Trelissick 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Trelissick 1

Fiona Bruce and the team head for the beautiful gardens of Trelissick near Truro in Cornwall. Objects include a bust of Churchill, a group of medals and a lifebelt.


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For this week's Antiques Roadshow,

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we're travelling to the southernmost area of the UK,

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to a destination that lies along the banks of the River Fal in Cornwall.

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People have been crossing the River Fal at this point

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for thousands of years

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and, these days, a lovely, clinky, chain-link ferry

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is the perfect way to come across the water.

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And this route forms part of the Pilgrims' Way.

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That way, travellers went to Glastonbury in Somerset.

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But today, I'm heading south in this gorgeous 1926 Bentley

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to our idyllic venue for today's Antiques Roadshow.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow's pilgrimage

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to Trelissick House and Gardens here in Cornwall.

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Since the 1600s, there's been a house on this site,

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owned by various families involved in agriculture, tin, copper,

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but, more recently, in fine porcelain.

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Ronald and Ida Copeland

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owned the Spode Copeland China factory in Stoke,

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but lived at Trelissick, a house with an extraordinary view.

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The house was given by the Copeland family to the National Trust only

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recently, so the bit of wear and tear you see now is how it came.

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Actually, that's rather exciting,

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cos we don't often get to see country houses au naturel

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before they've been rather grandly reupholstered.

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For instance, climbing the lovely wooden stairs,

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you might notice the rather warped banister rail.

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It's been so damp,

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the wallpaper and paint are peeling from the walls and ceiling.

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There's quite a bit to do.

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The sunroom is cracking up and condemned,

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the exterior portico is crumbling,

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and the roof leaks.

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The whole place is ready for a country house makeover.

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I wouldn't mind having a go!

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If you look into the distance,

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you can just make out the port of Falmouth.

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And from there, a specially commissioned ferry service

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will bring our visitors all the way here to Trelissick.

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It's a different way to travel to the Roadshow!

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Let's hope it's not too choppy

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as our visitors from Truro and beyond come to meet our experts

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in this wonderful setting.

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Let's see what they've discovered.

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What a classically inspired house

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and a classically inspired brooch.

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How did it come into your family?

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Well, my mother passed it down to us.

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Originally it came from her cousin,

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who passed away, I think, in the early '90s.

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I don't know its full history.

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I believe that cousin originally purchased it in Italy.

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Probably in the 1940s.

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-Right.

-I believe it's called a micro-mosaic.

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It's made of extremely intricate, tiny pieces of I don't know what.

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-Yeah.

-So apart from its value at the moment,

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I'd like to know more about it and in particular how it was made.

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I gather it's 19th century.

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Date wise, we're looking at between

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1860 and 1865 as the period

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that it was probably made.

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What's fascinating is that it was actually bought in Italy,

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which is wonderful, really, because there was a very important family

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of jewellers who were based in Italy, called the Castellani family.

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They were a father and son set-up.

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There was Fortunato Pio - what a great name - and his son Alessandro,

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who came into the business.

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Now, as a family, they started off in Italy

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but then came over to England and were very influential

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within our market over here as well.

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And every jeweller throughout the Victorian period

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would look at them for inspiration.

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So would this be a copy?

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Well, this is where it becomes a little bit tricky

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because we've had a really good look at this piece.

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You've had it for years, you've had a good look at it as well, I know.

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And we can't find any markings on it.

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So it is in their style, but not necessarily by them.

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But it is of a quality that is really quite exceptional.

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And the micro-mosaic, which are these tiny, intricate pieces,

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are what we know as tesserae,

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which are made up of a glass compound and a paste compound.

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And each of those individual pieces are hand applied and built up,

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rather like a jigsaw.

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But in such detail.

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The patience, really and truly, it's quite, quite extraordinary.

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Of course, the subject matter is quite sorrowful, really, isn't it?

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It's this young lady looking lost and forlorn and sitting by an urn,

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and is naturally to do with mourning,

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and she's obviously lost somebody very close to her.

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But that was a theme of neoclassical inspiration

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which started in the Georgian period.

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We were reviving this idea of going back to the classics

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and getting a feel for what they had been producing

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back in those ancient times.

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And I just think it's inspiring, isn't it,

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that things like this could be made?

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Is it a subject matter that sort of upsets you, or...?

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No, it's just a bit drab, I think!

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And I wouldn't wear it.

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You're absolutely right, it is a rather dark, sort of sombre mood

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and colour, isn't it, with the grey and the black?

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But to brighten things up,

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the gold mount is something quite extraordinary.

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If it went into an auction

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then I would expect it to fetch between £4,000 and £6,000.

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-Really?

-Wonderful. Thank you very much.

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It's been stuck in a drawer!

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THEY LAUGH

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That is hideous.

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It's a monstrosity.

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Why on earth have you bought that?

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They're the sorts of things my mum would have said to me

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if I'd have turned up at home with this!

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We're looking at a nail sculpture art piece

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by the Danish artist Oluf Gravesen.

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And it's signed just down here.

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Why did you buy it?

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I didn't buy it. I actually came across it.

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-OK.

-I'm a carpenter by trade

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and this was on another job just past my job,

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left in the garage with all other stuff that was being abandoned

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and I happened to see it and asked if I could then take it.

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They said, "Yes," and then I owned it, basically.

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So presumably, if you're a carpenter,

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the whole idea that somebody had used nails,

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which are very much the tools of your trade,

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to create a piece of art?

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Yeah, made it all the more appealing to me.

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Do you know anything about it? Have you done any research?

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All I know is what the owner of the house told me.

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-OK.

-That it was commissioned for the director of EMI

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and this was apparently done for either his birthday,

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I'm not too sure on what the occasion was,

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but basically commissioned for him to replicate an LP.

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He then gave it to his producer

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and the producer obviously had the holiday home where I got it from.

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Well, I suppose you can see the sort of record shapes here,

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-that are undulating.

-Yeah, the shimmers and... Yeah.

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It's also a little bit sort of moon landing-like as well.

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-Yeah.

-Especially with these craters.

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Gravesen's an interesting guy.

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He was born in Copenhagen and he was one of the youngest artists

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to be invited to exhibit at the Copenhagen Royal Academy.

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And during the 1960s and '70s, his profile sort of grew.

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He exhibited in Paris and in New York

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and he led quite a colourful life, let's say, in New York,

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and died relatively early, sort of in his early 40s, in 1987.

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I think there's just so much going on here.

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-Yeah.

-I mean, for me, I love it.

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It does exactly what you should see from the 1960s and '70s.

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A sort of size and monumentalism.

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As well as being sculptural, sort of almost tribal arty.

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-Yes.

-So I think it's got a sort of incredible amount going on.

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-Yes.

-But it isn't everybody's cup of tea.

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-Probably not, no!

-Are you married, girlfriend?

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Girlfriend, yes. Likes it, loves it.

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-Seriously?

-Yeah, yeah.

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This is our kind of era, I suppose.

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-OK.

-So, yeah.

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-I love it.

-His pieces at auction are slightly sporadically priced.

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I've seen them sell for as little as sort of a couple of hundred pounds

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and my feeling is that with that provenance and with that connection,

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you're looking at somewhere between £800 and maybe even £3,000.

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Oh!

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-Very nice.

-Not bad for a garage find.

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Not bad for a garage find, not at all!

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Well, you've brought some interesting glasses along here

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and I'm wondering what your focus is, why you're here.

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Well, they're my father's collection.

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My father died three and a half years ago.

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He started collecting them back in the early '60s

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and as a child I remember some of them out

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and breaking one

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and absolutely all hell being let loose

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and they were rapidly packed away and put back in the loft.

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You stopped him in his tracks!

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-Yes!

-He used to hide in the loft to look at his glass.

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-He would disappear up the step ladder...

-He would disappear, yeah.

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..crawl in there, and unwrap his glasses and admire them?

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That's right, yeah. Because he liked handling them, actually.

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I'm quite proud of the fact I've got them here all in one piece today!

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Well, well done, you.

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And presumably he'd be made up that we're all sitting here...

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-He would be thrilled.

-..appreciating his collection

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-and giving it a critique.

-Absolutely.

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So, let me examine these glasses that he bought in 1968, etc.

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He got a lot and we have his buying book here and I've separated them

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into sort of run-of-the-mill

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and interesting, for various reasons.

