Cracknell Cash in the Attic


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Cracknell

Series looking at the value of household junk. Margaret and Caren try to raise money for a special surprise for Auntie Dorothy, who has helped the family through a difficult time.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic, the programme that hunts for antiques and collectables in your home

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and then sells them with you at auction. Today I'm in County Durham.

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This area is credited with being the birthplace of the railways,

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because it was here in nearby Darlington in 1825

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that the very first steam locomotive made its maiden journey at a remarkable 12 miles an hour!

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And before we go full steam ahead to our rummage location, we've stopped off at nearby Redworth Hall,

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a magnificent Jacobean mansion.

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It was owned by the same family for hundreds of years

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and was once the site of bloody battles in the Civil War.

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But in the 20th century, it was converted into a luxury hotel.

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Throughout history it's attracted royalty and the aristocracy.

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But recently it's been a favourite haunt of a different kind of royalty - millionaire footballers.

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Coming up on today's Cash In The Attic - a family with an appetite for antiques.

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I used to take them off the dressing table and chew them a little bit.

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Our expert has food on his mind.

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Didn't Napoleon say that his army should march on their stomach? Yes.

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Mine is making some funny noises. You need some food, John!

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And we're served up some successes at auction.

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That's brilliant! That's great! I didn't think it would come to that.

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But will we have reached our target when the final hammer falls?

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I'm meeting a lovely lady who used to have her own antique shop,

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so her house should be a veritable treasure trove.

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This cosy house in the historic town of Darlington is home to Margaret Cracknell and her daughter Karen.

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Margaret's late husband was in the armed forces and the couple moved house numerous times,

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living all over the world.

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But since Karen and grandson James moved in with her a year ago,

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they are running out of space for their combined possessions.

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Angela, how are you? I'm very well, John. We've got a crack mother and daughter team to meet this morning.

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So what do you know about them? Mum used to have an antique shop, so she knows a bit about the business.

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So hopefully we'll find a few gems today. Well, you go and look for the gems, I'll go and meet the mum. OK.

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Karen, Margaret... Hello, Angela. You're talking about your grandson here?

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Yes, we are. He's a gem, you know, he really is.

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Now, I gather, Margaret, that you used to be in the antiques business yourself, didn't you? That's right.

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In a very small way. I just dealt with porcelain.

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And it was a small shop, but it was a little gem for me because I enjoyed it.

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It went off very well and the villagers liked it. This was up in Scotland?

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In Drymen, near Loch Lomond. So you must've been brought up around beautiful things and antiques?

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Yes. I've grown up with antiques. I love antiques.

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And we have done antique fairs, the odd boot sale, which are great fun.

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It's been a great part of my life.

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So now, why have you called us in?

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Mum's had large houses and she's downsized and downsized,

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so she's got rid of a lot of things already. But it's now that you really want to empty your cupboards.

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I want rock bottom actually. I don't want any more!

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So have you helped your mum buy some of these things over the years?

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Um... Well, I've been present at times, but mainly... Antique shops?

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We've done the antique fairs and sometimes the odd boot sale.

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Dad was a good partner for that, because he used to do all my buying and stuff, so he was good at that.

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And how much do you want to raise? About 500. That would be fine.

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And what are you going to spend it on, Margaret?

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Well, I've got a sister-in-law that's really been thoughtful and kind since my husband died

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and I would just love to give her a nice treat. And she's got the same interests as me, art and things.

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And she doesn't know nothing about it yet, so... So this will be a surprise? Yes. I hope so.

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It'll be a lovely surprise. She has been so kind. And it'll be nice for them to spend some time together.

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So ?500 is the target. I think we've got our work cut out, so shall we get started? OK. Come on. Thank you.

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Treating sister-in-law Dorothy to a day out sounds like a very worthwhile cause.

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And with Margaret's background in antiques, we should have a veritable feast of treasures to choose from.

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And we've got our expert on hand. John Cameron is based in Portsmouth,

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but has driven all the way across the country to lend us his years of experience as a valuer.

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John... Good morning. This is Margaret and Karen. And I see you've got an armful of babes there.

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It's not the first time you've caught me with dolls on my arm(!) Where did these come from, Margaret?

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The oriental ones come from Kuala Lumpur as we lived there for a while. They must be over 50 year old.

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That's interesting as a lot of the great European doll manufacturers did make oriental dolls.

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And that was due to fashion again.

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There was a huge fascination with oriental styles from the 1870s right up until the 1930s.

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We see a lot of oriental porcelain, a lot of lacquer, Japanese prints.

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And children even started to play with oriental dolls.

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So these could quite easily have been European examples.

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Did you play with them when you were a little girl, Karen?

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Yes. Unfortunately, I did use to take them off the dressing table and chew them a bit.

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They're a bit worse for wear. Is that all she did? Chew them? Yes.

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Their noses and things. Thank God you're here to tell the tale today!

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And you haven't done too much damage.

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Fascinating history about the dolls, John, but what would their 21st-century price be at auction?

