Episode 16 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 16

Old friends become rivals as antique experts Phil Serrell and James Braxton hit the road. The pair start their journey in Glasgow and head for their auction in Edinburgh.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts,

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with £200 each, a classic car...

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We're going "roond"!

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..and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I want to spend lots of money!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction,

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-but it's no mean feat.

-Oh, no!

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-We've done it!

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..and valiant losers.

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You're kidding me!

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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-What am I doing?

-We've got a deal.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Today we're embarking on a new antiques expedition

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with two old Road Trip hands.

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For surveyor and auctioneer James Braxton,

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it's furniture that tickles his fancy,

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and apparently a spot of rollerblading.

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Now, that I would like to see!

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I hate this bit because I can never get out very elegantly.

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Classic cars and sport keep auctioneer Philip Serrell very busy.

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Coming from Worcester, it's no surprise

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he has a passion for Royal Worcester.

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It's exciting!

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Philip's starting out today in the driving seat

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of the 1955 Austin Healey,

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and, with £200 burning a hole in each of their pockets,

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it's all set to be a cracker of a week.

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I think it's a lovely car. I'd like to own this.

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I'd like a slightly more glamorous passenger.

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You've got gravitas.

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You've got polish.

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I bring many things to the party, bar short skirts.

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Thank goodness for that!

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Our two experts will navigate around 950 miles,

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taking in both west and east coasts of Scotland,

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down through the Borders to the Lakes,

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into Lancashire, Cheshire,

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and pulling up to a halt in Newport, Shropshire.

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The first stint is a tale of two cities,

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starting in Glasgow and winding up at auction at Leith in Edinburgh.

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The arrival of the 2014 Commonwealth Games

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brought big changes to Glasgow,

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with a massive £1 billion cash injection,

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improving transport, local amenities,

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and adding an extra 1,000 new hotels.

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So, with this whole city's worth of wares at their fingertips,

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what are they going to buy?

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Call me old-fashioned, but I'm going to try and buy a bargain.

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-What?

-Yup, a bargain.

-A bargain!

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I don't know a shop that sells those.

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But, as the boys are prone to a touch of cheekiness,

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let's hope neither end up with a Glasgow kiss.

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I'll tell you what you're going to buy.

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You'll buy a malting shovel.

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You can't beat a good malting shovel.

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You'll buy a cartwheel,

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anything else that has woodworm in it, I would have thought.

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I want to buy a sheep this time.

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Moving on, boys...

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The recently gentrified area of Finnieston on the edge of Glasgow's

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trendy West End is home to this lovely shop.

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The man in charge today is Joe McCutcheon.

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Good luck, Phil. Well done.

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-Hi there, how are you doing?

-Hello, James.

-Joe.

-Nice to meet you.

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This is a great shop. What has come in recently?

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Aye. I've got a ukulele.

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-A ukulele?

-Aye, it just came in yesterday.

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-It's not in bad shape, is it?

-Aye, it's no' bad.

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All the strings are there as well.

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These are Bakelite, they're not actually ivory, those,

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-which probably helps.

-Yeah.

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TUNELESS STRUMMING

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No. I never played the guitar at school.

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We'd never have guessed.

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Is anybody out there?

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Looking good, James!

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Perhaps they could help you spot a bargain.

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Right, what else have we got?

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Oh, a barometer. We've got a barometer in. I like that myself.

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It's quite nicely carved, isn't it?

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-Aye.

-Is that cheap?

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45 quid.

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So, it's an aneroid barometer, and it's by Edwards of Glasgow.

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Not bad, is it? It's obviously very accurate.

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What's it doing? It's peeing down with rain out there,

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and it's reading fair.

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Aye. Glasgow fair.

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I'm surprised it doesn't say...

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rain, hail, rain...

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Early barometers used mercury to measure differences in air pressure,

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but they were replaced later in the Victorian era

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with aneroid monitors, meaning without liquid.

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They were cheaper and lighter, making them more portable,

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but slightly less precise.

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James has already spotted his next potential bit of swag.

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That's rather nice, isn't it? They're nice objects, aren't they?

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People buy them for shop displays.

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Pubs are buying them an' all, you know? There's another one there.

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West Mile Street in Glasgow, that one.

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A Royal. And much are they?

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Um... That one is 30.

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-That's 35, James.

-Quite nice with that, isn't it?

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-With the Royal.

-Aye.

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It's the sort of trendy furnishing stuff which is quite retro,

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that really fills a button there, retro.

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But the antique in me quite likes the idea of the barometer.

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Can you make me a special price on this?

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I know Glasgow is well-known for its generosity.

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-I said 45, didn't I?

-Yeah.

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Call it 50.

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JAMES LAUGHS

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James has his work cut out there.

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Whereas Philip has got it all to come

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as he heads to the heart of Glasgow's West End.

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It's a tough call, this. How do you beat Braxton?

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Well, I just think

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you've got to go and buy things that are just different.

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Things that... Anybody can reckon a Doulton figure,

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so you've really got to go completely off-piste with something.

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Rathbone Mews is a gem of an antiques arcade.

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Well, usually.

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The first stop is closed.

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But, not one to be put off by a little hurdle like that,

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and true to form, Philip is going off-piste,

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this time to Singh's Car Garage.

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-Hi, I'm Philip. You are?

-Mr Singh.

-I might need help.

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Have you got anything that I could perhaps look at, buy?

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You've got to admire his optimism.

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I think the cars might be out of my price range a bit, but... Anything?

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Give me two seconds, I'll have a look. You might be in luck here.

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You have a look round.

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You never know, things might turn out all right.

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One definitely never knows with you, Philip.

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James on the other hand, is playing the long game.

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James?

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James?! Wake up!

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He's trying to strike a deal with Joe for the barometer

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and the Royal typewriter.

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That's 35.

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That's 45.

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It's 80.

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-£65 for the two.

-£65 for the two?

-Yes.

-It's tricky.

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Give me 60 quid.

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You can have it for that.

