Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 4

Beginning in York, Christina Trevanion and Charlie Ross head towards their auction in Bourne, Lincolnshire, on the fourth leg of their road trip.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts,

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-with £200 each, a classic car...

-We're going roond!

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..And a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I want to spend lots of money.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-Oh, no!

-There'll be worthy winners...

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-Yes!

-We've done it.

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..And valiant losers.

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You are kidding me on!

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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What am I doing?

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Got a deal.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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This week, we're hitching a ride with two antiques experts,

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Christina Trevanion and Charlie Ross.

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Are you looking for an antiques shop? Cos that's what we're here for.

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You don't want an interior shop, you want an antiques shop.

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Bakery! Bakery!

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Christina loves anything old that sparkles.

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She's a Shropshire lass who loves to shop.

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I will absolutely bite your hand off for that.

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Co-driver and veteran road-tripper Charlie is a tough task master

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when it comes to doing deals.

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If I offer you 35 quid will you put the phone down?

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You'd put the phone down?

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They've take to the road in a 1977 Volkswagen camper van.

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Do you know? The weather is so lovely today.

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It is.

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I think I've got a suggestion for tonight.

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Don't look at me like that!

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Let's sleep in the van tonight.

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OK.

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-Yes?

-Yes, I'm up for that.

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-Definitely.

-Have you got a hotty?

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-I've got you!

-A-ha-ha, matron!

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Lordy! It's all very Carry On Camping.

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Both experts kicked off with £200.

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After a disappointing start,

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Christina has just £153.10 to take to the shops.

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But Charlie's still in the money.

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He has £359.14 in his kitty to spend on this leg.

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Charlie won the first two auctions, but Christina's fighting back.

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You've narrowed the gap, haven't you?

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-I think that's...

-You have narrowed the gap.

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You were 300 behind, now you're 200 behind.

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After the next auction, you'll be 100 behind,

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therefore it'll be absolutely nip and tuck at the end.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Christina and Charlie are travelling over 500 miles, from Inverness

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in the Scottish Highlands to the Lincolnshire coastal town of Boston.

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Today, they're starting in the city of York

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and heading south to the auction in Bourne, Lincolnshire.

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-Oh, God!

-Mind these bicycles.

-Cyclists make me nervous.

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-Look! York Minster!

-Really?

-Oh, it's fantastic.

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Cyclists make me nervous, Charlie.

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SHE GASPS

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I've seen York Minster, you can now take me away.

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York is renowned for its Roman and Viking heritage.

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Iconic York Minster Cathedral in the heart of the city is one of

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the largest of its kind in Northern Europe.

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Up to the bollard and stop.

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Whoa!

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-Perfect. Well done. We're here!

-Marvellous.

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-Happy shopping.

-Yeah, best of luck.

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Charlie and Christina will head their separate ways to

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take on the antique dealers of York.

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Christina's first shop is The Red House Antiques Centre.

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Before the browsing starts, she's calling the auction house.

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It'd be really helpful to know what sells well,

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what you've got really strong buyers for.

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'Collectibles...'

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What about jewellery and things like that?

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'Jewellery's fine, we have a fair bit of jewellery.'

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Thanks so much for you help. Cheers.

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Bye now. Bye-bye.

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Great!

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Jewellery and silver do well.

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Hello, gents. Could I possibly have a look in a cabinet?

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-Yes.

-Would that be all right?

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Dealer Steven is on hand to help.

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I will give huge discounts because I am here and I want to sell.

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Yay!

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Sounds promising!

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What about the dog bookends?

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They're signed.

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Yeah, but they're massively over my budget, Steven.

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They're not jewellery, either.

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The ticket price is £250 for the pair -

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that's £100 over Christina's budget.

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I would be looking at £80-£100 for them.

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Ah, couldn't do that, though. I would do 150 on them.

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That is all my money.

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Yeah. If I were you, I wouldn't want to tie all my money up in them.

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Neither would I!

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But I can see why Christina was drawn to them.

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They sport a signature by Prosper Lecourtier.

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Known for sculpting life-like bronze animals.

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A Lecourtier bronze is worth thousands of pounds.

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But these bookends were cast later and they're not bronze.

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So they're just a couple of dogs.

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Couldn't go any more on them?

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Sadly not, no. 140.

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They actually cost me, and people say this all the time,

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but on this occasion it is the truth...

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SHE LAUGHS

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-They cost me £150.

-Not a word of a lie.

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-They're quite lovely, aren't they?

-Yeah, they are.

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Dog things are always in.

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They could show a profit, actually, them. They could.

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The bookends would be an incredible risk at auction.

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Lecourtier's name could draw bidders but they're not original,

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and if Christina buys them, it'll be the gamble of the Road Trip.

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Oh, Steven...120.

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-I can't.

-120.

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-I can't.

-Go on, it gives me...

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Look - 130.

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That's it, we've met halfway.

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OK. That's as far as I'm going.

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130.

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-130?

-130.

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That's £120 off the list price.

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If I got them for 130...

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Yes?

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..You've got another store, you said.

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Vintage emporium on the top floor.

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-Has it got clothing?

-Clothing.

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If I got those for 130, could you throw in something?

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I know the way this is going.

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You can choose from a selected range - a scarf.

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-A scarf. All right. Is that deal?

-Absolutely.

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-Oh, no! Really?

-I'm waiting for you to shake my hand.

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Oh, no!

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-Are you ready?

-Yeah.

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-It's got to be a good scarf.

-Well, we'll see.

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-Am I going to make any money on these?

-I would think so.

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I would dearly hope so, for your sake.

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-Oh, God! OK. £130.

-Done! Done!

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Deal's done - £129 for the bookends and a token £1 for the scarf.

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What a gamble. If those bookends don't rack up profit,

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Christina's lost a huge chunk of her money.

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Meanwhile, Charlie's been browsing the three

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floors of York's Antiques Centre,

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and he's called dealer Rebecca over to open a cabinet that

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belongs to her mother.

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Ah! There's something I like.

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There's something I really like. You know what that is?

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-Hat pin.

-This is a hat pin by a man called Charles Horner.

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-Heard of him?

-Yes.

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Very good.

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Charles Horner's silver is incredibly collectable.

