Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 14

Thomas Plant and Anita Manning cruise around the sunny south coast, heading for an auction in Dorking, Surrey.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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-a classic car...

-We're going round!

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..and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I want to spend lots of money.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction - but it's no mean feat.

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-Oh, no!

-There'll be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-We've done it.

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..and valiant losers.

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You are kidding me.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-What am I doing?

-You've got a deal.

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's another day out on the road trip for Thomas Plant

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and Anita Manning,

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and this time they're cruising around England's sunny south coast.

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Thomas, here we are in Bournemouth.

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The sea is over there, the sun is shining.

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-Maybe we could get some buckets.

-Buckets and spades.

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-Buckets and spades. A kiss-me-quick hat.

-Oh!

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Don't tempt me, Thomas.

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It is a real sort of holiday feeling, isn't it?

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It certainly is.

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Thomas Plant is an antiques expert who never neglects

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the body beautiful.

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And experienced auctioneer Anita Manning is never

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surprised by something old.

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IT GROWLS

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Both Thomas and Anita started the trip with £200,

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but after taking an early lead, Thomas's big spending has

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caused big losses, and he is starting today with only £154.98.

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Thrifty Anita has now taken the lead with £255.94.

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-Summertime and the living is easy.

-The living is easy.

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Well, the living isn't easy for me because I'm so poor, but you're so rich!

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I know. I must say, Thomas, I've surged ahead here.

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I was going to say I crept ahead,

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but in actual fact I've surged ahead!

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Surged ahead, and I've sort of surged backwards.

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We're on our fourth leg

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and I don't know if you've got a leg to stand on.

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That's fighting talk, Anita.

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So with a full tank in their 1968 Lotus Elan,

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let's see where our happy pair are off to.

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On this road trip, Thomas and Anita will travel over 550

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miles from the village of Redbourn, in Hertfordshire,

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all the way to the town of Maidstone, in Kent.

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But today they start in beautiful Bournemouth

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before driving across southern England to end up at an auction,

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100 miles away in Dorking.

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You were a wee bit casual in the way you spent your money the last time.

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I was. You were very careful - that was the right approach.

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My plan is to follow you again and to spend little.

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So, now, Thomas has a plan.

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He's off to Robin's Antiques, run by,

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no prizes for guessing, Robin.

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What we do need to know before you do start is have you got a licence?

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-A licence for what?

-Begging.

-No, I haven't got a begging licence.

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I won't be begging.

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And keeping up the family tradition is his grandson, Dan.

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This place is a feast for the eyes

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and there's quite a few items catching Thomas's eye.

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-Very arts and crafts, isn't it?

-It is, isn't it?

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-Gothic-like.

-Gothic coat hook.

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Still, it's made out of silver-plated brass,

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with a planished,

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as in a hammer-beating effect. Planished hand-beating.

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I think it was a coat hook and it would have had a couple

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-of brushes hanging from it...

-Certainly could have had that, yeah.

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-..for brushing off your coat and what have you.

-What a fun thing.

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-Can I think about that? How much is that?

-It is £35.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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That one is a definitely maybe for Thomas.

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Now, what has he found out the back?

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-It's a complete smoker's compendium.

-It is lovely.

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Smoker's compendium. So you've got your table lights...

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-Your table lights.

-..your vesta.

-That's right.

-An ashtray...

-Yeah.

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..or a tobacco pot, or ashtray in there.

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I would say that was for a drink, have a whiskey,

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but it's nice being complete.

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The style of it, there is no damage, and the whole thing is £80.

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I find it so cool. I love this Jugendstil style,

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the cleanness of lime.

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Jugendstil, or "young style", was the German version of Art Nouveau

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from the turn-of-the-century.

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This was made by the Wurttembergische Metallwarenfabrik

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or, more simplify, WMF.

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Could Robin simplify the ticket price a bit, perhaps?

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The smoker's compendium...

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£65.

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So, Robin is asking for £100 for the two items.

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Any movement on that?

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I wanted to come in here and spend 50 quid on a couple

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of lots, and then 50 quid on another couple of lot somewhere else.

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Don't look like that! Don't look like that.

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He looks as if he is going to throw you out the shop.

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Listen, I will let you have both bits.

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That is the smoker's compendium and the coat hook for 70 quid.

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-Really? Very good man.

-There we are.

-You are a very good man.

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Well, that was a good bit of business, Tom.

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£50 for the smoker's set and £20 for the coat hook.

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Anita has travelled nine miles east from Bournemouth to

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New Milton and crossed the county line from Dorset into Hampshire.

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She's here to shop in Serendipity One.

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IT GROWLS

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-TOM LAUGHS

-Must be a "do-you-think-he-saurus."

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And he certainly did, Anita. Here to help us is Nick.

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-Nice to meet you.

-I love your reception committee.

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Well, yes, he is there to let me know someone is in the door.

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-He is not a watchdog or anything?

-Not really.

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-Did he tell you to spend all your money?

-I'm not telling you.

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We will get some out of you.

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There is a bit of everything in here,

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and it is just the sort of wonderful shop where you would never

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-know what you're going to buy.

-Indeed.

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Now, how about this little fella?

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This type of thing I find fascinating.

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I find the simplicity of the carving very, very attractive.

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And at the turn-of-the-century it was this type of carving

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and African tribal masks that inspired artists like Picasso.

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It's carved in some sort of hardwood

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and there are little mother of pearl insets here.

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(There is no price on it, so I wonder how much it is.)

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If I can get that really quite cheaply...

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..I'm going to have a go at him.

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But first, what else can she sniff out?

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A sign like this is like a red rag to a bull in this game.

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-Nick.

