Episode 28 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 28

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures. James Braxton and Helen Hall start in the city and county of Bristol before heading to auction in Swindon.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire. Yes!

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Sold. Going, going, gone.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Be a good profit.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh, oh!

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Yes!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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It's the third leg of the road trip for James Braxton

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and newcomer Helen Hall.

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Helen, you're fast approaching me.

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I am. I've closed the gap a little bit in the auction, haven't I?

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Helen isn't shy of getting into precarious situations

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-to find a bargain.

-Wow!

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Whereas road trip veteran James

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is prepared to work up a sweat for a good deal.

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Oh!

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Oh, dear.

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They're travelling in the trusty 1974 E-Type Jaguar.

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The car is feeling very good.

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Helen lost the first auction,

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and although triumphant on the second leg...

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Well done, you needed that, Helen, well done!

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I did.

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..gold hand James still has an overall lead.

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Thank the Lord!

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James started the trip with £200

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and after the two auctions saw his money grow to £218.28.

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Helen started her first road trip with the same amount,

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but has seen her profit shrink to just £184.

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Our compadres are cruising over 500 miles from Oswestry in Shropshire,

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through Wales and southern England,

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before ending their road trip in the county town of Lewes in East Sussex.

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On this third leg, they're starting in the city of Bristol

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before heading to auction in Swindon in Wiltshire.

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It is a very good-looking city, Bristol, isn't it?

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It is very pretty, I like all the follies of the architecture.

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Bristol has been a major trading port for many centuries.

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Renowned engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel

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designed one of its most famous landmarks,

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the mighty Clifton Suspension Bridge,

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but there's no bridge too far for our duo

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when it comes to finding a bargain.

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Here we are. A day of buying.

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Who is going to buy the better items today?

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Well, I'm feeling the pressure to close that gap even more, James.

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Try and close the gap but I'm going to try and expand it.

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Right, I'm feeling the pressure. Have a good one!

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Cor, they're really competitive today.

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They're actually shopping next door to one another.

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Whilst Helen visits Rachel's Antiques,

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James is off to Michael's Antiques.

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James! Very nice to meet you, Michael. What have you got new in?

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What do you think I might be interested in?

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I don't know what your taste is.

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-Something is winking at me, that green stuff.

-Yes, it's in that clock.

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That green stuff, as James so eloquently puts it,

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is a mineral called malachite.

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It was mined extensively in Russia's Ural mountains.

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I like that.

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I like that clock.

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It hasn't worked since I've had it, but it's right twice a day.

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-That's all you need, isn't it!

-He's a live one, this one, isn't he!

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We got a bit of a cracked dial there, haven't we?

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No, it's not cracked, it's just scratched. I can feel it.

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Do you find you get to an age where you've got to feel things?

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I feel everything! Your fingers never lie, do they?

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I think James is quite keen on that.

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So we got the malachite, the green here,

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and we've got the bell and that should attach the movement somewhere.

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There's the striker, the gong.

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A bit of soldering going on on that arm there.

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It's well over 100 years old.

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If you were over 100 years old, we would be soldering you up a bit.

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-I would be on the repair, wouldn't I?

-You would do.

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I think Michael has the measure of you, James.

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That's a possibility, I like that, Michael.

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The first one to consider, maybe.

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Helen is getting on with the serious business

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of finding a bargain at Rachel's Antiques.

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I changed my tactics for the last leg.

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For the first leg, I went more vintage,

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slightly more 20th century, but then I realised that

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I needed to go more antique, more specialised, a bit more age.

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So I think the technique on the last leg worked well.

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I would like to buy some silver again. Some nice early silver.

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Doesn't look like there's much silver here, dearie,

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but this place is packed to the gunwales with all manner of things

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and Helen is now searching high and low for a bargain. Especially high.

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-Wow!

-Wow! Lordy!

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Perhaps it's best to keep your feet on the floor, Helen.

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I wonder how James is getting on over at Michael's.

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-Come here. That's a Wurzel hat.

-A Wurzel hat, do I have to wear this?

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# Drink up thy zider, George... #

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-That is a proper Wurzel hat.

-I was given that in 1962.

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I don't know, I leave him for five minutes!

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So here, we have an interesting carved wood profile

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and it's a very hard wood. It looks like mahogany here.

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Somebody has written, "in the manner of E Gill."

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Eric Gill was an influential sculptor and designer,

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most active in 1920s and '30s.

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The person who made this has clearly been inspired by him.

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It's got a great look about it.

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It's got that very strong stylish 1910, 1920s look about it,

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with that very strong bob, very strong, aristocratic nose.

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A very good jaw line. It's a great item, but it's a very unusual thing.

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Wooden profile, beautifully done. Unfortunately, it's slightly damaged.

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It's got the old antique juices going, this one. I like it.

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But do you like it enough to buy it, James?

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This is rather fun, this is a mirrored stand,

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so you could put it on the wall, or you could have stood it on a table.

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They made great things for displaying things.

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If you imagine, you put it on something like that

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and then you can display a nice object.

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Slightly out of proportion but you can display fun things.

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People use them, they are a retailer's aid.

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They are rather fun with these lovely little convex bubbles.

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A band of bubbles. Interesting to see what this would do in auction.

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I think he's quite keen on that too.

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Time to talk to Michael about money.

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So, give us your worst.

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150 for the three of them.

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-I know, Michael, you're being very kind.

-I sense there's a "but" coming.

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I think you can be kinder.

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130, could you do it for 130?

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I'll tell you what, 135 and we've got a deal.

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135, I will find that hand.

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-That was too quick.

-Michael, it's been an absolute pleasure.

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-Really lovely.

-Every fiver counts.

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£135 on the mantle clock, a mahogany portrait and the mirrored stand.

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-Michael, what is the secret of your eternal youth?