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He produced exquisite work in silver and enamels from the 1850s,

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his factory was in Halifax and that's only 45 miles away.

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I think that's absolutely glorious.

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The problem is it's £78.

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And I think it's been damaged and soldered.

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Do you see there?

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So I'm afraid, fabulous though it is,

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probably have to be bought for...30 quid or something.

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That's a cheeky low offer - less than half the asking price.

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-Is she nice, your mum?

-She is nice.

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Nothing ventured, nothing gained - you go make a phone call,

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-I'll carry on having a look round.

-OK.

-OK? Thank you.

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Probably think I'm being a bit mean here,

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but that damage is all-important to a bit of silver like that,

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so I'll keep my fingers crossed.

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It's never going to make a huge amount of money,

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and if I buy it for 30, it's going to make £40/£50 at auction, I think.

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It's what I would call a "Christina buy" - safe...

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and a little bit boring.

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You rotter!

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I wonder if Christina's found her scarf?

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You can pick any one of those.

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-One!

-One.

-Oh, Steven, come on!

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One scarf - that was the deal.

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Oh!

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That's quite sweet, isn't it?

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-So £130 for our scarf and my bookends?

-Yeah.

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Done! And I have been!

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I feel the same.

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Christina walked into this shop with £153.10,

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she's leaving with £23.10, two dog bookends and a scarf.

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Across town, how's old Charlie-boy doing?

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I've got hold of my mum and she says you can have that for 30.

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She didn't?

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-She did.

-Did she think I was being rude?

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-It's OK.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah!

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Would you tell your mum...? Give me your hand. Mwah!

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Tell your mum she's a star.

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Now...while you were twisting Mum's arm,

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I spotted a little something down here.

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There's a little scent bottle down there.

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Sort of pod-shaped. I love it.

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-And it's got a simulated sort of crocodile skin...

-Mm-hm.

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..Effect to it. And it's got some age.

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I can see here...

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I'm afraid, with my glasses...

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It's Birmingham, but it's 1906 so it's Edwardian.

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Ticket price - £49.

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It's owned by another dealer.

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Could you just simply ask what the best price would be on it?

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-I will do.

-I'll keep my fingers crossed.

-OK.

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There's a painted bronze figure...

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What can you notice about that?

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There's a hinge here and there - what does that tell you?

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That tells you that when Rossco does this...

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HE GASPS ..All is revealed.

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Isn't that splendidly risque?

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And I think this is by Bergman...

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Now...his name was Bergman, but he's signed it Greb here.

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Why Greb?

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Bergman was Jewish, mid-European,

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and what you expect in the end of the 19th,

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beginning of the 20th century - a certain amount of persecution.

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So as not to be...found out, persecuted,

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when he signed his name, he quite often signed it "Greb".

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Why Greb?

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Bergman - first four letters of Bergman backwards - G-R-E-B.

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B-R-E-G going to the other way.

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Hugely collectable and so

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delightfully unaffordable for old Rossco,

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this Bergman bronze is priced at £2,200.

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Put the girl down, Charlie.

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-Hello.

-Hello!

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I've spoke to Catherine, the dealer.

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What's the damage?

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-She says she can do it for 25 for you.

-£25?

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-Yes.

-I'll have it. Thank you very much indeed,

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and I'll pay you, too!

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Charlie leaves, having spent £30 on a Charles Horner hat pin

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and £25 for a silver Edwardian scent bottle.

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Christina's made her was across York to hear a story of secrecy,

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resistance and determination -

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she's visiting the oldest active convent in the country,

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and nun Sister Agatha Leitch.

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-How lovely to see you.

-Thank you.

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I'm longing to tell you all about the exciting people who have

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lived here over the ages.

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In the 16th century, Catholicism was outlawed.

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Catholic families had a stark choice -

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loyalty to their church or Protestant King Henry VIII.

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For priests, it meant a life on the run

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and in some cases, death for treason.

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York's Bar Convent was founded in secret in 1686.

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The nuns took on aliases and became teachers.

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And the convent's secret chapel remained a closely guarded

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secret for well over 100 years.

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All that gold leaf as well.

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-So when was that built?

-1767.

-Gosh.

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To avoid detection,

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the chapel was built secretly in the centre of the building.

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The beautiful neo-classical designed dome is ingeniously

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concealed from outside by a pitched slate roof.

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It's stunning!

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It's...

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It's just so decadent!

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Look at that gold.

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Why are there so many doors?

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You've got one, two, three, four...

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Five, six, seven, eight.

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-Eight!

-Get out quickly.

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People coming up the stairs,

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priest saying mass - he would have said it that way.

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Right. He goes straight out of that door there, shoots down the stairs,

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comes up through a secret stairway and ends up in the priests'

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hiding hole there.

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Really?!

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So there was so many doors cos they had to get out.

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Fortunately, as far as records tell,

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the clandestine escape routes never had to be used.

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The convent is custodian of a unique artefact,

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a brutal reminder of the persecution Catholics

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faced in medieval England -

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the 400-year-old hand of Catholic martyr Margaret Clitherow.

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Margaret lived 200 years before the chapel was built,

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in a time when sheltering a Catholic priest was a criminal offence,

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punishable by death.

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However, she had created a secret room in her house for priests

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to give mass.

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The authorities were suspicious and raided her home.

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They tried to do everything to make her say,

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"Right, I will renounce being a Catholic."

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But she wouldn't - she wanted to protect her children.

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Margaret knew if she ended up in court,

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her children would be forced to give evidence and tortured.

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By refusing trial by jury,

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she was automatically sentenced to execution -

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she would be pressed to death.

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That doesn't sound very nice.

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No, it doesn't and I'll show exactly what happened too.

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Oh. OK.

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She was brought down and someone,

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mercifully, put a stone there.

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Then they put heavy weights, doors on until she was pressed to death.

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But in fact, the stone pierced her spinal cord

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and she died within a quarter of an hour.

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Jesus have mercy on their souls.

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Margaret Clitherow died while refusing to renounce her faith

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and became a Catholic martyr.

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But Margaret's grizzly demise didn't end there.

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She was thrown onto the dung heap

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and at night, a Catholic came

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forward and cut off, I don't know

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whether it was one hand or two hands.

