

0:34:440:34:49

Are we all finished? Five, on my right. 60. Five.

0:34:490:34:55

70, on my right. Are we all finished? ?70.

0:34:550:35:00

I fancy Margie's back in the lead again...just.

0:35:000:35:03

I'm glad it's the last day, I can't cope any more.

0:35:030:35:06

Not sure this lot will calm your nerves then, Margie.

0:35:060:35:09

100 for this.

0:35:090:35:10

50 for it.

0:35:120:35:14

30 then. 40 bid. Five.

0:35:140:35:18

50. It's an old-fashioned antique, that.

0:35:180:35:23

Five. 60. Five. 70.

0:35:230:35:26

Look at this. ?70.

0:35:260:35:29

I'll get my money back.

0:35:290:35:31

Two. 72, I'll take it. 74.

0:35:310:35:34

76. 78. He's doing his best for you. 80.

0:35:340:35:38

82. 82. ?82.

0:35:380:35:42

Got out of trouble. Yeah.

0:35:420:35:44

A loss after commission, though.

0:35:440:35:47

The toleware, Margie's other big buy.

0:35:470:35:49

50 for this.

0:35:490:35:51

30 to get started.

0:35:510:35:53

30 I'm bid.

0:35:540:35:56

30. Two. 34. 36. He's a worker. I can't look.

0:35:560:36:03

38. I can't look. How much? 38.

0:36:030:36:09

?38. Oh. A big hit.

0:36:090:36:12

So these two now are neck and neck.

0:36:120:36:14

Excuse me, that should have done better.

0:36:140:36:17

Of course it should.

0:36:170:36:19

Do you want me to ask the auctioneer to put it up again?

0:36:190:36:22

Enter Charlie's car boot craft.

0:36:220:36:25

Pond sailors ahoy. 50 for this.

0:36:250:36:28

30 for a start. ?30 for the yacht.

0:36:280:36:32

20 then. Two. 22 in front. 22. 24.

0:36:320:36:38

Six. 28. 30. Two. 34. 36. 38.

0:36:380:36:43

40. Five. 50. Five. 60. Five. 70.

0:36:430:36:48

70 I'm bid. Oh, you're sneaking ahead.

0:36:480:36:53

?70. All finished? Telephone!

0:36:530:36:56

Five. On the phone.

0:36:560:36:57

75 on the phone. 80. 80 I'm at. ?80 I'm at.

0:36:570:37:03

Telephone bid for a pond yacht!

0:37:030:37:06

All finished? ?80.

0:37:060:37:08

Well done, my friend. I'm loving that auctioneer.

0:37:080:37:12

That profit's put Charlie out ahead, but here comes his riskiest buy.

0:37:120:37:16

James Henderson in charge.

0:37:160:37:18

Look at that. ?200. 150. ?100 inkwell.

0:37:180:37:23

100.

0:37:230:37:25

50, then. ?50. 50 for it, well worth that. 50 I'm bid, thank you. At 50.

0:37:250:37:31

Five. At 55.

0:37:310:37:34

60. And five. At 65. 70. At 75. At 80 now.

0:37:340:37:40

At 85. At 90.

0:37:400:37:43

At 90 I'm bid with the lady. At 90, bid five.

0:37:430:37:46

At 95. 100. At 105. At 110. At 120. At 130.

0:37:460:37:53

At 130 I'm bid.

0:37:530:37:55

At five if you like. At 135. At 135.

0:37:550:37:58

At 135. At 135 at five. All done? At ?135.

0:37:580:38:05

You've got out of jail with that.

0:38:060:38:08

Yes, he has.

0:38:080:38:09

It's looking good for Charlie now.

0:38:090:38:11

He could be further ahead with this little silver salmon.

0:38:130:38:16

?40 for this silver brooch. 40. 30 then.

0:38:160:38:20

?20, folks.

0:38:200:38:22

Surely ?20. Ten. Thank you. Ten I'm bid. At 12.

0:38:220:38:26

14. At 14. 16. 18.

0:38:260:38:30

On the rail at 18. Fresh bid at 20. Bid of two. At 22. Five. At 25.

0:38:300:38:37

At eight. At 28. At 30. At 32.

0:38:370:38:41

At 32 I'm bid. At 32.

0:38:410:38:43

Fresh bid. 35. At 38. At 40.

0:38:430:38:49

On my left here at 40.

0:38:490:38:51

It'll go for 40 quid.

0:38:510:38:52

Are we all done at ?40?

0:38:520:38:54

Doubled its money.

0:38:540:38:56

Now, will they snap up Margie's curious crocodile?

0:38:560:38:59

?30. 30 for it now. 20. He's obviously quite keen.

0:39:000:39:06

It's not going well.

0:39:060:39:08

Ten then. Ten I'm bid. At ten, I'm bid.

0:39:090:39:13

12. 14. 16. And 18.