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Let's do a turkey shoot first.

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And it's interesting...

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-That is one.

-..that that's a turkey.

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-I know. But he liked it.

-So this one...

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-Would you like to tell him?

-Tell him.

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Hello, Dad, I'm really sorry to break the news to you,

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that is actually a 20th-century copy.

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Yes, as we thought.

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This is in the manner of 1750, but actually 1925.

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This is an "if only" glass.

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An English glass of that form,

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with that stem,

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would be £2,500.

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-Oh, I wish.

-It's not, though!

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Absolutely correct.

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It's a Dutch one and thus is worth 70 quid.

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That's great, it can go in the glass cabinet at home now and enjoy.

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Go in the glass cabinet.

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The earliest and nicest glass here, in my opinion,

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is this flamiform ale glass,

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dwarf ale glass.

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This dates from 1725, it's really early,

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and it's a really interesting academic glass.

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Let me see how much he paid.

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He paid for that...

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This one he bought on the 18th of January 1968.

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It's a dwarf ale, two-piece, moulded gadrooning,

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set directly onto a domed and folded foot,

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circa 1700.

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Well, he was out by 20 years

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and he paid 15 quid for it

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and then later, when he went up into the loft,

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he said that he reckoned it was worth 100.

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So he's actually bumping up, he's appraising his collection.

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So I'm illuminating what he did up in the loft.

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He was going through and writing down

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-how much he reckons they're worth now!

-Yes!

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Well, now that's 350, 250-350.

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So he's done OK on that one.

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This is a firing glass.

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It's called a firing glass because if you are at a function

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and there's a toast and then the cheers...

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Well, the firing glasses, if you get 100 blokes doing that on a table,

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then it sounds like cannon fire.

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That one today, 400 quid, thereabouts.

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And that one, which is really the prettiest,

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the most commercial glass.

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-It is beautiful.

-Lovely.

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Look at it, that stem in the light.

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It's a bit chippy, the foot's a bit chippy, I'm afraid.

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Going to cost you 50 quid to get it fixed

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and then without the chips,

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600, 700, 800.

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So there you are, Dad. And we're happy to talk about your glass

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-and I'm just sorry you're not here to be with us.

-Yes.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you. He would have loved to have met you.

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Many years ago, I bought a wonderful bowl and sold it,

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made of serpentine, and I thought I'd collect it.

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But I found it so hard to do that

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and find the good pieces. And now I know why,

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cos you've got them all!

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-Not quite!

-I mean, these are fabulous examples

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of Serpentine carving.

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-Thank you.

-Have you been collecting, were you bequeathed them?

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No, I spent the first 58 years of my life at the Lizard,

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which is where all this stone comes from.

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The most southern tip of Cornwall.

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Being associated with the Lizard,

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I started about 40 years ago collecting.

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First of all buying odd bits and pieces from the local turners

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and then auctions, junk shops, so on and so forth.

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-So, how many pieces do you have?

-About 180.

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No!

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That's extraordinary.

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Well, you know that obviously serpentine is the name

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for a group of minerals, don't you?

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And you get various serpentines

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and it's been used all over the world for about a thousand years,

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a couple of thousand years.

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The Aztecs loved serpentine, the very green stuff.

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The Indians use a translucent type of serpentine called bowenite,

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which they called false jade cos it looks a bit like jade.

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But it's funny that you've got this natural material here,

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so you can see how it carves and polishes up.

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-That's right.

-And this has got lizards on it.

-That's right.

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-And it's from the Lizard.

-And it's from the Lizard.

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-And there is a type of serpentine called lizardite.

-There is.

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-Did you know that?

-Yes, I did.

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And that's one of my favourite pieces here.

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And it's not uncommon, serpentine,

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you can find it readily.

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But these pieces are amazing examples.

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Those candlesticks are fantastic.

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Which is your favourite piece?

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-That one.

-I love that little font.

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-Little font.

-Do you know where that was made?

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It's probably made at the factory at Poltesco.

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And do you know when?

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-Late-19th century?

-Yeah, I would have thought that.

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Most of these pieces are late-19th century.

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And, of course, this has a practical use, with the infant mortality,

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children dying and so on, so they were christened

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with actual serpentine fonts.

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Yes, and that tazza, that bowl, the footed bowl over there,

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the size of it!

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Well, that's one of the reasons why I bought that,

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because you just cannot get that size now.

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-The size of the material.

-Yeah.

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Do you know why it's called serpentine?

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I don't know why it's called serpentine.

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Well, because a thousand years ago or so, they thought

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the surface of it looked like the surface of a serpent.

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Let's get down to value here.

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I think the most valuable piece here is probably the tazza,

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-the footed bowl.

-That's interesting.

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Because of the size of the material and the quality of it.

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You see, all these pieces are perfect.

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I would value that at, in auction, if two people wanted it,

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a good £500-£600.

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Is that right?

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Those candlesticks, I think, are magnificent.

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They really do make an impact and I'd value those at about the same.

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This beautiful little font,

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about the same again.

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So I think on this table we've got £2,000-£3,000.

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-Oh, dear...

-But if you've got 170 pieces,

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that's something like...

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No, no, no, they're not all of this quality, I would hasten to add.

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It's still something like £10,000-£12,000,

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from what you've told me.

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LAUGHTER

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Is it really?! Don't tell my wife, will you, please?!

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Now, I'm used to filming

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and valuing dolls on the show

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but, I must admit, I've never filmed

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or seen a silver doll.

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Tell me, where did you get it?

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Well, my dad was a butler

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for people called Sir John and Lady Tremayne

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and they lived in a place called Croan, a big house,

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which is near Weybridge.

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Lady Tremayne gave it to me when I was five as a toy to play with.

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-Goodness.

-And, of course, I've broken...

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Oh, you did the breaking, did you?

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-Yes.

-Naughty girl!

0:17:060:17:08

I think I must have, you know,

0:17:090:17:11

but it's been in the cupboard and I don't know what it is, Bunny.

0:17:110:17:15

Well, I'm very glad you brought it.

0:17:150:17:16

-I don't know.

-Now, she or he... Do you think it's a she or a he?

0:17:160:17:20

-Well, I would say she, of course.

-She, OK.

0:17:200:17:23

Well, she should have a companion.

0:17:230:17:26

-Oh.

-Because she's not really just a doll.

0:17:260:17:31

-Oh.

-She is a pepper.

0:17:320:17:35

-Oh, she's pepper!

-Pepper.

0:17:350:17:37

So she should have a salt.

0:17:370:17:40

What did you think it was, snuff?

0:17:400:17:42

Just thought years and years ago

0:17:420:17:44

when people used to write with quills,

0:17:440:17:46

they used to have something on their desk, like sand or something,

0:17:460:17:49

to dry it, didn't they?

0:17:490:17:51

Oh, that's a very good idea. So it's extraordinary,

0:17:510:17:54

but it's so unusual because it's articulated and, I mean,

0:17:540:17:58

so you can play with it.

0:17:580:17:59

She's got wonderful articulated legs,

0:17:590:18:02

and the thigh, and the knee,

0:18:020:18:05

which is so unusual. It's a lot of work in there.

0:18:050:18:07

The head is not made of silver.

0:18:070:18:10

-No.

-It's made of porcelain,

0:18:100:18:12

so basically the head screws onto the body.

0:18:120:18:15

-Yes.

-It was made, almost definitely, by Sampson and Mordan,

0:18:150:18:20

who worked in Birmingham and in London.

0:18:200:18:23

Sampson and Mordan made propelling pencils, all sorts of things,

0:18:230:18:27

but novelty things. They're very proud of themselves,

0:18:270:18:29

cos they put the silver mark all over one arm, all over the back,

0:18:290:18:34

and on the back it says, "Percy Edwards".

0:18:340:18:37

That is the retailer in Piccadilly,

0:18:370:18:39

so they were the shop that sold these novelties,

0:18:390:18:42

made by Sampson and Mordan.

0:18:420:18:45

-Right.

-They started in 1883 in Piccadilly,

0:18:450:18:49

so we're talking about...

0:18:490:18:51

probably about 1890 for this.

0:18:510:18:54

-Oh, right.

-So it's quite old, isn't it?

0:18:540:18:56

-Yeah, yeah.