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Margaret's 400-year-old preserved hand is a solemn reminder of

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when Catholicism was effectively suppressed in England.

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I think it's a wonderful thing to have an object that you know

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has belonged to a holy woman.

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People come form all over the world to venerate this woman.

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Margaret became a saint in 1970

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and her hand is kept as an exhibit at the convent.

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Sister Agatha, it has been such a pleasure meeting you.

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It is just fascinating, it really is.

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Thank you so much for having us.

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And I've loved meeting you, Christina,

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and good luck with those antiques.

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Thank you - I do need it, desperately.

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Meanwhile, Charlie's headed to Kirkstall,

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a few miles west of Leeds city centre.

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Not far from the beautiful 12th-century abbey

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is Aquarius Antiques, where Pete's been trading for 30 years.

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-Pete, I assume?

-Hello.

-Charlie here.

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-Hello, Charlie.

-Nice to see you.

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Over that time, he's packed his sizeable shop with

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furniture from every decade, and the odd collectable.

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It's a minefield here!

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That's a nice hinge.

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Really lovely hinge.

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Ah, I've seen something there.

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There's no ticket - Pete's off to his office to find a price.

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Now we've got there a Georgian, oak, tray-top commode.

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Commode comes from the French for "convenient",

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and this would have been at a time before homes had indoor loos.

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In the middle of the night, you'd have that by your bed and you'd

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think, "Hm, I think the time has come...Rossco's in position."

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When you're finished, you put your lid back on your...

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Ah!

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Now you just slide that back in,

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and get back into bed and go to sleep.

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Pete's back - what's the damage?

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Is it just too insulting to offer you £40 for it?

0:17:200:17:24

Cheeky!

0:17:240:17:25

I'll take 50 and that is it for me.

0:17:250:17:29

To hell with it.

0:17:290:17:31

I will pay you £50 for that.

0:17:310:17:34

If someone doesn't want to pay more, well, bother them!

0:17:340:17:38

-Put it there.

-OK. Thanks, Charlie.

0:17:380:17:40

Now that's a great price for a nice piece of Georgian furniture.

0:17:400:17:43

# Good night, sweetheart, well, it's time to go... #

0:17:460:17:51

It's the end of a very busy day of buying.

0:17:510:17:53

Looks like our tired twosome are true to their word

0:17:530:17:56

and have set up camp.

0:17:560:17:59

It's time for some shut-eye, and Christina's bagged the top bunk.

0:17:590:18:02

-Right, I'm putting the lights out, is that all right?

-OK. Good night then.

0:18:030:18:07

-Night-night!

-Sleep tight.

0:18:070:18:09

Don't let the bed bugs bite, eh?

0:18:090:18:10

-Charlie?

-Mm?

0:18:120:18:14

Are you warm?

0:18:140:18:16

I'm toasty.

0:18:160:18:18

I'm a bit cold.

0:18:180:18:20

Oh, don't be so wet!

0:18:200:18:22

Will we go and find somewhere to stay?

0:18:220:18:24

-You're pathetic!

-I know!

0:18:240:18:27

Your camping's about as bad as your antique buying.

0:18:270:18:32

But I love you.

0:18:320:18:34

Off to a hotel - night-night, you two.

0:18:340:18:36

It's day two of the Road Trip!

0:18:380:18:39

Yesterday, Charlie haggled hard for some bargains

0:18:410:18:44

and picked up a Charles Horner silver hat pin,

0:18:440:18:47

a silver scent bottle and an oak commode.

0:18:470:18:51

He spent a total of £105, leaving him with £254.14 to spend today.

0:18:510:18:57

Today, I'm going to spend, spend, spend like there's no tomorrow.

0:18:580:19:03

I'm going got thrill you with the quality of my purchases.

0:19:030:19:07

-Oh, OK. Good, good.

-For the first time on this tour!

0:19:070:19:10

Christina started with £153.10.

0:19:100:19:13

She bought some dog bookends and a scarf, all for £130.

0:19:130:19:18

She has just £23.10 for the day ahead.

0:19:180:19:22

You know I about roughly 150 quid?

0:19:220:19:24

Yes.

0:19:240:19:25

I've spent 130.

0:19:250:19:28

Ooh! I'm liking this, Christina.

0:19:280:19:30

Christina, to use a horrible modern expression that I can't stand,

0:19:300:19:35

you've come to the party.

0:19:350:19:37

SHE LAUGHS

0:19:370:19:39

This morning sees our pair

0:19:400:19:41

make their way across West Yorkshire to Menston,

0:19:410:19:45

a village in the picturesque Wharfe Valley,

0:19:450:19:47

about six miles northeast of Bradford.

0:19:470:19:50

First stop for the day - Park Antiques.

0:19:500:19:53

-What a lovely shop.

-Does lovely mean expensive?

0:19:530:19:55

No, no! Cheap with your charm.

0:19:550:19:58

-Wish me luck.

-I will.

-I might need it.

0:19:580:20:01

Park Antiques is run by Brian and Les.

0:20:010:20:04

Brian looks after the furniture,

0:20:040:20:06

Les, the smalls and porcelain.

0:20:060:20:08

-Hello.

-Hi!

-Hi, I'm Christina.

0:20:080:20:11

-I'm Les. Pleased to meet you.

-Nice to meet you, Les.

0:20:110:20:14

-Hello. Who are you?

-I'm Brian.

-Brian?

0:20:140:20:15

Nice to meet you. Hi, Brian. Oh, my goodness.

0:20:150:20:18

This looks amazing.

0:20:180:20:21

And I wish I had more money to spend!

0:20:210:20:23

Yeah, so will they when they find out you've only got £20.

0:20:230:20:27

What have we got in here?

0:20:270:20:29

This looks like my kind of lot. What have we got in here?

0:20:290:20:32

That's just an assortment...

0:20:320:20:33

It's my kind of price tag as well! Here we go.

0:20:330:20:36

A box of goodies, 14 pieces in all, for a fiver.

0:20:360:20:39

The auction house said jewellery sold well.

0:20:390:20:42

What have we got here?

0:20:420:20:43

Some brooches, Wedgwood Blue, jasper cameo ware.

0:20:430:20:46

And then we've got... What on earth is that?