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-For the two?

-For the two.

-Yes, OK.

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Come on, Joe. Thank you.

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That's really kind.

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Joe's even taken off the brackets to make it look nicer to sell on.

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You found a good one there, James.

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-Joe, thanks a lot, mate. There you are, there's your money.

-Thank you.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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James is £60 lighter with two items in the old bag and, as usual,

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Philip's rummaging around a random place,

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looking for whatever he can get his hands on.

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I love the can.

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-Do you want to sell this? Can I buy this off you?

-Yes, you can.

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Mr Singh's father used the paraffin can to light the Salamander heater,

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helping to keep the garage warm back in the 1960s.

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It isn't going to make very much, Mr Singh.

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It's going to make somewhere between £5 and £15 at an auction,

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-so I'm going to buy it for a couple of quid or something.

-That's fine.

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-Is that all right, if I give you £2 pounds for it?

-That's fine.

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Philip can't resist cleaning it up as best he can,

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but he's not done yet.

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Now, they say that the current in look is vintage industrial.

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And it don't come much more vintage industrial than that, does it?

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-Do you want to sell these?

-Really?

-What's the price?

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I'll double the money up and give you four quid.

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Call it a fiver.

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I'll give you a fiver for the two, but that's me finished.

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-Right, fine, you've got a deal.

-You're a gentleman, Mr Singh.

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-There we are.

-Taking my stepladders, I don't know.

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-I tell you what, I've enjoyed meeting you.

-There we go.

-Seriously good fun.

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Thank you very much indeed. I hope I do all right with these.

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Big spender Serrell has spent £2 on the can and £3 on the ladder,

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giving him a grand total of £5 on two items so far.

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Trust Philip to find booty in the strangest of places.

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Well, I think the word is eclectic.

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Eclectic.

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What I have learned is that you have to keep your options open,

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so I've bought one or two lots with the stepladder

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and the paraffin container.

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Well, he did say he wanted to go off-piste.

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Meanwhile, James braves the weather, to head 49 miles south of Glasgow

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to the stunning Ayrshire coast, where lies Culzean Castle.

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Originally belonging to the Kennedy family,

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descendants of Robert the Bruce, it's now in the hands of guide

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Barry McCorkindale, or so he'd like you to think.

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-Hello. James.

-Lovely to meet you. I'm Barry. Welcome to my castle.

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Slight fib. Not mine, technically National Trust, but what can I say?

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The castle's had many alterations,

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but it's romantic design dates back to the 18th century,

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when the 10th earl hired an eminent Scottish architect

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to help show off his family's wealth.

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-This is really beautiful, Barry.

-A fantastic setting, what can I say?

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And I can hear the sea.

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We're sitting right on the coast here

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with a beautiful Robert Adam designed building.

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It's a 58-room bachelor pad for a bit of entertaining.

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Even we could be handsome with a castle like this, James,

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don't you think?

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In your dreams, fellas!

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The Kennedy family donated the castle

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and its 600-acre estate to the National Trust in 1945,

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later becoming Scotland's first country Park.

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-Can I introduce you to a friend of mine up here?

-Ah-ha.

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-Who's this fine fellow?

-Looking very dapper, handsome and fabulous.

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I think it's the white hair that does it, to be quite truthful!

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After fighting in Flanders in the mid-18th century,

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the ninth Earl, Thomas Kennedy, inherited Culzean

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and toured the Continent, hunting out treasures to furnish the castle.

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So, Thomas has kind of got everything.

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And you think to yourself,

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am I going to get into the kingdom of heaven?

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I've got all these riches, what's the solution?

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-Have you come across one of these before?

-I've never seen one.

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We know Thomas up here, my friend,

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-acquired this in the first of his Grand Tours.

-And what is it called?

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It's a plenary indulgence, or a papal pardon.

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Or, if you're going round with me,

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we call it your "get into heaven free" card!

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Brilliant.

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From the 12th century onwards,

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plenary indulgences were often given in return for donations.

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This pardon for sin was an assurance of reaping rewards

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for good behaviour in heaven, but not a licence to commit sin.

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If you look at the details in here,

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you'll see it's made out to my friend Thomas up here.

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It says the Laird at Culzean Castle, which he was at that particular time.

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My favourite part is,

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and Thomas and I are definitely on the same wavelength,

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what happens if you get there and you don't know anybody?

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Nominated persons 1 to 50. We're sorted.

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We can select 50 friends or relatives.

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This is rather interesting.

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If you fell out with anyone, you'd say, "You're off the list!"

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You're being scratched.

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I'm always saying what a great guy you are, James.

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The 12th earl, Archibald Kennedy, added his own flourish,

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gathering one of the world's largest collections of swords and pistols.

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Bought from the Tower of London, it now dominates the entrance hall.

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My word. Isn't it amazing?

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The man in charge of the Tower of London assured His Lordship that

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if he went ahead with the purchase he would have the completest

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and most splendid armoury of any individual in the kingdom.

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The first delivery, which was in July 1813, was for 500 pistols,

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shipped up from the Tower of London, 12 chests,

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and a lovely piece which says, "along with a man from the Tower

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"to fit them up in the proper manner".

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It is stunning.

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But it seems the best arrangement involves a little artistic licence.

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Don't tell me they chopped off all the swords.

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They did, indeed, to make them fit. But, James, it only cost sixpence.

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-Sixpence a sword?

-Sixpence a sword, that was exactly it.

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A receipt for you, James, look.

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-£78.

-£78. Isn't that fabulous?

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We have an invoice, which details quite nicely the pistols.

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-500 of them. Swords, 450.

-It is a remarkable collection.

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Barry, thank you very much indeed.

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I think Culzean is absolutely superb.

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-Beautiful place.

-I'm glad you enjoyed coming.

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And I want to come back on a sunny day and go around the gardens.

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It's nearly always sunny, James, up here in the West Coast of Scotland.

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That's what they always say about Scotland. I don't believe it.

