Highlights of 2016 Antiques Roadshow


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Highlights of 2016

In a special edition, Fiona Bruce looks at the most talked about finds of the year. Plus a look ahead to the locations for 2017.


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After the hundreds of thousands of miles clocked up

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in search of treasures on the Antiques Roadshow,

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sometimes people ask if we could ever run out of great finds.

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Well, it's that time when we look back on our year

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and I can tell you, if this last 12 months is anything to go by,

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there's little danger of the well running dry.

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From the rarest doll's house figures we've ever seen...

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The dream item for me. I couldn't have imagined anything better.

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Those are seriously early and important.

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..to the most gorgeous jewellery...

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There were some wonderful workshops that were making

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these types of jewels and they're highly collected now today.

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The '70s period is really quite in.

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..and an important painting that had been thought lost.

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I'm very excited about it. I've never seen it before

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and it's by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

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-Now, he is a very important person.

-Could it be very valuable?

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I'm afraid you'll have to wait and see on that.

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Yes, it's been an exciting year, as our team scoured the country

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in search of prized pieces, many with remarkable stories.

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We're about to bring you up to speed on what happened next

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after the experts dropped the bombshell on unsuspecting owners

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and I'll be meeting some of those surprised faces again,

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here in the sumptuous setting of Cardiff Castle.

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Our first update takes us to the silver department.

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Between them, our experts have uncovered

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dozens of beautifully wrought pieces,

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from the finest early English spoons to elaborate oriental services.

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For the experts, it's all about rarity,

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craftsmanship and high value, and all three came together

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when veteran Roadshow specialist Ian Pickford

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spotted a tankard at our show at Broughton Castle.

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Wow!

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-What a tankard!

-Yes.

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How long have you actually had

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the good fortune of owning it?

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Owning it, only since it was passed to me,

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-but I've known it all my life.

-Right.

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But I know little about it.

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What we've got here...

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The form is entirely European - very English, actually.

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It's the form of a 17th-century tankard.

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Right.

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-But it's not English.

-Oh.

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So where does it come from?

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-China?

-Well, yes.

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The market today for Chinese work, Chinese-related pieces,

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-is very, very hot.

-Oh, right.

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There's been nothing as good as this on the market,

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as far as I'm aware.

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So, when you've got something that's probably the best that there is,

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I would think we're looking at

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between £20,000 and £25,000.

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-CROWD GASPS AND MUTTERS

-My word.

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That's fantastic!

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-And it could go more.

-Really?

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Right.

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The owner of that tankard, Rob Lowe, is here,

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along with Marilyn, your wife. You looked pretty surprised.

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What did you think when Ian suddenly came up with that value?

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Er, it was a shock.

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I've always thought it might be valuable,

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but nothing like that, of course.

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And Ian had said nothing abut it at all until we got on camera.

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-That's how it works, you see. We like to do that.

-Yeah.

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And you were absolutely flabbergasted, weren't you?

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Yes, I was, yes. We never thought it was

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anywhere near worth that amount of money, so, yeah.

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It was a bit of a rollercoaster for you, wasn't it,

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-after that valuation?

-Yes, once we got the valuation,

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we decided to sell it cos we were nervous of having it in the house

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and we took it to various places to get second opinions

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and everybody had a different opinion.

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We decided to take it to another valuation house and auction house

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and they did an awful lot of investigation work

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and actually sent it away to a London assay office

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to have it tested to determine what age it was.

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So they put the silver through a test, a physical test,

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to ascertain its age.

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Apparently, they can tell the age because of the level of impurities

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in the silver and it turned out to be between 1500 and 1600.

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Wow!

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That's incredible, isn't it?

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And it also turned out to be English rather than Chinese.

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Which is what Ian had thought it might be.

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Ian quite rightly thought it was Chinese because of its appearance

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and because of the rarity of what it turned out to be.

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So, you ended up with a silver tankard

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-that was even earlier than Ian had thought.

-Yes.

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And English, as opposed to Chinese, once these tests had been done

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which, obviously, we can't do at the Roadshow.

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So, what did you sell it for in the end?

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In the end, it went for £36,000, which was absolutely amazing.

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So, what are you going to do with the windfall?

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We've got two sons and some grandchildren in Australia,

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so we hope to visit them more than we would have done before.

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-It'll buy you quite a few flights, won't it?

-Yeah.

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Another visitor to a Roadshow, shown earlier this year, was Jim Dunstone,

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who was stunned when oriental expert John Axford

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examined his collection of jades.

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These Chinese jade carvings,

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I think they're great things. They are made to be handled.

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They are made by scholars. Where did you get these from?

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We bought them in Singapore, when we were there in the 1970s.

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We were always told they were sleeve pieces. What does that mean?

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Well, that's one way of calling them, sleeve pieces.

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They could also be called handling pieces,

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because they were designed specifically to be picked up,

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handled and turned over.

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The idea of them being a sleeve piece,

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if you are wearing a long Chinese robe,

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you'd be able to store them turned up in your sleeve.

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So, they become a handling piece or a sleeve piece

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and they are to be picked up, touched.

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And so, how tactile they are is very important to them.

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-How glorious.

-It is. It's a lovely idea.

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These all date from the reign of the Emperor Qian Long.

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That's what we were told.

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Do you remember how much you paid for them in Singapore?

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These were all under 100 Singapore.

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Nowadays, you're probably looking at £5,000 here.

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-Goodness.

-Maybe a little bit more here.

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Maybe 5,000 to 8,000 here.

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And I think this one could easily top £10,000 at auction.

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So, I think you've got more than £20,000 here.

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I think I'd better up the insurance.

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Having been made aware of their value, owner Jim made a plan.

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He wanted to sell the pieces and donate the money

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to a cause that had special relevance

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to him and his late wife, Catherine.

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We met up with Jim to tell us all about it in Swanage.

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The original idea, with my wife,

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was that those things would pay for our house,

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once we got back to the UK.

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But we got the house without it

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and, as my wife was in a convalescent home, dying,

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we decided that we ought to do something sensible with it

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and we'd both sailed ever since we were married.

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What better charity could there be than the RNLI?

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I have had occasion to call them out.

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So, we sold them and sent the cheque to the RNLI.

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And that's what my wife wanted when she died.

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The sale of the jades raised £20,000,

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which was gratefully received by the RNLI.

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Jim went to meet Neil Hardy, its operations manager at the site

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of its new lifeboat station to see how his donation was being spent.

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We're very grateful for your donation

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because, obviously, as you can see from the nature of the project,

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a lot of people have put a lot of money and time towards it

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and without their help and your help, we couldn't do this

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and I couldn't stand here, as a proud volunteer of the RNLI,

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and say, "Look at our brand-new lifeboat station."

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It's really going to make a difference to the people out there

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who are counting on minutes and hanging on.

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We will be able to get away a lot quicker.

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Well worth every bob.

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I think my wife would be very, very impressed and very, very grateful

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that the money is going to such a worthwhile cause.

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What a generous gesture by Jim and his wife.

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We've since heard that a plaque will be installed at the lifeboat station

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in memory of her and in recognition of their donation.

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Now, we love a good book on the Antiques Roadshow

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and our book experts have been kept very busy over the last year.

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Here are a few of the most memorable page-turners.

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-This is extraordinary. This is an original watercolour.

-Yeah.

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And it dates, obviously, from about 1900.

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It's so typical of this period.

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Look at the frontispiece. This is just...

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-Well, it's heavenly, isn't it? Absolutely heavenly.

-Yeah.

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It's a general book on anatomy from 1546,

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written by a chap called Charles Etienne

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and this is his work on "La dissection des parties du corps",

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so on dissection of the parts of the body.

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Here we have a wonderful peep and as you look down into it,

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you see all the way along the grand central aisle of the Crystal Palace.