0:20:460:20:48

It's got a stamp on, hasn't it?

0:20:480:20:51

It has. Some really nice enamel work on there.

0:20:510:20:55

Can I ask you hold that for me?

0:20:550:20:57

Have I got my trusty...?

0:20:570:20:59

I never usually leave home without it - here we are.

0:20:590:21:02

Let's have a look.

0:21:020:21:03

This one bears all the hallmarks of being a Charles Horner piece.

0:21:030:21:06

Looks like the Charles Horner hat pin Rossco picked up

0:21:060:21:09

yesterday might have some competition in the auction.

0:21:090:21:12

Oh-ho! Hello!

0:21:120:21:15

-Sterling silver - CH.

-There we go.

0:21:150:21:17

-Charles Horner.

-Lovely.

-Perfect.

0:21:170:21:19

Well done - there's your bargain.

0:21:190:21:21

There is a bargain!

0:21:210:21:24

Christina needed a bit of luck -

0:21:240:21:25

no wonder our jewellery expert is smiling.

0:21:250:21:28

So we've got £5 on that.

0:21:280:21:29

That's the box to make your fortune on, isn't it?

0:21:290:21:32

I will absolutely bite your hand off for that.

0:21:320:21:34

-OK.

-At £5, thank you very much.

0:21:340:21:37

Thank you - it's a deal.

0:21:370:21:38

-But I have got some change.

-Excellent!

0:21:380:21:42

Still with £18.10 left,

0:21:430:21:45

Christina is shopping on.

0:21:450:21:48

That's rather lovely.

0:21:480:21:50

Well, that's priced at...£30.

0:21:500:21:55

Oh, is it?

0:21:550:21:56

Lots of lovely little natural inclusions in there.

0:21:560:21:58

She's spotted a spray brooch, set with 14 semi-precious stones,

0:21:580:22:03

including some sapphires.

0:22:030:22:05

With just a sniff over £18 in her pocket,

0:22:050:22:08

can she get this at a better price?

0:22:080:22:11

Would you take £18.10 for it,

0:22:110:22:14

should the need require?

0:22:140:22:15

-If it will help, go on. £18.

-£18.10 - I like that very much.

0:22:150:22:18

Christina has gone for broke.

0:22:180:22:21

She started this leg with £153.10 and has spent every single penny and

0:22:210:22:26

is leaving Park Antiques with a nice collection of brooches and fobs.

0:22:260:22:31

Meanwhile, Charlie's on his way to

0:22:310:22:33

Shipley on the outskirts of Bradford.

0:22:330:22:35

His next stop is Carlton Antiques Centre.

0:22:350:22:38

35 dealers trade from here, including Alan.

0:22:380:22:42

-Hello there.

-Hello, Charlie. Alan.

-Alan. Good to see you, Alan.

-And you.

0:22:420:22:46

Alan's keen to show Charlie round.

0:22:460:22:48

Lovely bowl as well.

0:22:480:22:51

The work that's gone into that...

0:22:510:22:53

Superb! That's phenomenal workmanship, isn't it?

0:22:530:22:57

Dated as Victorian - I don't think there's any doubt it's Victorian.

0:22:570:23:00

-About 1870.

-Yeah, which is nice.

0:23:000:23:02

It's what the French would call a bonbon dish,

0:23:020:23:05

a bowl for sweeties to you and me.

0:23:050:23:07

The over-the-top decoration, the bobbin handle

0:23:070:23:11

and the vine-leaf decoration are typical of the period.

0:23:110:23:14

Ticket price is £85.

0:23:140:23:17

I wish it was silver!

0:23:170:23:18

-It'd be about £385 then.

-I think it would be!

0:23:180:23:22

It certainly looks he part,

0:23:220:23:23

but it comes down to getting a good price over

0:23:230:23:25

the phone from the dealer.

0:23:250:23:28

-Let's see if we can do a deal.

-OK.

-What's his name?

-Paul.

0:23:280:23:31

-Paul?

-Yeah.

-Is he a nice man?

0:23:310:23:33

-He's lovely.

-Ask him if he'll speak to me.

0:23:330:23:36

Hiya, Paul, it's Alan from Carlton Antiques.

0:23:360:23:39

I've got Charlie Ross on the phone for you. Just one moment...

0:23:390:23:41

There you go, Charlie.

0:23:410:23:44

Is that Paul? I'm doing extremely well.

0:23:440:23:47

I've spotted something which I'm told belongs to you.

0:23:470:23:50

Whether this is good news or bad news, I don't know.

0:23:500:23:53

I'm going to try one-one ditch effort here -

0:23:530:23:56

if I offer you 35 quid, will you put the phone down or say,

0:23:560:23:59

"Charlie, I'd like to sell it."?

0:23:590:24:01

You'd put the phone down.

0:24:010:24:03

40's the death. Right, you've got a deal.

0:24:030:24:05

-I'll have it.

-Well done. Better than half price.

0:24:050:24:08

Looks like something else has caught his eye too.

0:24:080:24:11

That's a very ornate Victorian claret jug.

0:24:110:24:14

With a lid.

0:24:140:24:17

Strangely...

0:24:170:24:20

it...

0:24:200:24:22

You'd think, to all intents and purposes, it is silver plate.

0:24:220:24:26

If you look at the bottom of it...

0:24:260:24:28

you'll find a stamp on the bottom and that looks silver.

0:24:280:24:31

Having said that, that looks plate -

0:24:310:24:33

it's rubbed away - but this looks silver.

0:24:330:24:37

And this looks silver.

0:24:370:24:39

And it's a complete mystery.

0:24:390:24:41

The jug is priced at £120.

0:24:410:24:44

If it's silver, it could be worth up to £200 for scrap alone,

0:24:440:24:48

but if it's silver plate,

0:24:480:24:49

it will struggle to make a third of that.

0:24:490:24:53

Are you the owner of this exceptional object?

0:24:530:24:55

-Yes, I am, certainly.

-Tell me all about it. What's your name, sir?

0:24:550:24:58

-Malcolm.

-Malcolm, I'm Charlie.

-Hello, Charlie.

0:24:580:25:00

I've been looking at that and I can't work it out,

0:25:000:25:02

-so explain it to me.