-Fitness.

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I just go like that. That's one.

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-That stops the knees from seizing.

-OK, so I will limber up for it.

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Do you really want to try this, James?

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Oh!

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At least I got it up! Anyway, thank you, Michael.

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Not only have I been fleeced,

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but I've also been physically damaged by you here!

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I'm exhausted just watching you.

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Whilst he catches his breath,

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Helen has found some nice glassware she seems to like.

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It's a nice piece of opaque glass.

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No mark or anything, but it's very Thirties in style.

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Very much in the slight manner of Lalique

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and all those glass artists, working in Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods.

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Rene Lalique was a French designer

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who created exquisite Art Nouveau glassware

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-in the late 19th and early 20th century.

-I think it's pretty.

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But does it have a pretty nice tag to match?

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Time to chat to dealer, Rachel.

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I rather like this sort of Art Nouveau style green glass dish.

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I like to think it's 1930s.

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I thought it might have been for flowers.

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Yes, a short flower vase or a bonbon dish or something like that.

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I do like it. I'd like to offer you a tenner for it. Where are you at?

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That seems about right because normally I would sell that

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for about 15.

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OK, a tenner, done, thank you very much.

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Whilst James has gone all out on his first shop,

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Helen has been more cautious,

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picking up a nice piece of glass for just £10.

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It is hot here. I must say, the temperature is about 28 degrees.

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I have been on colder foreign holidays.

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I'm going to buy one item here hopefully

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and then I'm going to go for a jolly nice swim in the river Avon.

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That sounds like more exercise, James.

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His next shop is called Odds And Todds and I presume this man is in charge.

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-It's a hottie, isn't it? James. Hello.

-Nice to meet you.

-Very good.

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-What's your name?

-Les.

-Les, good to meet you.

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-Can I leave that jacket there? It's not a bugle.

-I think it's a cornet.

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That looks like a cornet, doesn't it? It's got stops and things.

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Hello! Here we are.

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PLAYS BADLY

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See? I haven't got any puff!

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Helen, meanwhile, is taking time out to discover

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more about one of Bristol's most famous sons, Banksy.

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Banksy is an artist who uses a pseudonym to remain anonymous.

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He's become a global phenomenon and his work is bought by movie

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stars and canny he amateur collectors alike.

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Controversially, walls on which he has painted have been

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taken down to sell for hundreds of thousands of pounds at auction.

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Helen's meeting Tim Coren, curator of the Bristol Museum of

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Art, for a guided tour of Banksy's early work.

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-Hi, are you Tim?

-Yes, hi!

-Helen, nice to meet you.

-Hi, Helen.

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-Nice to meet you.

-So, here we are in Bristol, home of Banksy.

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Well, we think it's the home of Banksy.

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-You can never be sure, can you?

-No!

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-That's part of the allure and mystery, isn't it? The mystique.

-Yeah.

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Banksy's street art is now found all over the world

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and combines humour with graffiti in a distinctive stencilling technique.

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Banksy started working in Bristol in the sort of early to mid '90s

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and he was really part of a huge movement in Bristol that grew

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out of 1980s and early 1990s hip-hop culture,

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which was brought over here from New York.

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And then Banksy comes on the wave of that,

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a little bit after that initial wave, and he just...

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I suppose by his wit and his skill

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and his brilliance in placing the right thing in the right place

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at the right time,

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he just becomes incredibly well known in Bristol and beyond.

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Yeah. So, what's this one been called?

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This is The Grim Reaper and it's here on Harbourside in Bristol.

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Banksy came down here and tagged the Thekla, which is

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this ship over here, and then raced away in a rowing boat, we're told.

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Brilliant. Shall we pop off to the next one?

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Banksy's work often features a satirical message,

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such as this one in Stokes Croft, Bristol's cultural quarter.

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This arrived here in the late '90s and it was a time

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-when everybody was going to free parties.

-Those were the days!

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Exactly. Those were the days!

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There was a lot of dance music, a great scene going on.

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But there was also quite a backlash from authority about that.

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I don't know for sure, but I often look at this piece and wonder

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if there's something in it about the cuddly

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and the friendliness of the party people not putting up with

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the anti-authoritarianism of the forces of law and order.

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# It's a hard knock life... #

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Banksy really has made a connection with the people of Bristol.

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In 2006, when this image appeared,

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the City Council asked residents if they wanted it to stay.

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-The overwhelming response was - yes!

-So what date was this piece executed?

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Execution is a good word. This is called The Hanging Man.

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And 2006, it appeared.

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The story is that Banksy arranged for scaffolding to be erected

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here and worked behind it for a couple of days,

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as people walked past, and then had the scaffolding taken away

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and lo and behold, this piece was left there.

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And it's probably one of the most photographed and famous.

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You get coach loads of people.

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In 2009, the city museum had an exhibition of Banksy's work.

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That's quite tricky to curate when the artist wishes to remain unknown.

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A piece from the exhibition still remains at the museum.

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-One of our most popular exhibits.

-Wow! Is it really?

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Yeah, it's the thing that people come to see.

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We've got this place full of art from all over the world

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and from all sorts of incredible artists

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and Banksy is right up there amongst them,

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as being one of the most popular pieces in the collection.

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And that's nice cos he's a local artist

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-and he should be celebrated in his hometown.

-yeah, he's local.

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And he's also, let's face it, possibly one of the biggest artists alive today as well.

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What I think is great about Banksy is the legacy that he's left,

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certainly in the Art Museum, but also in the art world in general.

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He's shifted perception of graffiti artists and hopefully that's forever.

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That perception has changed for the good and for the future.

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It's great to see. Brilliant. Thank you so much for having me.

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Thank you and take care. All right, bye-bye.

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The next time you have some graffiti removed,

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it might be worth checking because it could be worth thousands.