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This huge leather-bound volume looks like a monster book, doesn't it?

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-Yes.

-And it says Alice In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

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But further down, it says, "A Motion Picture".

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This is signed to Anne Waddington from Alice In Wonderland.

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And what this is, in fact, is an amazing presentation script

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for the 1933 Paramount film Alice In Wonderland.

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It's quite difficult to try and think about

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what something like this is worth,

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-but I'm going to put £5,000 to £8,000 on this.

-Oh, my!

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SHE LAUGHS

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I won't give it back to my mum! I'm off!

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But perhaps the most exciting find came in to Tewksbury

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earlier this year when Clive Farahar was presented

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with a cinematic family tale, as he met our next owner, Guy Bowden.

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"The Third Man, the draft script."

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This was the film that Carol Reed made in 1949. Tell me about it.

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My mother was the secretary to the film director

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Carol Reed, as he was then.

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And when we were going through her effects, we found this.

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I knew, growing up, that she'd been part of the filming process...

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-Yes.

-..and been his secretary.

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But I never realised that she had this in her possession.

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So, she actually went out to Vienna with Carol Reed and Orson Welles?

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Tell me how this came about,

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because this was originally a novella by Graham Greene.

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Carol Reed, who was well-known for being quite grumpy,

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was presented with this novella to read,

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and he said, "I haven't time to read this."

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So, he tossed it to my mother and said,

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"Could you read this and do me a precis?"

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And that's how the script came about.

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And here is a picture of her -

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a lovely picture of her, I have to say,

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beautifully made up and all the rest of it.

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Beautifully posed with the rest of the crew.

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She was there for the whole period of filming.

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So, right from the time they flew first out to Vienna,

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to go round and look for locations.

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They went to the cafes, they investigated the sewers.

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-All the iconic...

-Images that we know so well.

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-Yes.

-Fantastic.

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After the show went out, we were contacted by a museum in Vienna,

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devoted to the film The Third man.

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They were desperate to see the collection.

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So, we took owner Guy and his wife, Sarah, to the city.

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They just had to stop off at one of the film's classic locations -

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the big wheel at Prater amusement park.

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We had no idea that the journey to Tewkesbury to the Antiques Roadshow

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would take us any further than that.

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I had no idea that it would take me this far

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and bring us both to Vienna to see the museum of The Third Man.

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I was contacted by Gerhard,

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who is the director-owner of The Third Man Museum,

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and he was delighted to hear that such a thing as this script

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and some of the other photographs

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and other memorabilia, that my mother had, existed.

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The next part of Guy's mission in Vienna

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was to meet Gerhard, who owns the museum.

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The Third Man, to Vienna, is very important

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cos it's one of the most famous movies of movie history

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and it's shot in the city and it brings a lot of tourists.

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-Gerhard.

-Oh, wow! Hello, Guy.

-We meet at last.

-Yes.

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This is fantastic.

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I'm speechless. This is so wonderful.

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Yes, I started 19 years ago. I got this huge collection together.

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It's supposed to be one of the most important British movies,

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great British-Austrian connection. Today, it's a cult movie.

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And it's a huge phenomenon.

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I think I have something that you might be interested in.

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Oh, yes, I think so too.

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-Here it is.

-Oh, wow.

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Oh, wow...

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Oh, Guy, this is fantastic!

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This is very, very personal and everything.

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We don't have equivalent items like that.

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Gerhard was so thrilled to see the script,

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he offered Guy the value quoted by Clive Farahar

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on the Roadshow - £5,000.

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It's brilliant that the script has found its home here, I think,

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because that's where it belongs, and I think, if my mum was alive,

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that's where she'd want it to be.

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What a perfect home for that script - back in Vienna,

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67 years after the release of that famous film.

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And it's a good moment to tell you about a very special edition

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of the Roadshow we'll be filming next year.

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We're producing an entire episode around stars and related objects

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from the world of film, music, theatre and TV.

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Now, where would be the perfect place for such a programme?

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MUSIC: Theme to EastEnders

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Yes, next summer, the Roadshow will roll in to Albert Square.

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Have you got a story about a brush with fame?

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Perhaps the day you met the Beatles

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or when your relative worked on a movie?

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Maybe you own something connected with an iconic TV show.

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Tell us of your moment and memento

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and maybe you could be the star of our production

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on the set of Britain's best-loved soap,

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as we take up residence in Walford East.

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We'll be selecting the best stories

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for a special day out in Albert Square.

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Details are on our website.

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Our jewellery team are always fascinating to watch at a Roadshow.

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They've mastered the perfect poker face

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when confronted with a great piece and an unsuspecting owner.

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This is absolutely fabulous.

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This is luxury at its height, in terms of the craftsmanship.

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We're going to look inside and see the most ravishing brooch,

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in the form of a darting kingfisher with its prey in its beak.

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Jewellery - it's about love, it's about power,

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but it can also be a little bit about scandal.

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And who would have thought it with a beautiful bracelet like this?

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Everybody likes things like this

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because they are really, really super-duper,

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top-of-the-range stones.

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I think your brooch is probably worth

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something in the region of £40,000 today.

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That's nice.

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But one jewel, brought in to Joanna Hardy, at Audley End,

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turned out to be something of a puzzle.

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What was going through your mind when you saw this

0:16:410:16:44

-and when did you see this?

-I bought it in 1972

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in Collingwood's of Conduit Street,

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a jeweller no longer with us, I think,

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and I have no idea by whom it was made.

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This stone is a tourmaline, which is a natural stone.

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And this would have come from Brazil.

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There were some wonderful workshops

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that were making these types of jewels

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and they're highly collected now, today.

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The '70s period is really quite in.

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Do you remember how much you paid for it?

0:17:150:17:17

-No idea.

-Well...

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I just think it is absolutely fabulous

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and I think, at auction, you'd be looking in the region

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of around about £5,000 to £7,000.

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-Heavens!

-SHE CHUCKLES

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That's lovely.

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-And the only thing is, there is no signature.

-I know.

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-There is no signature of this wonderful craftsman.

-Mmm.

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And I would love to know who the craftsman is.

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-Maybe he might be watching.

-Wouldn't that be wonderful?

0:17:450:17:49

That ring was a real whodunnit.

0:17:490:17:52

After it was shown, lots of people in the jewellery world contacted us,

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keen to solve the riddle of the ring.

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I have found out who made it and so we're here at the Assay Office.

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I've invited the owner to come and we're going to hallmark it

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with the maker's mark, which is so exciting.

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What was wonderful is that, in the end,

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we nailed it down to Lawrence Wheaton.

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He was born in 1944.

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He went to train as a goldsmith

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with the Swedish royal court jewellers, Bolin,

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which is pretty amazing.

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And then he came back to England

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and he worked for a workshop before he set up on his own.

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And he was also a teacher

0:18:360:18:38

at the Hornsey College of Art at the same time.

0:18:380:18:40

-And, unfortunately, he died about seven years ago.

-I see.

0:18:400:18:46

But I needed confirmation that it was made by Lawrence Wheaton,

0:18:460:18:51

so I managed to get hold of his wife, Pat,

0:18:510:18:57

and I showed her the close-up of the ring

0:18:570:18:59

and she said, "That's my husband's ring."

0:18:590:19:02

And Lawrence Wheaton, now, is going to be remembered

0:19:020:19:07

and not lost to the history books.

0:19:070:19:10

So, having confirmed the maker of the ring,

0:19:100:19:13

the next step was to hallmark it with Lawrence Wheaton's mark,

0:19:130:19:16

using a state-of-the-art laser.

0:19:160:19:18

So, this is where it's all going to happen.

0:19:180:19:20

-This is where the hallmarking is going to happen.

-Hi.

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:19:200:19:24

And what have we got on the screen here?

0:19:240:19:26

Basically, this is what the general hallmark looks like.