-Yes, Anita?

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-Staff only.

-We don't let everybody out here,

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but only because it is you.

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-Thank you.

-Carry on.

-So these are all boxes that you brought in...

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Bags and boxes, China, bits and pieces.

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Oh, I can't wait to have a rummage.

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Get in there and have a good old rummage.

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This is like access all areas.

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This is like backstage, and this is where sometimes you can find

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the really nice bits and pieces.

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Ah! Now, I love this stuff.

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This is a piece of Poole Pottery made in the '60s/'70s.

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It is from the Aegean and Delphis range.

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It was the time of psychedelic colours.

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It was a time of Carnaby Street.

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It was a time of hippies.

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It was absolutely... It was colourful

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and Poole reflected the mood of the times in the designs for this range.

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Yes, Poole Pottery comes from nearby Poole and is collectable,

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but what can Anita get it for?

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It would be lovely to get it for under 20.

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-It reflected the age.

-Yes.

-And this sort of...

-Nice and local as well.

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Well, that's what I was thinking. That's what I was thinking.

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So hopefully, if you're selling locally, it could be a good thing.

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Yeah. It's the type of thing that I would have in my house.

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And, of course, you don't know how much it is.

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-No, well, that's the rub.

-It's cheap.

-Is it?

-It's cheap.

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-£10 to you.

-£10?

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£10, that's a bargain. One off.

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-No more to be said on that.

-No more to be said.

-OK, one deal done.

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But what about our little friend?

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-It's nearly as tall as you.

-It nearly is. He can be my wee pal.

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He was £75, but we want you to win and, as you say,

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he is a bit damaged.

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-What about if we did 40 for you?

-40. Still a wee bit dear at 40.

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-Could we go 30?

-Shall we do that?

-Shall we shake our hands at 30?

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30's fine. Thank you very much, Nick.

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There you go, Anita.

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Another low-spending shopping trip. £10 for the pottery

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and £30 for the sculpture means plenty of cash left.

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Watch out for the door dinosaur!

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Thomas, meanwhile, has also gone west, to Hampshire,

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travelling nearly 42 miles from Bournemouth to Wickham

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for his next spot of shopping.

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This historic conservation village has been a settlement

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since Roman times.

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Thomas is off to Warwick Lane Shopping Centre to meet Steve.

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-Hi, I'm Thomas.

-Hi, Thomas.

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-Steve, I'm the manager at Warwick Lane in Wickham.

-Hello, Steve.

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Warwick Lane has about 40 dealers and is packed with goodies.

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I found some vintage skipping-ropes for my new-found fitness.

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Now, what's that saying about a bull in a china shop?

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-What's your age, Thomas?

-Three.

-And barely that, some might say.

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A pair of glass salt dishes.

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Handle with care, for goodness' sake.

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They're cut glass with cut glass rims in the boat shape.

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Got a tiny bit of wear to them round there.

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Just got to work out how old they are.

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I think they're early 19th century.

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£6 each. £6 each for a pair of early 19th-century salts.

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Phew!

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£6 for an item that would have sat on the dining table

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around the time of Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo? Incredible!

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Now, back to something sweet. It's a sugar bowl.

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This is rather stylish, got a lovely shape to it,

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and I love the finial.

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It's Art Deco, around about 1920s, with a planished interior,

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hammer-beaten planished effect.

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Been made by hand. This finial, this handle here, that is polished ivory.

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Well, it's a controversial material.

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But, if formed before 1947, it's legal to buy and sell.

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Quite a nice thing. So that's something I'm going to think about.

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I shall go and ask Steve about these, the two things I've picked up.

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So yes, what can be done on those, if anything at all, please?

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Well, I'll ring up the sellers and we'll find out.

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The pair of glass salts is priced at £12.

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Steve checks with dealer, Mandy, for the best price.

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-Would you accept £8?

-Yes, perfect. Done.

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-And what about that one there?

-The sugar bowl is priced at £15.

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Steve checks with dealer, Sue.

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-Would £9 be more acceptable?

-Perfect. Thank you very much.

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-Why didn't I come here fist?

-THEY LAUGH

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-Brilliant.

-This is brilliant. Thank you.

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So, that's the glass salts for £8,

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the sugar bowl for £9, and nothing broken.

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Very bullish of you, Thomas.

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Anita has now made her way 45 miles east to Gosport,

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a town with a proud Naval history,

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and home to the Royal Navy Submarine Museum.

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Submarines are now huge hi tech craft,

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vital for the defence of our island nation,

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but it didn't start out that way.

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And Anita's here to find out about the sacrifices

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made to develop this deadly technology.

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Here to meet her is archivist George Malcolmson.

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You know, from Glasgow, I've always had a fascination for the sea

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and for ships, but submarines are something really quite different.

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This looks like a strange creature from the deep.

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Can you tell me a bit about it?

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Well, we're looking at the Holland 1,

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or to give it its proper name,

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His Majesty's Submarine Torpedo Boat Number 1.

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It was launched in October 1901.

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The Holland 1 was the Royal Navy's first ever submarine,

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named after John Philip Holland, an Irish-American engineer.

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Previous attempts at building subs date back to 1620,

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but Holland's design, made for the US Navy in 1900,

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is regarded as the mother of modern submarines.

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Countries, including Britain, all began to build subs

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after the Americans allowed the design to be sold.

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-Can we go inside?

-Yes, we can go in. Have a look through.

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Just mind your head.

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Are submariners usually wee?

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-Strangely enough, no. I know many who are over six foot.

-SHE LAUGHS

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The Holland would have had a crew of eight men,

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squeezed into this small space, with no contact with the outside world.