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If I were putting these into auction, I'd keep them together.

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There's no individual huge value. I'd put them in at ?40 to ?60

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and see where we go from there. Hopefully, it would be upwards.

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Pleased with that? That's good. And maybe if you hadn't chewed their noses off? It's my fault again!

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But what a nice start to your ?500 target. Yes. Let's see what else we can add to the pot. Come on, guys.

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'?40 for the dolls is a cracking start to today's search.

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'But with a ?500 target, our expert wastes no time in getting down to the business of rummaging.

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'Straight away this heavy cut-glass decanter catches his eye.

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'It has a lovely silver top.

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'And John gives it a sparkly ?60-?80 price tag.

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'In the living room, Karen spots our first piece of porcelain today.

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'It's a soup dish and plate made by Royal Worcester who have been producing bone china since 1751.

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'John estimates its value at ?30 to ?40.

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'Meanwhile, Margaret and I have spotted something that I hope will really excite our expert.'

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John, look at this wonderful collection of porcelain figurines.

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May I see? Bonaparte and his generals.

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I'd say they're German.

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German porcelain. And 19th century.

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It's very similar to Sitzendorf or one of the German factories like that from Bavaria.

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They do look grand with all the gilding on their epaulettes and on their medals. Absolutely fantastic.

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Well, collecting-wise, they'd be very popular,

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because they'd not only appeal to collectors of porcelain figures,

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but also the Napoleonic Wars in general provide such a diverse area for collecting.

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And also for people with a fascination in one of the most important periods of French history.

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The one person that is missing from this team, though, is Josephine,

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because the French soldiers believed that she was their lucky talisman

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because while Bonaparte was married to her, he never lost a single battle.

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So, John, bearing in mind that they are French and have such an association with French history,

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how much do you think we might get for them in a British auction house?

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I think they should have no problem, seven of them together, making about ?150 to ?200. Oh, brilliant.

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?150, Margaret, a great deal to put in the pot. Your sister-in-law is going to have a great day out.

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That's lovely. Good. Now, didn't Napoleon say that his army should march on their stomach? Yes.

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Talking of which, mine's making funny noises. You need food, John. You've got to look after the troops.

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We better get you in the kitchen!

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'That was a brilliant find. And our lovely lady heads off to give John a snack and a cuppa to keep him going.

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'We've made a good start towards the ?500 for their day out.

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'But before settling in this pretty village near Darlington,

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'our retired antique shop owner has lived all over the country and the world. I'm keen to find out more.'

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Margaret, after a lifetime of travelling around the world with your husband,

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you've settled in a lovely village community in England. It must be lovely to put down roots.

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Yes. And hopefully I'll never have to move again. How many times did you move in your life?

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Oh, it must've been 35.

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Really, I mean, I can't tell you... But sometimes there's been houses, three or four in the same area.

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But the places... We've done most of Britain. You know, we've lived in most of Britain. We've lived abroad.

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And Germany. This is because your husband was in the army? Yes.

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Is that why you've got so much sort of military memorabilia in the house? Well, it could be, yes,

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because my husband loved carvings. And he just bought a lot of carvings.

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I mean, we haven't got half as many now as we did do because of downsizing all the time.

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But he was the culprit for some things and I like the ceramics.

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Now, your husband Robert died last year, didn't he? Yes. How long were you married? 54 years, yes.

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And you had four lovely children? Yes, four lovely children, so I've not missed out on anything.

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And had a happy life. But you miss him dreadfully, don't you? Yes, I do, very much, yes.

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But your sister-in-law Dorothy has been a particular help to you, hasn't she? Absolutely.

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She's been such a stalwart as far as feeling as though there's someone else there that cares,

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so that was lovely for her to be like that. And she has lost her husband, so she knows what it feels like.

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She's a lovely person anyway. We're going to raise money to give your sister-in-law a surprise day out.

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Shall we see what else we can find? OK.

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'Dorothy was clearly a big support to Margaret over what must have been a very difficult year,

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'so I can't think of anything better than raising money for them to have a day trip together.

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'I hope the others have been busy.'

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John? John, what do you think about this?

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Oh, a sampler? Yes.

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It's an interesting piece and they tend to have information on them about the maker and the date.

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And we can see here at the bottom,

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"Elizabeth Brown finished this work, August 1847." That's lovely.

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Samplers like this were very popular in the 19th century and earlier.

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You do see 18th century and 19th century samplers. And they tended to be produced by young ladies.

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And the word "sampler" comes from the Latin "exemplum", meaning "an example to follow".

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It was considered a real skill to be able to produce this.

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And you can understand why collectors really do covet good quality samplers, can't you? Yes.

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Condition of samplers - very important. Right.

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The two biggest sources of damage to a sampler - sunlight.

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And we can see the colours in this are pretty good. Oh, right.

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Never hang it in direct sunlight. Always keep a sampler on a shaded wall and the colours will last.

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So this has been looked after. And the other thing is the moth larvae which will eat away.