0:19:260:19:30

We've got the sponsor's mark,

0:19:300:19:32

the crown for the gold and the "750" is 18-carat gold.

0:19:320:19:37

And then we've got the leopard's head

0:19:370:19:39

which is the London Assay Office mark,

0:19:390:19:41

so it shows it's been actually assayed

0:19:410:19:43

and it's actually been here to the London Assay Office.

0:19:430:19:46

-And the LVW, in the script like that...

-Yes.

0:19:460:19:49

-..is for Lawrence Victor Wheaton.

-That's right, yes.

0:19:490:19:52

Which is the same mark as he would have had in 1972.

0:19:520:19:56

-Yes, that's right.

-So, now you're going to hallmark it.

0:19:560:19:58

I've never seen this before.

0:19:580:20:01

This green mark is where the mark is actually going to go,

0:20:010:20:04

so I'm just going to set it up properly

0:20:040:20:06

and make sure it's all straight.

0:20:060:20:07

-So, is that done then?

-Yeah, all done.

0:20:180:20:21

-I can't...I can't wait.

-So quick.

0:20:210:20:24

I can't wait to see it.

0:20:240:20:26

Oh, my goodness! That is incredible!

0:20:260:20:30

I am now going to present you with your ring.

0:20:300:20:33

I wish you a wonderful heirloom to have forever.

0:20:350:20:38

Fantastic! Thank you so much!

0:20:380:20:40

So, now you know what a visit to the Roadshow can lead to.

0:20:470:20:50

That lucky owner, Jane, is very happy

0:20:500:20:52

with her newly embellished ring.

0:20:520:20:54

When an exciting find turns up at the Roadshow, word gets round fast.

0:20:540:20:59

Like when Fergus Gambon showed me something very special

0:20:590:21:01

at our Roadshow in Gloucestershire.

0:21:010:21:03

Fergus, word's going round the Roadshow

0:21:030:21:06

that you've found something seriously exciting.

0:21:060:21:08

Something quite, quite, quite extraordinary.

0:21:080:21:11

The dream item for me. I couldn't have imagined anything better.

0:21:110:21:14

-What is it?

-Well, this guy, he's turned up,

0:21:140:21:17

and in this box are three doll's house dolls.

0:21:170:21:21

Look at those. Now, those are seriously early and important.

0:21:210:21:27

But then what does he say? He says,

0:21:270:21:29

"I've got the whole house at home

0:21:290:21:31

"with all the furniture and more dolls."

0:21:310:21:33

-The doll's house?

-The doll's house that they come from.

0:21:330:21:35

Which, if it's early 18th century...

0:21:350:21:38

..it's of national importance.

0:21:390:21:41

And we weren't disappointed

0:21:410:21:42

when Fergus brought the collection to camera.

0:21:420:21:45

Can you tell me what you know about it?

0:21:450:21:49

All I know is that it's from the beginning of the 18th century,

0:21:490:21:52

1705, apparently.

0:21:520:21:53

It's followed the female line of my mother's family

0:21:530:21:56

since, I believe, somewhere around then,

0:21:560:21:58

but previous to that it was built by some tradesmen on the Isle of Dogs

0:21:580:22:02

in 1705 for a lady called Miss Westbrook, whose initial is E,

0:22:020:22:07

which I think means Emily, but it might have been something else.

0:22:070:22:10

Right. So let's get this into context.

0:22:100:22:12

1705.

0:22:120:22:14

-That's right.

-And this house, the Westbrook baby house, as we call it,

0:22:140:22:18

because early English doll's houses are referred to as baby houses,

0:22:180:22:22

not doll's houses, until the early part of the 19th century.

0:22:220:22:25

There is no other like it. It is totally unique.

0:22:250:22:29

So, it was quite unorthodox for the Roadshow,

0:22:290:22:33

because the doll's house from which they came was in your house.

0:22:330:22:37

So, like never before, we trailed over to your house with a cameraman

0:22:370:22:42

and I looked at it.

0:22:420:22:44

When I opened it...

0:22:440:22:46

those panelled rooms

0:22:460:22:49

and that wonderful furniture,

0:22:490:22:51

I was looking at something which was unchanged, essentially,

0:22:510:22:57

for 311 years.

0:22:570:23:01

When you see something that's so well preserved and complete

0:23:010:23:04

when one is so used to looking at things in terrible condition,

0:23:040:23:08

it's quite difficult to look at things and think,

0:23:080:23:10

"That can't be real and genuine."

0:23:100:23:13

But it is! It's the importance of this object.

0:23:130:23:16

So...

0:23:160:23:18

For the house with its contents we're looking at,

0:23:180:23:22

um, a conservative estimate...

0:23:220:23:26

..of £150,000, maybe £200,000.

0:23:270:23:33

CROWD MURMURS

0:23:330:23:36

That's pretty astonishing.

0:23:360:23:39

Fergus, I remember that Roadshow so clearly

0:23:420:23:44

and as soon as you saw those dolls,

0:23:440:23:46

you had a suspicion, a strong suspicion where they'd come from.

0:23:460:23:49

Mm-hmm, I did, I did. But I couldn't believe it would be true, really.

0:23:490:23:52

I was, like, "No, I must be wrong."

0:23:520:23:55

Just put into context for us, Fergus,

0:23:550:23:56

how significant a find it was.

0:23:560:23:59

It's massively significant, really.

0:23:590:24:02

But this was a doll's house that you knew about already, didn't you?

0:24:020:24:05

I knew about it because it's quite well-known

0:24:050:24:07

because it was illustrated in a book that was published in 1955,

0:24:070:24:12

but it's just in a granular black and white single photograph

0:24:120:24:16

and people had been looking at this photograph for years, wondering,

0:24:160:24:20

"Where's that house? Where can we see it?"

0:24:200:24:22

And it prompted quite a reaction amongst doll's house enthusiasts.

0:24:220:24:25

It certainly did. They were used to staring

0:24:250:24:28

at this black and white photograph and all of a sudden,

0:24:280:24:30

the Roadshow allowed them to see the house in high definition

0:24:300:24:33

and in colour and they were really excited

0:24:330:24:36

and they realised the importance of it and the beauty of it.

0:24:360:24:40

So, there were a lot of reactions.

0:24:400:24:42

The other reaction was a reaction to my valuation.

0:24:420:24:45

-What, too high or too low?

-Both.

0:24:450:24:48

There were some who found the concept of valuing a doll's house

0:24:480:24:53

at £150,000 to £250,000 in some way morally wrong

0:24:530:24:57

because you could actually buy a real house for that kind of money,

0:24:570:25:00

and I can understand that totally. But I think you have to look at it.

0:25:000:25:04

It's not a mere toy, it's a work of art.

0:25:040:25:07

It's an important object, it's a great antique.

0:25:070:25:10

So, if you look at a painting by Picasso,

0:25:100:25:13

that would be valued at many millions of pounds,

0:25:130:25:15

I think you wouldn't be offended by that.

0:25:150:25:17

You'd understand why that was the case.

0:25:170:25:19

And I think you have to look at the doll's house in the same way.

0:25:190:25:22

And there were others who felt that my valuation didn't reflect

0:25:220:25:25

the importance of the piece at all

0:25:250:25:27

and some people said, "I'd have said half a million on that."

0:25:270:25:30

So, you can't win in this job,

0:25:300:25:32

but I had to come up with something

0:25:320:25:34

and, as I think I explained at the time, there's no precedence,

0:25:340:25:37

so one has to make a judgement and that's what I did.

0:25:370:25:40

Well, it's not just Fergus who's had a great year.

0:25:400:25:42

Our paintings team has as well.

0:25:420:25:45

We've two updates about paintings.

0:25:460:25:48

Both relate to pictures brought in to Arley Hall in Cheshire.