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Ha! James is still at Odds And Todds and seems rather relaxed.

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I can afford to be choosy. I'm doing quite well.

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I've bought three good items.

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One very speculative item, bit of a banker,

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the little mirrored stand, and the malachite fellow...

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I've done quite well with clocks recently.

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Black slate, wouldn't have bought it,

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but with the malachite panels, I was in there.

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-But, you know, I can afford to be choosy.

-You're always choosy, James!

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No change there, then!

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A three-legged tray, here.

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Look at that.

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That is a huge piece of pottery.

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There isn't a lot interesting, bar the fact that it has three legs.

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-It's a very rare tray.

-It's supposed to have four legs.

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Only having three bobbles.

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But the interesting thing is that is one sheet of pottery

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and that's quite an achievement. Imagine putting that in the kiln.

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A flat piece is quite difficult to fire.

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That's why tiles come in quite small sizes. It's quite a difficult thing.

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This is... What is it? 1920s, '30s maybe?

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Residual value? Zero.

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But technically, quite clever. Les!

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Well, the pussy doesn't look impressed by it.

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There's no maker's name on it,

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but it looks like it could be early 20th century.

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I'll give you a fiver for your three-legged tray.

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I thought that had four legs when I seen it.

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But obviously hasn't.

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You're wonky, mate! You're wonky!

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Wonky donkey!

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You're going to say two, aren't you? I know you!

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-A tenner.

-Tenner! Fiver's me offer, mate!

-Fiver!

-Five pounds.

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-He's a horrid man, isn't he?

-I'm doing you a favour.

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It's not a proper job, is it?

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-Eh?

-It's only got three legs!

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I'll look where the other leg's gone, then.

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Where's that leg gone? Go on, Les.

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You find me the leg and I'll give you a tenner.

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If you can't find it, I'll give you a fiver.

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It's a nice thing, though, isn't it, really?

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Is it?! A three-legged tray?

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-Eight pound.

-Fiver's all I've got, mate.

-Come off it, James!

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You've got £85 left.

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He's happy with it, aren't you? You're happy with it! Well done!

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Come on!

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A three-legged tray, eh?

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James thinks it'll do well and at just £5, he might be right!

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-Les, there's a fiver, mate.

-I'll get rich on that.

-You will.

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Ice creams all round!

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-Someone's not amused.

-Thanks a lot.

-Bye, then. Cheers, then.

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It's been a busy day. Time to turn in. Night-night, you lot.

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And it's day two of the roadtrip.

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So how did you get on yesterday, Helen?

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-I just bought one thing yesterday.

-Right.

-A little cheap thing.

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-A cheapo.

-A cheap thing that I still probably paid too much for!

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Even though it was still cheap but it was really nice.

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-Is it doll two or not?

-No!

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I am avoiding all dolls.

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You're avoiding just about everything it seems

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because yesterday Helen spent a paltry £10 on a green vase

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leaving £174, seemingly not, burning a hole in her pocket.

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James, meanwhile, spent an impressive £140

0:18:360:18:39

on a slate and malachite clock, carved portrait,

0:18:390:18:43

glass stand and porcelain tray, leaving him £78.20p today.

0:18:430:18:47

James is in the driving seat and he's dropping Helen off

0:18:490:18:52

in the historic market town of Corsham in Wiltshire.

0:18:520:18:55

Corsham is one of the most picturesque towns in England.

0:18:590:19:02

It owes much of its early prosperity to the wool trade.

0:19:020:19:05

I don't think the traders will be able to pull the wool over

0:19:050:19:08

Helen's eyes much, who's hopefully in a buying mood today.

0:19:080:19:12

-Thank you, James, have a good day.

-Same to you.

-See you later.

-Bye.

0:19:120:19:16

Helen's first stop of the day is Harley Antiques.

0:19:180:19:21

This shop is set in a Georgian country house.

0:19:210:19:24

Perhaps the ideal setting to pick up something special.

0:19:240:19:27

I had an idea I was going to buy slightly more contemporary

0:19:290:19:33

pieces today but only because I was inspired by Banksy yesterday.

0:19:330:19:37

But this shop's got some beautiful things.

0:19:380:19:41

I could spend a fortune if I had a fortune to spend.

0:19:410:19:44

Helen seems really focused on buying the right thing.

0:19:440:19:46

She's got £174 left, not quite a fortune,

0:19:460:19:50

but enough to buy something enticing.

0:19:500:19:52

These are nice, nice little matchstick holders.

0:19:520:19:56

They're Asprey, silver. So, you know a nice decent quality make.

0:19:560:20:00

Asprey is a British company founded in 1781 that provides

0:20:000:20:05

luxury and bespoke items.

0:20:050:20:06

It's hallmarked 1960.

0:20:060:20:09

I'd want to make a bit of an offer on it.

0:20:090:20:11

Yesterday, Helen said she was looking for some silverware.

0:20:110:20:14

Might this be what she's after?

0:20:140:20:16

-Lee?

-Yes.

0:20:160:20:17

-I'm going to make you a really cheeky offer.

-Fire away.

0:20:190:20:23

Would you consider, because you've got a couple of them,

0:20:230:20:27

-maybe a few more hanging around.

-That's it I'm afraid.

-Is it?

0:20:270:20:30

-That's the end of them.

-There goes my theory.

-Oops!

0:20:300:20:33

Erm, I'm going to make a really cheeky offer and start at £20.

0:20:330:20:36

Not possible I'm afraid. No, you do get the matches with this one.

0:20:360:20:41

A bargain then!

0:20:410:20:42

What would you go to on it? It's £69.

0:20:420:20:45

So, the trade is £60.

0:20:450:20:47

-The death would be 45.

-Right, OK.

0:20:470:20:52

-Would you go 35?

-I will meet you in the middle, 40.