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It was hot, uncomfortable, dangerous work for the crews,

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not to mention the smell.

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The smell of the petrol engine,

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the fumes coming up from the batteries...

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There would have been a very distinct odour in these submarines.

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And they always said, you could smell a submariner

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before you saw him.

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It's difficult to imagine eight or nine men working in here,

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but I believe you have something even smaller to show me.

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By the start of World War I, the Royal Navy had more subs

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than any other nation, and by the Second World War,

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its engineers were getting ever more inventive.

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The X Class midget submarines were even smaller than the Holland

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and were involved in some of the war's most daring raids

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as they could sneak in, undetected, to enemy harbours to lay mines.

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These were very hazardous missions.

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This one is the great survivor because she went on two operations

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to Norway, attacking the U Boat facilities in Bergen, and came back.

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One of the few that came back.

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Success came at a price, though.

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In the raids on Bergen

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and in the mission to sink the battleship Tirpitz,

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eight midget submarines were used -

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-only three completed the mission.

-How many men would be in here?

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Three crew and a diver.

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Of the 12 X Class subs that saw service during World War II,

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only five survived and nearly half of the crewmen were killed.

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George, I imagine that this tiny submarine

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must have been even more dangerous than the big submarines.

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Were submariners a special type of man?

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Well, the volunteers for this type of hazardous service

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were called from the Navy and people volunteered,

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and they had to go through fairly rigorous training.

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The very nature of being in a submarine...

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It just means that you're relying on other members of the crew

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for your safety.

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And the more difficult the conditions,

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it seems to bind the people together much more strongly.

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The submariners life has always been difficult,

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and over 5,000 of them have died serving their country.

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But the submarine's qualities of stealth and surprise,

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so vital in the past,

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are what keeps it at the forefront of defending Britain today.

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That sombre note brings us to the end of day one. Night-night.

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It's the start of another sunny day on the Road Trip.

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Well, not quite, but our duo are in Southsea and are in good spirits.

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Thomas, how do you feel being in Southsea,

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sitting beside a beautiful woman, in a lovely yellow sports car?

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Well, do you know? I have to say, I enjoy the British seaside.

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And I love things like these gorgeous huts.

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Yeah, they're great, aren't they? With their lovely pastel colours.

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It's sweet, isn't it?

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There is something magical about the British seaside.

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-And people all muffled up against the wind.

-Yeah, yeah.

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-There's no such thing as bad weather.

-No.

-It's poor clothing.

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That's right.

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A very British attitude. Now, Thomas had a trying day yesterday.

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He tried not to spend too much,

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but still managed to pay out £87 on four items.

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The smoking set, the coat hook,

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the glass salts and the Art Deco bowl.

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That leaves him with £67.98 for the day ahead.

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Low-spending Anita played it sensible and canny again,

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spending only £40 on two items.

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A tribal sculpture and a Poole Pottery plate,

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giving her £215.94 to spend today.

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Anita is starting her day in Southsea,

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with a trip to Parmiters Antiques, run by the very charming Ian.

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-Stand by.

-Can I leave my bonnet here?

-Of course you can.

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I'll put it on the dog.

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-Don't sell it.

-Ha!

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So, with her hat off and her buying head on,

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Anita has a bit of a rummage.

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These are boots that certainly weren't made for walking.

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These boots were made for showing off.

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-They don't fit me.

-They don't fit you?

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-I don't think they'd fit me either.

-She's given the boots the boot.

0:19:010:19:05

But time is marching on. What's going to be worth a punt?

0:19:050:19:08

Little wall plaque with a photograph in the middle

0:19:110:19:14

commemorating HMS Vengeance.

0:19:140:19:17

-Ian!

-Yeah?

-This little HMS Vengeance.

0:19:190:19:26

-It's sweet, isn't it?

-It is.

0:19:260:19:27

You know, it's very, I suppose, evocative.

0:19:270:19:32

And it's typical of what you might find in a town like this

0:19:320:19:37

that was based on ships and the Navy and so on.

0:19:370:19:40

And you've got these two serious little children

0:19:400:19:43

who have all been scrunched into their best clothes.

0:19:430:19:47

-They had to sit there for five minutes.

-Sit there for five minutes.

0:19:470:19:50

-Do we know anything about the HMS Vengeance?

-No.

0:19:500:19:53

I haven't even looked it up, but I'm guessing 1900...

0:19:530:19:56

Maybe a dreadnought. One of the old dreadnoughts.

0:19:560:20:00

Ian is very nearly right.

0:20:000:20:02

HMS Vengeance was built in 1899

0:20:020:20:04

and was one of the last of the battleships made

0:20:040:20:06

prior to the massive dreadnoughts.

0:20:060:20:08

-What sort of price is a bargain?

-Bargain to you - 20 quid.

-20 quid?

0:20:080:20:14

-That's an absolute bargain.

-I like that for 20. I think I'll take that.

0:20:140:20:19

-That's one down. Now, what else has Ian got?

-I've got one for you.

0:20:200:20:25

-See all this 18th century pottery?

-Uh-huh.

0:20:250:20:28

-All that, 25 quid the lot.

-25 quid for the lot?

0:20:290:20:33

It's all damaged - guaranteed.

0:20:330:20:36

There's a lot of stuff there, and it might well sell, but it's a gamble,

0:20:360:20:40

-particularly if it's damaged.

-How many bits have we got? One, two...

0:20:400:20:44

..three, four, five, six, seven. Eight.

0:20:450:20:48

Nine, ten, 11 bits.

0:20:480:20:50

-No rush, Anita. You just take your time.

-Of 18th century ceramic?

-Yeah.

0:20:530:21:00

18th and early 19th.