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So there's no moth in here. Good. And the colours are pretty good,

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although it's quite a plain sampler.

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Value-wise, I think we ought to be looking at ?60 to ?80 for it. Yes.

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But somebody might push it over 100. With current demand considered, that's where I'd pitch an estimate.

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So what do you think? Yes. I think that's another one for the auction. Yeah? Great. Great news.

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Good find, but we're not there yet. Let's see what else we can turn up. OK.

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?60 for that pretty sampler.

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That's a cracking find. I think Karen has inherited her mum's eye for antiques.

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She also spots these ceramic figures in the hall.

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John hopes they could bag us a tidy ?25 to ?45 when they go to auction.

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And we'll also be sending this collection of Welsh china.

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Margaret's eye for ceramics is doing us proud

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as John values it at ?50-?80.

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And in the living room, John spots yet another interesting looking piece of porcelain.

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Margaret? Karen? Come here a second.

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I want to talk to you about this little cream pot, this little porcelain cream pot.

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Oh, yes. So you're the porcelain buff, aren't you? Well, I try to be. So what can you tell me about it?

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It's Meissen by the swords on the bottom. It's a really pretty colour.

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I don't know whether it's hand-painted or not,

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but it does look like it.

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It's not a transfer print. That's hand-painted.

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It's pretty. There's real skill and artwork gone into that piece.

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And that's very typical of a fashion in the rococo period in the 1720s and '30s.

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This scene of this courting couple with their musical instruments

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is very typical of the French artist, Watteau.

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Again, the little moulded finial of the flower rose at the top there,

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all very typical. This is a very typical Meissen piece.

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This little intertwined handle here, like little branches intertwined there, again, very typical.

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Damaged there. But I think even in this condition it should make about ?30 or so.

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So, Margaret, can we sell it? Oh, yes, I think so. Now, Mum, are you sure you'd like to get rid of it?

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You have enjoyed it. Well, I've had my time with it, so it can go. All right. Are you happy with ?30?

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Yes, that could be all right. Well, if you're happy with it then, yes.

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'I'm glad Margaret's willing to let that piece go as every pound counts towards our ?500 target today.

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'Whilst Margaret and John carry on looking for saleable treasures, I catch up with daughter Karen.'

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Karen, you and your mum are quite a team as you were a great support to her during her bereavement.

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But she's been a great support to you because after your divorce, you and your son moved in with your mum.

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How did your mum take to having a six-year-old running around?

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Well, to begin with, it did break the peace and quiet.

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But Mum has melded into it now and I don't think she'd be without him. She just absolutely adores him.

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And he brings a lot of life and a lot of fun into the home.

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And they do spend a lot of time laughing.

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And generally, the different generation gap,

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Mum is James's playmate, really, now. So that's how it's ended up.

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So he loves having Granny around? Absolutely, yes.

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We really have turned out to be quite a good team, actually.

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We've had adjustments to make, but we've made them and come up tops.

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Karen, it also sounds as if your mum and dad were a terrific team. Yes, they were. First class.

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They really, really were. They just lived for each other. And they knew each other inside and out.

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And what they wanted to do were the same things and they wanted to please each other.

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They had a wonderful life together and they were very close, so it has been a huge change recently, yes.

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Well, let's get back to work and see what else we can take to auction

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to give your Auntie Dorothy that special day out. Lovely.

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'Having three generations under one roof really works here. It's lovely to see a family that's so close.

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'We're nearing the end of today's search but are still hard at work on the hunt for collectables.'

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Margaret, I'd like to ask you a few questions about this box,

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because it's interesting to know what other people know about something.

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They often give you some history, so come on. Well, really, it was a present to me.

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It was a Christmas present that my son bought me.

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And I don't know where he got it from, really. You know, that's all there is to it. There's no history.

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OK. Have you any idea about its age?

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Well, I should think it's heading on for a century, would you think so? It's a bit older than that.

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And I'll tell you for why. Do you know the wood?

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Is it rosewood? It is indeed. It's rosewood. And that was a timber much used in the Regency period,

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in the period of about 1820-1830, around the time of George III and the transition to George IV.

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Now, the other thing I find interesting about that is this brass inlay. It's rather nice, that.

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It is indeed. Again, a very typical feature on Regency furniture.

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And a feature that was popularised by a very well-known cabinetmaker called George Bullock.

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But it has suffered knocks. Some of the brass work is lifting up.

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And some of the veneers have chipped here and there. So it is a piece that's due for restoration.

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But it is a Regency writing box.

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Value-wise today, well, I'd put this into auction with an estimate of about ?50 to ?80.

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I'd be hoping it makes ?100. But I think ?50 is a tempting estimate. That's fair enough. Exactly.

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So what do you think? Can we sell it? You can. That's all right, yes!

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?50 to ?80 is certainly a price tag to write home about. Quick work, folks!

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We've left no stone unturned and no cupboard unopened in our rummage.

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And I'm pretty impressed with our haul so far.