0:39:130:39:17

At 18. It's a profit, isn't it?

0:39:170:39:22

At 22. You're making a profit on this bit of rubbish.

0:39:230:39:26

At 28. At ?28.

0:39:260:39:30

Crawled out of that one.

0:39:300:39:33

A good profit, but it hasn't got her much closer to Charlie.

0:39:330:39:37

We've only had one loss today,

0:39:370:39:38

the toleware was the only thing that's lost money.

0:39:380:39:41

Have you lost anything? No. Is that why you brought it up?

0:39:410:39:45

It wasn't, no.

0:39:450:39:46

Can her bookends hold their own?

0:39:480:39:51

What are they worth, folks? ?50. 50 for them.

0:39:510:39:54

He's started on 50.

0:39:540:39:56

?30. 20 then, the bookends.

0:39:560:39:59

Ten then, surely. Oh, no.

0:39:590:40:02

Come on. 14. 16. At 18 now.

0:40:020:40:07

We need more money.

0:40:070:40:09

At 18 for them. 18 bid. 20 now. At 20. On the railings here at 20.

0:40:090:40:14

Two. At 22. At five. He's doing what he's doing well.

0:40:140:40:18

At 28. 30 now.

0:40:180:40:21

At 30. This is more than you paid for them.

0:40:210:40:23

This is a result.

0:40:230:40:24

At 30 bid. They're going to go.

0:40:240:40:26

At ?30.

0:40:260:40:28

Oh, dear, Margie, it's now Charlie's to lose.

0:40:280:40:31

If my vases...

0:40:310:40:32

Do well. ..40, 50 quid, something like that, I think I'll have won.

0:40:320:40:36

If they bomb... They're not going to bomb.

0:40:360:40:39

Here we go.

0:40:390:40:41

After a great week, the result is riding on these last two

0:40:410:40:44

pieces of glass.

0:40:440:40:46

What shall we say for the two vases? What are they worth?

0:40:460:40:48

?100. He's asked for 100.

0:40:480:40:51

100 for them. And nobody is bidding.

0:40:510:40:54

At 50. ?50 for them. 30 then, surely.

0:40:540:40:59

?30 for the vases now. 30 I'm bid. Five. 40. Here it goes.

0:40:590:41:05

At five. At 45.

0:41:050:41:07

50. At 55. And 60. Five. 70. I think I'm all right.

0:41:070:41:14

At 75. 80. And five. 85. 90.

0:41:140:41:18

At 90 bid. And five. At 95 now.

0:41:180:41:21

At 95 for the vases.

0:41:210:41:23

Are we all done now?

0:41:230:41:26

At 95. I think that's done it.

0:41:260:41:28

All done. At ?95.

0:41:290:41:32

Yet another profit and Charlie wins on the final whistle.

0:41:320:41:36

I'm mentally and physically drained.

0:41:360:41:39

I'm so pleased for you.

0:41:390:41:41

With those heartfelt words ringing in his ears,

0:41:420:41:45

Charlie the victor takes his bow.

0:41:450:41:48

Margie started out with ?429.32 and after paying auction costs,

0:41:480:41:54

she made a loss of ?14.64, leaving her with a final total of ?414.68.

0:41:540:42:01

While Charlie began with ?305.84 and after paying auction costs,

0:42:030:42:07

he made a profit of ?181.60,

0:42:070:42:11

which means Charlie, with ?487.44,

0:42:110:42:15

is this week's winner. All profits go to Children In Need.

0:42:150:42:19

There have been two highlights for this trip. Yes.

0:42:200:42:24

One has been the scenery. Absolutely. And the other...

0:42:240:42:28

has been you.

0:42:280:42:30

Oh, my goodness me.

0:42:340:42:36

Oh! Wow! Oh!

0:42:370:42:39

Evening.

0:42:390:42:41

CAR HORN

0:42:430:42:44

All right, viewers.

0:42:490:42:51

Steady on.

0:42:510:42:52

CLUTCH SCREECHES Oh, good Lord!

0:42:540:42:57

Oh! Who said romance is dead?

0:43:040:43:07

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Paul Laidlaw

0:43:070:43:10

and Thomas Plant embark on the trip of a lifetime.

0:43:100:43:13

I'm in love.

0:43:130:43:14

Oorah. And they've both got their eyes on a prize.

0:43:140:43:17

Don't occupy me, I'm busy. Can't you see I'm working?

0:43:170:43:21

Have that, Laidlaw.

0:43:210:43:23

THEY LAUGH Come on.

0:43:230:43:25

# I put a spell on you

0:43:490:43:52

# Cos you're mine

0:43:550:43:59

On the last day of their Scottish road trip, Charlie Ross and Margie Cooper begin at Nairnshire at Auldearn before travelling through Aberdeenshire and heading to auction at Hamilton, South Lanarkshire.