-Isn't she?

-Yes, she.

0:18:560:18:59

Anyway, have you any idea what she's worth?

0:18:590:19:02

I'm not really worried what she's worth,

0:19:020:19:04

-I just wanted to know what she was.

-You're not worried?

0:19:040:19:06

-The trouble is, I've got to give you an idea.

-Oh, have you?

-Yes.

0:19:060:19:09

Right, I would say...

0:19:090:19:11

..£100, perhaps.

0:19:120:19:14

Two?

0:19:160:19:17

Three?

0:19:190:19:20

No, no, no, no.

0:19:200:19:23

Even with the damage.

0:19:230:19:24

Even with the damage!

0:19:240:19:26

800.

0:19:270:19:28

Oh, my gosh.

0:19:290:19:30

No! 800?

0:19:320:19:34

-Oh, my gosh.

-You'd better go and look for the salt, hadn't you?

0:19:360:19:39

-I've gone all hot!

-LAUGHTER

0:19:390:19:41

So, you've brought me this rather intriguing figure of Churchill.

0:19:470:19:50

It was actually in a lake, and the level of the water had gone down,

0:19:500:19:53

and just his head was poking above the water.

0:19:530:19:56

So it was a question of going in, not far, and retrieving it.

0:19:560:20:01

Well, it's signed F Belsky,

0:20:030:20:05

who was the artist Franta Belsky,

0:20:050:20:07

who was born in Czechoslovakia in 1921.

0:20:070:20:09

He actually fled to Britain when the Germans invaded Czechoslovakia.

0:20:090:20:15

He had kind of rather a sad life.

0:20:150:20:16

Most of his family had died in the Holocaust.

0:20:160:20:19

To all intents and purposes, it looks like it's bronze,

0:20:210:20:24

but it's actually a resin maquette.

0:20:240:20:26

Bronzes would have been cast with this,

0:20:260:20:28

and he did a number of different bronzes of Churchill,

0:20:280:20:31

both whole figures and busts,

0:20:310:20:33

but obviously, this being the resin maquette, it's the original.

0:20:330:20:36

I would have thought it might make 1,000-1,500 if it came up for sale.

0:20:360:20:40

Really? Crikey.

0:20:400:20:42

-So what's your gut instinct?

-That it's a knock-off.

0:20:460:20:48

-OK, wrong.

-Oh.

0:20:480:20:50

The hieroglyphics on it all look right.

0:20:500:20:53

I think it's about 1500 BC.

0:20:530:20:56

-That's pretty odd.

-Pretty old, isn't it?

0:20:560:20:59

What about this?

0:21:000:21:01

Yes, my brother hardly even noticed

0:21:030:21:04

it had been broken and glued back together.

0:21:040:21:06

I think this is broken,

0:21:060:21:08

I don't think it's an accident.

0:21:080:21:10

-Really?

-On the better pieces, what you'd do, you'd break into a tomb,

0:21:100:21:13

a tomb robber...

0:21:130:21:15

Because obviously a lot of the tombs were cursed,

0:21:150:21:17

it was a way of protecting them,

0:21:170:21:19

to release the spirit

0:21:190:21:20

they would snap it

0:21:200:21:21

and then re-glue it.

0:21:210:21:23

That released the spirit, which meant you weren't cursed.

0:21:230:21:26

I never heard of that.

0:21:260:21:27

I think at auction, £1,500-ish.

0:21:270:21:30

Really? That is a surprise.

0:21:300:21:33

Now, how many people have got a little sketch

0:21:380:21:42

done by their kids on their fridge at home?

0:21:420:21:46

This looks fresh and new,

0:21:460:21:48

as if one of your two boys could have sketched it yesterday.

0:21:480:21:52

But there's a little giveaway, which is the date here, 1874.

0:21:520:21:56

And it's a tale, really, that this gets us into, of two families.

0:21:570:22:02

There's one family,

0:22:020:22:04

the family that was responsible for the sketch

0:22:040:22:06

and then there's the Durrant family, which is what all this is about.

0:22:060:22:10

Now, who is Captain Durrant?

0:22:100:22:13

Captain Durrant, he was my grandfather's great-uncle.

0:22:130:22:18

He eventually became Admiral Durrant

0:22:180:22:21

and he was Commander of the Royal Yacht Osborne

0:22:210:22:24

and also he was Governor to Prince George and Prince Edward.

0:22:240:22:28

We have some of the memorabilia that I've been aware of,

0:22:280:22:31

but only recently, within the last couple of years,

0:22:310:22:34

when unfortunately my dad died,

0:22:340:22:35

that we found some of these extra little bits and pieces,

0:22:350:22:38

that have obviously really interested us in the family.

0:22:380:22:40

We're not actually talking about Edward VII

0:22:400:22:43

or the child of Queen Victoria

0:22:430:22:45

that went on to be Edward VII,

0:22:450:22:47

we are talking about Edward VII's children.

0:22:470:22:51

We're talking about Queen Victoria's grandchildren.

0:22:510:22:54

-Yeah.

-So, we've got here Prince Albert Victor,

0:22:540:22:58

Eddy as he was always known,

0:22:580:23:01

and his brother, George, who went on to become George V.

0:23:010:23:07

Now, there was only a year's difference between them,

0:23:070:23:09

-probably a bit like these two.

-Very much like these two.

-There we go.

0:23:090:23:12

You should have christened them Albert and George really!

0:23:120:23:15

It's dated 1874, so he was about 10 then.

0:23:150:23:19

-How old are you?

-I'm ten.

0:23:190:23:21

You're ten, OK. So that's the sort of date that Eddy was drawing this.

0:23:210:23:26

It's a picture, I think, of the Royal Yacht.

0:23:260:23:29

There's the captain at the helm

0:23:290:23:31

and turn it over

0:23:310:23:33

and there's a fabulous picture of...

0:23:330:23:35

Well, it looks like a soldier

0:23:360:23:39

sticking his tongue out,

0:23:390:23:40

-which I'm sure happened a lot.

-LAUGHTER

0:23:400:23:43

And along with all that,

0:23:430:23:45

there's a lovely continuum of letters as they get older,

0:23:450:23:49

but also a lovely letter here from Queen Victoria,

0:23:490:23:53

a cable message, dated 1884, saying,

0:23:530:23:57

"Delighted at good news of dear George passing his examination.

0:23:570:24:02

"The Queen."

0:24:020:24:03

They went on wonderful journeys...

0:24:030:24:06

-Yes.

-..to visit, of course, all their aunts and uncles.

0:24:060:24:10

Western Europe was governed by Queen Victoria's children.

0:24:100:24:14

Nine children, she had.

0:24:140:24:16

-This is in Durrant's hand?

-It is, yes, yes.

0:24:160:24:19

"The Duke of Edinburgh arrived on board shortly after 11am

0:24:190:24:23

"and the Tzar accompanied by the Tzarina the Duchess of Edinburgh

0:24:230:24:26

"and all the grand Dukes came at a quarter to one,

0:24:260:24:28

"and shortly after sat down to lunch."

0:24:280:24:30

There we go. A party of around 40.

0:24:300:24:33

So you can see he was part of this extraordinary world,

0:24:330:24:38

-governed by...

-A very different world.

0:24:380:24:40

It's a different world and it's a really collectable world.

0:24:400:24:43

The little sketch, I would say,

0:24:430:24:46

is going to be worth perhaps £1,500.

0:24:460:24:49

The little letters,

0:24:510:24:52

the young letters from the young princes, again I would say

0:24:520:24:56

they'd probably be £1,500, maybe even £1,800...

0:24:560:24:59

-Blimey.

-..for the two.

0:24:590:25:00

The letter from Queen Victoria which everybody would probably go,

0:25:010:25:04

"Ooh-ah, a letter from Queen Victoria!"

0:25:040:25:06

-actually she was a great letter writer.

-Yeah. Quite a few, then.

0:25:060:25:09

There are quite a few around.

0:25:090:25:10

So that's going to be in the sort of £300-£400 bracket.

0:25:100:25:14

But putting it all together, I would have said,

0:25:140:25:16

we're certainly talking about £5,000-£7,000.

0:25:160:25:19

-Wow!

-And I know that there's more in your bag.

0:25:190:25:22

-Yeah.

-So it is a remarkable collection

0:25:220:25:26

and I think a great archive to hand on to your two boys.