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Margaret digs out a collection of linen from an almost forgotten cupboard.

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There are tablecloths, some dating from Victorian times.

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And John values them at ?30 to ?50.

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I spot this lovely pair of vases produced by a factory in the Gouda province of the Netherlands.

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The area is famous for its distinctive style of pottery.

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We're hoping that these vases will capture the bidders' imagination.

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We're on the home stretch for today's rummage, but John has got one last lot up his sleeve.

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Well, I don't think I've seen so many handkerchiefs in any one place.

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This is a collection that would rival even somebody like Tom Jones,

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who's probably had his fair share of hankies and other things thrown at him on stage over the years.

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But I'm intrigued to know, how did this collection start?

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Well, just by, first of all, finding a couple of pretty textiles, more than hankies.

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I just thought of them as textiles, the era of where they come from and what year and all that.

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And there's a lot of handkerchiefs from the First World War that they sent their wives instead of cards.

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Embroidered with their insignias and their badges and so on on top of them. Yes, that's right.

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People don't use handkerchiefs as much as they did. Once upon a time, every gentleman wore a handkerchief.

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And they were often used as a kind of a language. What you did with the handkerchief could signal...

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You picked one and dropped it. What did that mean? Do tell me.

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The boyfriend picked it up and there you were. Oh, I see!

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That's what that meant. I think it did. What on earth have you got here, John? This looks fantastic!

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Well, we have got a fantastic collection of handkerchiefs. God only knows how many are here!

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But I'll have to go through these if I'm to value them. How many do you think are here? About 300 to 400.

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I forget now. I did count them at one stage.

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They're wonderful. What do we think they're worth, John, if we take them to auction?

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Let's all have a stab at what we think they might be worth. Angela?

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Oh, my gosh! Phew!

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Perhaps someone would be prepared to pay...

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..?40 for them? Karen? Well, it's difficult to say as nobody really knows and it depends who's there.

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I would say 30 to 40. Yes. Margaret? Good starting block.

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Come on, put your money where your mouth is!

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You honestly think they're going to make more than that, don't you?

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Well, to me, it's a personal thing, but 30 to 40 is fine.

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Well, the thing is, whatever you get for these handkerchiefs, it's going to be a bonus,

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because I can tell you that taking John's lowest estimate on everything that he's looked at today,

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we reckon that you should be able to make ?555.

0:22:110:22:17

Wow! That's good! Which means you're on your way to a great day out with Dorothy. Oh, great.

0:22:170:22:23

But depending on what we make on the handkerchiefs, this little treasure trove of textiles here,

0:22:230:22:29

whatever that makes is going to be a bonus on top, which means, um...

0:22:290:22:33

We'll just have to wait until the hammer comes down. Lovely!

0:22:330:22:38

'Our rummaging in Margaret's home has given us a fantastic selection of items to take to auction.

0:22:380:22:43

'Our rummaging in Margaret's home has given us a fantastic selection of items to take to auction.

0:22:430:22:44

'We've got the 19th-century sampler, valued at ?60 to ?80,

0:22:440:22:48

'Margaret's collection of dolls with a combined estimate of 40 to 60.

0:22:480:22:53

'And the Napoleonic busts,

0:22:540:22:56

'which we're hoping could bag us a massive ?150 to ?200 at auction.

0:22:560:23:00

'But we have to wait until the sale

0:23:000:23:02

'for John to reveal his valuation on the handkerchiefs

0:23:020:23:06

'and see whether we were right with our guestimates.

0:23:060:23:09

'Still to come on Cash In The Attic - our expert feels that his neck is on the line.'

0:23:090:23:16

I hope that we get that target for them or I may face the guillotine.

0:23:160:23:20

'And there are some tense moments.'

0:23:200:23:22

Not a lot of money. Not a lot of money at all.

0:23:220:23:26

'But John wins our ladies over.'

0:23:260:23:28

You're so clever, John. No, I'm not. You're too kind, Margaret.

0:23:280:23:33

'So will we have reached our target when the final hammer falls?'

0:23:330:23:37

Don't you just love Margaret and Karen? What a great mother and daughter team they are!

0:23:410:23:47

And they do have some lovely items, which we've brought from their home in Darlington down the A1

0:23:470:23:53

to Thompsons Auction Rooms here in Harrogate.

0:23:530:23:57

Now our goal today is to raise ?500,

0:23:570:24:00

so that Margaret can give her sister-in-law a very special treat.

0:24:000:24:05

It's her way of saying thank you for the great support that she gave her

0:24:050:24:10

after the death of Richard, Margaret's beloved husband of 54 years.

0:24:100:24:15

So there's an awful lot riding on those items today when they go under the hammer.

0:24:150:24:20

'I'm losing my voice, but nothing will hold me back from our sale.

0:24:200:24:24

'And John Cameron spots me checking out one of my favourite lots.'

0:24:240:24:29

Ah, there you are, Angela. Hi, John. Napoleon and his team.