0:25:480:25:51

In our first, Amin Jaffer, an authority on Indian and Asian art,

0:25:510:25:55

was delighted to tell owner John about a family portrait.

0:25:550:25:59

You might think you're looking at a portrait

0:25:590:26:01

by a European artist of the 1930s.

0:26:010:26:03

In actual fact, this painting was done

0:26:030:26:07

by an Indian artist in the 1950s. It's obviously a portrait.

0:26:070:26:11

Can you tell me something about the sitter?

0:26:110:26:13

Yes, the sitter's my mother.

0:26:130:26:16

It was painted in India and...

0:26:160:26:20

..the artist worked for Grindlays Bank,

0:26:210:26:24

which was where my father worked,

0:26:240:26:27

and that's how we got to know...

0:26:270:26:29

That's how he came to paint your mother?

0:26:290:26:31

-Yes.

-Well, the artist has actually signed his name.

0:26:310:26:34

-A very well-known artist in India today, Krishen Khanna.

-Yeah.

0:26:340:26:38

So, obviously, you have a family relationship with him

0:26:380:26:40

-or you had a family relationship with him?

-Yes, my mother did.

0:26:400:26:43

I was too young at the time, but my mother knew him.

0:26:430:26:45

It's extremely rare to find a picture by Krishen Khanna from 1954.

0:26:450:26:51

Do you have any idea of the value of a 1954 Krishen Khanna painting?

0:26:510:26:57

None, none whatsoever. It's never been valued.

0:26:570:27:01

I sort of mentioned to my mother that I might bring it here today

0:27:010:27:04

and she said, "Go ahead, see what happens."

0:27:040:27:07

But no idea whatsoever.

0:27:070:27:09

Well, I think she would be happy to know that,

0:27:090:27:11

were it to be offered at auction,

0:27:110:27:13

it would probably be with an estimate of something like

0:27:130:27:16

£30,000 to £50,000 today.

0:27:160:27:18

CROWD LAUGH

0:27:180:27:20

-Crikey!

-Are you shocked, or am I?

0:27:220:27:25

I think you're going to make her a very happy lady today.

0:27:250:27:29

What we all wanted to know was how mum Patricia reacted.

0:27:290:27:32

We caught up with them to find out.

0:27:320:27:35

Well, astonished.

0:27:350:27:37

SHE LAUGHS

0:27:370:27:39

Krishen painted the portrait

0:27:390:27:41

because he'd been short of somewhere to stay

0:27:410:27:45

and we said, "Oh, come and stay with us.

0:27:450:27:48

"We've got a spare room if you can put up with two small boys."

0:27:480:27:54

I can't remember sitting for the portrait but...

0:27:540:28:00

..when Krishen was leaving, he...

0:28:010:28:04

..gave it to us and we were quite overwhelmed.

0:28:050:28:11

Krishen was always very cheerful and, um...

0:28:120:28:16

er...exactly the sort of person you'd like to have as a friend.

0:28:160:28:22

Krishen Khanna is alive and well and living in India.

0:28:220:28:26

We arranged a video call to reunite him with Patricia, after many years.

0:28:260:28:30

-Patricia.

-Krishen, how wonderful to see you!

0:28:310:28:36

How marvellous to see you! Lovely to see you!

0:28:360:28:39

HE LAUGHS

0:28:390:28:42

-It's been so long.

-What are you doing now? Are you...?

0:28:420:28:46

-Painting away like crazy.

-Good.

-I make a lot of work, a lot of work.

0:28:470:28:54

Are those your paintings in the background?

0:28:540:28:58

Well, some of them, yes. There are... Yes, yes, yes.

0:28:590:29:04

-They're drawings and paintings that my son, Karan, has.

-Oh, yes.

0:29:040:29:11

-But I'm doing very large works now.

-Are you? Oh!

0:29:110:29:16

That, behind you, is the portrait that I did of you.

0:29:160:29:20

That's the one, yes.

0:29:200:29:22

THEY LAUGH

0:29:220:29:24

She is, I would say, she's more beautiful now.

0:29:240:29:28

THEY LAUGH

0:29:280:29:31

It's a memory of a very happy time.

0:29:320:29:35

-Ah, yes, it is, yeah.

-Yes.

-It is.

0:29:370:29:41

-Love to you and the family.

-Yes.

-Thanks, Krishen. Bye.

0:29:410:29:45

How lovely to see Patricia back in conversation

0:29:530:29:56

with 91-year-old Krishen after all these years.

0:29:560:29:59

We saw Patricia's painting at Arley hall,

0:29:590:30:01

which turned out to be a rich scene for art.

0:30:010:30:04

Rupert Maas told me about a remarkable portrait,

0:30:040:30:07

which he was about to film with its owner, Nicholas.

0:30:070:30:09

Rupert, I know we've got to talk in whispers about this,

0:30:090:30:12

because the owner is nearby.

0:30:120:30:13

Why are you so excited about this picture?

0:30:130:30:15

It doesn't look like much, does it?

0:30:150:30:17

Perhaps it isn't. It's just a guide to an engraver to show him

0:30:170:30:20

how to do the engraving and it's by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

0:30:200:30:23

He is a very important person.

0:30:230:30:25

He's a wonderful Victorian neoclassical painter.

0:30:250:30:28

He's the single most valuable artist that there is in Victorian times.

0:30:280:30:32

I was talking to the man who owns it, who brought it in,

0:30:320:30:35

and he told me, "Actually, I've got his portrait,

0:30:350:30:37

-"the engraver's portrait."

-That's what this is, is it?

0:30:370:30:40

We sent the van and we've got it and it's coming up on camera

0:30:400:30:43

-and we're about to record it.

-Fabulous.

0:30:430:30:45

He is SUCH a good painter

0:30:450:30:47

and when he's not doing, sort of, neoclassical ladies in togas,

0:30:470:30:50

he does a portrait for his own purposes.

0:30:500:30:53

-This wasn't for sale.

-So this is Alma-Tadema painting his engraver?

0:30:530:30:56

Yes, he's off his pitch, but it is the most wonderful portrait

0:30:560:31:00

and I'm very excited about it. I've never seen it before.

0:31:000:31:03

-Could be very valuable?

-I'm afraid you'll have to wait and see on that.

0:31:030:31:06

And we didn't have to wait long

0:31:060:31:08

for Rupert to join the owner, Nicholas, in front of the camera.

0:31:080:31:10

Now, it really isn't often that I get a picture like this

0:31:100:31:14

on the Antiques Roadshow. This is an artist I know very well.

0:31:140:31:17

His name is Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

0:31:170:31:19

and it's a portrait of your great-great-grandfather

0:31:190:31:23

and he was Leopold Lowenstam, a very important man to Tadema

0:31:230:31:26

because he was his engraver.

0:31:260:31:29

This man, Lowenstam, your great-great-grandfather,

0:31:290:31:32

was incredibly important to Tadema.

0:31:320:31:35

What I like about the portrait of him is

0:31:350:31:38

here he is actually making the plate from a painting by Tadema

0:31:380:31:41

and then the light has been diffused

0:31:410:31:43

by this wonderful paper screen

0:31:430:31:46

that's set at an angle against the window,

0:31:460:31:49

so that the light is non-directional.

0:31:490:31:52

What an amazing portrait.

0:31:520:31:54

You must know something about it?

0:31:540:31:56

It was a wedding present, um...

0:31:560:31:58

and I think the wedding was in 1883 and then it was...

0:31:580:32:03

That's the date of the picture, it's up there.

0:32:030:32:06

Yes, and it was displayed in the Royal Academy a year later,

0:32:060:32:09

in 1884, at the Summer Exhibition.

0:32:090:32:11

In fact, it's actually inscribed with a dedication here

0:32:110:32:14

and the dedication is to Mrs Lowenstam,

0:32:140:32:17

of her husband aged 41 years.