0:20:520:20:56

-It is the absolute death and that's...

-Right, OK.

0:20:560:21:01

-I think I'm going to decline then.

-OK.

-All right, yeah.

0:21:010:21:04

I think I'll leave it then. Thank you.

0:21:040:21:06

You could just buy the matches!

0:21:060:21:08

Yeah, I think I've just got to buy a little bit lower

0:21:080:21:10

because otherwise my profit is just going to go out the window

0:21:100:21:13

and then I'm going to be left with nothing for the rest of the trip.

0:21:130:21:17

I'm trying not to let my emotions rule my purchases.

0:21:170:21:21

£174 is hardly nothing

0:21:210:21:24

but I think Helen's really determined to beat James.

0:21:240:21:27

Don't worry, Helen, there's still another shop to go.

0:21:270:21:31

I'm feeling the pressure. I'm feeling the pressure.

0:21:310:21:34

This shop better be, er, cheap.

0:21:340:21:37

James doesn't seem to be feeling any pressure though

0:21:380:21:41

and has made his way over to Bradford-on-Avon in Wiltshire.

0:21:410:21:45

In 19098, recently qualified pharmacist,

0:21:490:21:52

Richard Christopher, bought a chemist's shop in Silver Street.

0:21:520:21:56

The shop remained in the family for nearly 80 years

0:21:560:21:59

and throughout that time hardly changed.

0:21:590:22:01

When it closed, locals wanted to keep it

0:22:010:22:04

so the entire contents were transferred to the new museum.

0:22:040:22:07

James is meeting local historian, Ivor Slocombe, to find out more.

0:22:070:22:12

-This is marvellous. Look at this.

-This is the recreated shop front.

0:22:120:22:16

Somewhat smaller than it was in reality

0:22:160:22:19

but it's got all the essential elements and the first thing

0:22:190:22:23

which always greets you are these four big bottles.

0:22:230:22:27

They're called carboys, coloured water, nothing else.

0:22:270:22:31

They should be blue, green, red and yellow

0:22:310:22:34

but they lose their colour very badly apparently.

0:22:340:22:37

They're simply a symbol of a chemist shop like the barber's pole

0:22:370:22:41

-or the three balls for a pawn broker.

-Really? Just that?

0:22:410:22:45

Do the colours represent anything?

0:22:450:22:48

-The four basic elements are fire, air, earth and water.

-Ah!

0:22:480:22:52

-Which is that sort of mystical chemistry in a way.

-Yes.

0:22:520:22:56

Go back to the Middle Ages and alchemy and all the rest of it.

0:22:560:22:59

Everything was painstakingly removed from shop,

0:22:590:23:02

including the original flooring.

0:23:020:23:04

Right, come on in here, James, and you can see our shop

0:23:040:23:07

recreated exactly as it was when it closed in 1986.

0:23:070:23:12

But hadn't changed for 80 years, it seemed to me.

0:23:140:23:17

It is exactly as a Victorian chemist shop would have been.

0:23:170:23:21

It is exactly as it was and every item is exactly as it was

0:23:210:23:24

on the shelf when it closed.

0:23:240:23:25

-We haven't imported things from outside.

-That is fabulous.

0:23:250:23:29

Now, Ivor, I'm a 19th century gentleman, I've come in here,

0:23:290:23:32

I'm feeling a little liverish, a bit below par.

0:23:320:23:35

I've probably had too many glasses of claret last night.

0:23:350:23:38

What would our man prepare for me?

0:23:380:23:40

Well, let's assume you've gone to the doctor because you're ill,

0:23:400:23:44

whatever the cause of it, and he would give you a prescription.

0:23:440:23:48

In those days it looked like a cooking recipe.

0:23:480:23:50

It would have a list of chemicals, abbreviated Latin,

0:23:500:23:55

-using apothecary weights, almost unintelligible.

-Right.

0:23:550:23:58

-And you would bring this to Mr Christopher.

-So, secret code...

0:23:580:24:02

-Absolutely.

-..between doctor and pharmacist.

0:24:020:24:04

Nowadays, most pharmaceutical drugs are ready-made.

0:24:040:24:07

In the Victorian era, chemists would have to physically make

0:24:070:24:11

the pills using raw ingredients.

0:24:110:24:13

The chemist would mix the recipe as prescribed by the doctor with

0:24:130:24:17

a glucose substance into a long putty-like form before cutting.

0:24:170:24:22

You take this machine, you roll it out into a kind of sausage.

0:24:220:24:26

-You then grip each side firmly.

-OK.

0:24:260:24:29

And pull it straight down very firmly. Down over.

0:24:290:24:33

Right. And lift it off.

0:24:370:24:39

Now, you've got something which is almost a pill but not quite round.

0:24:390:24:45

Looks like a bead necklace, doesn't it?

0:24:450:24:48

You take that one and you take that, and you roll it round

0:24:480:24:52

until you get a perfectly round pill. Very, very lightly.

0:24:530:24:59

Very lightly.

0:24:590:25:01

-This was half a day's work to pick up your medicine, wasn't it?

-Absolutely.

0:25:010:25:04

In fact, while I'm preparing these immaculate pills,

0:25:040:25:07

the poor chap could be dead, couldn't he?

0:25:070:25:10

Packaging is a fascinating thing.

0:25:100:25:12

-So, I put my pills in there.

-Put your pills in there.

0:25:120:25:15

Your customer's been sitting on that chair over there.

0:25:150:25:18

-Seeing his preparation.

-Anxiously waiting.

0:25:180:25:21

And then how much would I charge him for this?

0:25:210:25:24

-Probably two and sixpence.

-Two and sixpence.

0:25:240:25:27

-So, two shillings and sixpence.

-Which I would then ring up on the till.

0:25:270:25:31

I go over to the till here, I see reds for the shillings.