-Well, you and me both.

0:25:020:25:05

-I bought it as silver plate.

-Yes.

0:25:050:25:07

Presumably, if you bought it as silver plate,

0:25:070:25:10

you paid 30 quid for it?

0:25:100:25:11

-I paid more than that.

-You didn't!

0:25:110:25:13

I paid double that and you can have it for 80.

0:25:130:25:15

-And that is it.

-You're all heart.

0:25:150:25:18

-I know.

-What do you mean, "That's it."?

-That's it. That's it.

0:25:180:25:21

I want 20 quid profit out it.

0:25:210:25:22

If it's silver plate, it'll make 35 quid at auction, won't it?

0:25:220:25:25

But, ah! If it IS silver plate.

0:25:250:25:28

I'm not that much of a gambler!

0:25:280:25:29

There's only one way this is going, isn't there?

0:25:290:25:32

Look at me. It's going to begin with a seven, isn't it?

0:25:320:25:36

And it's then going to have a nought and we'll both have won.

0:25:370:25:40

-You've worn me down. You've worn me down.

-Yeah?

0:25:400:25:43

-Go on, then.

-Put it there.

0:25:430:25:46

Charlie leaves Shipley with two lots -

0:25:470:25:49

the ornate silver-plated Victorian bonbon dish, bought for £40,

0:25:490:25:53

and the claret jug - could be silver,

0:25:530:25:56

could be silver-plated - a gamble for £70.

0:25:560:25:59

While Charlie shops, Christina's got her feet up.

0:26:010:26:04

Earlier, she picked up a job lot of brooches and fobs for just a fiver.

0:26:040:26:08

This, for me, it's my bargain day.

0:26:080:26:12

What I've actually done, the box of 14 items,

0:26:120:26:16

I've actually split them into two separate lots.

0:26:160:26:18

So I've split the enamel brooches on here,

0:26:180:26:21

and then I've put the remainder over

0:26:210:26:24

here as a single lot as well.

0:26:240:26:26

That's now two £2.50 lots - a shrewd move.

0:26:260:26:30

Dividing her jewellery means she stands a better

0:26:300:26:33

chance of conquering at auction.

0:26:330:26:36

Meanwhile, back in the van, is Charlie as chipper?

0:26:360:26:39

Was I kidding myself with that claret jug?

0:26:390:26:42

Did I really think it might be silver?

0:26:420:26:45

It's a gamble. However, all is not lost.

0:26:450:26:48

I've got a fascinating bit of history to attend to now.

0:26:480:26:51

Yes, you have!

0:26:520:26:54

Charlie's driven to Boothtown

0:26:540:26:55

on the outskirts of Halifax in West Yorkshire,

0:26:550:26:58

and the former home of road contractor Percy Shaw,

0:26:580:27:00

whose invention has saved thousands of lives.

0:27:000:27:04

Charlie's meeting Percy's niece, Glenda, to hear the story of how

0:27:040:27:08

a cat on a foggy night inspired her uncle's inventive mind.

0:27:080:27:13

You must live in the only house in the world that has Catseyes

0:27:130:27:16

-going up to the front door!

-Yes, I think so.

0:27:160:27:19

It was here that Great Uncle Percy invented the Catseye, was it?

0:27:190:27:23

-It was.

-Yeah.

0:27:230:27:24

-If you like, come inside and I'll tell you more about it.

-Thank you.

0:27:240:27:29

In the 1930s, driving a car was becoming an affordable reality.

0:27:290:27:32

But there was a real danger to this new-found luxury.

0:27:320:27:37

At night, poor street lighting made driving hazardous

0:27:370:27:40

and in foul weather, it could be deadly.

0:27:400:27:43

One night in April, 1933,

0:27:450:27:48

driving home from the pub through bad weather,

0:27:480:27:50

Percy struggled to see the road ahead.

0:27:500:27:53

As he as coming past a very dangerous part of the road,

0:27:530:27:56

it happened by sheer fluke,

0:27:560:27:59

he saw a cat sat on the edge of the road.

0:27:590:28:04

And it reflected in his headlights

0:28:040:28:07

and so he stopped the car, immediately,

0:28:070:28:10

realised he'd averted sure disaster

0:28:100:28:15

and then that's when he got his eureka moment.

0:28:150:28:20

Percy knew if he could replicate the reflection of cats' eyes,

0:28:200:28:24

he could prevent thousands of accidents.

0:28:240:28:27

Then in 1934, after tinkering with ideas in his workshop,

0:28:270:28:31

he produced a reflecting road stud prototype.

0:28:310:28:35

Although this was a useless idea that he made,

0:28:350:28:39

but the idea's there -

0:28:390:28:41

you can see it's made of the three component parts

0:28:410:28:44

that are still in existence today.

0:28:440:28:46

-You've got the glass eyes...

-Yes.

-..You've got the rubber

0:28:460:28:51

-that protects the glass...

-Yes.

0:28:510:28:54

-..And then you've got the metal casting to protect the rubber.

-Yeah.

0:28:540:28:58

And that goes in the road.

0:28:580:29:00

That really is quite different from the modern one, isn't it?

0:29:000:29:03

He soon developed this idea -

0:29:030:29:06

that you've got to have the eyes pointing this way,

0:29:060:29:10

so that they can pick up the car headlights.

0:29:100:29:15

Percy's Catseyes worked in all weathers,

0:29:150:29:18

were robust enough to be repeatedly driven over by heavy trucks

0:29:180:29:22

and required minimal maintenance,

0:29:220:29:24

but he struggled to persuade the Ministry Of Transport

0:29:240:29:28

to invest in his invention.

0:29:280:29:30

It wasn't until almost ten years later,

0:29:300:29:32

during the Second World War blackouts,

0:29:320:29:34

that Percy's Catseyes were adopted.

0:29:340:29:37

Business boomed, Percy built a factory beside his house,

0:29:380:29:42

employed around 130 locals

0:29:420:29:44

and was soon manufacturing 1.5 million Catseyes a year.

0:29:440:29:48

-This is the modern one, which has larger eyes.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:29:500:29:55

Specification for modern-day conditions.