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Poor Philip could do with better weather

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as he takes the Austin Healey for a spin up to Prestwick, Scotland's

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oldest baronial borough, which dates back over 1,000 years.

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This coastal town is known for its international airport,

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the only place in the UK Elvis Presley ever visited

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whilst on a refuelling stop during his military service.

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MUSIC: "A Little Less Conversation" by Elvis vs JXL

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Seeing as Phillip's only spent a fiver so far, it's time

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for a little less conversation, and more action at Prestwick's

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collectables emporium, Nae-sae-new, run by Gary Donis.

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-Gary, good to see you.

-Lovely to meet you.

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So where are the hidden gems that

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the normal punters don't get to see, then?

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The first little beauty to catch Philip's beady eye

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is a cider costrel, with a ticket price of £8.

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Usually made from oak, small, robust barrels, or costrels, like this

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were carried by agricultural workers who were sometimes paid in alcohol.

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It was the sort of thing that the farm worker

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took out into the country with him...and, erm...

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You know, when he was working it would have cider in it.

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This is probably European, isn't it?

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And this is coopered.

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And, whereas a lot of them are held together with brass or copper straps,

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this has actually just got reeds that hold it together.

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Erm...

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And the pity with it is... When I say "the pity", there's

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a broken hinge there and it should have a top on there.

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-Can I give you that to...

-Yes.

-..put by?

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HE WHISPERS: Do you know what? If that's £8

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I could perhaps get that down to £5.

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I could be heading here to have the lowest spend

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on any programme ever.

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Come on, Philip, you won't win with that kind of attitude!

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That's interesting, isn't it? It's an old boot scraper.

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-I think that's quite fun. You've got 28 on that, haven't you?

-Yes.

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And you've got eight on that. Which is 36 quid.

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What might you be able to get down to for those?

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I could probably give you a BOGOF in favour of that, 28 for the pair.

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Bog off?! I don't think there's any need for that.

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I've just worked that out, buy one, get one free.

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Ah. And if Philip knows anything, it's how to drive a hard bargain.

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I was thinking of 15 quid and a fiver.

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-20 quid for the two.

-22.

-22?

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How did we work that out, then? Are we saying £15 and £7?

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Or 17 and five.

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See, that's... 15 and five is just so much easier, mentally,

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-isn't it? Don't you think?

-Oh, go on.

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Yeah, OK.

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Well done, old chap.

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That's 20 quid. Now, let me have another look around.

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Where he's of to now?

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I quite like those.

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Yes, of course, he's found a ladder.

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-What am I doing?

-Not sure.

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While I'm here...

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I quite like those chairs as well. How much are those?

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-Tenner a pop.

-And how much do you really want for two of those?

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-How does 15 for a pair sound?

-15 quid?

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Yeah, but you're getting a free ladder.

0:17:230:17:26

I'm sort of, by accident, creating the industrial look here.

0:17:260:17:29

So I'm going to have one lot that,

0:17:290:17:31

if I buy those in this thing here, I will have two stepladders,

0:17:310:17:35

a pair of industrial chairs and an old, sort of, petrol can thing.

0:17:350:17:40

Well, I'm sure it makes sense to Philip.

0:17:400:17:43

-The last ladder cost me £3.

-Right.

-OK.

0:17:430:17:47

-And those have got to be a pound apiece, haven't they?

-No.

0:17:470:17:50

What about if we meet each other halfway, then? That's a fair deal.

0:17:500:17:55

-Depends how good your maths are.

-Well, I've said a fiver.

0:17:550:17:58

You said 15 quid. I'll give you a tenner for the three.

0:17:580:18:01

-That's halfway each, isn't it?

-OK.

-Honour is retained.

0:18:010:18:05

Philip has managed to knock Gary down from £36 to £30 for his

0:18:050:18:09

four items, with a free ladder thrown in to boot.

0:18:090:18:12

I'm really pleased with Gary's shop

0:18:120:18:14

because I've bought some interesting things.

0:18:140:18:16

I've got a really cool industrial lot for another tenner.

0:18:160:18:19

And I can put those with my other bits and bobs.

0:18:190:18:21

I've had quite a good day, really.

0:18:210:18:23

HE SNIFFS

0:18:230:18:24

I can smell a profit in the air.

0:18:240:18:26

Yes, could be the paint fumes coming off your ladders.

0:18:260:18:29

Even with both sets of ladders, the chairs, oil can,

0:18:290:18:33

cider costrel and boot scraper,

0:18:330:18:35

Philip's seven items still leave him with £165 to spare.

0:18:350:18:40

James has another £140,

0:18:400:18:42

so there's plenty of shopping to be done tomorrow.

0:18:420:18:46

But for now, chaps, sleep tight.

0:18:460:18:49

It's a new dawn and a new day, and I for one am feeling good,

0:18:520:18:56

so I hope you two are. Lovely day for the roof down again, chaps.

0:18:560:19:00

Ha!

0:19:000:19:02

I saw one of the locals earlier... This is a nice day.

0:19:020:19:05

There's no such thing as bad weather.

0:19:070:19:09

-You can see why, though.

-Merely poor clothing.

0:19:090:19:12

Ha. And you're certainly dressed for the part, you two.

0:19:120:19:15

The chaps got off to a sensational start on the road yesterday.

0:19:160:19:19

James still has £140 in his pocket, after spending

0:19:190:19:22

£60 on an aneroid barometer and a typewriter.

0:19:220:19:25

Philip scooped up a staggering seven items for just £35,

0:19:270:19:32

leaving him with £165 to splurge if he chooses to.

0:19:320:19:38

BEEPS HORN

0:19:380:19:40

It's all to play for still on the first leg of their journey.

0:19:420:19:45

Our charming chaps have made their way from Glasgow

0:19:450:19:49

to the seaside town of Largs.

0:19:490:19:52

Its Victorian promenade

0:19:520:19:54

and ice cream parlours now dominate the seafront,

0:19:540:19:56

but back in the 13th century Largs was the scene of a battle,

0:19:560:20:01

repelling a fleet of Viking longboats,

0:20:010:20:04

leading to the end of Viking influence over Scotland.