0:21:000:21:01

You can't go wrong, can you?

0:21:010:21:03

She's thinking about it. How about a double deal, Ian?

0:21:030:21:07

£40 for that and the frame.

0:21:070:21:09

-Let's go for it.

-All right.

-Let's go for it. 40 quid.

0:21:130:21:16

-If you don't make money, I'll give you a tenner.

-Oh. SHE LAUGHS

0:21:160:21:19

Another brace of budget buys for Anita.

0:21:210:21:24

A varied lot of pottery for £20

0:21:240:21:27

and the HMS Vengeance life saver portrait, also for £20.

0:21:270:21:31

Tom's starting his day in Southsea

0:21:340:21:36

with a trip to hear the story of D-Day,

0:21:360:21:39

the invasion of France, told from a local perspective,

0:21:390:21:42

-and showing him round is Andrew.

-Hello, I'm Andrew.

0:21:420:21:45

-It's so windy here, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

0:21:450:21:46

Was it windy when we went to France on D-Day?

0:21:460:21:49

The weather wasn't very good anywhere.

0:21:490:21:51

I think it was worse than today, though.

0:21:510:21:53

So much has been talked about and concentrated on the actual events

0:21:530:21:56

in Normandy, D-Day itself,

0:21:560:22:00

but what happened in Portsmouth and to the people of Portsmouth,

0:22:000:22:03

the civilian population, how did they survive?

0:22:030:22:05

How did they cope?

0:22:050:22:07

Yeah, I think the preparations for D-Day that took place in Portsmouth

0:22:070:22:10

and also all along the south coast, are often forgotten about,

0:22:100:22:14

but they were just as important to the success of D-Day.

0:22:140:22:17

June the 6th, 1944, or D-Day as we now know it,

0:22:170:22:21

was the start of the Allied invasion of Normandy

0:22:210:22:24

and the beginning of the liberation of Europe from Hitler's Nazis.

0:22:240:22:28

But it was a long time in the planning

0:22:280:22:30

and, as the Allies prepared to go to France,

0:22:300:22:33

changes began to appear around Portsmouth

0:22:330:22:35

and the south coast in early 1944.

0:22:350:22:38

As D-Day approached, there would be more

0:22:380:22:40

and more troops building up and gathering into the area.

0:22:400:22:43

There were restrictions.

0:22:430:22:44

There was a ten-mile-deep band running along the south coast

0:22:440:22:49

where you had to have a special pass to get into it in the lead up to D-Day,

0:22:490:22:52

so there were special security restrictions.

0:22:520:22:55

You had camps, troop camps, probably a few miles inland,

0:22:550:23:00

often hidden away in a wood.

0:23:000:23:02

In a wood so that if there were enemy aircraft flying overhead

0:23:030:23:06

or spies around, it was a lot harder to see them.

0:23:060:23:09

Troops had been waiting in there for a couple of weeks,

0:23:090:23:12

maybe a month or so before D-Day and about a week or so before D-Day,

0:23:120:23:17

the camps were sealed, which meant no-one could go in or out.

0:23:170:23:21

By the end of May, over a million troops from the Wash to Land's End

0:23:210:23:24

waited expectantly,

0:23:240:23:26

but none of them knew the top secret time and date of D-Day.

0:23:260:23:29

Surely the Germans had an inkling that we were coming?

0:23:290:23:32

Well, that's definitely true.

0:23:330:23:35

It wasn't a secret that D-Day,

0:23:350:23:37

or an Allied landing somewhere on the coast of Europe was coming soon.

0:23:370:23:42

The Allies had made no secret of that.

0:23:420:23:44

But the two key bits of information that the Germans

0:23:440:23:47

really needed to find out, but fortunately didn't,

0:23:470:23:50

were where and when it would be happening.

0:23:500:23:52

Just as well the Germans never got their hands on one of these, then.

0:23:520:23:57

It's a step-by-step guide on how to invade occupied France.

0:23:570:24:00

So when were they given these?

0:24:000:24:03

They'd have been given them maybe a week or more before D-Day,

0:24:030:24:07

but until the last minute, they were sealed up.

0:24:070:24:09

So in a sealed envelope, which they weren't allowed to open.

0:24:090:24:13

And then, just days before D-Day, the order went out,

0:24:130:24:15

they could open their orders

0:24:150:24:17

and actually find out where they were going.

0:24:170:24:19

Didn't people open them immediately and think, "Oh, what's going on?"

0:24:190:24:22

People knew that it was really important to preserve secrecy

0:24:220:24:25

and to make sure that the enemy didn't get wind of what was coming.

0:24:250:24:29

On the 4th of June,

0:24:310:24:32

the troops due to invade Normandy began to move into place

0:24:320:24:36

to embark from Portsmouth docks,

0:24:360:24:38

filling the streets with trucks and troops.

0:24:380:24:40

How did the civilian population of Portsmouth react

0:24:420:24:46

-to this huge influx of military personnel?

-There were, as you say,

0:24:460:24:52

huge numbers of troops in the area in the lead up to D-Day.

0:24:520:24:55

Troops would have been just sleeping in or under their vehicles,

0:24:550:24:58

so local people often did things like invite them

0:24:580:25:01

into their house for a bath or to share some food.

0:25:010:25:04

And, obviously, food was rationed so that was quite a big thing.

0:25:040:25:07

So quite often,

0:25:070:25:09

you had friendships struck up just in a day or two between people,

0:25:090:25:14

civilians living along the south coast, and these troops.

0:25:140:25:18

But as the troops from various countries waited at the docks

0:25:180:25:21

to board their landing craft,

0:25:210:25:22

one local five-year-old girl called Betty White and some of her chums

0:25:220:25:27

saw the opportunity for a spot of memento collecting.