0:29:550:29:57

Surely, the problem with these is that you get a bit of rain,

0:29:570:30:00

bit of mud and it just covers over the lens

0:30:000:30:03

and you've lost the function.

0:30:030:30:06

-Yes, you get rain, but it goes into the dish there...

-Yeah.

0:30:060:30:11

..And there you've got a slit there...

0:30:110:30:13

These are your cat's eyes,

0:30:130:30:15

and it works exactly like a cat's eye or a human eye, for that matter.

0:30:150:30:20

When a car goes over it, it goes into the water

0:30:200:30:24

and the eyelid washes it.

0:30:240:30:26

-Oh, that's amazing. So it's self-cleaning.

-Yes.

0:30:260:30:30

Catseyes went on to be a global success.

0:30:300:30:33

In 1965, Percy was awarded an OBE in recognition for services to export.

0:30:330:30:38

By the time Percy died in 1976, aged 86,

0:30:400:30:44

around 15 million Catseyes had been made.

0:30:440:30:48

Today, the component parts are manufactured abroad,

0:30:480:30:53

but Catseyes are still assembled in the same factory 80 years on.

0:30:530:30:57

And it's still a family business. The company's run by Glenda's dad.

0:30:570:31:01

Thank you so much for showing me around. It's been wonderful.

0:31:010:31:04

Wonderful. When I drive home, I shall think of Percy.

0:31:040:31:07

And, as our experts take the road at auction,

0:31:090:31:11

here's a rundown of what Charlie and Christina

0:31:110:31:14

picked up on their travels.

0:31:140:31:15

Charlie bought a Georgian oak tray-top commode. Handy.

0:31:150:31:20

An Edwardian silver scent bottle.

0:31:200:31:22

A Charles Horner silver hatpin.

0:31:220:31:25

An ornate Victorian bonbon dish.

0:31:250:31:28

And a possibly silver Victorian lidded claret drug.

0:31:280:31:32

All that lot cost £215.

0:31:320:31:35

But challenger Christina's gone for broke

0:31:370:31:40

on a pair of bronzed-effect dog bookends,

0:31:400:31:43

an Indian-style shawl, a spray brooch,

0:31:430:31:46

and a box of jewellery she split into two lots for auction.

0:31:460:31:51

All for a grand total of £153.10.

0:31:510:31:56

But what do our experts think of each other's purchases?

0:31:560:31:59

There's nothing in Charlie's purchases which is really kind of...

0:31:590:32:03

lighting my fire.

0:32:030:32:05

Sugar basket...

0:32:050:32:06

Yeah...

0:32:060:32:08

Scent bottle...

0:32:080:32:09

Yeah...

0:32:090:32:10

Dog bookends, I don't like dog bookends.

0:32:100:32:14

I think there could be a bit of a clanger there.

0:32:140:32:17

It cost £129.

0:32:170:32:19

Value?

0:32:190:32:21

I shouldn't take off the hundred if I were you!

0:32:210:32:25

HE LAUGHS

0:32:250:32:26

I have a big fat zero in my pocket.

0:32:260:32:31

So I have invested everything into this auction.

0:32:310:32:35

Oh, dear.

0:32:360:32:37

So, will it be boom or bust for Christina at auction in Bourne?

0:32:390:32:43

Situated in the heart of South Lincolnshire, Bourne is a small

0:32:450:32:49

historic market town.

0:32:490:32:50

-Oh, it's a bit bumpy.

-It is very bumpy.

0:32:520:32:54

It's also very, very, very flat, isn't it?

0:32:540:32:57

It's very flat. Have you ever been to Lincolnshire before?

0:32:570:32:59

I don't think I have.

0:32:590:33:01

The town was built around natural springs, hence the name Bourne,

0:33:010:33:05

which derives from the Anglo-Saxon, meaning water or stream.

0:33:050:33:09

-I do feel nervous about today, I do.

-What are you doing buying dogs?!

0:33:090:33:15

-Well...

-I mean, dog bookends.

0:33:150:33:17

-Well...

-Do you honestly think dog bookends are commercial?

0:33:170:33:21

Today's auction takes place at Golding, Young & Mawer.

0:33:210:33:25

The company has a history of selling since 1864,

0:33:250:33:29

and old hand Colin Young is at the rostrum.

0:33:290:33:32

The bits that are a little bit more interesting are that wonderful

0:33:320:33:36

pair of bookends because they sit so well

0:33:360:33:39

and they look a little bit better than they probably are.

0:33:390:33:42

The claret jug is a really interesting one.

0:33:420:33:44

It is stamped 925, so it doesn't have a full set of English

0:33:440:33:47

hallmarks on it, and for that reason it's catalogued as white metal,

0:33:470:33:52

and we'll let the buyers decide how far they want to go with it.

0:33:520:33:55

Well, now's the time for Colin to grab his gavel and our experts

0:33:550:33:59

to take their seats because Charlie's claret jug is first up.

0:33:590:34:03

Good luck, good luck.

0:34:030:34:04

Could be silver, could be plated. A gamble by Charlie, bought for £70.

0:34:060:34:10

Stamped 925 on the bottom...

0:34:100:34:12

Yes!

0:34:120:34:13

At 30 and bid. 5 now, do I see?

0:34:130:34:16

Bid 40. 45?

0:34:160:34:18

45, bid 50? 50, bid 5?

0:34:180:34:19

Bid 60, 65.

0:34:190:34:20

See, see, see, see!

0:34:200:34:22

£70 on the internet...

0:34:220:34:24

-He thinks it's silver.

-Well, it'll do.

0:34:240:34:27

He has done well, Colin.

0:34:270:34:29

You're all out in the room, then. All out, going at £70.

0:34:290:34:31

STRIKES GAVEL

0:34:310:34:33

A small loss after auction costs.

0:34:330:34:35

It could have been worse, it could have been better.

0:34:350:34:37

It was such a gamble, I think it must have been plate,

0:34:370:34:40

in which case it is a miracle.

0:34:400:34:42

Christina's first lot is the richly embroidered Indian-style shawl,

0:34:420:34:47

bought as part of a job lot with the expensive bookends,

0:34:470:34:51

it cost just £1, modelled by Charlie.

0:34:510:34:53

Oh, no.

0:34:530:34:55

Who's going to start me at £80?