0:20:040:20:08

-James, where are we?

-We are in West Scotland, Largs.

0:20:080:20:12

-Largs.

-This is Scotland's summer seaside resort.

-Oh, it's nice, isn't it?

0:20:120:20:17

-It's lovely.

-It's lovely.

0:20:170:20:19

Today it's all about the battle of the boys,

0:20:190:20:21

Braxton versus Serrell,

0:20:210:20:23

as they fight it out to find the most profitable purchases.

0:20:230:20:27

-Here we are, James.

-See, there is something for you.

0:20:270:20:32

And where better than this antiques treasure trove,

0:20:320:20:34

perfect for our budding buyers?

0:20:340:20:36

I think I'll go to the left.

0:20:360:20:37

-I'll go to the right, then.

-OK.

-See you later.

0:20:370:20:40

With his eyes firmly on the Scottish prize,

0:20:400:20:42

Philip knows exactly what he wants.

0:20:420:20:45

No, not that!

0:20:450:20:47

So, he heads back outside to find shop owner Franco.

0:20:470:20:51

Lovely dog, how much are you? I've only got 150 quid.

0:20:520:20:56

-I couldn't possibly sell you him.

-No?

0:20:560:20:58

I think he'd do rather well at auction.

0:20:580:21:00

-Now, while we are here.

-Curling stone.

0:21:000:21:03

With a recent success in the various Games,

0:21:030:21:06

curling is a sport that people have taken to their hearts, isn't it?

0:21:060:21:10

I've got to bid you, like, 40 quid for that, haven't I?

0:21:100:21:14

-Friendly 50.

-45.

0:21:140:21:16

-It's a deal.

-Right, that's that done.

0:21:160:21:19

Blimey, Philip's off to a flying start.

0:21:190:21:22

Meanwhile, James is working his magic

0:21:220:21:24

on shop assistant David McMillan.

0:21:240:21:26

That's quite detailed.

0:21:280:21:31

Wee clipper in the background. Lighthouse.

0:21:310:21:34

You can say it's naive but it's fairly well done.

0:21:340:21:37

It's a lovely package. It's got everything.

0:21:370:21:40

Irritatingly, it's deteriorated, which is a shame.

0:21:400:21:45

It's still an attractive item.

0:21:450:21:46

All this sort of stuff has taken a right old trouncing, hasn't it?

0:21:460:21:51

While James is playing hard to get,

0:21:510:21:53

Philip looks like he's found his next lot.

0:21:530:21:56

It's a...probably Victorian.

0:21:560:21:59

Late. It's a Nailsea walking stick.

0:21:590:22:03

And you've got this sort of spiral down there.

0:22:030:22:06

-I think that's a really cool thing. How much is it?

-£30

0:22:060:22:09

It is damaged.

0:22:090:22:11

Perfect for you, then, Phil.

0:22:110:22:13

Nailsea glass became popular in the late 18th century,

0:22:130:22:16

specialising in glass containing pulled, or combed,

0:22:160:22:19

white splashes or lines.

0:22:190:22:21

-I quite like that. Did you say £15?

-No, I did not.

0:22:230:22:26

-What did you say, my hearing's awful?

-I said £30.

-Did you say £20?

0:22:260:22:30

-25, you can have it.

-OK. I like that.

0:22:300:22:34

But Franco knows his audience,

0:22:340:22:36

so he's unearthed another stick from the back of the shop.

0:22:360:22:39

It's an Indian thing.

0:22:390:22:41

Silver-top stick, so it wouldn't be hallmarked in any way, would it?

0:22:410:22:44

And it's a slightly lower-grade silver.

0:22:440:22:46

It's probably, what, 600 parts?

0:22:460:22:48

But what's interesting about it, it's got these lovely little

0:22:480:22:51

-figures around here. And how much is that?

-£30.

0:22:510:22:54

We'll put the two of them together, Phil. We'll do two of them, 50 quid.

0:22:550:23:00

That's...

0:23:000:23:01

Would 40 quid buy the two? I'm trying hard here.

0:23:030:23:05

I'll offer you 45 again. You're a 45 man.

0:23:050:23:08

So I've bought these two for £45

0:23:080:23:10

and I've bought a curling stone for £45.

0:23:100:23:12

I've got to now part with £90, haven't I?

0:23:120:23:15

And, along with yesterday's purchases,

0:23:150:23:18

Philip's racked up ten items.

0:23:180:23:19

But how's James getting on?

0:23:190:23:22

James, so are you buying

0:23:220:23:25

a painting of a boat on the coast,

0:23:250:23:28

-and taking it 60 miles inland?

-Correct.

-Right.

0:23:280:23:31

That'll work well, won't it?

0:23:310:23:33

So says the man who's bought two ladders.

0:23:330:23:36

And I don't think he realises Leith is the port of Edinburgh.

0:23:360:23:41

Maybe because he's only got one thing on his mind.

0:23:410:23:44

One last buy. I've got to buy them, haven't I? Don't you think?

0:23:450:23:49

Uh-huh. Fortunately, they're not for sale.

0:23:490:23:52

On the other side of the shop, James is persisting with the painting.

0:23:520:23:55

-Damp is a devil with plaster.

-Yeah.

0:23:550:23:57

Damp has deteriorated that, but luckily it's to the side.

0:23:570:24:02

I have a feeling you like it, all the same, despite its problems.

0:24:020:24:07

-And are you open to offers?

-Yes, of course.

0:24:070:24:11

So what's your thoughts on it, then?

0:24:110:24:15

-Well, 70 quid, really.

-70.

0:24:150:24:18

See, I said 150 and I was willing to come down to 120.

0:24:180:24:22

How does 90 sound?

0:24:220:24:23

-I would be very happy to meet you in the middle at 80.

-It's a deal.

0:24:230:24:27

-Thank you very much indeed. There's your money.