0:25:270:25:30

They asked the troops to give them badges from their uniforms

0:25:300:25:33

and that's where all these badges come from,

0:25:330:25:35

and her mother later sewed them

0:25:350:25:37

onto this coat to hold the whole collection together.

0:25:370:25:41

But those badges, it's a cross section of different units

0:25:410:25:44

and different nationalities,

0:25:440:25:46

so it's a great summary of many of those troops who went from Gosport.

0:25:460:25:51

-No doubt the troops weren't meant to do this.

-No.

0:25:510:25:54

But this coat really is a good example,

0:25:540:25:56

isn't it, of how the troops and the local people did get talking,

0:25:560:26:02

did exchange gifts and things like that

0:26:020:26:04

-despite the official regulations.

-Yeah.

0:26:040:26:06

Overnight on the 5th of June, the thousands of troops

0:26:060:26:09

and boats disappeared, leaving an eerie calm.

0:26:090:26:13

The story of what happened next has been well told,

0:26:130:26:17

but the towns of the south coast can be proud of their vital role.

0:26:170:26:21

And our Anita has hit the road again,

0:26:250:26:27

this time eight miles east to Chichester.

0:26:270:26:30

Now, Chichester is the county town of West Sussex.

0:26:300:26:33

Its cathedral is almost 1,000 years old,

0:26:330:26:36

and is the final resting place of the composer Gustav Holst.

0:26:360:26:40

But Anita is hoping there'll be something

0:26:400:26:42

going for a song in Hancock Antiques, run by Peter.

0:26:420:26:45

Lovely to meet you.

0:26:450:26:46

More crockery, Anita?

0:26:530:26:54

And loads of it too.

0:26:590:27:01

SHE LAUGHS

0:27:010:27:04

There's a lot of pottery here and most of it

0:27:040:27:06

isn't in good condition, so it's probably no use to me. Oh!

0:27:060:27:10

Heard a wee clink there. I have to be careful.

0:27:110:27:14

You might feel more at home with Peter's jewellery.

0:27:150:27:18

I love rummaging through all this.

0:27:200:27:22

Lovely wee bits and pieces of jewellery.

0:27:220:27:25

That's a rather pretty piece of agate, Peter.

0:27:270:27:29

Agate is a popular stone with beautiful striping.

0:27:310:27:35

This brooch has a ticket price of £40.

0:27:350:27:38

Can that one be bought for 20?

0:27:390:27:41

It's not gold. The stone's in good condition

0:27:440:27:47

and it's the type of thing that a private lady might fancy at auction.

0:27:470:27:54

-I can do it for 20.

-You can do it for 20?

0:27:540:27:56

Let's do it for 20 then. That's lovely. Thank you very much, Peter.

0:27:580:28:01

That's great.

0:28:010:28:02

So Anita has rounded off her shopping

0:28:040:28:06

with an attractive agate brooch for £20.

0:28:060:28:09

But no more porcelain.

0:28:110:28:13

Meanwhile, Thomas has made the journey ten miles east to Emsworth.

0:28:130:28:17

He's heading to Emsworth Antiques and the very obliging Hillary.

0:28:170:28:22

-Hello.

-Hello.

-I'm Thomas.

-Oh, I'm Hillary. Pleased to meet you.

0:28:220:28:26

And he's already after the sympathy vote.

0:28:260:28:29

-You've run out of money?

-Not necessarily.

0:28:290:28:31

I'd be lying if I said I'd run out of money,

0:28:310:28:34

but I'm desperate to claw back the money I lost last auction.

0:28:340:28:38

So one is being, as one says in Somerset, careful.

0:28:380:28:43

-Right.

-Less of the sob story and more shopping, please, Thomas.

0:28:430:28:47

-He's looking.

-Come on, Plant. Where is it?

0:28:530:28:56

And still looking.

0:28:580:29:00

Sometime today might be nice, Thomas.

0:29:000:29:02

-You're struggling, aren't you?

-No. No, I'm not struggling.

0:29:020:29:05

No, I'm just picking myself up to sort of... Er, find something.

0:29:050:29:10

I beg your pardon?

0:29:100:29:11

More small shiny things?

0:29:140:29:16

How about something large and not shiny for a change, Thomas?

0:29:170:29:20

Something like...

0:29:200:29:21

..them.

0:29:230:29:24

Two garden ornaments.

0:29:250:29:27

One in terracotta of a Grecian girl, and another in composite,

0:29:270:29:34

or like a concrete, which has been weathered.

0:29:340:29:37

They're both quite nice, really, aren't they?

0:29:370:29:39

The frost has been at this, being a terracotta.

0:29:390:29:42

-But that shows that she's been places, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:29:420:29:45

-It does. How much for these two?

-How do you feel about 80?

0:29:450:29:47

Oh, I haven't got £80.

0:29:470:29:49

-You didn't tell me that!

-I haven't got £80.

-What do you have?

0:29:490:29:53

-Oh, not very much at all.

-Well, make me a suggestion.

0:29:530:29:56

Oh, I don't think they're worth a huge amount.

0:29:560:29:59

35 on those.

0:30:000:30:01

Mm-hm. That's the death, is it?

0:30:050:30:08

Well, they look as though they've died already.

0:30:080:30:10

-They've been decapitated, yeah.

-What could you go to?

0:30:100:30:13

I think they're great fun.

0:30:130:30:15

30 and we've got a deal. Or is that not going to happen?

0:30:160:30:18

-Go on, then. 30.

-£30, brilliant.

-We've got a deal.

0:30:190:30:22

(That was hard work!)