0:34:550:34:56

£80? My goodness.

0:34:560:34:58

I've got to get the bids in early before he displays it!

0:34:580:35:01

At 50 bid. 5 anywhere else cos that's going to kill it dead?!

0:35:010:35:04

How dare you!

0:35:040:35:06

£50, anyone?

0:35:060:35:07

All right, then, start me at £20. £20, anyone? 10 to go, surely.

0:35:070:35:11

£10, anybody? £10.

0:35:110:35:13

£10, surely.

0:35:130:35:14

It didn't work, Charles! £10? Surely, £10 for it.

0:35:140:35:20

It's not mine!

0:35:200:35:22

That's the whole point - he was trying to wreck it for her!

0:35:220:35:25

You were supposed to twirl magnificently!

0:35:250:35:28

I've never been so embarrassed.

0:35:280:35:30

This is five times more than you paid for it.

0:35:300:35:33

Selling at £5.

0:35:330:35:36

With a £5 winning bid, Christina has the first profit of the day.

0:35:360:35:40

You realise if I hadn't modelled it, it would have made 30?

0:35:400:35:43

Yes, possibly, yeah!

0:35:430:35:44

Next, Charlie's Edwardian silver scent bottle.

0:35:440:35:48

50 to go, surely. £50, anybody?

0:35:480:35:50

Yeah, it started at 80 for my scarf.

0:35:500:35:52

HE GASPS

0:35:520:35:54

5 anywhere else? 5, surely?

0:35:540:35:56

At 40.

0:35:560:35:58

Do we do 2? We do on the net. 45, 48 now.

0:35:580:36:01

48 bid. £48 now, surely. It's no money at all here at £48.

0:36:010:36:05

45. Got a bid back in the room. 48 is the last call, then.

0:36:050:36:07

At £45, the whole world has seen it, the whole world is bidding.

0:36:070:36:11

£20 profit!

0:36:110:36:12

Back in the room at 45, selling at £45, all done.

0:36:120:36:15

STRIKES GAVEL

0:36:150:36:16

Sold for a £20 profit.

0:36:160:36:19

-£20 up.

-£20 up.

-Well done.

0:36:190:36:22

Christina's spray brooch is next.

0:36:230:36:26

Can it keep up their run of profits?

0:36:260:36:30

30?

0:36:300:36:32

Thank you, the lady's bid at 30.

0:36:320:36:33

5, I've got, 35.

0:36:330:36:35

Oh, my goodness!

0:36:350:36:37

45, bid 50, do I see?

0:36:370:36:40

It's a fantastic profit, £50.

0:36:400:36:42

5 again now, surely. 50 with me.

0:36:420:36:44

-We are doing so well.

-Last call, then. It's on the market at 50.

0:36:450:36:48

All done and finished, I will sell, you've all seen it.

0:36:480:36:51

STRIKES GAVEL

0:36:510:36:52

Cracking result! A profit of over £31, wow.

0:36:520:36:55

You're doing so well, Christina.

0:36:550:36:57

SHE LAUGHS

0:36:570:36:58

Charlie's damaged Charles Horner hatpin now. Here it goes.

0:36:580:37:04

£10, anyone? £10, 12 with you,

0:37:040:37:07

15, 18, 20, 22,

0:37:070:37:09

25, at 25, surely?

0:37:090:37:12

Fresh blood.

0:37:120:37:13

-28?

-28, I've got. 30? 30 bid.

0:37:130:37:16

At 30, standing in the middle of the room.

0:37:160:37:18

That's commission.

0:37:180:37:19

Last call, then. Selling at £30, all done.

0:37:190:37:21

STRIKES GAVEL

0:37:210:37:22

That's the second lot to sell at the cost price,

0:37:220:37:25

technically a loss after auction costs.

0:37:250:37:27

Next under the hammer is the first of Christina's fobs and brooches.

0:37:270:37:32

She bought her job lot for a fiver and split them into two for auction.

0:37:320:37:36

This lot includes her Charles Horner Hallmark brooch.

0:37:360:37:39

£30, anyone? 20 to go, surely.

0:37:390:37:42

Oh!

0:37:420:37:43

I've got two on the book. 25 now, 28.

0:37:430:37:46

He's making ten times more than it cost you.

0:37:460:37:48

The internet is flashing, but you have to roll onto 32 now.

0:37:480:37:51

My 30's in the room. 2 now, do I see on the net?

0:37:510:37:54

At 30, back in the room at 30, are we all done?

0:37:540:37:56

Selling this time at £30.

0:37:560:37:58

STRIKES GAVEL

0:37:580:37:59

Her shrewd move to split that box of trinkets has paid off.

0:37:590:38:03

-It's not bad, is it?

-It's unbelievable!

0:38:040:38:07

Now Charlie's bonbon dish.

0:38:080:38:10

£40, anyone?

0:38:120:38:13

30?

0:38:130:38:14

Such a lovely thing. Oh, this is so cheap.

0:38:140:38:17

£20 to go, then, surely? Who is going to start me at £20?

0:38:170:38:20

Nobody interested? We'll move on if you don't. £20, anybody?

0:38:200:38:23

That didn't even make you bring your arm up, no?

0:38:230:38:25

-£10, then?

-Oh, no.

0:38:250:38:28

10 bid? Oh, everyone, that's all right.

0:38:280:38:30

10 bid, 12 bid, 15, 18, 20,

0:38:300:38:33

20 bid, 2 bid. 22, 25 now...

0:38:330:38:36

At 22, the bid's down here at 22.

0:38:360:38:37

5 anywhere else? At £22.

0:38:370:38:40

At 22. Surely one more.

0:38:400:38:42

At 22, last call, then, selling...

0:38:420:38:45

Going then at £22, thank you.

0:38:450:38:47

GAVEL STRIKES

0:38:470:38:48

Oh, that is a loss of £18. It appears the tables have turned.

0:38:480:38:52

This is not Charlie's auction.

0:38:520:38:54

-Oh.

-Welcome to my world.

0:38:540:38:56

SHE LAUGHS

0:38:560:38:58

That hurt.

0:38:580:38:59

Christina's second lot of brooches and fobs now.

0:38:590:39:02

Right, this is your big one.