-My pleasure.

0:24:270:24:31

It's dog eat dog on this trip

0:24:310:24:33

and now James is all spent up, the doubts are creeping in.

0:24:330:24:37

Philip's bought two really good buys. In fact, I'm slightly worried.

0:24:370:24:42

I am worried.

0:24:420:24:43

Slightly irritated that I bought that stupid typewriter yesterday.

0:24:430:24:48

Live and learn, live and learn.

0:24:480:24:50

With Philip's shopping all done, he's heading to Brodick,

0:24:520:24:55

on the Isle of Arran, just off the West Coast of Scotland.

0:24:550:24:59

-Right, Phil, here you are.

-Have you got my rubber ring?

0:24:590:25:02

Just a 55-minute crossing from Adrossan

0:25:070:25:09

is the island affectionately labelled "Scotland in miniature".

0:25:090:25:13

Not to be confused with the Irish Aran Islands

0:25:130:25:17

and home of Aran jumpers.

0:25:170:25:19

This Arran has over 4,500 residents

0:25:190:25:22

and even its own edition of Monopoly.

0:25:220:25:25

I'm just going to do my Celine Dion bit.

0:25:260:25:29

MUSIC: "My Heart Will Go On" by Celine Dion

0:25:300:25:33

Wonderful, Philip. Hollywood surely beckons.

0:25:340:25:38

A couple of miles north of the harbour

0:25:390:25:42

sits Brodick Castle, Garden and Country Park.

0:25:420:25:44

The castle was the ancient seat of the Dukes of Hamilton

0:25:440:25:47

and features on the reverse of the Royal Bank of Scotland's £20 note.

0:25:470:25:51

It's seen many battles, but the estate was mainly

0:25:510:25:55

used for hunting. Later it became the residence of the 10th Duke.

0:25:550:25:59

It's now owned by the National Trust,

0:25:590:26:01

and Philip's here to meet curator Lindsay McGill.

0:26:010:26:04

-Hi, Lindsay.

-Hello, nice to meet you.

-I'm Philip, how are you?

0:26:060:26:08

-Good, thank you.

-This is an impressive place, isn't it?

0:26:080:26:11

I'm pleased you are impressed. It's a hunting lodge.

0:26:110:26:14

In the Victorian period, it was used as a hunting lodge for the Dukes of Hamilton.

0:26:140:26:18

And I think you can see the pastimes of this grand family

0:26:180:26:21

-on the surrounding walls.

-Absolutely.

0:26:210:26:23

-This cost money, didn't it?

-It certainly did.

0:26:230:26:26

And it was the 10th Duke's father-in-law,

0:26:260:26:28

William Beckford, had died as a cash injection into the family.

0:26:280:26:33

And so his newly married son, the future 11th Duke, was given

0:26:330:26:37

some money in order to be able to transform Brodick Castle

0:26:370:26:40

into what you see today.

0:26:400:26:42

William Beckford was one of the wealthiest men in Europe.

0:26:420:26:46

His fortune was built from sugar plantations,

0:26:460:26:48

but what he really craved was status.

0:26:480:26:51

One of his main fixations was proving he came from royal blood.

0:26:510:26:55

After confirming a link to the Hamilton family, who descended

0:26:550:26:59

from the royal household of Stuart, he took on their family crest.

0:26:590:27:02

He commissioned several items displaying it, even

0:27:020:27:05

a painting on his deathbed,

0:27:050:27:07

surrounded by objects showing his lineage to the Hamiltons,

0:27:070:27:11

and the porcelain producer of choice was Philip's favourite.

0:27:110:27:14

Now, I think that might have a bit of an association with me.

0:27:170:27:21

-Who do you think this is from?

-That's Worcester.

-Yes.

0:27:210:27:25

And you can tell it's Worcester by that sort of orangey colour.

0:27:250:27:29

From the late 18th century, Worcester Porcelain was owned

0:27:320:27:34

and run by the Flight and Barr families.

0:27:340:27:37

For many years the pottery carried variations of the two names,

0:27:370:27:41

until Royal Worcester was formed in 1862.

0:27:410:27:46

Oooh, it's exciting.

0:27:460:27:49

There you are, BFP, underneath the crown. Barr, Flight, Barr.

0:27:490:27:53

Determined to affirm his illustrious pedigree,

0:27:530:27:56

Beckford commanded a personalised dinner service,

0:27:560:27:59

especially for his daughter's wedding.

0:27:590:28:01

You have this scarlet colour which represents the Hamilton household.

0:28:010:28:06

When you combine the red with the gold, it's

0:28:060:28:09

also representing the Royal Household of Stuart.

0:28:090:28:11

Beckford heraldic emblems are the gold martlets that you see here.

0:28:110:28:17

-Martlets, which is a...

-It's a bird. It's a type of bird.

0:28:170:28:20

And also the Latimer-cross. So the whole surface is really

0:28:200:28:25

screaming out, "I'm important.

0:28:250:28:27

"And this is the wedding day of my daughter as well."

0:28:270:28:30

If you want to show somebody, "Look at me, I have got some wealth,"

0:28:300:28:34

you actually have the bottom of your saucer

0:28:340:28:36

that no-one's really going to see,

0:28:360:28:38

hand-painted with your family crest and motto.

0:28:380:28:42

-That's quite impressive, isn't it?

-Very.

0:28:420:28:45

And Beckford's great-grandson,

0:28:450:28:47

the 12th Duke of Hamilton, seems to have inherited

0:28:470:28:49

his great-grandfather's love of collecting,

0:28:490:28:52

in particular animal-related objects, like these claret jugs.

0:28:520:28:56

Those are just fantastic, aren't they?

0:28:560:28:59

They were made by a Scottish silversmith

0:28:590:29:02

called Alexander Crichton.

0:29:020:29:04

-When were these, 1880?

-1881, 1882.

0:29:040:29:07

If you look at that period,

0:29:070:29:09

the Victorians produced all sorts of novelty silver bits, didn't they?