0:25:260:25:31

Family history, we are immensely proud, all immensely proud.

0:25:310:25:34

-Yes.

-Brilliant.

-Thank you ever so much.

0:25:340:25:36

-All of that is brilliant.

-Lovely, thank you.

0:25:360:25:38

Eight medals here, which show a man who has served from the Boer War,

0:25:420:25:48

1899-1902, all the way through the First World War,

0:25:480:25:53

and then through the Second World War.

0:25:530:25:56

Now, that is an impressive row of medals.

0:25:570:26:00

-It is, isn't it?

-And from a military perspective,

0:26:000:26:03

that's really quite unusual. That's at least

0:26:030:26:05

45 years' service and most of it on what we would call active service,

0:26:050:26:09

so this man isn't just in a garrison,

0:26:090:26:11

he's actually out there fighting.

0:26:110:26:13

Yeah.

0:26:130:26:15

But these medals have a social story as well, don't they?

0:26:150:26:18

-Yes.

-Cos these medals belonged to someone in your family.

0:26:180:26:22

-And who was that person?

-He was my grandfather.

0:26:220:26:26

John Jackson. He was a company quartermaster sergeant

0:26:260:26:29

in the King's Rifle Corps.

0:26:290:26:31

He was wounded during the defence of Ladysmith in the Boer War.

0:26:310:26:36

When he left the Army in 1919,

0:26:360:26:39

he found it hard to get work and he eventually ended up

0:26:390:26:44

having to pawn his medals to raise a loan

0:26:440:26:46

to buy clothes for his children.

0:26:460:26:49

And, incredibly, you've still got the pawn ticket here.

0:26:490:26:52

-Yes.

-Dated the 30th of June 1924.

0:26:520:26:57

And he pawned them for 15 shillings.

0:26:570:27:00

-That's right.

-That's about 75p...

-Really?

-..in today's money.

0:27:000:27:03

-Is that right?

-Yeah. What happened then?

0:27:030:27:06

He received a letter for the interest on the loan

0:27:060:27:09

which he couldn't afford to pay, so he lost the medals.

0:27:090:27:13

He kept the pawnbroker's ticket and the letter all his life,

0:27:130:27:17

which I still have, of course.

0:27:170:27:19

He was obviously very proud of these.

0:27:190:27:21

-Yes.

-Because he had served in some amazing places.

0:27:210:27:24

I mean, the Boer War here with that defence of Ladysmith,

0:27:240:27:27

where you say he was wounded.

0:27:270:27:29

1914-15 Star, British war medal, victory medal.

0:27:290:27:32

But he has here the quite rare thing called the Delhi Durbar Medal...

0:27:320:27:37

-Yes.

-..of 1911, for the coronation.

0:27:370:27:39

So the big procession held in Delhi for the Emperor of India

0:27:390:27:43

as King George V came to the throne.

0:27:430:27:45

And then he has his long service and good conduct,

0:27:450:27:48

which for him in those days was 18 years' unblemished service.

0:27:480:27:52

-Yes.

-So he was very proud of these medals.

0:27:520:27:55

He then went off and served in World War II.

0:27:550:27:57

What did he do in World War II?

0:27:570:27:58

Well, he emigrated to New Zealand in 1929.

0:27:580:28:02

He put his age back ten years to enlist as a patrolman

0:28:020:28:07

in the Royal New Zealand Air Force.

0:28:070:28:09

And that's the uniform that he's wearing in this picture here...

0:28:090:28:12

-That's the uniform.

-..as an airman in World War II.

0:28:120:28:15

-Yes.

-So, World War II finished.

0:28:150:28:18

Did he claim his medals?

0:28:180:28:19

No, no, he didn't.

0:28:190:28:22

No, he'd lost his others,

0:28:220:28:24

so he didn't claim those two.

0:28:240:28:26

And when did we get these two?

0:28:260:28:28

My father, as next of kin, he claimed them in 1980.

0:28:280:28:31

It kindled an interest

0:28:310:28:33

as to what had happened to the rest of his medals.

0:28:330:28:35

I hunted around antiques shops

0:28:350:28:38

and with collectors and dealers and so on for years

0:28:380:28:41

until I advertised in a medal finders service

0:28:410:28:46

and an American collector responded.

0:28:460:28:48

When I contacted him, he said he did own the medals

0:28:480:28:51

and he was willing to sell them to me as I was the man's grandson.

0:28:510:28:56

-Isn't that amazing?

-It is amazing, yeah.

0:28:560:28:58

-After, what, 75, 80 years...?

-75 years.

0:28:580:29:01

75 years of them not being in the family, there they are,

0:29:010:29:05

proudly displayed,

0:29:050:29:06

as they should be. And they are a superb set.

0:29:060:29:10

And an auction valuation for these in British money

0:29:100:29:14

would be between £500 and £600.

0:29:140:29:15

-Really? That much?

-Yeah.

0:29:150:29:17

-Definitely.

-Really? I'm surprised.

0:29:170:29:19

It's a very lovely set of medals. Well done in finding them.

0:29:190:29:22

Thank you very much.

0:29:220:29:24

This is absolutely gorgeous.

0:29:250:29:28

-Where did you get it from?

-I got it in an antiques shop in Oxford.

0:29:280:29:32

-About four years ago.

-You lucky person.

0:29:320:29:35

I'm so jealous. It's so charming.

0:29:350:29:37

-Obviously a little milking stool.

-Yes.

0:29:370:29:39

This to me, I've never seen this before,

0:29:390:29:42

but I think almost certainly,

0:29:420:29:44

-you would just tie that with a sash to your waist.

-Oh, OK!

0:29:440:29:47

I'm sure. That's why you've got these two little lugs

0:29:470:29:49

and this shape here.

0:29:490:29:51

But there's so much...

0:29:510:29:52

Look at this. The colour here.

0:29:520:29:54

Look at that. Now, you know what that's from.

0:29:540:29:57

That is patination.

0:29:570:29:58

That is to me half the value of this piece of furniture.

0:29:580:30:01

When she's been milking, she's got probably dirty, sticky hands,

0:30:010:30:05

from the teats, you pick it up like that

0:30:050:30:08

if you're right-handed and tie it to your body.

0:30:080:30:11

-Ah!

-And then you do that day after day.

0:30:110:30:14

This is 1840, 1850.

0:30:140:30:16

Mid-19th century.

0:30:160:30:18

Elm top, and the sticks...

0:30:180:30:20

Look at these. They're just sticks.

0:30:200:30:22

From the hedgerow. Still got the bark on them.

0:30:220:30:25

Made by a local chap, probably for his daughter, the farmer's daughter,

0:30:250:30:28

to go milking. It's a wonderful icon of 19th-century life.

0:30:280:30:32

And probably English. Did you pay a lot of money for it?

0:30:320:30:35

It was on sale for £225

0:30:350:30:37

and I managed to get it for 175.

0:30:370:30:40

Which is quite expensive, but it was worth it.

0:30:400:30:42

It is expensive for a little milking stool, isn't it?

0:30:420:30:45

But I really wanted it, so...

0:30:450:30:46

Well, if I tell you that is now worth £400 or £500...

0:30:460:30:50

Ooh! Wow!

0:30:500:30:53

I'm very, very jealous.

0:30:530:30:55

Thank you, I'm delighted, because I really didn't think

0:30:550:30:58

you'd be very interested in it.

0:30:580:30:59

I love it. I want to keep picking it up.

0:30:590:31:01

This week's Enigma has to be, I think, one of our strangest yet.

0:31:150:31:18

So perhaps it's no surprise

0:31:180:31:19

that it's been brought along by Ronnie Archer-Morgan.

0:31:190:31:22

You've been trawling the local museums

0:31:220:31:24

and you've brought along this intriguing little thing.

0:31:240:31:27

What could it be?

0:31:270:31:29

I think it's an amazing object.

0:31:290:31:31

It's so surreal.

0:31:310:31:32

It's like conceptual art.

0:31:320:31:34

It's from the Boscastle Witchcraft Museum.

0:31:340:31:37

Oh, it's the witchcraft museum, is it?

0:31:370:31:39

Can I know what's inside it?

0:31:390:31:40

I believe that's mercury.

0:31:400:31:42

And what are these things here?