0:24:290:24:33

They look as if they're lined up, ready for battle, don't they?

0:24:330:24:37

They look splendid up there. And you were rather impressed with them. I was.

0:24:370:24:41

Not only do they need to do battle today, but so do we. We really want to do well for the family today.

0:24:410:24:49

Well, they were fantastic. And I do hope we get that target for them

0:24:490:24:52

or I may face the guillotine.

0:24:520:24:55

The sampler was wonderful. Yes, it had reserved its colours nicely.

0:24:550:25:00

It was a decent sampler, a good example. I still can't get over that amazing collection of handkerchiefs.

0:25:000:25:06

I've never seen anything like it. There was so much in there, it was difficult to put a value on it.

0:25:060:25:12

She had some lovely commemorative examples, Victorian and Edwardian, so I'm hopeful for those.

0:25:120:25:18

Not only was it difficult to put on a price, we had to guess how much they'd go for. Will you tell us?

0:25:180:25:24

Patience, Angela. Let's wait till the Cracknells are here, shall we? OK. Let's go and find them.

0:25:240:25:30

'Well, I've got high hopes for those handkerchiefs. We've got a fantastic variety of lots here today,

0:25:300:25:37

'but how will Margaret and Karen feel when they go under the hammer?'

0:25:370:25:42

Hello, Angela. Hello. How do you feel seeing all your lovely things now in a public auction room?

0:25:420:25:49

Yes, but it's time they did go.

0:25:490:25:51

It's a bit cluttered in my house, so you can see that it would be a relief to get rid of some of them.

0:25:510:25:58

Now, John kept us all in suspense about those handkerchiefs,

0:25:580:26:02

as we've never seen anything like that before, and we had to guess how much we thought they were worth.

0:26:020:26:10

So are you going to put us out of our misery, John? I've actually got no idea what they're worth.

0:26:100:26:16

But we have to come up with an estimate and I've gone for ?80 to ?120. Never? That's a surprise.

0:26:160:26:22

Fantastic. I did take the liberty of taking a white one out just in case I need it for a surrender.

0:26:220:26:28

Well, you did right there because you know what I'm like! I do. That's why I took it out!

0:26:280:26:34

Let's see what everybody is prepared to pay for your lovely things as the auction room is filling up.

0:26:340:26:41

Shall we take our places? Oh, yes.

0:26:410:26:43

?80 for the handkerchiefs - that's a fantastic valuation.

0:26:430:26:47

I'm not sorry we were all wrong with our guestimates. If you're thinking of buying or selling at auction,

0:26:470:26:54

remember that commission will be added to your bill. So always check with your local saleroom first.

0:26:540:27:00

The bidders are ready and waiting.

0:27:000:27:02

The auctioneer is ready. And we've found a spot with a great view of the action, so it's all systems go.

0:27:020:27:09

First up is Margaret's collection of Victorian linen which we're hoping will raise ?30 to ?50.

0:27:090:27:15

Start me at ?20? 20 we have.

0:27:150:27:19

25, do I see? 25. 30.

0:27:190:27:23

35. 40.

0:27:230:27:25

No? Standing at the back at 40. Do I see...? 45.

0:27:250:27:29

50. No? 50 with you, sir. 55 anywhere else?

0:27:290:27:33

Gentleman's bid at 50. Are we all finished now at ?50?

0:27:330:27:37

Right in the middle. Right in the middle of your estimate, John. That's fine. Oh, that's great.

0:27:370:27:45

?50 is a solid start for our sale today. With a ?500 target to reach,

0:27:450:27:49

I hope the bidders have plenty of cash and are willing to dig deep.

0:27:490:27:55

It's our first porcelain lot up next, the pretty Meissen jug,

0:27:550:27:59

which John estimated at ?30.

0:27:590:28:01

Lot 120 is the late Meissen lidded jug. This is as found. Start me at ?20? ?10?

0:28:010:28:08

?10 somewhere? 10 we have. 15.

0:28:080:28:11

20, madam? 20. Good.

0:28:110:28:14

25. Gentleman's bid at 25. Do I see 30?

0:28:140:28:19

Gentleman's bid now at 25. 30, new bidder.

0:28:190:28:23

No? Lady's bid now at ?30. Are we all finished now at ?30?

0:28:230:28:28

John, on the button.

0:28:280:28:30

Our expert's valuations are certainly proving accurate so far.

0:28:300:28:34

Let's hope it lasts as our ceramic figures come under the hammer.

0:28:340:28:38

John valued them at ?25 to ?45.

0:28:380:28:42

Start me at ?20?

0:28:420:28:44

?10? 10 we have. 15 do I see?

0:28:440:28:48

Lady's bid now at 10. Do I see 15 anywhere?

0:28:480:28:52

In the middle of the room at 10. Are we all finished now at ?10?

0:28:520:28:57

?10. ?10! Not terribly good, but it does... That's all right.

0:28:570:29:02

?10 is a disappointing result for those ceramic figurines.

0:29:020:29:07

But Margaret isn't too downhearted.