0:29:090:29:13

This is the only dodo actually known.

0:29:150:29:18

He's really interesting, because Crichton is using Sir John Tenniel,

0:29:180:29:23

who designed and drew the dodo in Alice In Wonderland,

0:29:230:29:26

he's using him and his dodo as inspiration for this piece here.

0:29:260:29:30

I mean, that is the ultimate statement of wealth.

0:29:300:29:33

At your dinner party, it would be a wonderful thing to bring out.

0:29:330:29:37

Do you know what? I've had a fabulous visit.

0:29:370:29:39

It's really been first class.

0:29:390:29:41

Meanwhile, back on the mainland,

0:29:460:29:48

James is heading north-east to the small Ayrshire town of Kilbirnie.

0:29:480:29:54

Back in the '50s and '60s, the town was famed for its concert hall,

0:29:540:29:57

where people flocked to see big bands of the time.

0:29:570:30:00

The 1955 Austin Healey would have fitted right in

0:30:000:30:04

and today it's helping James feel all rock'n'roll.

0:30:040:30:08

Really nice to be in such a lovely car, it really is fabulous.

0:30:080:30:12

We're in the rain, but this is such fun to drive. You don't feel it.

0:30:120:30:16

Your legs are beneath the warm engine, it's lovely.

0:30:160:30:19

James is off to an old haunt to try and out-do Philip.

0:30:190:30:23

I'll try and buy antiques.

0:30:230:30:25

He can remain buying the woodwormed offerings that he is so drawn to.

0:30:250:30:29

Greta Logan, owner of The Stirrup Cup, knows James all too well.

0:30:310:30:36

-Hello again. Greta!

-Hi, James.

0:30:360:30:40

So, she's already dug out a little something to catch his eye.

0:30:400:30:43

Why have you got this fellow out, then?

0:30:430:30:46

I took that out in case you wanted to look at it.

0:30:460:30:49

It just amazes me that something from 1820 is almost in perfect condition.

0:30:490:30:54

-I know.

-It's hallmarked 1820 on the collar,

0:30:540:30:58

so it's got a silver collar.

0:30:580:31:00

Originally designed to scoop Stilton

0:31:000:31:03

out of the middle of a full or half wheel,

0:31:030:31:06

this Stilton scoop has a mechanical slider to help push off the cheese.

0:31:060:31:11

It's perfect for embracing the 19th century saying,

0:31:110:31:14

"Drink a pot of ale, eat a scoop of Stilton every day,

0:31:140:31:17

"and you'll make old bones."

0:31:170:31:19

I think that's supposed to be a good thing, don't you?

0:31:190:31:22

That's amazing because it looks as if it just came out of the packet.

0:31:220:31:26

It does, doesn't it? It is superb.

0:31:260:31:28

Although there's a possibility the handle could be ivory,

0:31:290:31:33

as it was made before the 1947 CITES Agreement it's legal to sell.

0:31:330:31:38

James has already spotted another goody.

0:31:380:31:42

You've got a profile.

0:31:420:31:45

It looks quite shiny, doesn't it? Is it old?

0:31:450:31:49

I think it's old.

0:31:490:31:51

I tell you what it could be,

0:31:510:31:54

-it could be a profile made from scrapped ship's timbers.

-Mm.

0:31:540:31:58

It's rather nice, that. I like profiles.

0:31:580:32:02

So that's just newly in, so I don't think it will hang about too long.

0:32:020:32:06

-Really?

-And bang, James is putty in her hands.

0:32:060:32:10

As soon as you mention fresh goods,

0:32:100:32:13

the hairs on the back of my neck start tingling!

0:32:130:32:18

-How much have you got on this?

-It's just 30.

0:32:180:32:21

Greta, I'll take it.

0:32:210:32:22

-Thank you very much, James.

-I'll take that definitely.

0:32:220:32:26

That's £170 of his £200 budget gone.

0:32:260:32:29

But still, £30 left to play with.

0:32:290:32:32

Is that pushing, could that be £30?

0:32:340:32:36

Yes, James. Yes.

0:32:360:32:38

-That is absolutely fabulous.

-Super.

-I've got two fabulous items.

0:32:380:32:41

I've got the profile and that lovely fellow.

0:32:410:32:44

Thank you very much.

0:32:440:32:45

James is now completely spent up after bagging himself five lots.

0:32:450:32:49

Alongside his Stilton scoop and carved ship's model,

0:32:490:32:54

he has an aneroid barometer,

0:32:540:32:55

a typewriter and a marine scene painting.

0:32:550:32:58

Philip is hoping to threaten James's bid for victory

0:33:000:33:03

by entering five lots too, costing a scant £125.

0:33:030:33:07

He's offering up a curling stone, a pair of walking sticks,

0:33:070:33:11

a boot scraper, a cider costrel,

0:33:110:33:13

and his industrial collection,

0:33:130:33:14

comprising two stepladders, two chairs and a paraffin can.

0:33:140:33:18

So, how do they rate each other's booty?

0:33:190:33:23

Really, a typewriter?

0:33:230:33:25

Honestly? A barometer?

0:33:250:33:27

A watercolour?

0:33:270:33:29

A Stilton scoop? Yawn.

0:33:290:33:32

But, Mr Braxton, I really do think you've surpassed yourself

0:33:320:33:35

with your half ship's hull. That's going to do really well. I hate you.

0:33:350:33:39

Am I worried about Philip and his barrels, his stepladders,

0:33:390:33:44

his jerry cans?

0:33:440:33:46

No. Slightly more worried about his Malacca cane.

0:33:460:33:50

But it's too late for worrying now.

0:33:500:33:52

After starting in Glasgow, 200 miles later the chaps have ended up

0:33:520:33:56

just an hour down the road at auction.

0:33:560:33:59

Sadly, there's no sunshine on Leith today.

0:33:590:34:02

This is suddenly Edinburgh and it's raining.

0:34:020:34:06

-Every gentleman should be prepared.