0:39:020:39:05

-This is my leftovers.

-This could make 50 quid.

0:39:050:39:08

Start me at £40.

0:39:080:39:09

£30, anybody?

0:39:090:39:11

-Oh, come on!

-Don't worry, this will fly.

0:39:110:39:13

The lady has bid at 10.

0:39:130:39:14

-12 anywhere else?

-12 on the internet.

0:39:140:39:17

Oh, we're up to 20 on the internet.

0:39:170:39:18

Oh! On the internet!

0:39:180:39:21

25 now? 25 bid, do I see now?

0:39:210:39:24

28 now? Well, there are a lot of them.

0:39:240:39:25

28 bid. 30, do I see?

0:39:250:39:27

£30 bid. 32 now, do I see? 32 now, surely?

0:39:270:39:30

HE GASPS

0:39:300:39:32

£32?

0:39:320:39:33

Christina!

0:39:350:39:36

You're all out in the room, back on the net, selling at 35 bid.

0:39:360:39:40

Oh!

0:39:400:39:41

At 35. If he gets excited at 35, he's going to be excited at this.

0:39:410:39:45

I've got 38.

0:39:450:39:46

Oh!

0:39:460:39:48

40 now, do I see? 40 is the last call.

0:39:480:39:52

Selling at £38.

0:39:520:39:53

STRIKES GAVEL

0:39:530:39:54

Another solid profit from the smart buy Christina.

0:39:540:39:57

Well done.

0:39:570:39:59

Oh! Christina, that's one of the biggest percentage profits

0:39:590:40:03

ever made on an auction.

0:40:030:40:04

SHE LAUGHS

0:40:040:40:06

Charlie's 18th-century commode is up next.

0:40:060:40:08

His profits have been going down the pan today.

0:40:080:40:11

Can he have any success with this last lot?

0:40:110:40:15

£30, anyone? I'll take 20 to go, then.

0:40:150:40:17

No.

0:40:170:40:18

£10. 15? 20?

0:40:180:40:21

Bid 30? Bid 40?

0:40:210:40:24

Bid 50? 50 bid.

0:40:240:40:26

5 now, surely. 55 bid.

0:40:260:40:28

Well done, Colin.

0:40:280:40:30

At 50 bid. Bid 60. It's 60.

0:40:300:40:33

5 anywhere else? Bid 70.

0:40:330:40:34

See?!

0:40:340:40:36

5 anywhere else?

0:40:360:40:37

-This is why I like furniture.

-From £10 to £80, are you kidding me?!

0:40:370:40:42

5 now at 8, it's on the market, it's going to sell, make no mistake.

0:40:420:40:45

Done and finished at £80.

0:40:450:40:47

STRIKES GAVEL

0:40:470:40:48

Old Rossco is a furniture know-it-all and with a profit

0:40:480:40:51

like that, I wonder he didn't buy some more.

0:40:510:40:54

You know how people say brown furniture doesn't sell any more?

0:40:540:40:57

-Well, there you are, it does.

-Well, that is why had faith in you.

0:40:570:41:00

HE SIGHS

0:41:000:41:01

Now their last lot of the day.

0:41:010:41:04

Christina is winning the auction

0:41:040:41:06

but if her bronze defect bookends don't sell well,

0:41:060:41:09

she could lose all the profits she's made so far. Here they come.

0:41:090:41:13

Straight in at the bottom estimate, start me at £40.

0:41:130:41:15

Thank you, 40.

0:41:150:41:17

Do I see 50? I'll take five, then.

0:41:170:41:20

45? 50?

0:41:200:41:22

60 and 5. Bid 70?

0:41:220:41:25

75 bid. 80 bid.

0:41:250:41:28

90 bid. 95 bid. 100.

0:41:280:41:30

110. 120 now, surely.

0:41:300:41:32

110, 120, 130 now,

0:41:320:41:36

140, 150, 160,

0:41:360:41:40

170 now. 160.

0:41:400:41:43

At 160, are we are all done and finished?

0:41:430:41:45

You're all out in the room, make no mistake.

0:41:450:41:47

At 160, you are out on the net.

0:41:470:41:49

All done and finished and selling at £160.

0:41:490:41:52

STRIKES GAVEL

0:41:520:41:54

SHE LAUGHS

0:41:540:41:56

Oh, my God!

0:41:560:41:57

A profit of £31. Christina's made a profit on every lot today.

0:41:570:42:01

That's two auctions in a row she's beaten Charlie.

0:42:010:42:05

-What about that, then? Four auctions down.

-Yes.

0:42:070:42:10

-Two to you, two to me.

-I think that's generous, but...

0:42:100:42:13

-Now we are going to the decider.

-The final leg.

-Come on.

0:42:130:42:17

It is all to play for.

0:42:170:42:19

After costs, Charlie made a loss of £12.46,

0:42:190:42:23

but Rossco still has £346.68 in his kitty to carry forward.

0:42:230:42:29

After paying auction house fees,

0:42:300:42:32

Christina has made a gain of £78.96.

0:42:320:42:36

As a result, Ms Trevanion has £232.06 to start the next leg.

0:42:360:42:42

She's catching up.

0:42:420:42:45

SHE LAUGHS

0:42:450:42:46

-Thank you.

-Genius, we're genius.

0:42:460:42:50

I take it all back!

0:42:500:42:52

I take it all back! Those dogs were absolutely marvellous.

0:42:520:42:55

-In the passenger side.

-All right, all right.

0:42:550:42:58

HORN HONKS

0:42:580:42:59

You're so good!

0:42:590:43:01

On the next Antiques Road Trip, with the last auction approaching, it is

0:43:010:43:06

all to play for.

0:43:060:43:08

Has Charlie rediscovered his lucky charm?

0:43:080:43:11

Look at that, it's not a Ross tartan, but is not bad.

0:43:110:43:15

Or will Christina's strong run continue?

0:43:150:43:17

It's heavy, it's really heavy!

0:43:170:43:20

Beginning in York, Christina Trevanion and Charlie Ross head towards their auction in Bourne, Lincolnshire, on the fourth leg of their road trip. Charlie hears about a simple invention that changed British roads forever and Christina finds out the story behind the 400-year-old hand of a Catholic saint.