0:29:070:29:10

I just hope the porcelain collectors get a bit more excited about the rest of our lovely lady's pieces.

0:29:100:29:16

But next up is the Royal Worcester soup plate and bowl.

0:29:160:29:21

Lot 150 is the Royal Worcester soup dish and plate.

0:29:210:29:25

Start me at ?20? ?10?

0:29:250:29:27

Five pounds? Five we have. 10.

0:29:270:29:31

15, madam? No? Gentleman's bid at 10. Do I see 15 anywhere?

0:29:310:29:35

On my left at ?10. Do I see 15?

0:29:350:29:39

Your bid, sir, now at ?10.

0:29:390:29:41

?10, I'm afraid. Not a lot of money.

0:29:410:29:44

Not a lot of money at all. No!

0:29:440:29:48

Another ?10 result.

0:29:480:29:51

Our strong start has dwindled somewhat.

0:29:510:29:54

Have we got our work cut out here today?

0:29:540:29:57

Maybe our delicate, Victorian sampler

0:29:570:30:00

will manage to get the bidders back on-side.

0:30:000:30:03

John estimated its value at ?60-?80.

0:30:030:30:06

Embroidered sampler dated 1847, lot 140. Start me at ?50?

0:30:060:30:12

?20? 20 we have. 25 do I see?

0:30:120:30:15

Lady's bid now at 20. 25. 30.

0:30:150:30:19

35. Your bid, sir, at 35. Do I see 40 anywhere?

0:30:190:30:24

Gentleman's bid at 35. Are we all finished now in the room at ?35...?

0:30:240:30:29

Oh, that is cheap. That's very cheap. It is. Disappointing.

0:30:290:30:34

But that's the thing with auctions. They're always so unpredictable.

0:30:340:30:38

With just one lot left before the half-time total,

0:30:380:30:42

we have no idea what will happen next.

0:30:420:30:45

Well, we're into battle, Napoleon at the head of his troops.

0:30:450:30:49

And what we want is a cracking good price for this, isn't it? It is.

0:30:490:30:53

Are you not sad to see him go because you're fond of Napoleon?

0:30:530:30:57

I do really like him. You have a soft spot for him? I have!

0:30:570:31:01

What do we reckon, John? Well, we're looking for ?150 for them or more if possible. But let's see how we go.

0:31:010:31:09

Start me at ?50? ?50?

0:31:090:31:12

50 we have. 60 do I see?

0:31:120:31:16

60. 70. 80. 90. 100.

0:31:160:31:20

110. 120.

0:31:200:31:23

130. 140. 150.

0:31:230:31:26

On my left at 150. Do I see 160? New bidder - 160.

0:31:260:31:32

Good. New bidder - we like that.

0:31:320:31:35

180. 190. 200.

0:31:350:31:38

No? 200 seated. Do I see 210?

0:31:380:31:41

Gentleman's bid at 200. Are we all finished now? Seated at ?200...

0:31:410:31:47

Excellent. ?200. Brilliant! Do you know how much you paid for them?

0:31:470:31:51

I think it was 150 or something. We did pay a lot for them. But it's still profitable, isn't it?

0:31:510:31:57

Fantastic.

0:31:570:31:59

What a relief! ?200 is a triumphant result for the Napoleonic busts.

0:31:590:32:04

And it's a great way to end what's been a rather up and down morning.

0:32:040:32:08

Half-time at the auction. This is where the girls come out with the pom-poms... No, it's not.

0:32:080:32:14

No, this is where I tell you how much we've made. And so far what you've made is ?335.

0:32:140:32:21

So we are over the halfway mark. And as I say, lots of nice things still to come.

0:32:210:32:27

But as it is the halfway point, why don't we put our feet up for five minutes? What will you do, John?

0:32:270:32:34

I'm going to see a little lot I spotted as I came in. I'll tell you about it when we get back. OK.

0:32:340:32:40

As we head off for a cuppa, Margaret's passion for porcelain is obviously rubbing off on John.

0:32:440:32:51

And keeping with the theme of tea,

0:32:510:32:53

I was delighted when I spotted this fantastic little example of early English porcelain production.

0:32:530:33:00

What an absolute cracker, in tip-top condition,

0:33:000:33:03

which is marvellous when you think how much abuse a teapot can get.

0:33:030:33:07

Given the amount of boiling hot water that goes inside a teapot, this is in perfect condition.

0:33:070:33:14

And the age? This little beauty is 250 years old. This is a piece of Worcester porcelain.

0:33:140:33:20

It's not marked, so how do we know that? Worcester is very distinctive.

0:33:200:33:26

There's peppering around the edge. That's a classic Worcester sign.

0:33:260:33:31

And also the pooling of the glaze in the corners as well,

0:33:310:33:35

that bluish tinge, is another classic Worcester feature.

0:33:350:33:39

Estimate in the catalogue - ?150 to ?200. I think that's great.