0:31:420:31:44

They look like whelk shells.

0:31:440:31:46

-They're shells, anyway.

-Talk me through the options, then.

0:31:460:31:49

What's my first option?

0:31:490:31:51

Does it contain the spirit of a sailor lost at sea?

0:31:510:31:55

Someone who has lost their husband at sea or a loved one at sea

0:31:550:32:00

might go to a wise woman.

0:32:000:32:03

The wise woman would say, "I'm going to put the soul,

0:32:030:32:06

"the spirit of your loved one in a bottle to protect him."

0:32:060:32:11

And then the person would take this home and keep it with them.

0:32:110:32:14

Yes, keep it with them to protect a loved one's soul.

0:32:140:32:17

You've got another option, about the weather, haven't you, Ronnie?

0:32:170:32:20

So explain that then.

0:32:200:32:22

Well, you would go to the wise woman again and you'd want something...

0:32:220:32:26

-The wise woman plays a large part...

-Well, it is a witchcraft museum.

-OK.

0:32:260:32:29

I mean, the wise woman is another name for someone who uses witchcraft

0:32:290:32:34

to help people.

0:32:340:32:35

So you'd go to the wise woman, you would say, I need something

0:32:350:32:39

to tell me about the weather because when I go out to sea,

0:32:390:32:41

I need to know what's going on.

0:32:410:32:42

And she would say, take this little bottle

0:32:420:32:44

and put it on your windowsill. And when something might happen,

0:32:440:32:48

you'll know what the weather is going to be.

0:32:480:32:50

The thing is, with wise women, and with witchcraft,

0:32:500:32:53

the more that is explained about how it works,

0:32:530:32:58

-the less it's supposed to work.

-The less magical it is.

-Yes.

0:32:580:33:01

-That's rather convenient for you right now.

-Exactly.

0:33:010:33:03

Which is not going to help you.

0:33:030:33:06

So, we've got the soul of a lost sailor,

0:33:060:33:09

something that helps you tell the weather,

0:33:090:33:11

-and what's the last option?

-A sailor's friend.

-A sailor's friend.

0:33:110:33:15

So if you're bringing contraband up the estuaries,

0:33:150:33:17

like this beautiful estuary here, at the dead of night,

0:33:170:33:20

and you don't want to be stopped by the customs officers,

0:33:200:33:24

you hang this over the side of your boat to make yourself invisible,

0:33:240:33:28

so you believe, so that Customs can't see you.

0:33:280:33:31

-A form of invisibility cloak.

-Absolutely.

-OK.

0:33:310:33:34

What does everyone...? What do you think?

0:33:340:33:36

-The weather.

-It's nice.

-It's nice!

0:33:360:33:39

-Good answer.

-The weather, cos the mercury rises.

0:33:400:33:43

You think weather cos mercury rises.

0:33:430:33:45

So, who thinks it could be the spirit of a lost sailor?

0:33:450:33:47

-Anybody?

-I think so, yeah.

0:33:470:33:49

-You think it could be?

-I do, yes.

0:33:490:33:50

-Does that appeal to your sense of...?

-Yes. Yes.

0:33:500:33:52

-Of romance and witchcraft.

-Oh, yes.

0:33:520:33:54

I mean, how long ago would something like this be used?

0:33:540:33:57

It's about 100 years old.

0:33:570:33:58

Maybe the beginning of the 20th century.

0:33:580:34:01

I think it's got to be the weather.

0:34:010:34:03

Because it contains mercury.

0:34:030:34:05

Yeah...

0:34:050:34:06

Don't you think that's too obvious, though?

0:34:070:34:09

-Yeah.

-That's why I like it. I think that's why we like it.

0:34:090:34:12

OK, do you know what, I'm going to not go with the majority view

0:34:120:34:15

cos because this came from a witchcraft museum.

0:34:150:34:17

So why would a barometer type object be in a witchcraft museum?

0:34:170:34:20

So, let's go for...

0:34:200:34:22

the spirit of a lost sailor.

0:34:220:34:24

-Yes.

-That's what we're going for.

0:34:240:34:27

-Come on.

-You're so...

0:34:270:34:30

-Fickle.

-Wrong.

0:34:300:34:32

Oh!

0:34:320:34:34

-Is it the weather thing?

-We had you.

0:34:340:34:36

You were so on to it.

0:34:380:34:39

So why have something like this than just a common-or-garden barometer?

0:34:390:34:43

Well, maybe someone that believed in witchcraft

0:34:430:34:45

didn't want a common-or-garden barometer,

0:34:450:34:47

so the wise woman saw an opportunity to make some money.

0:34:470:34:50

Yeah. Well, you've worked your magic here, Ronnie.

0:34:500:34:53

Well, it's the first time I've won with you.

0:34:530:34:56

So...

0:34:560:34:58

All the other ones I've done with you, you've won.

0:34:580:35:01

And I've been very happy for you.

0:35:010:35:03

-So be happy for me.

-Well done.

0:35:030:35:04

Well done.

0:35:040:35:06

I mean, the quality of this is absolutely astounding.

0:35:100:35:13

It's unbelievable. And if you turn it over,

0:35:130:35:16

it gets even better.

0:35:160:35:18

You've got this fabulous water dragon rising out of whirlpools

0:35:180:35:22

and foam and waves and even the eyes, they're picked out,

0:35:220:35:26

I think, in silver.

0:35:260:35:28

When objects like this

0:35:280:35:31

arrived in the West

0:35:310:35:33

from Japan in the 1870s and 1880s, Western collectors were entranced.

0:35:330:35:37

They were amazed. But where did you get it?

0:35:370:35:40

Well, my great-grandfather went out to Japan in 1864.

0:35:400:35:45

I think he'd had an argument with his father,

0:35:450:35:48

who was part of Hunt and Fry's, the chocolate...

0:35:480:35:50

-Oh, the chocolate makers.

-So he went off to make his fortune,

0:35:500:35:54

he became a dealer in tea and a tea exporter

0:35:540:35:59

and eventually formed his own company in Japan.

0:35:590:36:03

And before he retired,

0:36:030:36:05

he collected a whole lot of bronzes and inro, netsukes,

0:36:050:36:09

ad things which belonged to the family then.

0:36:090:36:12

-So, you have a whole collection of Japanese...?

-No, unfortunately,

0:36:120:36:15

the family was rather large and it split up.

0:36:150:36:17

-We have a few.

-Well, this is a fabulous little piece.

0:36:170:36:21

It's a very interesting time in Japanese history.

0:36:210:36:23

You have the Meiji restoration, took over from the Shoguns.

0:36:230:36:29

The Court moved from Edo, which is now Tokyo, back to Osaka.

0:36:290:36:34

But this little box, I'm sure you know what it is,

0:36:340:36:36

it's called an inro. It's made in lots of sections,

0:36:360:36:39

which, they are very tightly fitted together, but they can come apart.

0:36:390:36:42

And it was designed to hang from your belt and your robe

0:36:420:36:47

and supported by this toggle, which is a netsuke.

0:36:470:36:50

This netsuke, it's a flattened one,

0:36:500:36:53

but it's also reticulated and they call it a ryusa netsuke.

0:36:530:36:58

And there's also the gold lacquer made from the sap of trees -

0:36:580:37:02

you've got a raised lacquer, called maki-e,

0:37:020:37:05

and then we've got this gold sprinkling,

0:37:050:37:07

which is nashiji lacquer.

0:37:070:37:09

It's a fabulous technique.

0:37:090:37:10

How they perfected it, I do not know.

0:37:100:37:13

And they would have kept their medicines in it?

0:37:130:37:15

Well, realistically...

0:37:150:37:17

I think this was made for a Westerner.

0:37:170:37:21

I don't think this was ever used.

0:37:210:37:23

It's in fabulous condition.

0:37:230:37:24

So many things were made in the Far East for Westerners,

0:37:240:37:27

this was made for a wealthy Westerner.

0:37:270:37:30

It was your grandfather, you said.

0:37:300:37:31

-Great-grandfather.

-Great-grandfather.

0:37:310:37:34

-Well, he was obviously very successful.

-Yes.

0:37:340:37:36

Because he bought some of the best things

0:37:380:37:40

that could be bought at the time.