0:32:170:32:20

It's also the year of his greatest success.

0:32:200:32:22

He'd only just been made a Royal Academician,

0:32:220:32:25

he'd just moved into this massive house,

0:32:250:32:27

he was making tonnes of money, he was very happy.

0:32:270:32:30

We're talking about Tadema here, not Lowenstam.

0:32:300:32:32

He was a very happy, jovial man.

0:32:320:32:35

They were close family friends and I think my great-great-grandmother

0:32:350:32:38

might have been the governess to their children as well.

0:32:380:32:41

Tadema, a very valuable artist in his own day

0:32:410:32:44

and in recent times, he's become very valuable again.

0:32:440:32:47

In fact, he holds the record for a Victorian painting

0:32:470:32:51

at 36 million for an enormous picture

0:32:510:32:54

sold in New York a few years ago.

0:32:540:32:56

This one doesn't quite reach that,

0:32:560:32:58

because it's not of a neoclassical subject and it's not huge,

0:32:580:33:01

but it is very, very good.

0:33:010:33:04

Er, I'm going to put it at £200,000 to £300,000.

0:33:040:33:08

HE GASPS

0:33:080:33:10

CROWD MURMUR AND LAUGH

0:33:100:33:12

(Yeah.)

0:33:120:33:14

LAUGHTER

0:33:160:33:18

-The trouble is, it would never be sold.

-No, of course not.

0:33:220:33:25

What a wonderful thing.

0:33:250:33:27

Actually, you know, this might be one of the best pictures

0:33:270:33:30

we've ever seen on the Roadshow in its entire history.

0:33:300:33:33

Well, the story doesn't end there.

0:33:330:33:35

It turned out scholars of the work of artist Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

0:33:350:33:39

had been searching for this picture for decades.

0:33:390:33:42

After our Roadshow,

0:33:420:33:43

the owner decided to have the painting restored.

0:33:430:33:46

Our expert Rupert oversaw the process.

0:33:460:33:48

So, Stuart, this picture has been untouched for 130 years

0:33:480:33:52

and you're the first person to do so.

0:33:520:33:54

What sort of condition is it in?

0:33:540:33:56

It's almost in pristine state and perfect state of preservation.

0:33:560:34:00

There are no cracks.

0:34:000:34:02

There's nothing but a little bit of soot that's got trapped

0:34:020:34:04

between the glass and the paint layers are in excellent condition.

0:34:040:34:11

The only thing is where there's been a small thin amount of varnish

0:34:110:34:16

that's dropped back, so some of the colours are not as saturated

0:34:160:34:19

and as rich as they should be.

0:34:190:34:21

We've brought the picture to Stuart Sanderson,

0:34:230:34:26

a restorer I've known for a long time,

0:34:260:34:27

and he's very used to Victorian pictures.

0:34:270:34:29

In fact, I believe he's restored two very, very important pictures

0:34:290:34:33

by this artist, so he's no stranger to them.

0:34:330:34:36

He knows how they should look,

0:34:360:34:37

he knows what you can do to them and what you can't.

0:34:370:34:39

The first thing that happens when you clean a picture

0:34:390:34:43

is that these layers of 130 years of soot and dirt come off the top

0:34:430:34:47

and underneath, especially when you wet it,

0:34:470:34:50

you get this wonderful change.

0:34:500:34:51

It's like wetting a stone and suddenly,

0:34:510:34:54

you can see inside it and all the colours go ping.

0:34:540:34:57

One of the other things about finding a picture of this stature

0:34:570:35:01

is the big splash it makes in the academic pond

0:35:010:35:04

if you tell the right academic about it.

0:35:040:35:07

Liz Prettejohn,

0:35:070:35:08

one of the leading authorities on Alma-Tadema,

0:35:080:35:10

received a call from Rupert

0:35:100:35:12

and wanted to learn more about this rediscovered work.

0:35:120:35:15

I've been working on Alma-Tadema for at least 20 years, probably longer.

0:35:150:35:19

Alma-Tadema was one of the major painters, not just in Britain

0:35:190:35:24

but in all of the world in the second half of the 19th century.

0:35:240:35:28

He was really famous for his scenes of classical antiquity -

0:35:280:35:33

maidens in classical drapery on marble benches,

0:35:330:35:38

drenched in sunlight.

0:35:380:35:40

And I always knew there was a portrait of this sitter,

0:35:400:35:44

Leopold Lowenstam, but it was unknown where it was.

0:35:440:35:49

So, now I hear that the painting's been discovered

0:35:490:35:53

and I'm really excited to see it at last.

0:35:530:35:55

The timing couldn't have been better,

0:35:550:35:57

as Liz was preparing a major exhibition

0:35:570:36:00

of the work of Alma-Tadema,

0:36:000:36:01

so was keen to see the portrait for herself.

0:36:010:36:03

So, you've seen a lot of paintings by Alma-Tadema, I know,

0:36:030:36:07

but I'm fairly sure you've never seen this one.

0:36:070:36:09

No, I certainly haven't! It's amazing.

0:36:090:36:12

I'm really quite impressed by what a wonderful condition it's in.

0:36:120:36:17

So, did you ever think of looking for this picture?

0:36:170:36:20

Oh, sure, but I never thought I'd see it.

0:36:200:36:23

-But he did show the painting.

-Oh, did he?

0:36:230:36:26

Yeah, he showed it and it appeared several times at exhibition,

0:36:260:36:30

including in his memorial exhibition in 1913,

0:36:300:36:33

-which I think is the last time it's actually been seen in public.

-Wow!

0:36:330:36:38

It didn't take long for Liz to decide

0:36:380:36:40

she wanted the picture to be part of the exhibition.

0:36:400:36:43

The Museum of Friesland in the Netherlands

0:36:430:36:45

was where it would debut, not far from Alma-Tadema's birthplace.

0:36:450:36:48

Rupert arranged to meet the owner, Nicholas, on its opening night.

0:36:480:36:52

-It was a great shock to find out how valuable it was.

-Yeah.

0:36:520:36:56

But I think you were equally shocked that we brought it along.

0:36:560:36:59

I couldn't believe it!

0:36:590:37:00

It was as if all my Christmases had come at once

0:37:000:37:02

cos you don't see, on television,

0:37:020:37:04

how many sort of coloured-in prints and things that aren't valuable

0:37:040:37:08

or interesting that I look at, and to see this, that was just...

0:37:080:37:13

Well, it was like finding a great big nugget of gold in a desert.

0:37:130:37:17

That's great.

0:37:170:37:18

How fabulous does it look, now it's been cleaned

0:37:180:37:21

and the frame restored as well?

0:37:210:37:23

Yes, it's looking magnificent and it's wonderful to see it here,

0:37:230:37:27

surrounded by other magnificent paintings by Tadema.

0:37:270:37:30

I think it's really exciting doing my job on the Antiques Roadshow.

0:37:320:37:36

It's a bit like Raiders Of The Lost Ark - finding something,

0:37:360:37:39

and it's not been seen by the public for hundreds of years,

0:37:390:37:43

is the most exciting thing,

0:37:430:37:45

and to be part of the process of restoring it,

0:37:450:37:49

researching it, presenting it to the wider public, in context,

0:37:490:37:54

is a very exciting thing to do.

0:37:540:37:57

Surrounded by many of Alma-Tadema's finest paintings,

0:37:570:38:01

Nicholas's great-great-grandfather's portrait

0:38:010:38:04

was finally back in the spotlight after more than a century.

0:38:040:38:08

That touring exhibition visits the UK next July.

0:38:140:38:17

And we've our own celebrations to mark next year.

0:38:170:38:20

On May 17th, 1977, Hereford town hall threw open its doors

0:38:200:38:24

and a young man called Bruce Parker turned to the camera

0:38:240:38:27

to record the very first Antiques Roadshow.