0:33:390:33:43

If you bought this from a specialist dealer, I'd be surprised if you had much change out of ?400 or ?500.

0:33:430:33:49

A real classic example from one of Britain's best porcelain producers, the Worcester teapot.

0:33:490:33:55

'The second half of the auction is already underway.

0:33:580:34:02

'I hope the luck of the Napoleonic busts rubs off on our other lots.

0:34:020:34:08

'Margaret's rosewood writing box is first under the hammer.'

0:34:080:34:12

Margaret, tell me about this lovely Victorian rosewood writing box. It's such an elegant piece.

0:34:120:34:19

Well, my son bought it for me for a Christmas present.

0:34:190:34:23

And with downsizing and everything, I haven't anywhere for it, really.

0:34:230:34:27

I'm sad for it to go but I have enjoyed it while I had it.

0:34:270:34:31

320 is the Victorian rosewood, brass-inlaid writing box.

0:34:310:34:36

Start the bidding here at ?30. 35 do I see?

0:34:360:34:41

35. 40. 45. 50.

0:34:410:34:44

My bid's still at 50. Do I see 55 anywhere?

0:34:440:34:47

My bid now, commission bid at ?50. Are we all finished now at ?50...?

0:34:470:34:53

Oh, well. Brilliant, ?50. That's good. Good price for that. Yes.

0:34:530:34:58

It's a good start to the second half and we're pleased with that result.

0:34:580:35:02

We've another china lot up next

0:35:020:35:04

and with a ?50 to ?80 estimate it's an important item for us.

0:35:040:35:08

Our porcelain sales have proved unpredictable. How will this fare?

0:35:080:35:13

Margaret, as well as appreciating fine china,

0:35:130:35:17

you like bright colours too, because we've got this collection of Welsh china coming up now,

0:35:170:35:23

described in the catalogue as "Gaudy Welsh China". Exactly.

0:35:230:35:27

Lot 330 is the collection of Gaudy Welsh China.

0:35:270:35:32

I'm 25 bid. 30 now?

0:35:320:35:34

My bid here at 25. Do I see 30? So interest in it already.

0:35:340:35:38

30. 35. Still my bid here at 35. Do I see 40?

0:35:380:35:43

Are we all finished now at ?35...? BANGS GAVEL

0:35:430:35:47

Not bad. What was the price?

0:35:470:35:50

?35 is 15 under estimate. Margaret doesn't seem too disappointed.

0:35:500:35:54

But we do need the bidders to be a bit more flash with the cash

0:35:540:35:58

for the rest of our lots.

0:35:580:36:00

Will the dolls take us closer to our ?500 target?

0:36:000:36:05

Now, Margaret, are you braced for this? Oh, I know.

0:36:050:36:09

It's the dolls coming up now and I don't think you really want to part with these, do you? Not really.

0:36:090:36:15

They've been with me for a long time. All the children wanted to play with them and I didn't let them.

0:36:150:36:21

So they've been my little dolls. Well, we've got a ?40 to ?60 price tag on them.

0:36:210:36:27

If they go for that, will you be happy? All right. Yes. All right. Yes, that's not bad.

0:36:270:36:34

Well, let's see what they do. Yes.

0:36:340:36:36

Collection of English, German and oriental dolls, lot 340.

0:36:360:36:41

Lot 340. Start me at ?20? ?10?

0:36:410:36:44

10. 15. 20.

0:36:440:36:48

Five. 30. 30 with the lady.

0:36:480:36:51

35 anywhere else? Lady's bid now at 30. Are we all finished now? In the doorway at ?30...

0:36:510:36:58

BANGS GAVEL 30. 30.

0:36:580:37:02

Oh. Oh...

0:37:020:37:04

Never mind. It's fine.

0:37:040:37:06

Margaret's putting a brave face on things.

0:37:060:37:09

?30 may be only ?10 under estimate,

0:37:090:37:11

but it was really tugging at her heartstrings to let them go at all.

0:37:110:37:15

I really do wish they'd made a bit more money for her.

0:37:150:37:19

And things don't get any better

0:37:190:37:21

when the pair of Gouda vases fail to make the bidders dig deep.

0:37:210:37:25

Are we all finished now at ?10...?

0:37:250:37:28

Selling well under their ?30 to ?40 estimate.

0:37:280:37:32

With just two of our items left today

0:37:320:37:35

and a big chunk of our target still outstanding, it's fingers crossed.

0:37:350:37:40

OK. Next up is our nice, heavy, cut-glass decanter with the silver-mounted top.

0:37:400:37:46

Really nice thing, this. And I know new, these are ?150, ?200 easily.

0:37:460:37:51

And you quite like this decanter, don't you? I do like the decanter. I think it's a really nice piece.

0:37:510:37:57

So how do you feel about your mum getting rid of it? It's up to Mum. There's plenty more in the cupboard!

0:37:570:38:04

I am 30 bid. 35 now? My bid here at 30.

0:38:040:38:08

35. 40. 45.

0:38:080:38:11

50. 55. 60.