0:37:400:37:41

The value of something like this... It's slightly disappointing,

0:37:410:37:44

they were worth more years ago, but I think, at auction today,

0:37:440:37:48

it's in the region of £1,500.

0:37:480:37:50

Good heavens! I never realised that.

0:37:500:37:53

-That's amazing.

-I don't think it's that amazing, for the quality.

0:37:530:37:56

I mean, look at it. It is staggering.

0:37:560:37:59

When you brought this clock to me,

0:38:030:38:05

the first thing I noticed was the name Robert Philp on the dial.

0:38:050:38:08

What do you know about it?

0:38:080:38:10

It was my father's. He had it, virtually,

0:38:100:38:13

as far as I can remember, all his life.

0:38:130:38:15

And it never ran.

0:38:150:38:18

Ever.

0:38:180:38:20

And after his death, I inherited it

0:38:200:38:22

and I discovered in fact that it had a broken mainspring,

0:38:220:38:26

which was the reason why it never ran.

0:38:260:38:28

I had it fixed, but the restorer said at the time,

0:38:280:38:33

this clock has hardly ever run through its life.

0:38:330:38:37

How long the mainspring had been broken, I have no idea.

0:38:370:38:40

But he said it's in almost pristine condition.

0:38:400:38:43

Well, that's one of the things that I particularly liked about it.

0:38:430:38:46

In fact, probably the bit that I most like about this clock

0:38:460:38:49

is not so much the dial, but the backplate.

0:38:490:38:52

What I really like is the fact that

0:38:520:38:53

the pendulum is the original pendulum.

0:38:530:38:56

It's been cut off just here so the door can fit when it's snug.

0:38:560:38:59

It looks a bit strange like that, but it's been done on purpose.

0:38:590:39:02

-Right.

-And the other thing that everybody will notice

0:39:020:39:05

-about the backplate is that it's beautifully engraved.

-Mm.

0:39:050:39:07

And you've got this lovely scrolling foliage

0:39:070:39:10

with the central urn issuing flowers and husks

0:39:100:39:12

and all sorts of things going on.

0:39:120:39:13

But actually, that isn't particularly unusual.

0:39:130:39:16

This is a typical type of engraving

0:39:160:39:19

for an English table clock of the third quarter of the 18th century,

0:39:190:39:23

so we are talking about 1770-1780.

0:39:230:39:26

So, as you pointed out, it hasn't been used very much.

0:39:260:39:29

And you often find alterations to the pendulum and the escapement.

0:39:290:39:33

But this one is exactly as it was made.

0:39:330:39:35

In fact, this part here, which is the pulley for the alarm system -

0:39:350:39:39

so it's got an alarm, which is slightly unusual -

0:39:390:39:41

has the original engraving on there

0:39:410:39:43

and as soon as you see the original engraving on the barrel cover there,

0:39:430:39:47

you tend to realise there's very little been done to this.

0:39:470:39:49

Because often the alarms get pulled out by clockmakers

0:39:490:39:52

in the 19th century because it's such a pain,

0:39:520:39:54

-because they never work properly.

-Right.

0:39:540:39:55

I've always thought it slightly strange to have an alarm

0:39:550:39:58

on a table clock. I mean, when are you going to need the alarm?

0:39:580:40:00

Are you going to take this upstairs and have it in your bedroom?

0:40:000:40:03

I suppose you could do. I mean,

0:40:030:40:04

it's an enormous thing to carry upstairs every time, isn't it?

0:40:040:40:07

It's strange. So, just turn it round.

0:40:070:40:10

It's a very simple plain dial.

0:40:100:40:12

Silvered brass.

0:40:120:40:14

Ebonised fruit wood case.

0:40:140:40:16

Typical of its type.

0:40:170:40:19

With a bell top, bracket feet, it's quintessentially typical.

0:40:190:40:23

But Robert Philp was well known for his musical clocks.

0:40:230:40:26

-Right.

-And this is not one of them. I mean, were it to be that,

0:40:260:40:29

we'd be in the hundreds of thousands of pounds, perhaps.

0:40:290:40:32

But he was capable of making clocks of that quality.

0:40:320:40:34

This is one of his more simple clocks,

0:40:340:40:36

but I like it because of the cleanliness of the movement,

0:40:360:40:39

the originality, so let's put a value on it.

0:40:390:40:43

I doubt it'll be a surprise to you, but at auction today,

0:40:430:40:46

it's got to be worth between £3,000 and £4,000.

0:40:460:40:50

-Right. OK.

-Which I suspect is where you thought.

0:40:500:40:52

Yes, probably. Yes. I haven't really thought about its value.

0:40:520:40:56

I've always just simply kept it.

0:40:560:40:58

-Well, thank you very much for bringing it in.

-My pleasure.

0:40:580:41:01

Now, Stoke Mandeville Hospital is world famous

0:41:060:41:09

for the work it's done on patients

0:41:090:41:11

who've got spinal and other injuries.

0:41:110:41:14

But what's your association with the hospital?

0:41:140:41:17

My mother as a young lady became the medical photographer there in 1954.

0:41:170:41:22

So a lot of her work was involved in taking the photos of

0:41:220:41:26

the disabilities of people that had been maimed in accidents.

0:41:260:41:29

-And who is this here?

-This is my mum, Margaret Bennett.

0:41:290:41:33

In 1955, she was there, they held the Stoke Mandeville games.

0:41:330:41:38

-Right.

-And so she took a lot of photographs for that.

0:41:380:41:41

And any occasion that happened at the hospital,

0:41:410:41:44

she put herself in the position of taking the photographs for it.

0:41:440:41:48

And here we've got an aerial view of the hospital.

0:41:480:41:50

-Yes.

-And that was founded in, well, 1944...

0:41:500:41:54

-Yeah.

-By, I believe, a Dr Guttman.

0:41:540:41:58

-Yes.

-Who himself had a spinal injury.

-That's right.

0:41:580:42:00

-And he started, you know, this fantastic history...

-Yes.

0:42:000:42:04

-..that's gone on to the present day.

-Yeah.

0:42:040:42:07

And here we start the Stoke Mandeville games. August 1955.

0:42:070:42:10

Eight years after the very first one.

0:42:100:42:13

So, the Paralympic Games all started

0:42:130:42:16

way back in the 1940s by Dr Guttman -

0:42:160:42:19

there he is, at the prize-giving.

0:42:190:42:21

And it's expanded into this major media and sporting event

0:42:210:42:26

that we see today. Here are the games very early on...

0:42:260:42:29

-Yes.

-Netball, javelin throwing...

0:42:290:42:32

Table tennis. And here is the very famous Roger Bannister.

0:42:340:42:38

Yes. Yes, indeed.

0:42:380:42:39

For the march-past, I believe.

0:42:390:42:42

-And now today...

-Yes.

0:42:420:42:44

..it's the second most popular sporting event in the world.

0:42:440:42:48

-Yes.

-And 4,000 athletes,

0:42:480:42:52

160-odd countries.

0:42:520:42:54

-Yes.

-And it is estimated at 1.5 billion TV viewers.

0:42:540:43:00

Oh, it's just become phenomenal, hasn't it?

0:43:000:43:02

Since 2012, it's just become such a fantastic showcase

0:43:020:43:08

for people with a can-do attitude.

0:43:080:43:12

And what was interesting, in my mum and my father's case,

0:43:120:43:15

my sister was born with a disability,

0:43:150:43:17

so a lot of our life as children, and as my parents,

0:43:170:43:21

was involved in promoting equality and searching for opportunities.

0:43:210:43:27

So exciting to see an archive like this

0:43:270:43:30

that obviously has never been published.

0:43:300:43:32

And I think, you know, from a historical point of view,

0:43:320:43:35

I'm sure that people would be interested to see.

0:43:350:43:38

-All the history is here.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:43:380:43:39

And it's in fantastic condition and she was a great photographer.

0:43:390:43:42

-Yes.

-So, you've got all those elements.

0:43:420:43:44

Now we have to think about price.

0:43:440:43:46

I mean, when you're thinking about the Olympic Games,

0:43:460:43:48

everybody wants the gold medal.

0:43:480:43:51

This is rarer in many ways, but it's not going to be as valuable.

0:43:510:43:55

For the social history of it, you can't do better,

0:43:550:43:59

in Paralympic terms. So I would have thought

0:43:590:44:02

if you ever did decide to sell it,

0:44:020:44:04

it would fetch certainly in excess of £1,500, maybe as much as £2,000.