0:30:220:30:24

-I can't shake your hand because I'm busy. Have a head.

-THEY LAUGH

0:30:240:30:29

£80 to £30 - now that's a great discount.

0:30:290:30:32

The deal is done, with a great discount

0:30:320:30:35

and neither of them lost their heads.

0:30:350:30:37

So, Thomas is finished for the day.

0:30:370:30:39

Let's just have a little reminder of what he's bought for auction.

0:30:390:30:43

Thomas spent just £117 on five lots -

0:30:430:30:46

the smoking set, the coat hook,

0:30:460:30:48

the glass salts, an Art Deco bowl,

0:30:480:30:51

and a pair of stone heads...

0:30:510:30:53

as you do.

0:30:530:30:54

Anita had another great day of shopping carefully.

0:30:560:31:00

She also bought five lots -

0:31:000:31:02

the tribal sculpture, the Poole Pottery,

0:31:020:31:04

the ceramic mix, the naval photo frame,

0:31:040:31:07

and the agate brooch,

0:31:070:31:09

costing her a reasonable £100.

0:31:090:31:11

So, let's hear what they think about each other's treasures.

0:31:140:31:17

My favourite item of Thomas' is that wonderful Art Nouveau coat hook.

0:31:170:31:24

And if I was going to swap that, I think

0:31:240:31:26

I would swap it with my tribal figure.

0:31:260:31:28

Not because I don't love it,

0:31:280:31:30

but because I think I might have paid a little bit too much for it.

0:31:300:31:35

Well, of Anita's,

0:31:350:31:36

my favourite has to be the mixed lot of broken ceramics.

0:31:360:31:40

I think she's got real potential there

0:31:400:31:42

because some restorer could do a real job, but it only cost her £20.

0:31:420:31:45

Our dealing duo are ready for auction,

0:31:470:31:49

so off to Dorking, 40 miles north.

0:31:490:31:51

Avanti!

0:31:510:31:53

Thomas, we're heading for our fourth auction and, darling,

0:31:530:31:58

I hate to say it but I'm a wee bit ahead of you.

0:31:580:32:01

You are a wee bit ahead. Just a wee, a wee hundred pounds!

0:32:010:32:06

A wee hundred pounds indeed.

0:32:070:32:09

Today's auction house is Crow's Auction Gallery.

0:32:090:32:12

It's been here in Dorking for over 100 years,

0:32:120:32:15

-so it's like an old antique itself.

-There it is, Anita.

0:32:150:32:18

Oh, here we are, Thomas. Are you excited?

0:32:180:32:20

-I am because I fancy crawling back.

-Whacking me today?

-Not whacking you.

0:32:200:32:26

I never want to whack you, Anita!

0:32:260:32:29

Our auctioneer is Tom Lofts. Has anything caught his eye?

0:32:300:32:35

The African figure will be a challenging lot.

0:32:350:32:38

I'm lost for words, but we'll give it a go.

0:32:380:32:42

The collection of pottery and porcelain...

0:32:420:32:45

I hope that somewhere somebody has found a piece

0:32:450:32:48

that they can get out of jail with, but it could be a struggle.

0:32:480:32:52

It's not a packed room,

0:32:520:32:53

but there's a lot of interest on the telephone and over the internet.

0:32:530:32:57

Let the auction begin!

0:32:570:32:58

First off, is the psychedelic Poole Pottery dish.

0:33:000:33:03

-£10. Should double my money. Yes, yes.

-Who'll start me here, please?

0:33:040:33:09

-20, straight in? I've got it.

-20 straight.

0:33:090:33:12

And two and five and eight and 30 and two and five and eight and 40.

0:33:120:33:16

-Yeah!

-At 45. £45. 48 bid. Come on. 50 the bid. 50 bid.

0:33:160:33:20

-Oh, he's pushing them on.

-At £50 now. All out online as well.

0:33:200:33:24

-In the room has it at £50.

-£50!

0:33:240:33:26

-For the Poole. I like this.

-£40 profit.

-I sell away.

0:33:260:33:30

-All done then, at £50.

-Yes!

0:33:300:33:33

Brilliant.

0:33:330:33:35

Yeah, baby. That's £40 of profit.

0:33:370:33:39

I knew that I had a good one there. The rest of it has still to come.

0:33:400:33:46

Next up it's Thomas' smoking set.

0:33:470:33:50

-Will it set the auction alight, though?

-We like this a lot.

-Yes.

0:33:500:33:54

What do we say now? 40? 30? 20? Bid.

0:33:540:33:57

-30, bid. 40 bid. Quickly coming in at 42.

-Yep, yep, yep.

-45. At £45.

0:33:570:34:02

-48 bid. 50 bid. 55, 60 bid.

-Yes. Yes, yes.

0:34:020:34:05

60 I'm bid. Selling at 60. All out online? At 60.

0:34:050:34:08

-Thought we'd make a lot more on this. At £60.

-Well.

-I'm trading.

0:34:080:34:12

All done then at £60.

0:34:120:34:14

-£60.

-Well.

-You profit, Thomas. Profit.

-Got out of it.

-Yeah.

0:34:140:34:20

Oh, just. But a profit is a profit.

0:34:200:34:22

It's Anita's next item - the tribal sculpture.

0:34:240:34:27

He didn't look that tall in the shop.

0:34:270:34:30

-This is where I might fall down, Thomas.

-20. 30, 40 bid. £40.

0:34:300:34:35

There you are. You're into profit.

0:34:350:34:38

At £40, being sold. At 40, I do not believe this.

0:34:380:34:40

-At £40.

-You can't believe it, can you?

0:34:400:34:43

-45 and 50 and five and 60.

-There you are! Doubling your money!