0:38:110:38:14

Still my bid here at 60. Do I see 65?

0:38:140:38:16

Commission bid now at 60. Are we all finished at ?60...?

0:38:160:38:21

Oh, that was all right. That's fine, yeah. ?60, which was the bottom end of your estimate, John.

0:38:210:38:27

So you were once again right on the nose. You're so clever, John. No. You're so kind. That's the problem.

0:38:270:38:34

The decanter sale has cheered us up immensely,

0:38:340:38:38

topping up our fund by ?60. Let's drink to that.

0:38:380:38:41

It's almost the end of the sale

0:38:410:38:44

and the collection of handkerchiefs are last to go under the hammer.

0:38:440:38:48

And I for one can't wait to see how they do.

0:38:480:38:52

John, you put them in at between ?80 and ?120. Is that because you think there may be people

0:38:520:38:58

who collect the particular handkerchiefs that are tucked away in that pile?

0:38:580:39:04

Well, I didn't want to over-price them or under-price them.

0:39:040:39:08

Let's hope they've been displayed in two boxes, so that people would have had a good look through them.

0:39:080:39:15

Start the bidding here at ?30. 40 do I see? My bid here at 30. 40 we have.

0:39:150:39:20

50 now? Lady's bid at 40. Do I see 50?

0:39:200:39:24

50. 60. 70.

0:39:240:39:27

80. (80!) 80 still on my left.

0:39:270:39:30

90 do I see? On my left at ?80. Are we all finished now at ?80...?

0:39:300:39:35

Oh, well. Well done. That was good. That was a bit of luck there. Yes.

0:39:350:39:40

As opposed to method in my madness, if I'm honest. That was good.

0:39:400:39:44

?80 is a good final result.

0:39:440:39:46

After such a mixed day at auction,

0:39:460:39:49

it's time to see how we fared overall.

0:39:490:39:52

Margaret, I think it's an absolutely wonderful thing that you're doing,

0:39:520:39:56

this very special thank you that you're giving to Dorothy

0:39:560:40:00

for being so close to you after your husband's death.

0:40:000:40:04

Have you worked out exactly what you're going to do with the ?500?

0:40:040:40:08

Yes. I'd like some to go to Butterwick. They helped my husband in his last days, which was really nice.

0:40:080:40:15

That was a hospice? A hospice. And then the rest I would like to give Dorothy a nice day out.

0:40:150:40:21

And my daughter. Well, that's what you were going to do with ?500.

0:40:210:40:25

So what do you think you'll be able to do with what you've made, which is ?600?

0:40:250:40:32

Wow! That's brilliant! That's great!

0:40:320:40:34

Oh, I didn't think it would come to that. That's brilliant.

0:40:340:40:39

Well, it did. So that's a wonderful donation to the hospice.

0:40:390:40:44

Yes. And a great day out for you, your sister-in-law and your auntie!

0:40:440:40:49

Yes, that's right. That's brilliant.

0:40:490:40:52

Well, it's a few weeks since Margaret and Karen raised a fantastic ?600 at auction.

0:40:550:41:01

And today they're taking Dorothy for a surprise day out in Yorkshire.

0:41:010:41:06

Welcome. Thank you. Welcome. Hello.

0:41:060:41:10

So we're at Ripley Castle for a start. And then we're going to look round the castle and the gardens.

0:41:100:41:17

And then off to Harrogate to the tearooms for a nice cream tea.

0:41:170:41:22

The ladies share a keen interest in history, so waste no time in getting a guided tour around the castle.

0:41:220:41:29

Do you see the writing on the back of the wall? Yes.

0:41:290:41:33

That's very important because it helps to date it for us.

0:41:330:41:37

They also both love art and paintings, so a stroll around the gardens provides inspiration.

0:41:370:41:43

They're so hard to paint, though, Dorothy, those things. They are very hard to paint. I know, I tried it.

0:41:430:41:51

After a history and culture-packed morning,

0:41:510:41:54

the three ladies head off to Bettys Tea Rooms for a slap-up meal.

0:41:550:41:59

The tea rooms welcome more than one million customers every year.

0:41:590:42:04

Margaret's keen to treat Dorothy to some of the famous teas and cakes.

0:42:040:42:08

It's been great to bring Dorothy out today because she does appreciate it. She's a lovely person.

0:42:080:42:15

She's been such a comfort to me. And if I could do more, I would, you know, because she's worth it.

0:42:150:42:22

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2009

0:42:460:42:51

# Blue skies, smiling at me... #

0:42:540:42:57

It was a war between two different ways of life -

0:42:570:43:00

a war of ideas, a war of shadows.

0:43:000:43:03

Mother and daughter team Margaret and Caren Cracknell want to raise money for a special surprise for Auntie Dorothy, who has helped the family through a difficult time.

Margaret used to run an antiques shop, and has lived all over the world, so has a diverse range of collectables from figurines to dolls, and the biggest collection of antique handkerchiefs the Cash in the Attic team have ever seen.