0:44:040:44:09

Wow! I had no idea it would be that sort of thing.

0:44:090:44:12

Gosh.

0:44:120:44:14

Do you know what this is and where it comes from?

0:44:180:44:21

It's a gold box, that's about all I know about it.

0:44:210:44:24

My sister found it in a car-boot sale in France.

0:44:240:44:28

You're having me on.

0:44:300:44:32

No, serious, yes.

0:44:320:44:33

She picked this up in a box of bric-a-brac and...

0:44:330:44:36

About 20-odd years ago, and it's just been sat at home,

0:44:360:44:38

and when we were coming down to Cornwall,

0:44:380:44:40

we said we were going to go to the Antiques Roadshow,

0:44:400:44:42

she said, "Take it and see."

0:44:420:44:44

-So here we are.

-Right!

0:44:440:44:46

Well, it's a snuffbox.

0:44:460:44:49

It was made in France, in about 1785.

0:44:490:44:52

It's got this delightful little cameo on the front here.

0:44:520:44:57

We've got a dove

0:44:570:44:59

sitting next to a flaming heart.

0:44:590:45:01

And then another dove holding a ring above the heart.

0:45:010:45:05

So I suggest this was probably made as a wedding present.

0:45:050:45:09

-Oh, lovely. Romantic.

-The condition is outstanding.

0:45:090:45:12

Absolutely stunning.

0:45:120:45:14

If we open it up,

0:45:140:45:16

we see it's got some marks right tucked in the corner down here.

0:45:160:45:22

Oh, yes.

0:45:220:45:24

And the French actually marked things

0:45:240:45:27

when they are in their constituent bits,

0:45:270:45:29

before putting them together.

0:45:290:45:32

So it ends up with the maker's mark being unreadable,

0:45:320:45:34

and I can't actually tell you who made it.

0:45:340:45:37

But this is, I have to tell you, a real collector's box.

0:45:370:45:41

Wow!

0:45:410:45:42

-She'll be chuffed.

-Yeah.

0:45:420:45:44

And a collector would probably pay...

0:45:440:45:48

£15,000.

0:45:480:45:50

Oh, wow!

0:45:500:45:52

That's brilliant. Wow.

0:45:520:45:54

Not bad for a box of bric-a-brac.

0:45:540:45:56

No. Gosh. She'll be well pleased.

0:45:560:45:59

So, you're going to have a good visit back to your sister

0:45:590:46:02

and tell her it's worth £5 and you'll buy it off her.

0:46:020:46:05

-LAUGHTER

-Wonderful.

0:46:050:46:07

-Thank you. Lovely object.

-Fantastic.

0:46:070:46:10

Well, Mr Sandon, you're a ceramics expert -

0:46:130:46:16

I have a test for you. Do you know the name of this pattern?

0:46:160:46:20

It doesn't look familiar.

0:46:200:46:21

Oh, it's Sandon, the family china! How wonderful.

0:46:210:46:25

Sandon Hall was close to the potteries,

0:46:250:46:27

so a lot of factories call their patterns Sandon.

0:46:270:46:30

And mostly, they are awful.

0:46:300:46:31

But that's a really pretty one.

0:46:310:46:33

You're trying to dig yourself out of a hole now. But anyway.

0:46:330:46:36

-All yours.

-Isn't that great?

0:46:360:46:38

You can imagine having breakfast on that, sprinkling Worcester sauce...

0:46:380:46:41

That'd be lovely.

0:46:410:46:43

I discovered this under my front doorstep in my cottage.

0:46:460:46:51

It was up like that, in the ground, all I could see was that.

0:46:510:46:56

And as I picked it out, it came out like that.

0:46:560:46:59

It's half a bottle of something.

0:46:590:47:01

I would really like to know how old the bottle is,

0:47:010:47:04

and more or less, what's in it.

0:47:040:47:07

Well, old bottles are not all that rare.

0:47:070:47:10

But finding old bottles with their contents still in is pretty rare.

0:47:100:47:16

And what was revolutionary about the cylindrical bottle

0:47:160:47:19

is that by making it having straight sides,

0:47:190:47:22

you could stack them, and secondly, you had a cork,

0:47:220:47:26

and the act of keeping the cork moist

0:47:260:47:28

kept it expanded, which prevented air from going in,

0:47:280:47:32

which would spoil your wine

0:47:320:47:34

and turn it to vinegar.

0:47:340:47:35

This bottle dates from 1800,

0:47:350:47:38

but the idea that it's still got its contents in,

0:47:380:47:42

I want to find out if this worked as a concept.

0:47:420:47:46

I know bottles have been found from 1650 by the Museum of London,

0:47:460:47:50

where they have tested the wine and it has been found to be good.

0:47:500:47:53

CROWD "OOH"S

0:47:570:47:59

How brilliant!

0:47:590:48:01

It's very brown.

0:48:010:48:04

LAUGHTER

0:48:140:48:17

Down it!

0:48:190:48:21

Have a smell.

0:48:210:48:22

Oh, it's really rank, actually.

0:48:240:48:26

-I'm not going to go...

-Yeah.

0:48:270:48:30

It doesn't taste bad, but...I think it's port.

0:48:300:48:34

It's port or red wine, it's one or the other.

0:48:350:48:38

Or it's full of rusty old nails, and that's rust.

0:48:380:48:41

You've been really good... You've been really game about this.

0:48:430:48:46

Thank you very much indeed.

0:48:460:48:48

What it proves, actually, that could be worse...

0:48:480:48:51

It proves that not all corks worked all the time, I suspect.

0:48:510:48:55

But at 200 years old...

0:48:550:48:56

I wonder what we'd taste like when we're 200 years old.

0:48:560:48:59

Anyway, thanks very much.

0:48:590:49:01

-No problem.

-It's been great. Lovely. Thank you.

0:49:010:49:04

The first thing I do when I see a really nice handbag

0:49:270:49:30

is grab it. Tell me about it.

0:49:300:49:34

Well, I organise,

0:49:340:49:36

or am involved with organising, an annual fundraising event

0:49:360:49:39

and this year I thought, for a change,

0:49:390:49:41

we'll have a hats and handbags stall.

0:49:410:49:43

So I put the call out to friends and family,

0:49:430:49:46

and a friend of my mother's said that she had a couple of things

0:49:460:49:49

that she would like to donate,

0:49:490:49:50

one of them being "some old handbag with a light in it".

0:49:500:49:53

And I didn't really know what she meant.

0:49:530:49:55

And it wasn't until I saw it that I thought,

0:49:550:49:58

"This is more than just an ordinary handbag."

0:49:580:50:01

And there was no way I was going to put it on the stall

0:50:010:50:04

with a £2.50 ticket on it. I wanted to find out a bit more about it.

0:50:040:50:08

Well, it's brown and it's got this little diamond-shaped thing there.

0:50:080:50:14

You know, not very inspiring so far.

0:50:140:50:16

But then you open it up

0:50:160:50:19

and, oh, my goodness.

0:50:190:50:21

Straeter, so Dutch.

0:50:210:50:24

1950s.

0:50:240:50:26

And my goodness, have we gone downhill since then!

0:50:260:50:30

Because look at this. It's got a light for your make-up...

0:50:300:50:35

A light that shines down in your handbag, how clever is that?

0:50:350:50:39

It's got somewhere for your lipstick, your perfume.

0:50:390:50:43

Not that we do it any more, but a little place for your cigarettes.

0:50:430:50:47

And in 24-carat gold.

0:50:470:50:50

Amazing.

0:50:500:50:52

I mean, this is it.

0:50:520:50:53

You know, I think this is something that some handbag designer today

0:50:530:50:58

could take a patent out on.

0:50:580:51:00

-I think you're right.

-Because, look, it's amazing.

0:51:000:51:03

It's really well thought out.

0:51:030:51:06

And amazingly, it was designed by a man.

0:51:060:51:08

-Oh, right!

-So... I know!

0:51:080:51:11

I know.

0:51:110:51:13

I mean, what can I say?

0:51:130:51:15

Now, the bad news.

0:51:150:51:16

-OK.

-It's not leather.

0:51:160:51:19

-Oh!

-They were often in, you know,

0:51:190:51:22

leathers and crocodile and various things, but this isn't.