-Every gentleman prepared? Yup.

0:34:060:34:10

You're absolutely right, James. Every gentleman is prepared.

0:34:100:34:13

Blimey O'Reilly, Philip. That's a bit racy!

0:34:130:34:16

All you need is a rod.

0:34:160:34:18

A rod and a rock,

0:34:200:34:21

you'd make a very passable gnome.

0:34:210:34:23

I'm not sure Noddy and Big Ears

0:34:230:34:26

will fit in in the chi-chi port of Edinburgh.

0:34:260:34:29

Resting on the shores of the Firth of Forth, Leith is a bustling hub.

0:34:290:34:33

But, after having a pop at James for buying a marine picture to sell

0:34:330:34:37

in a city, Philip is now realising there's method behind his madness.

0:34:370:34:42

-So you've got a bit of a marine topic going on.

-I have.

0:34:420:34:45

-You've got that lovely ship's hull...

-Yeah.

0:34:450:34:47

And you got a painting.

0:34:470:34:49

Actually, you've been quite smart, haven't you?

0:34:490:34:52

Because Leith is a port. We're in Leith, and you've bought...

0:34:520:34:56

You ratbag! Why didn't you tell me that?

0:34:560:34:59

What better way to get ahead?

0:34:590:35:01

Whilst the boys fight it out, Ewan Armstrong

0:35:010:35:04

from Ramsay Cornish Auctioneers tells us who he thinks has the edge.

0:35:040:35:09

At the moment in Scotland, silver is doing very well,

0:35:090:35:12

and the Stilton scoop they've put in is a good item.

0:35:120:35:15

The ladders collection is not to everyone's taste,

0:35:150:35:18

but I do like it - I think it will do quite well.

0:35:180:35:21

So, James could get a good price for his £30 Stilton scoop,

0:35:230:35:26

but it sounds like Philip's industrial bits might also do OK.

0:35:260:35:30

Who'd have thought it, eh?

0:35:300:35:32

Now, the auction room is hotting up as the sale is about to start.

0:35:320:35:35

Are you going to scoop the prize or scoop the poop?

0:35:350:35:38

I hope I'm going to be scooping Stilton.

0:35:380:35:40

First up, it's auctioneer Ewan's pick,

0:35:400:35:44

James's silver Stilton scoop.

0:35:440:35:45

A little bit of interest in this one as well.

0:35:450:35:48

I can start the bidding on that one at £40.

0:35:480:35:50

-£40.

-£40 on the phone.

0:35:500:35:52

£45 here.

0:35:520:35:54

50?

0:35:540:35:55

55? 60.

0:35:550:35:58

-Breaking new ground.

-Show-off.

-65.

0:35:580:36:01

-75...

-Keep going.

-85?

0:36:010:36:05

Hey!

0:36:050:36:07

Any advance on £85? If not, it is going.

0:36:070:36:10

Gone for £85.

0:36:100:36:12

A fantastic start, snagging almost triple his money.

0:36:120:36:16

-It's OK.

-It's all right, isn't it?

-That's OK.

0:36:160:36:19

Ratbag.

0:36:190:36:20

It's better than a slap in the face, isn't it?

0:36:200:36:23

Which I think I might get any minute.

0:36:230:36:25

Next up, it's Philip's curling stone.

0:36:260:36:28

I can see myself as an Olympic curler.

0:36:300:36:32

-A short Olympic curler.

-We've got a little bit of interest in it.

0:36:340:36:38

-We'll start at £30.

-£30.

0:36:380:36:40

Do I see £35 anywhere?

0:36:400:36:42

It's a nice piece. £35.

0:36:420:36:44

£40. 45.

0:36:440:36:46

-Hey, Phil...

-£50. Do I hear £55?

0:36:460:36:49

Go on, madam. Go on, madam.

0:36:490:36:51

There we go. £55. £60.

0:36:510:36:53

£65? It's your last chance.

0:36:530:36:56

It's a good one.

0:36:560:36:58

A £15 profit, but less than he'd wanted.

0:36:590:37:03

Jolly good.

0:37:030:37:04

-Oh, shut up, James.

-Philip has got high hopes for his canes.

0:37:040:37:08

They've got to make 30 quid, haven't they?

0:37:080:37:11

Yes, £65 I think you'll make.

0:37:110:37:13

-Or they could bomb.

-Oh, great, thanks.

0:37:130:37:16

Why is that funny?

0:37:160:37:19

A nice little lot. Come on.

0:37:190:37:20

Someone must have a friend that looks like Willy Wonka.

0:37:200:37:24

£20?

0:37:240:37:25

I want to get a good lot on it. No?

0:37:250:37:28

I have £20 here. 25 anywhere?

0:37:280:37:30

25, 30,

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35, 40,

0:37:330:37:36

£45?

0:37:360:37:37

All out at £45.

0:37:370:37:39

Meaning a loss after costs.

0:37:410:37:43

Sorry about that, Philip, I really am.

0:37:430:37:45

-You look it.

-No, I am sorry.

0:37:450:37:48

Oh, shut up.

0:37:480:37:49

Poor James.

0:37:490:37:51

Well, maybe not in a minute, as his carved ship's hull model is up.

0:37:510:37:54

I've got a bit of interest in this on commission.

0:37:540:37:57

I'm going to start this off at £50.

0:37:570:37:59

Do I hear £55 anywhere?

0:37:590:38:01

55, we've got. I've got £60 here.

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65, 70 here.

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£75.

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Any advance on £75 in the room?

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Come on, it's a nice little lot.

0:38:100:38:12

No. ..Sold.

0:38:120:38:14

You're actually just taking nice little profits here, you ratbag.

0:38:140:38:18

James is another £45 up, motoring ahead.

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So, will Philip regret buying his next random lot,

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or can he scrape a tidy profit?

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-Boot scraper, boot scraper, boot scraper.

-Yes, come on, you need it.

0:38:280:38:32

-Don't I ever.

-I have £10 on the phone. Do we have £12 anywhere?