0:38:270:38:31

We're in Hereford today,

0:38:310:38:33

the city that gives its name to white faced cattle and cider,

0:38:330:38:36

the beautiful cathedral city on the River Wye.

0:38:360:38:39

There are people with all sorts of packages, large, small,

0:38:390:38:43

some objects carefully packed up,

0:38:430:38:45

others in supermarket carrier bags.

0:38:450:38:47

And the people here all have the one idea of finding out more

0:38:470:38:51

about that particular item they've had at home,

0:38:510:38:53

perhaps through generations,

0:38:530:38:55

but they've never had the opportunity to ask anybody.

0:38:550:38:58

What I can see is that Arthur Negus is over there

0:38:580:39:01

with a very interesting piece of needlework.

0:39:010:39:03

And the rest is history.

0:39:030:39:06

We're preparing to mark our 40th anniversary, by inviting back owners

0:39:060:39:10

who brought along some of the most memorable objects to the Roadshow

0:39:100:39:13

to hear what's happened since. To give you a flavour,

0:39:130:39:15

we tracked down the owner of one of the programme's famous finds,

0:39:150:39:19

Ozzie the Owl, first seen in Northampton in 1990.

0:39:190:39:23

I caught up with his owner, Pat Ramsey,

0:39:230:39:25

and the man who made the discovery, expert Henry Sandon,

0:39:250:39:28

when the show visited Cornwall.

0:39:280:39:29

Pat, it's great to see you again.

0:39:310:39:33

And we couldn't miss this chance to reunite you with Henry

0:39:330:39:36

and a copy of Ozzie. This is not the real Ozzie.

0:39:360:39:40

That was one of our most memorable days on the Roadshow,

0:39:400:39:43

when you came in. What do you remember of it?

0:39:430:39:45

We wanted to know, Mum and Dad, how old he was, you know.

0:39:450:39:49

I thought, "It's a good chance. The Roadshow's in Northampton.

0:39:490:39:53

"I'll...I'll take him."

0:39:530:39:56

It's actually a little drinking cup. You pour out the drink into there

0:39:560:40:00

and you can't put the head down

0:40:000:40:02

-until you've drunk it all up.

-I see.

0:40:020:40:04

It's a useful way of making sure you drink all your drink up.

0:40:040:40:07

It's what we call slipware, made in Staffordshire,

0:40:070:40:11

somewhere round about 1700, 1720.

0:40:110:40:15

-Oh, my word! What's that?

-270 years old.

0:40:150:40:18

-Good gracious!

-This is pretty rare.

0:40:180:40:22

So, I was really shocked, you know.

0:40:220:40:25

Well, and YOU were pretty shocked when Ozzie turned up.

0:40:250:40:28

-What do you remember, Henry?

-I was petrified of it.

0:40:280:40:31

It was the finest piece I'd ever had on the Roadshow

0:40:310:40:34

in all the years I'd been doing it and there he was, in my hands.

0:40:340:40:38

It was absolutely wonderful because he was an enormous prize.

0:40:380:40:43

I don't know what you or your father think it's worth. Any idea?

0:40:430:40:47

-We don't know.

-Are you comfortably sitting there?

-Yes, I'm OK.

0:40:470:40:53

Something between about £20,000 and £30,000.

0:40:530:40:57

-Good gracious! Never!

-£20,000 and £30,000.

0:40:580:41:01

-You said, incredibly, you'd brought it in on the bus.

-Yes.

0:41:010:41:07

So, I said, "Take it home by taxi"...

0:41:070:41:10

LAUGHTER

0:41:100:41:12

..which I thought was very clever and they did.

0:41:120:41:14

-They went home by taxi.

-Yes.

0:41:140:41:17

But more than that. You went home with a police escort.

0:41:170:41:20

Two policemen. Frightened Mum and Dad to bits!

0:41:200:41:24

-What did he eventually sell for?

-I think it was £17,000 or £17,500.

0:41:240:41:29

£17,000, £17,500.

0:41:290:41:32

He went to the museum, which, you know,

0:41:320:41:34

we were quite thrilled that he was in a museum.

0:41:340:41:37

-Yes, he's in Stoke-on-Trent Museum.

-Yes.

0:41:370:41:40

-And they're very, very proud of him.

-Yes.

-They think he's great.

0:41:400:41:43

And, Pat, some of the money went to help children in Brazil.

0:41:430:41:47

-Tell me about that.

-Well, it my dad's idea.

0:41:470:41:50

Donate it to the Salvation Army,

0:41:500:41:54

because they help a lot of the street children in Brazil, you know.

0:41:540:41:59

South America, as you all know, is quite poor.

0:41:590:42:04

-It's a wonderful legacy, though, isn't it?

-Mmm.

-Lovely children.

0:42:040:42:08

I get in contact with them sometimes.

0:42:080:42:11

We call her Mrs Owl and the children are the owlets.

0:42:110:42:17

-The street children in Brazil?

-Yes, yes.

0:42:170:42:20

And now the owlets have baby owlets as well,

0:42:200:42:23

-so I think it's all due to this little chap.

-All due to Ozzie.

0:42:230:42:28

He means a lot to me and to everybody.

0:42:280:42:31

What a great story! And, of course, there have been all sorts of tales

0:42:310:42:35

of what's happened to objects after their moment of fame

0:42:350:42:38

on the Roadshow since cameras first rolled, back in 1977.

0:42:380:42:41

If you've got a good story, let us know.

0:42:410:42:44

Contact us via our website.

0:42:440:42:46

And we hope to see you as the show tours the country next year.

0:42:510:42:54

Let's catch up next with a curious little object

0:42:540:42:57

we first saw earlier this year when it turned up

0:42:570:42:59

during a Roadshow in Wiltshire.

0:42:590:43:02

The question was, what was it?

0:43:020:43:04

You brought in this tiny little box and...are many, many questions.

0:43:040:43:09

Well, I brought this in on behalf of my father.

0:43:090:43:11

There's a code on one of the sides,

0:43:110:43:13

a sort of numerical code that he's never been able to crack.

0:43:130:43:16

And we just wondered, really, what the story was about it.

0:43:160:43:20

It's got a name on the top, which I read as J Jones.

0:43:200:43:26

Now, that was the person who probably gave it.

0:43:260:43:29

We also know the date, because it's here on the top - 1785.

0:43:290:43:33

And then it's got a chain of numbers.

0:43:330:43:35

Now that's the enigma.

0:43:350:43:37

Eagle-eyed Roadshow viewer Paul Wisken was watching and, Paul,

0:43:380:43:42

you were convinced that you could crack this 230-year-old code.

0:43:420:43:45

Is this something you do as a hobby?

0:43:450:43:47

Um, yes, I've always been fascinated by codes

0:43:470:43:50

and, specifically, ciphers, rather than any other type of code,

0:43:500:43:54

where you've got a plain substitution of numbers for letters.

0:43:540:43:57

Well, here, we've got numbers and symbols,

0:43:570:43:59

so how did you go about trying to crack it?

0:43:590:44:01

Well, I looked at the numbers around the side

0:44:010:44:04

and we have ten possible digits,

0:44:040:44:07

but then I noticed some of them have symbols

0:44:070:44:10

beside them or over the top, which gives 30 possibilities,

0:44:100:44:14

which gives us the full alphabet of 26 letters, plus a few spares.

0:44:140:44:18

Then I noticed that there is a repeated sequence

0:44:180:44:21

with the two double eights

0:44:210:44:24

and they're both preceded by another number

0:44:240:44:28

and they are repeated in the way that one is a three-letter word

0:44:280:44:33

and the other combination exactly the same.

0:44:330:44:35

It's the last three letters of a five-letter word.