0:25:310:25:35

-Two shillings and sixpence.

-Right.

0:25:350:25:39

-Just a moment, you're a little bit near.

-Right.

0:25:390:25:42

-It could catch the unwary?

-Two shillings and sixpence.

0:25:420:25:45

TILL RINGS

0:25:450:25:47

There we are. It was a bit close, wasn't it.

0:25:470:25:50

I could have been in need of an ointment if I'd been a little closer!

0:25:520:25:56

-Thank you, Ivor, it has been really fascinating.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:560:26:01

Speaking of tills, there's not long till the shops close

0:26:010:26:05

so time to pick up, Helen, and head to Devizes in Wiltshire.

0:26:050:26:08

Despite being a small town, Devizes has nearly 500 listed buildings,

0:26:110:26:16

one of the highest concentrations anywhere in England.

0:26:160:26:19

They're both shopping at Crowman Antiques

0:26:210:26:23

and whilst James parks up, Helen's getting a head start.

0:26:230:26:27

-Are you John?

-I am indeed.

-Hiya, I'm Helen. Nice to meet you.

0:26:270:26:29

Helen's only bought one item so far on this leg of the trip.

0:26:290:26:33

She seems to be keeping her powder dry for the right things

0:26:330:26:36

but time is running out.

0:26:360:26:38

-Great car horn.

-HORN SOUNDS

0:26:390:26:42

Yeah, nice. Very nice. That'll look great on the E-Type!

0:26:420:26:45

Very tempting.

0:26:450:26:47

Yes, but not tempting enough to buy, Helen, eh?

0:26:470:26:49

Still feeling the heat, here comes James.

0:26:490:26:51

-Oh, hello.

-Hi, Helen. How are you?

0:26:510:26:54

He's worried you've found a bargain before him.

0:26:540:26:56

Right, I've got things to do, know what I mean?

0:26:560:27:00

-I'll give you some space.

-Thank you. Thank you.

0:27:000:27:03

If you go, the kitchen is the coolest place.

0:27:030:27:05

-I will go to the kitchen.

-Go through there and get some fresh air.

0:27:050:27:08

There are three floors of goodies to choose from here

0:27:080:27:11

so just enough room for the two of them.

0:27:110:27:14

-A World War I commemorative beaker.

-Slightly just after.

0:27:140:27:17

I like it with the "peace" and the dove, you know.

0:27:180:27:21

Truly celebrating the end of World War I. It's quite nice.

0:27:210:27:25

Peace celebration 1919.

0:27:260:27:28

Presented by the Lord Mayor, alderman and citizens

0:27:280:27:32

to the city of Manchester.

0:27:320:27:34

She seems keen but is it worth the £48 ticket price?

0:27:340:27:37

I'd want to offer something like £25 on it.

0:27:370:27:40

-I'll go 28 on it.

-Right, OK. I'll give that some thought

0:27:400:27:43

-and we'll have a look upstairs if that's all right?

-Yeah.

-Brilliant, thank you.

0:27:430:27:47

Do you know, I wonder if Helen's going to buy anything today.

0:27:470:27:50

Fresh from his pharmacy visit, James is in the next door room. Oh, lordy.

0:27:500:27:55

What's he doing? Poor chap.

0:27:550:27:57

Right, so, what have we got?

0:27:570:27:58

These are the unction bottles, so these are skin ointments.

0:27:580:28:02

These are the things you would have rubbed on your skin.

0:28:020:28:05

So, unction, simple. So that's a simple unction.

0:28:050:28:09

So, that would have been in a pharmacy. That's a nice looking bottle as well.

0:28:090:28:13

Quite, James, but maybe you should get down from there before you break something.

0:28:130:28:17

Ow! My knees.

0:28:170:28:19

You could need some unction for that, otherwise known as ointment.

0:28:190:28:22

It seems like he's quite interested in these.

0:28:220:28:25

You know, these two at a tenner apiece, £20,

0:28:250:28:27

I'd be very pleased but he might delight me.

0:28:270:28:30

He might say, "James, I like the cut of your jib, I know you're hot,

0:28:300:28:33

"I know you're sweaty and I'll give you a fiver each for them."

0:28:330:28:37

Always the optimist.

0:28:370:28:38

I wonder if Helen's found anything else she likes?

0:28:380:28:41

That's a nice little writing box.

0:28:410:28:44

You know, ladies would sit at their desk

0:28:440:28:47

and have this sloping lid here for writing letters on.

0:28:470:28:51

And then you keep your pens in here.

0:28:510:28:53

You know, they're nice, often the writing slope isn't intact

0:28:530:28:59

or it's totally broken inside and often these bits are missing.

0:28:590:29:03

So, it's kind of nice, I like it.

0:29:030:29:05

But do you like it enough to buy it?

0:29:050:29:07

-Hiya. How much are you asking for your writing box?

-£40.

0:29:070:29:10

Would you take £25 for it?

0:29:100:29:13

Erm, that's a little bit cheeky.

0:29:130:29:16

Erm, 32.

0:29:160:29:17

-Would you meet me in the middle then and say 30?

-I would do 31.

-31! OK.

0:29:170:29:22

You drive a hard bargain. All right, OK, I will take that for 31.

0:29:220:29:27

Brilliant, OK.

0:29:270:29:29

After being so indecisive earlier, Helen's finally bought something.

0:29:290:29:33

Quickly, get to the till before she changes her mind again!

0:29:330:29:36

And I'm going to take the World War I beaker.

0:29:360:29:38

-How much did we say on that again?

-We said 28 on that.

-Sure?

0:29:380:29:41

-Oh, I think so, yes. Squeezed to the limit.

-All right, OK.

0:29:410:29:45

I'm going to take that as well. Thank you.

0:29:450:29:48

And I think the car horn's fun.