0:38:320:38:35

-£10 on the phone bid?

-14...

0:38:350:38:37

£16? I'll take £15.

0:38:390:38:41

We're got £15 up here. £16.

0:38:410:38:43

-17...

-You're in profit.

0:38:430:38:45

18...

0:38:450:38:47

£20 we have. 22, 24...

0:38:470:38:50

-Steady work, I always like to say. Steady.

-28.

0:38:500:38:54

Are we all out at £28?

0:38:540:38:56

That's a relatively good profit,

0:38:570:38:59

but he's got a fair way to go to catch up.

0:38:590:39:02

Time for Philip's cider costrel.

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£12 to get started. You're quite quiet. It's a nice little lot.

0:39:060:39:09

-It is, you're in profit, James.

-It hasn't got bid yet!

0:39:090:39:12

Don't make me come down too low. Eight we have.

0:39:120:39:15

Do I hear nine anywhere?

0:39:150:39:16

£9. 10?

0:39:160:39:18

-Racing ahead.

-£10. Come on, we want £12.

0:39:180:39:21

-I think James is enjoying this.

-Come on, £12 we have. 14?

0:39:210:39:25

14, 16, 18.

0:39:250:39:27

Are we all done?

0:39:270:39:29

A 200% profit in the bank for that one.

0:39:300:39:33

It's like sort of treading water, isn't it?

0:39:330:39:35

James, why don't you just shut up?

0:39:350:39:38

James is laughing now, but let's see how his typewriter fares.

0:39:380:39:42

Do I hear £20 in the room? I'm going to the phones. Do we have £20?

0:39:420:39:47

He's got a phone bid. I don't believe it!

0:39:470:39:50

£20 we have on the phone.

0:39:500:39:51

-I do not believe it.

-Phone bids?

-22, 24?

0:39:510:39:55

-Well done, madam, keep going.

-£26.

0:39:550:39:57

-Are we all done at £26? I will take 27...

-Take £28!

0:39:570:40:02

27, we have, 28...

0:40:020:40:05

A fine upstanding gentleman.

0:40:050:40:06

Are we all done at £28?

0:40:060:40:08

£28. That could have been so much worse.

0:40:090:40:13

True. James is down £2. Next, it's his big gamble,

0:40:140:40:18

after spending £80 on the marine painting.

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If he makes a loss here, it could put Philip ahead.

0:40:200:40:23

We'll start that one off for you.

0:40:240:40:27

-I've got a bit of interest here. £60.

-Oh, no, I'm doomed.

0:40:270:40:31

-It should be £65.

-65 we have.

0:40:310:40:34

£70 with myself here.

0:40:340:40:36

75, 80 here... £85?

0:40:360:40:39

-All done?

-I'm going to go now, James.

-It's not over yet, Philip.

0:40:410:40:44

£85 in the room.

0:40:440:40:47

No further bids?

0:40:470:40:48

Just a fiver a profit, putting him at a loss after auction costs.

0:40:490:40:54

-£275 worth of goods.

-That's bragging, James. That's bragging.

0:40:540:40:59

It's not a nice trait, it's bragging.

0:40:590:41:02

And he's still got one lot left.

0:41:020:41:04

I can start off with interest here at £30. Do I hear £35 anywhere?

0:41:040:41:09

-Oh, no.

-£35 for the barometer? £35 we have. 40?

0:41:090:41:12

£40 anywhere?

0:41:120:41:14

If not, it is going.

0:41:140:41:16

-Sold.

-Adding another fiver to his profit tally.

0:41:170:41:21

Last but not least, though,

0:41:210:41:23

it's time to see if Philip's risky lot pays off.

0:41:230:41:26

-They always keep the best till last in these sales, don't they?

-Yeah.

0:41:260:41:29

We've got the collection of ladders.

0:41:290:41:31

There's probably more paint on them

0:41:310:41:33

than there is on most of the collection of art in the sale.

0:41:330:41:37

We start that off for you at £20. £20 we have.

0:41:370:41:42

You get the petrol can too.

0:41:420:41:44

£20. 22 anywhere?

0:41:440:41:45

You've got a bidder.

0:41:450:41:48

Go on. £22?

0:41:480:41:50

I'll take £21...

0:41:500:41:52

-Sold.

-It may not be much, but Philip still made a profit.

0:41:540:41:58

Philip began with £200.

0:42:020:42:04

After a mixed day, after auction costs, he scraped a profit

0:42:040:42:08

of £13.58, leaving him with £213.58 to splash next time.

0:42:080:42:14

James has taken an early lead on the first leg. He started with £200.

0:42:160:42:21

After paying auction costs, he made a profit of £52.56,

0:42:210:42:25

so he now has £252.56 to spend next time.

0:42:250:42:30

With just under £39 between them, this could be a close match.

0:42:300:42:34

Well... I don't know how that happened.

0:42:350:42:38

How did you get the profit, that's what I'm trying to work out.

0:42:380:42:41

I don't know. Clearly, my goods just snuck under the radar,

0:42:410:42:45

but I expected to be about £80 behind you,

0:42:450:42:48

and I think I'm only 40 quid behind you.

0:42:480:42:50

-That's a result.

-You're no stranger to this game, are you?

0:42:500:42:55

Anyway, who's driving? Who's buying lunch? You on both, I think.

0:42:550:42:58

To the victor, the bill.

0:42:580:43:00

Next time, our Road Trip regulars

0:43:050:43:07

-may have bitten off more than they can chew.

-You must be joking!

0:43:070:43:11

James tries to beat Philip at his own game.

0:43:110:43:13

I don't think you can beat a rural bygone like this.

0:43:130:43:16

-And Philip's plan may go down the toilet.

-Oh, I love that!

0:43:160:43:19

Old friends become rivals as antique experts Phil Serrell and James Braxton hit the road in a 1955 Austin Healey. The experts start their journey in Glasgow and Phil heads off the mainland before the pair meet up again for their auction in Edinburgh.