0:44:350:44:39

And that only gives us - if it is in English - only six possibilities.

0:44:390:44:43

Ingenious. And so, where did you end up? What do you think it says?

0:44:430:44:47

I think it says, "The gift is small, but love is all."

0:44:470:44:51

My only problem is that the first word doesn't say "The",

0:44:510:44:55

-if the rest of the code is correct.

-What does it say?

0:44:550:44:58

-It says "Htd".

-Oh, that's rather unsatisfactory.

0:44:580:45:02

It is, yes. And for that reason,

0:45:020:45:04

I'm still treating this as a work in progress.

0:45:040:45:07

I can't definitively say that I've got it right.

0:45:070:45:10

I believe I have, but if I've got it right,

0:45:100:45:13

then the guy who carved it or wrote it has got it wrong.

0:45:130:45:16

But I'm not going to give up

0:45:160:45:18

until I've proved whether I'm right or wrong.

0:45:180:45:20

If you were going to try and crack that beginning there, "Htd",

0:45:200:45:24

how much longer do you think that would take?

0:45:240:45:26

It will take me probably several years,

0:45:260:45:28

even if I was working full-time on it,

0:45:280:45:31

because I would have to go right back to basics

0:45:310:45:33

and with that combination,

0:45:330:45:35

there are one million million million possibilities.

0:45:350:45:38

-So, maybe see you in ten years' time then.

-Or maybe 100 years' time.

0:45:380:45:43

-Paul, thank you so much.

-That's fine.

0:45:430:45:46

Well, at that same show, two visitors caught our eye.

0:45:460:45:49

Rowan and Thomas arrived at Bowood House

0:45:490:45:51

on a baking hot summer's day, wearing heavy woollen suits.

0:45:510:45:55

Roadshow expert Mark Hill decided to swelter with them

0:45:550:45:59

and put on a spare suit they'd brought along.

0:45:590:46:01

You two, me and this mannequin are wearing

0:46:010:46:03

some fantastic 1930s and 1940s suits

0:46:030:46:07

-by Montague Burton.

-Indeed.

-Yeah.

0:46:070:46:09

Montague Burton founded his company selling clothes in 1903

0:46:090:46:13

-and was enormously successful.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:46:130:46:15

By 1929, hundreds of shops, mills, factories.

0:46:150:46:19

I mean, he really captured that moment of, sort of,

0:46:190:46:22

in a way, would you say tailoring for the masses?

0:46:220:46:24

Yeah, definitely tailoring for the masses

0:46:240:46:26

and sort of allowing the everyday man

0:46:260:46:29

to buy a tailor-made suit.

0:46:290:46:32

Tell me the story. How did you get into this?

0:46:320:46:35

We're both sort of interested in the tailoring industry

0:46:350:46:38

and we're both '30s and '40s re-enactors.

0:46:380:46:41

We go all over the country doing re-enacting and World War II events.

0:46:410:46:44

-You do re-enactments.

-Yeah.

0:46:440:46:46

But you seem to have so much more than just suits.

0:46:460:46:49

Yeah, I sort of collected all the sort of collectibles

0:46:490:46:53

that go with it, really -

0:46:530:46:55

anything that interests me and displays the suits and...

0:46:550:46:59

-I just love it.

-You've got the habit.

-Yeah, I have, really.

0:46:590:47:03

Do we think we're perhaps a little obsessed?

0:47:030:47:05

A little bit, maybe. Yeah, definitely.

0:47:050:47:08

After the show went out, a viewer contacted us

0:47:100:47:12

to say they may have something else for Rowan and Thomas's wardrobe.

0:47:120:47:16

So, as they headed to Yorkshire on a vintage weekend,

0:47:160:47:18

we took them to meet Penny in her retro cafe,

0:47:180:47:21

dedicated to her late grandfather, Stanley.

0:47:210:47:25

When my grandfather, Stanley, died,

0:47:250:47:26

there were a number of items in his house

0:47:260:47:28

that were from his time at Burton's.

0:47:280:47:30

He worked there for nearly 40 years and he was very proud of his trade.

0:47:300:47:34

And I saw Rowan and his partner on the Antiques Roadshow,

0:47:340:47:38

who were actually Burton's memorabilia collectors,

0:47:380:47:41

which granddad would think, in itself, was absolutely fantastic.

0:47:410:47:45

For two people, young people to take an interest

0:47:450:47:48

and a real passion in the things that he shared a passion for,

0:47:480:47:51

he'd be absolutely over the moon

0:47:510:47:53

and I'm sure he's looking down now, laughing his head off.

0:47:530:47:56

-Hi, guys. Fantastic to finally actually meet you in person.

-It is.

0:47:590:48:03

-Thank you very much.

-You look incredible.

0:48:030:48:05

-I've got some photographs to show you of him...

-I'd love to see them.

0:48:050:48:10

..which... I think we'll agree, he looks quite sharp.

0:48:100:48:15

-Oh, yes.

-Oh, wow.

-That's incredible.

-They're his two sisters.

0:48:150:48:19

-And what year would this be?

-Um, that is... It's written...

0:48:190:48:22

-1948.

-Yeah, you can tell.

0:48:220:48:25

Big, wide, straight-legged trousers, big lapels.

0:48:250:48:28

-Actually, I've got two suits that I'd like to give to you.

-Oh, wow.

0:48:280:48:32

And this is him wearing one of those suits,

0:48:320:48:34

which is referred to as the christening suit

0:48:340:48:36

-cos he bought it for my mum's christening.

-Oh, wow.

0:48:360:48:38

-And he wore it pretty much for everything after that.

-Really?

0:48:380:48:42

-Yeah, the navy three-piece suit.

-Oh, wow.

0:48:420:48:44

And that's him with my grandmother.

0:48:440:48:46

He would be over the moon.

0:48:460:48:49

He would think the whole thing is absolutely hilarious.

0:48:490:48:51

He'd think the fact that two young, you know,

0:48:510:48:54

two young men are interested and are actually as interested as he was...

0:48:540:48:59

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-And if there was one thing about my granddad

0:48:590:49:02

was that he loved to laugh and if he was here now

0:49:020:49:05

and he could see you guys, he would be laughing his socks off.

0:49:050:49:09

He'd be absolutely over the moon.

0:49:090:49:12

-That's fantastic.

-Thank you very much.

0:49:120:49:14

-So, here we are.

-Wow!

-It fits quite well. It's really nice.

0:49:150:49:19

-Oh, my word, look at you! It looks like it was made for you.

-Yeah.

0:49:190:49:23

-It looks like Stanley's cut it for you.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:49:230:49:26

-Perfect for vintage weekends away.

-Vintage weekends away, yeah, yeah.

0:49:260:49:30

-Retro...

-Retro festivals.

0:49:300:49:31

We're going to one this weekend, so fantastic. Brilliant.

0:49:310:49:35

Thanks to Rowan and Thomas, resplendent in their new suits.

0:49:370:49:40

And if you have a vintage outfit to show off,

0:49:400:49:42

do come to a Roadshow. Our dates for 2017 are coming up.

0:49:420:49:46

And our final catch-up on items screened earlier this year

0:49:530:49:55

takes us back to our day at Audley End.

0:49:550:49:58

It's another wartime story which I was fascinated to hear about

0:49:580:50:01

when I met Brian Davis.

0:50:010:50:02

My mum was a cleaner

0:50:030:50:05

in the ministries in Whitehall in the early '80s,

0:50:050:50:09

notably the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

0:50:090:50:11

She noticed these from the basement.

0:50:110:50:13

They were being practically thrown out.

0:50:130:50:16

She was outraged, so she reported it to a senior civil servant,

0:50:160:50:20

but he said, "Would you like to take those home to keep them safe?"

0:50:200:50:24

And we've had them ever since.

0:50:240:50:25

And what do you know about him? Who is this?