0:34:430:34:47

60 in the room. Selling at 60. Selling at 60. Where are we now?

0:34:470:34:50

-At £60, being sold. At 60. At 60. The line's all out.

-This is it.

0:34:500:34:53

-I'm selling it at £60, all done. At £60.

-Well done.

0:34:530:34:58

£60. My objet trouve!

0:35:000:35:06

Doubled her money. Another excellent buy from Anita.

0:35:060:35:10

Do you want a hanky for that wee tear?

0:35:100:35:12

SHE LAUGHS

0:35:120:35:16

Come on, Thomas. You need the coat hook to get you off the hook.

0:35:160:35:19

Telephone interest, I believe, here. And commissions with me.

0:35:200:35:23

-Right, so here we start at 40.

-Yes!

-Five, 60, five, 70.

0:35:230:35:30

Can I say 70 bid on the telephone? Now telephone bid 70.

0:35:300:35:33

And five. At £75. 80.

0:35:330:35:35

85 bid. £85. £85. With me, then.

0:35:350:35:38

-Sold. All done. Sold at £85.

-Yes!

-Yes!

0:35:380:35:42

-Made up. Made up.

-That's great.

0:35:450:35:48

Outstanding. That's got him right back in the running.

0:35:480:35:51

-You're snapping at my heels.

-No, I'm not!

0:35:520:35:56

Not when you buy African figures which double their money.

0:35:560:35:59

Now, will Anita's lifebelt portrait sink or swim?

0:36:010:36:05

And we've got commissions, I'm pleased to say,

0:36:050:36:07

-but a very low start at 20.

-Oh, all right.

-22. 25. Don't get too excited!

0:36:070:36:12

28 bid. At £28. 30 bid. 32. 35. £35, liking this.

0:36:120:36:16

There you are, you see?

0:36:160:36:17

At £35, liking this a lot. At £35, out online.

0:36:170:36:20

-I thought there'd be more interest away.

-I thought there would be.

0:36:200:36:23

Eight bid. 40 with me. 40 I have. Selling at 40.

0:36:230:36:26

Still like this a lot. At £40 to be sold. Selling at 40.

0:36:260:36:28

-Doubled your money...

-Interesting piece.

-..again!

0:36:280:36:31

-Sold at 40. All done? At £40.

-Yes!

0:36:310:36:36

That profit has got Anita's head above the water.

0:36:370:36:41

-I'm a happy girl today.

-I bet you are! Look at you.

0:36:410:36:44

-"I'm a happy girl today..."

-It's just luck. It's just luck.

0:36:440:36:48

-"I'm a happy girl, a happy girl today."

-You behave yourself! THEY LAUGH

0:36:480:36:52

Thomas' glass salts next - small but perfectly formed - how will they do?

0:36:530:36:59

Away we go with me at 15. 18. 20. Two. £22. The salts. At £22. At 22.

0:36:590:37:07

-25 bid.

-Good, good, good, come on.

0:37:070:37:09

At £28, the salts. At £28. All out online. 30 I've got. 30 I'm bid.

0:37:100:37:14

£30.

0:37:140:37:16

-32. 35.

-Yes!

-38 bid. 40. Now getting excited down the front.

0:37:160:37:21

-Proper antiques. Proper antiques selling!

-£40, make no mistake.

0:37:210:37:25

-Selling at £40, the salts. All done. Sold at £40.

-Yes!

0:37:250:37:30

-Proper antiques.

-Oh, that's great.

0:37:300:37:32

Another profit for the Planter. That puts him in the lead.

0:37:320:37:36

-You are a good boy.

-Oh. I like to be a good boy.

-THEY LAUGH

0:37:360:37:42

You're a clever boy.

0:37:420:37:44

Is Anita's agate brooch going to push her ahead of Thomas?

0:37:460:37:50

Commissions with me. A low start again at ten. 12. 15. 18. 20. 22.

0:37:500:37:56

Yes, you're there. You going to double it again?

0:37:560:37:58

Like all your other things? Triple?

0:37:580:38:00

At 25, 25. 28. The lines are out. At £28. The brooch at £28. £30 bid.

0:38:000:38:06

£30. £30 to be sold. Selling at 32.

0:38:060:38:08

35. 35 bid. £35. £35. £35 the brooch.

0:38:080:38:11

-At £35.

-There you are.

-38 bid. 38. 40, I've got. 40. Selling at 40.

0:38:110:38:16

All right, stop now.

0:38:160:38:18

-£40, being sold.

-He likes you. Double your money.

0:38:180:38:23

Well done, sir.

0:38:230:38:24

Another healthy profit, but she still needs more.

0:38:250:38:28

Next for Thomas, it's the stone heads.

0:38:300:38:33

-We'll start this with me at 20. I have...

-20. Yeah.

-At £20.

0:38:330:38:38

-This is value at £20. 22.

-There's a lady.

-She feels sorry for you.

0:38:380:38:42

-At £22.

-Go on!

-25, bid. Come on, you can do it, madam.

0:38:420:38:46

-28 bid.

-There's another one.

-At £28 in the room. 28 in room. At £28.

0:38:460:38:51

-The lines all out.

-Come on!

-One more.

-Make no mistake. £28.

0:38:510:38:55

-The telephone's on as well, 30 on the telephone.

-Yes!

-At 32 bid.

0:38:550:38:59

32, 32. 35 bid, telephone bid. 38 can I say?

0:38:590:39:02

Come again, you can do it.

0:39:020:39:03

-You can do it.

-There's another one, matches!

0:39:030:39:05

-£35. £35. Yes or no? One more!

-One more.

-Yes.

-Go on. Yes!