0:29:490:29:52

Erm, what have you got on that?

0:29:520:29:55

Let's have a look what I've got on it. Erm...

0:29:550:29:58

-35. We'll say 28.

-28. OK.

0:29:580:30:02

-I want to say 22.

-22.

0:30:030:30:06

I think 26 will give you a little bit of....

0:30:060:30:09

HORN

0:30:090:30:10

-26.

-25.

-25?

0:30:100:30:13

-All right, we'll do 25.

-I can tell you're a dealer.

0:30:130:30:16

It's like waiting for a bus.

0:30:160:30:19

You hang about all day then three come along at once.

0:30:190:30:22

She's spent £84 on the writing box, china beaker and horn.

0:30:220:30:25

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-Take care now.

0:30:250:30:28

James, meanwhile, has had another look around

0:30:280:30:30

but is still very keen on the ointment bottles.

0:30:300:30:33

John, I've found two items.

0:30:360:30:38

You know I said this morning I'd been round a pharmacy?

0:30:380:30:41

And what sort of price are you looking for on this?

0:30:430:30:45

-The white one's going to have to be £80.

-£80?!

-Yeah, yeah.

0:30:450:30:49

Now, look, John, that bottle there, if I can indentify it,

0:30:490:30:55

-could I have it for a tenner?

-No.

-So, what do you want for that one then?

0:30:550:30:58

-30 quid.

-30 quid.

0:30:580:31:00

John, my final offer, could you do that for 20 please?

0:31:010:31:04

-25, you've got a deal.

-22.

-23?

0:31:040:31:08

-23, come on, it would be unseemly to haggle any further.

-There we are.

0:31:080:31:13

That would be really great. Thank you. Brilliant, very happy with that.

0:31:130:31:16

Fifth and final. Wahey!

0:31:160:31:18

I thought you were never going to agree.

0:31:180:31:20

Helen, meanwhile, isn't so sure she's finished her shopping.

0:31:200:31:23

So, I'm a bit nervous now because I've only got four items.

0:31:230:31:26

I don't want to turn up to the reveal with just four so I think

0:31:260:31:30

I think I'm going to call Lee

0:31:300:31:33

and I really want the silver matchbox cover now.

0:31:330:31:39

-Let's hope Lee hasn't already sold it then.

-OK, here goes.

0:31:390:31:42

Hi, is that Lee?

0:31:430:31:45

Hi, Lee, it's Helen Hall here. How are you?

0:31:450:31:49

I was wondering if I could have

0:31:490:31:52

the Asprey silver matchbox cover from you?

0:31:520:31:56

Can we do that?

0:31:560:31:58

Oh good, you've still got it. Good. Thank goodness.

0:32:000:32:02

So, did we say £40 on it?

0:32:020:32:04

Yeah, all right. OK. Brilliant. Thanks so much.

0:32:060:32:10

All right, speak to you again. Bye-bye.

0:32:100:32:12

Cor, that was lucky, wasn't it?

0:32:120:32:14

Thankfully Lee was able to send it round straightaway.

0:32:140:32:17

So, let's see who bought what.

0:32:170:32:20

-Right, then.

-Ready?

-Moment of truth.

0:32:200:32:22

Dum-dum-dum!

0:32:220:32:24

-Right. OK.

-Here's my array.

0:32:260:32:29

-What is that?

-That is a funny fellow, isn't it?

0:32:300:32:34

It's only got three legs instead of the four. And that worked for me.

0:32:350:32:41

-A fiver.

-Oh, well, that'll do.

0:32:410:32:43

-And that is, I don't know what your Latin's like?

-Bad.

-Aqua, for water.

0:32:430:32:48

-And cara is caraway seed.

-Oh, OK.

0:32:480:32:51

It's an extract of caraway seed and it was for the cure of wind.

0:32:510:32:57

Slightly prophetic. This is my most speculative item.

0:33:010:33:04

-Right, that's sweet.

-And this is a very stylish lady with a bob.

0:33:040:33:09

Great jawline, great nose.

0:33:090:33:11

It's slightly in the manner of Eric Gill who was a great illustrator,

0:33:110:33:17

sculptor, you name it, he was there.

0:33:170:33:20

-How much did you get it for?

-£70.

0:33:200:33:22

Oh, nice. I didn't had the best couple of days of buying, really.

0:33:220:33:26

-It happens to us all.

-I was struggling. I was struggling.

0:33:260:33:29

So, I've got a bizarre assortment of pieces. Here we go.

0:33:290:33:33

Lots of goodies. Da-da-da!

0:33:340:33:37

-Brass car horn.

-Lovely. Makes a great sound does it?

-Yes, here we go.

0:33:380:33:42

HORN SOUNDS

0:33:420:33:44

Lovely, very good.

0:33:440:33:46

Nothing like blowing your own hooter, eh?

0:33:460:33:48

You know, we can have fun with that in the E-Type.

0:33:480:33:51

It looks totally functional. And how much did you pay?

0:33:510:33:53

-I paid for that, £25.

-That's fine, That's lovely.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:33:530:33:57

-Nice item.

-This I love.

0:33:570:33:59

'20s, '30s in style, Lalique-esque.

0:33:590:34:03

But it's just a cheap, pressed, English glass maker but I love it.

0:34:030:34:07

-I like the decoration with the Art Deco style.

-And a flared collar.

0:34:070:34:11

-Yeah. I love it. I want it actually.

-Good luck. Last in?

0:34:110:34:16

Have you got your trunks?

0:34:160:34:18

If you got in this water I don't think anybody would see

0:34:180:34:21

whether you're wearing trunks or not. Anyway, let's go.

0:34:210:34:24

Before you go, chaps, tell us what you really think.

0:34:240:34:27

Helen's bought some nice items.