0:50:250:50:27

Hedley Nevile Fowler. Squadron Leader Hedley Nevile Fowler.

0:50:270:50:31

We know he was shot down in May of 1940, and taken into captivity.

0:50:310:50:36

He was held in three different camps -

0:50:360:50:39

finally, at Colditz Castle.

0:50:390:50:41

Colditz, that is a name to chill the heart, isn't it?

0:50:410:50:44

It is indeed. But he actually successfully escaped from Colditz.

0:50:440:50:47

And what happened to him then?

0:50:470:50:49

He was posted to the Armament Squadron,

0:50:490:50:51

near Boscombe Down, which was basically as a test pilot.

0:50:510:50:54

And in March of '44,

0:50:540:50:56

he had an accident and fell out of the sky and was killed.

0:50:560:51:00

What a story!

0:51:010:51:03

And how can we help you here today, Brian?

0:51:030:51:05

Why have you brought this all to us?

0:51:050:51:07

So, I really wanted to put it out there,

0:51:070:51:09

in case someone knows Hedley Fowler, or is related to Hedley Fowler,

0:51:090:51:14

and I'd quite gladly give it over.

0:51:140:51:16

So, could we find the relatives of Hedley Fowler?

0:51:160:51:19

Well, Brian's back with me now with...

0:51:190:51:21

Shirley Wilson and Sydney Craig.

0:51:210:51:24

-How are you related to Hedley Fowler?

-He was my mother's cousin.

0:51:240:51:28

And was he talked about in the family at all?

0:51:280:51:30

-Yes, he was always there.

-Always talked about.

0:51:300:51:33

He was a hero to the family. We were brought up with him.

0:51:330:51:38

-So brave that he got back.

-From Colditz?

-Yeah.

0:51:380:51:41

And he escaped from Colditz.

0:51:410:51:43

Took him a year to get back here and then, within months, he was dead.

0:51:430:51:46

-So tragic.

-Mm, terrible.

0:51:460:51:48

And when you came along to Audley End, you brought along,

0:51:480:51:51

as well as these pictures, this book,

0:51:510:51:52

-which is the story of Hedley's life.

-Yes.

0:51:520:51:54

-And I know, Sydney...

-His father wrote it. Here's another one.

0:51:540:51:58

-Wow, it's fantastic, isn't it?

-Is it a bit emotional for you, Brian?

0:51:580:52:01

-It is. It really is, honestly, yes.

-It chokes you up, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:52:010:52:06

And it's that picture we've never seen.

0:52:060:52:08

-We have seen a picture in there.

-But we've seen it in black and white.

0:52:080:52:13

So, that's the photograph and then this is the painting

0:52:130:52:15

-that was taken from it.

-Yes.

-And it's all thanks to you, Brian.

0:52:150:52:18

You so much wanted to be able to give these items back to people

0:52:180:52:22

-to whom they meant so much.

-I did, yeah.

0:52:220:52:25

It's actually down to my mum but, yes, I've had them in my possession.

0:52:250:52:32

They're not my family but I do recognise our heroes.

0:52:320:52:36

It means a hell of a lot. There are memorable days in your life.

0:52:360:52:40

You get married, you have children

0:52:400:52:42

and, for me, this is one of those, honestly. It's a lovely day.

0:52:420:52:46

-What does it mean to you to have these things from Brian?

-Oh!

0:52:460:52:50

-It's our family.

-Yeah.

-We haven't got many of us.

0:52:500:52:52

-It's just us three sisters.

-Yeah.

-It's great.

-It's...

0:52:520:52:57

I mean, we were brought up with him, you know, his name.

0:52:570:53:01

-Well done, you, Brian.

-Well done, thank you.

-That's fine.

0:53:010:53:04

No problem at all. I always wanted him to be remembered

0:53:040:53:07

-and all those that went with him as well.

-He is remembered.

0:53:070:53:09

-I know he will be.

-Mm.

-He definitely will.

0:53:090:53:12

We've come to the end of our look back on this year.

0:53:140:53:17

It's time to look forward to next year, our 40th anniversary,

0:53:170:53:20

and we'd love you to join our experts

0:53:200:53:22

as we travel around the country.

0:53:220:53:24

Diaries at the ready because here comes our line-up of venues,

0:53:240:53:27

including here, Cardiff Castle.

0:53:270:53:29

If you're interested in joining us at one of our future venues,

0:54:470:54:50

go onto our website because there are lots of tips

0:54:500:54:52

about how to get the most out of your visit.

0:54:520:54:54

We'd also love to hear about the special object

0:54:540:54:56

you might be planning to bring.

0:54:560:54:58

Contact us via our website.

0:54:580:55:00

Before we go, we have a sad end to this look back on our year.

0:55:060:55:10

A few weeks ago, our dear friend and colleague Graham Lay died.

0:55:100:55:14

Graham was a remarkable man,

0:55:140:55:17

deeply knowledgeable and well-respected in his field.

0:55:170:55:20

But, unknown to many,

0:55:200:55:21

he'd battled with cystic fibrosis from his childhood.

0:55:210:55:24

His contribution to the Antiques Roadshow

0:55:240:55:26

over the course of nearly 30 years was profound,

0:55:260:55:29

transforming our approach to filming human stories of wartime.

0:55:290:55:33

Here's an extract from a particularly memorable meeting

0:55:330:55:36

he had a couple of years ago.

0:55:360:55:39

-So, were you captured at the same time?

-Yeah.

0:55:390:55:41

And what happened to you?

0:55:410:55:44

I was taken to a French chateau and shown into a big room

0:55:440:55:49

and standing there was Field Marshall Rommel

0:55:490:55:54

and, looking out of the window, was Field Marshal von Rundstedt.

0:55:540:56:00

Two of the most important officers,

0:56:000:56:02

high-ranking officers in that part of the theatre at the time.

0:56:020:56:06

That's right. He said, "Is there anything that you require?"

0:56:060:56:11

So, I said, "Yes, I'd like a pint of beer."

0:56:110:56:14

LAUGHTER

0:56:140:56:17

"I'd like a packet of cigarettes and I'd like a good meal, please."

0:56:170:56:23

-Yeah.

-And I was served, in his mess,

0:56:230:56:28

and on the table was a stein of beer

0:56:280:56:31

and there was a packet of cigarettes.

0:56:310:56:35

-Not this... This packet?

-That's the empty packet...

0:56:350:56:38

-Good grief!

-..which I kept.

0:56:380:56:40

I think...that the medal group,

0:56:400:56:44

plus the story, plus the objects you have

0:56:440:56:47

are going to be worth somewhere in the region of

0:56:470:56:50

£7,000 to £10,000.

0:56:500:56:53

Not for sale.

0:56:530:56:54

LAUGHTER

0:56:540:56:57

-Good for you.

-Not for sale.

0:56:570:57:00

APPLAUSE

0:57:000:57:02

We'll miss Graham for all he brought to the show

0:57:050:57:08

but also as an irreplaceable member of our travelling band

0:57:080:57:11

and as a friend.

0:57:110:57:13

From the whole team, bye-bye.

0:57:130:57:16

Ever wondered what happened after the experts drop the bombshell valuation on stunned owners? In a special edition, Fiona Bruce looks at the most talked about finds of the year and reveals some surprising updates.

Art scholars searched for years for a missing work by eminent Victorian artist Alma-Tadema. Since appearing on the show, the newly restored painting has gone on to be displayed in an international exhibition. The owner of a group of valuable jade figures reveals how he used the proceeds of their sale in tribute to his late wife. There's a twist in the tale for the man who brought the original script for the classic film The Third Man to the Roadshow when he's taken on a surprise trip to meet a mysterious man in Vienna.

Plus a look ahead to the locations for 2017 as the show approaches its 40th year on the road.