0:39:050:39:10

At £38. 38 I've got. £38 in the room. Selling at 38. 38 to the room.

0:39:100:39:15

-I sell then at £38.

-Yes, well done, Thomas.

-Profit!

0:39:150:39:21

A profit, just. Will that put him in the lead?

0:39:230:39:27

Another big profit could put Thomas onto Easy Street here.

0:39:270:39:31

My starter with me is a low start of 20.

0:39:310:39:34

22. 25, 28, 30.

0:39:340:39:37

32, 35, 38. This is a nice piece. 40. At £40 only.

0:39:370:39:41

At 40. Still room to move here. At 40. Bid 42.

0:39:410:39:45

-45. 45 bid. 48. 48 now. Can I say 50?

-Go on.

0:39:450:39:48

50 I'm bid. 50 on the telephone.

0:39:480:39:49

50 telephone bid. 50 telephone bid. 50 telephone bid. Still liking this.

0:39:490:39:53

Disappointing but the lines have gone quiet. £50 on the telephone.

0:39:530:39:57

50 on the telephone. Selling at 50.

0:39:570:39:59

-I'm selling. All done. Trading then, at £50.

-Well done. That's a beauty.

0:39:590:40:04

It's good.

0:40:040:40:05

Brilliant stuff. That could be the lot that wins it for him.

0:40:050:40:08

A lack of hands means we can only see two of the 11 items

0:40:090:40:13

being held up. No-one had high hopes for this, even Anita.

0:40:130:40:18

She needs a whopping profit here to beat Thomas.

0:40:180:40:20

-And would you believe, commissions with me.

-See?

0:40:200:40:23

-Telephone interest as well.

-See?

0:40:230:40:25

-Now, what can I say. Away we go.

-150.

-Five. Eight. Ten.

0:40:250:40:30

12. 15. 18.

0:40:300:40:32

20. Two and five and eight. 30 in the room. 30 on the line.

0:40:320:40:35

30 online now. 30 online. 30 bid. 35 I've got. 35. 40 can I say?

0:40:350:40:40

-Look at that!

-35 bid. £35, you're out. 40, can I say?

0:40:400:40:43

40 can I say. Come again, the telephone. 40 I'm bid.

0:40:430:40:46

-Doubled your money.

-40, telephone bid.

-Double your money.

-42.

0:40:460:40:50

Double your...

0:40:500:40:52

-Come on, Tina. 45 bid.

-Go on, Tina!

-At 45 bid. £45.

-Good work, Tina.

0:40:520:40:57

-Come on, Tina! £48. 50 can I say? 50 bid.

-50, Tina!

0:40:570:41:01

-50 on the telephone. 50 telephone bid. 55.

-55!

-Come on.

0:41:010:41:05

Triple your money, Anita!

0:41:050:41:07

60 on the telephone bid. 65. £65.

0:41:070:41:10

-Right, you can stop.

-70 bid.

0:41:100:41:13

At £70 bid. £70. £70. £70. At £70. 75 bid.

0:41:130:41:16

-I feel I'm at the races here.

-80 the bid.

0:41:160:41:18

-£80 bid. £80 bid. Telephone bid. 80 on the telephone. 85.

-What?!

0:41:180:41:24

-85.

-Anita!

-That is a good lot. THEY LAUGH

0:41:240:41:27

-90 on the telephone. At 95. Come on! At 95, 95.

-Anita...

0:41:270:41:33

-Come on, Tina!

-Please. Say please. All done? 95 on line one.

-Please!

0:41:330:41:37

-100 bid.

-£100!

0:41:370:41:40

£100. £100 bid. 110. At 110. 110. 110.

0:41:400:41:44

At 110, line one.

0:41:440:41:47

-I'll do 15.

-TINA: No, no.

-Come on, say please nicely.

0:41:470:41:50

-Say please nicely.

-She's done well enough. It's fine.

0:41:500:41:53

Put the hammer down.

0:41:530:41:54

On line one. Selling at 110. At 110. Selling at 110 to line one.

0:41:540:41:57

-Sold at 110.

-Oh, Anita!

-110!

-Anita!

0:41:570:42:02

Kiss me there.

0:42:020:42:03

Amazing. A perfect profit of £90 on the imperfect pottery.

0:42:060:42:11

That means every item has made a profit today.

0:42:110:42:14

Well done to our duo.

0:42:140:42:16

But who has won the day and taken the lead?

0:42:160:42:18

After paying auction costs, Thomas is finally back in the black,

0:42:180:42:22

with a profit of £106.86,

0:42:220:42:25

leaving him with a total of £261.84.

0:42:250:42:29

But Anita has not only won the day again with a great profit

0:42:300:42:33

of £146, but she's kept her nose in front in the overall lead,

0:42:330:42:39

with a total of £401.94.

0:42:390:42:42

Well, Thomas, we both did well, but I'm still ahead of you.

0:42:420:42:46

-You're ahead about £150 now.

-But you're still snapping at my heels.

0:42:460:42:51

Well, Anita, we started poorly. Surging ahead now.

0:42:510:42:55

There's only one more chance now for Thomas to take the lead.

0:42:550:42:58

Oh, the tension!

0:42:580:43:00

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:050:43:06

Thomas reflects on past glories,

0:43:080:43:11

and Anita knows how to compliment a dealer's collection.

0:43:110:43:15

I had a little luck with some broken pottery before.

0:43:150:43:18

Thomas Plant and Anita Manning cruise around the sunny south coast, heading for an auction in Dorking, Surrey.

Anita takes a break from shopping in Gosport to dive deep in to the history of submarines, while Thomas visits Southsea to hear a little-known story about the D-Day landings.