0:51:220:51:26

This is synthetic.

0:51:260:51:28

Why would you put 24-carat gold in a non-leather bag?

0:51:280:51:33

-Exactly.

-But they have.

0:51:330:51:35

But it's still, you know, a fantastic piece of design.

0:51:350:51:39

And, you know, it's good vintage, vintage is in.

0:51:390:51:44

-Mm-hm.

-So I'm very glad you didn't put it on your stall.

0:51:440:51:49

-So am I, now.

-For £2.

0:51:490:51:51

Because I think it's very, very easily

0:51:510:51:56

£150, £200.

0:51:560:51:58

OK. Thank you so much. Very much. That's fantastic.

0:51:580:52:01

When I knew I was coming to Trelissick, which, as you can see,

0:52:040:52:07

couldn't be much closer to the sea itself,

0:52:070:52:10

I was hoping beyond hopes

0:52:100:52:11

that I would find things that came with a great maritime history.

0:52:110:52:15

And well, thank you very much,

0:52:150:52:18

because certainly you have not let me down.

0:52:180:52:20

So, we've got a life ring and a life belt

0:52:200:52:24

-relating to the Flying Enterprise, the SS Flying Enterprise...

-Yes.

0:52:240:52:28

-..on its way from Hamburg to New York.

-Yes.

0:52:280:52:31

Heading out across the Atlantic, and then what happened?

0:52:310:52:34

The story is that the Flying Enterprise in 1952

0:52:340:52:37

sank about 40 miles south of the Lizard, really bad storm,

0:52:370:52:40

and it's thought that she struck a rogue wave -

0:52:400:52:43

or vice versa, the rogue wave struck her,

0:52:430:52:45

raised her up and broke her back.

0:52:450:52:48

Her framing was broken, there was a crack across the weather deck.

0:52:480:52:52

And the cargo shifted and she was then listing in bad weather.

0:52:520:52:56

And the captain, Captain Kirk Carlson, stayed aboard that vessel,

0:52:560:53:00

refused to leave it, would not give up salvage of that vessel

0:53:000:53:03

until that ship slipped below the waves.

0:53:030:53:06

-I love this image here...

-Can you just quickly identify who is who?

0:53:060:53:10

Yes, certainly. On the right,

0:53:100:53:11

wearing the cap, is Captain Dan Parker.

0:53:110:53:14

He was the master of the salvage tug, the Turmoil.

0:53:140:53:16

On the left, wearing the beret,

0:53:160:53:18

that's the first mate of the Turmoil, Ken Dancy.

0:53:180:53:21

He's the guy that jumped aboard to help Captain Carlson,

0:53:210:53:25

who's seen pictured there in the centre.

0:53:250:53:27

So it was in trouble, it sent out distress messages...

0:53:270:53:31

-Yes.

-And the tug came from not a million miles away, did it?

0:53:310:53:34

The Turmoil was often berthed in Falmouth...

0:53:340:53:36

-Just over there.

-Just over here.

0:53:360:53:38

We're looking right down the river Fal.

0:53:380:53:40

And they would react to any maritime maydays

0:53:400:53:43

and they would go out to bring the salvage back to port.

0:53:430:53:46

So, on their way back, it slipped its tug...

0:53:460:53:49

It slipped its line or...?

0:53:490:53:51

They got a line on it, bad weather hit them again.

0:53:510:53:54

The tow parted. Her back was broken

0:53:540:53:56

and there was no way she was ever going to make it back to port.

0:53:560:53:59

And it was at that stage that Dancy and Carlson realised

0:53:590:54:02

that she had listed so far over that she was about to sink.

0:54:020:54:06

They called the Turmoil alongside and Captain Carlson,

0:54:060:54:10

wearing this life jacket, and Ken Dancy, carrying that life ring,

0:54:100:54:14

ran along the now-horizontal funnel,

0:54:140:54:17

jumped into the sea, and for about five to ten minutes,

0:54:170:54:20

swam to the Turmoil and were then hauled aboard

0:54:200:54:23

and fortunately given some rum and dry clothes,

0:54:230:54:26

they were healthy and happy.

0:54:260:54:27

Carlson went back to New York, where he was...

0:54:270:54:30

Although he was Danish, he was a resident in New York

0:54:300:54:34

and he was given a ticker-tape parade welcome.

0:54:340:54:37

This had become such an international media event.

0:54:370:54:41

Ken Dancy was honoured,

0:54:410:54:42

as was the captain as well.

0:54:420:54:45

But it was really the bravery of Carlson

0:54:450:54:48

that captured the public imagination.

0:54:480:54:51

There's also, you know,

0:54:510:54:52

a conspiracy theory about, why was there so much interest in the cargo?

0:54:520:54:56

I mean, it was meant to be pig iron and cocoa, or something like that.

0:54:560:55:00

The conspiracy theory was that

0:55:000:55:02

she was actually carrying, covertly, zirconium,

0:55:020:55:05

which was going to be used to make nuclear fuel

0:55:050:55:08

for the first American atomic submarine, the Nautilus.

0:55:080:55:11

And in fact, the launch of the Nautilus was set back a year,

0:55:110:55:15

coincidentally, from this disaster.

0:55:150:55:17

So, these things were saved,

0:55:170:55:20

and how do they relate to you and your family?

0:55:200:55:23

Well, the man you can see here in this photograph

0:55:230:55:26

is Jock Drennan, and he's my grandfather.

0:55:260:55:29

He ran what was at the time the most famous maritime, mariner's pub

0:55:290:55:33

in the world, the Chainlocker in Falmouth.

0:55:330:55:35

Ken Dancy, the family friend that he was, brought both of these items in.

0:55:350:55:39

He'd been given the life jacket by Captain Carlson.

0:55:390:55:42

He brought them in to my grandad,

0:55:420:55:43

my grandad had them cased and put them on the wall.

0:55:430:55:46

After my grandfather died, his son Bob, my uncle Bob took over the pub.

0:55:460:55:50

Sadly, Bob died and then when his widow retired,

0:55:500:55:52

she sold the pub and its contents.

0:55:520:55:54

And I just happened, just by pure chance, to see these

0:55:540:55:58

in a local auction room at St Day, a few miles down the road.

0:55:580:56:02

And I couldn't stand to see them go completely out of the family,

0:56:020:56:05

so I just had to go and buy them and bring them back in.

0:56:050:56:09

I think you'll all agree that is an amazing story.

0:56:090:56:12

And Hollywood couldn't have made a better one out of it.

0:56:120:56:15

They are poignant items.

0:56:150:56:16

The conspiracy theory sort of adds speculation to it all.

0:56:160:56:20

But more than anything, his bravery, or their bravery,

0:56:200:56:23

-I mean, that was truly amazing.

-Definitely.

0:56:230:56:26

So, what do we say?

0:56:260:56:27

Difficult because they're unique,

0:56:270:56:29

but certainly I would think, if you ever did decide to sell them,

0:56:290:56:33

in an international saleroom, I would see them fetching

0:56:330:56:36

certainly between £10,000 and £15,000.

0:56:360:56:39

Wow!

0:56:390:56:41

Seriously?

0:56:410:56:43

Oh, I'm very serious.

0:56:430:56:44

I'm amazed.

0:56:460:56:48

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you!

0:56:480:56:51

APPLAUSE

0:56:510:56:53

All day I've been watching the yachts

0:56:590:57:01

coming and going in the estuary there

0:57:010:57:03

and thinking about that shipwreck

0:57:030:57:04

that Jon Baddeley was talking about, back in the early '50s.

0:57:040:57:07

Just as the waters closed over that ship,

0:57:070:57:10

the years have folded over that story

0:57:100:57:12

and it's been largely forgotten now.

0:57:120:57:14

But that's the great thing about the Antiques Roadshow -

0:57:140:57:16

we can bring these stories back to life.

0:57:160:57:18

From Trelissick House and Gardens, until next time, bye-bye.

0:57:180:57:21

Fiona Bruce and the team head for the beautiful gardens of Trelissick near Truro in Cornwall. Objects under examination by the experts include a bust of Churchill found at the bottom of a lake and a group of medals owned by a proud grandson. A lifebelt tells the graphic story of a shipwreck off the Lizard peninsula in which the crew were rescued in desperate circumstances.