0:34:270:34:28

I slightly...I do covet that Asprey's matchbox cover.

0:34:280:34:32

It's a lovely item, and at £40,

0:34:320:34:35

if she'd asked me how much she'd spent on it, I would have said £50.

0:34:350:34:40

I think that pottery tray is horrible.

0:34:400:34:42

SHE LAUGHS

0:34:420:34:44

But his Eric Gill thing makes me very nervous.

0:34:440:34:47

That's the kind of thing that, you know,

0:34:470:34:49

if it could possibly be attributed

0:34:490:34:52

or even just sold in the manner of, that's really nice.

0:34:520:34:55

It will be interesting who will win this next leg,

0:34:550:34:59

and let's see how we do.

0:34:590:35:01

Indeed they will,

0:35:010:35:02

as they head 30 miles for today's auction in Swindon in Wiltshire.

0:35:020:35:06

The inspiration for the NHS came from a Swindon scheme,

0:35:070:35:11

established in 1871.

0:35:110:35:14

It offered railway employees cradle-to-grave health care

0:35:140:35:17

free at point of use.

0:35:170:35:19

There's nothing going free at today's auction, though, we hope,

0:35:190:35:23

as our friendly rivals arrive to do battle.

0:35:230:35:25

-Here we are.

-Here we are.

0:35:270:35:29

HONKS HORN

0:35:290:35:30

-A celebratory honk.

-We've arrived, everyone.

0:35:300:35:34

Kidson-Trigg's auction house

0:35:360:35:38

is the location for today's auction showdown.

0:35:380:35:41

Doing the honours at the podium is Pippa Kidson-Trigg.

0:35:410:35:44

What does she think of our items?

0:35:440:35:46

We've got a mixed bag.

0:35:460:35:48

Certainly, you know, we've got an interesting spread.

0:35:480:35:50

One of my favourites is the little posy vase.

0:35:500:35:53

It's functional, colourful, and it's fashionable.

0:35:530:35:56

It will suit the modern market.

0:35:560:35:58

Should fetch £20-£40, but hopefully a bit more.

0:35:580:36:01

The Eric Gill piece - I hope this might be a bit of a sleeper.

0:36:010:36:04

Obviously, Eric Gill's a great name,

0:36:040:36:07

so hopefully we might get to £100 today.

0:36:070:36:09

Am I going to sell everything today? Well, we'll see. Let's hope so.

0:36:090:36:14

James began this third leg of the road trip with £218.28,

0:36:160:36:21

and has gone on to spend £163 on five auction lots.

0:36:210:36:25

Helen started with £184,

0:36:280:36:31

and has parted with £134, also for five lots.

0:36:310:36:36

Thank you so much for having me, and I hope to see you again sometime.

0:36:360:36:39

So, with one auction win each under their belts,

0:36:390:36:42

it's time for the bidding to begin.

0:36:420:36:44

First up out of the trap is James's brown glass bottle.

0:36:440:36:47

Put me in at £5. I'm bid at £5.

0:36:470:36:49

-£10 at the back of the room. At £10. I'll take £15.

-£10. We're at £10.

0:36:490:36:53

At £15 now. At £20. Lady's bid at £20.

0:36:530:36:56

At £20 at the back of the room.

0:36:560:36:59

-Are we all done? Fair warning.

-Come on.

0:36:590:37:01

£20.

0:37:010:37:02

The bidders have bottled out of this one,

0:37:020:37:05

giving James his first loss.

0:37:050:37:06

-Oh, well. There you go.

-A winless area.

0:37:060:37:09

Can Helen get off to a better start with her posy bowl?

0:37:110:37:14

Start me off at £5.

0:37:140:37:17

£5. £5. At £5.

0:37:170:37:19

-£10 at the back of the room. Thank you.

-There we go. We got £10.

0:37:190:37:22

Phew.

0:37:220:37:23

-Go on the internet. Go on.

-At £10. Last call. Hammer's raised.

0:37:230:37:27

-Fair warning.

-Oh, there we go. A tenner.

0:37:270:37:30

Even Stevens, but it's just the beginning.

0:37:300:37:33

Next up is the commemorative China beaker.

0:37:330:37:37

Someone put me in at £5 to start. At £5.

0:37:370:37:40

At £5. I'll take £10. £5. I'll take £10 now. At £10. At £10.

0:37:400:37:44

They came in just before.

0:37:440:37:45

At £15 now. Anyone else in the room?

0:37:450:37:47

-OK, are we all done?

-£15.

-At £15.

0:37:470:37:49

That's a lot better, isn't it?

0:37:490:37:52

Exciting. It's another loss. But the biggest items are yet to come.

0:37:520:37:55

So what did you spend your money on, then, Helen?

0:37:550:37:59

-Will the matchbox holder strike a light with today's bidders?

-£20.

0:37:590:38:03

At £20. I'm bid at £20. I'll take £5.

0:38:030:38:06

-£25. Thank you, at the back of the room.

-Come on.

-At £25.

0:38:060:38:08

-£30. Fresh bidder.

-£30. Well done.

0:38:080:38:12

£40. Thank you.

0:38:120:38:14

At £45. With you. I'm selling at £45. Thank you.

0:38:140:38:18

-Phew.

-Well done.

0:38:180:38:19

-Pulled it back there.

-You certainly did.

0:38:210:38:23

A tidy fiver on top.

0:38:230:38:25

Will James see a big profit on his mirrored stand?

0:38:250:38:29

I'm going to start the bidding off at £50.

0:38:290:38:32

They are quite rare to see.

0:38:320:38:34

£75, still with me. At £75.

0:38:340:38:38

-Still with me.

-How very un-gentlemanly. And rather unseemly.

0:38:380:38:42

Almost a profit.

0:38:420:38:43

I'm selling on the internet at home for £90.

0:38:430:38:48

-What did it go for?

-I think £90 in the end.

0:38:480:38:51

That's lit up James's fortune, all right.

0:38:510:38:54

£75 profit puts him in the lead.

0:38:540:38:57

You see, you can't keep a good man down, Helen. That's the problem.

0:38:570:39:01

-James's three-legged tray is up next.

-There we are.

0:39:010:39:05

Start me off at £5. I'm bid at £5.

0:39:050:39:07

At £5, at £5. At £5, I'll take £10.

0:39:070:39:09

£5 for the tea tray.

0:39:090:39:10

Sorry, we'll just wait for the internet now. At £10. Thank you.

0:39:100:39:14

At £10 I'm bid. Fair warning. Fair warning at home. £10.

0:39:140:39:17

-Hey, I was right not to pay more than a fiver.

-Yeah, you were.

0:39:170:39:20

You definitely wear.

0:39:200:39:22

The tray has served up a fiver profit for James.

0:39:220:39:24

-Lovely tray.

-Mmm.

0:39:240:39:26

And now it's time for James's slate and malachite mantel clock.

0:39:300:39:34

Start the bidding off at £5. I'm bid at £5.

0:39:340:39:36

At £5.

0:39:360:39:38

£5? Oh, dear.

0:39:380:39:41

At £5. I'll take £10.

0:39:410:39:42

Thank you, seated. At £10 I'm bid.

0:39:420:39:45

Last call in the room. Fair warning.

0:39:450:39:47

Fair warning on the internet.

0:39:470:39:49

I wasn't expecting that. There we are.

0:39:490:39:51

-£10. That's an absolute bargain.

-Oh, dear.

0:39:510:39:54

He's clocked up a £40 loss with that.

0:39:540:39:57

I'm now back to zero again on that lot.

0:39:570:40:01

Now, is the writing on the wall for Helen's writing box?

0:40:010:40:03

£5. I'm bid at £5.

0:40:040:40:06

I think it's overpriced at £5, Helen.

0:40:060:40:09

£10. Thank you, Dave. At £10 at the back of the room. At £10.

0:40:090:40:13

I'll take £5. Thank you. At £15. At £15, seated. £20.

0:40:130:40:17

Fresh bid at £25 now. At £25. At £30. £5.

0:40:170:40:22

Do you want to go again?

0:40:220:40:24

At £40. At £5. At £45.

0:40:240:40:28

All done at £45.

0:40:280:40:30

-Yay! A profit!

-£45! That was well done. Well done.

0:40:300:40:34

A nice £14 profit for Helen before commission.

0:40:340:40:37

I think you've slipped into the lead there, chief.

0:40:370:40:40

Will anyone give a hoot for Helen's horn? £5.

0:40:410:40:46

At £5, please. Thank you. At £5.

0:40:460:40:49

At £5. I'll take £10. At £10, thank you. At £20.

0:40:490:40:53

At £20, seated. At £20.

0:40:530:40:55

Fresh bidder at the back of the room at £25. £30.

0:40:550:40:58

£35. £40. £45.

0:40:580:41:01

-£50.

-Yes! Come on, horn!

0:41:010:41:04

-All done at £50.

-Well done, well done.

0:41:040:41:07

Helen maintains her lead over James with a £25 profit.

0:41:070:41:12

-See, you've done very well on the last two.

-I've done well.

0:41:140:41:17

-They needed warming up, Helen.

-Yeah, they did.

0:41:170:41:20

Can James get back in front with his Eric Gill style portrait?

0:41:200:41:24

-Start the bidding off at

-£5. Oh.

0:41:240:41:27

£10 now. £10, £10, £10. £15.

0:41:270:41:30

It will go, it will go.

0:41:300:41:32

At £15. Any advance?

0:41:320:41:34

£20, thank you. At £25. Do you want to go again?

0:41:340:41:38

-At £30.

-She's bid on loads of stuff, that lady.

0:41:380:41:43

Selling in the room at £40.

0:41:430:41:46

-Oh, dear.

-Oh, James. I'm sorry.

0:41:460:41:49

It's all gone wrong horribly for me. Yes, he had high hopes for that.

0:41:490:41:54

But he's just lost £30 on it.

0:41:540:41:56

-HE LAUGHS

-Well, the market always decides, doesn't it?

0:41:560:42:00

-The market decides, yeah.

-So there we are.

-Oh, dear.

0:42:000:42:03

So let's total it up.

0:42:030:42:06

James started this leg of the Road Trip merrily with £218.28,

0:42:060:42:10

but after auction costs,

0:42:100:42:12

he's made a loss of £23.60,

0:42:120:42:14

leaving a gloomy £194.68.

0:42:140:42:18

Helen, meanwhile, started this leg of the trip with £184,

0:42:210:42:25

but after auction costs, scraped a profit of just £1.30,

0:42:250:42:29

thereby winning this third leg of the Road Trip with £185.30.

0:42:290:42:35

-You did well!

-Do you know what? Scores on the doors, £1.30 profit.

0:42:350:42:41

I'm closing the gap, James. You better watch out!

0:42:410:42:45

She certainly has. Helen's won two of the three auctions so far

0:42:450:42:49

on this trip, as the rookie turns master.

0:42:490:42:51

-Just avoid clocks and carved panels.

-And carved panels.

0:42:510:42:56

Right, here we go. And we're off.

0:42:560:42:58

On the next Antiques Road Trip, James loses his confidence.

0:43:030:43:08

I'm going through this sort of buying crisis.

0:43:080:43:10

But Helen's feeling flush.

0:43:100:43:13

Megabucks. Mega!

0:43:130:43:14

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures.

James Braxton and Helen Hall start in the city and county of Bristol before heading to Corsham and Bradford on Avon in Wiltshire then on to auction in Swindon.