Blackaby Cash in the Attic


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Blackaby

Antiques series. Garage sale regulars Frances and Ian Blackaby pin their hopes on a somewhat larger venue, to part with family heirlooms at auction.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic, helping you find hidden treasures

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and selling them at auction to raise money for whatever you have in mind.

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Today we're helping one couple to raise money for a little bit of home entertainment.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic:

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'Jonty's box of delights isn't quite what I'd expected.'

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-Is that it?

-What do you think?

-I'm not impressed.

-Look inside.

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I'm still not impressed.

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'Will our expert's short-term forecast convince our host?'

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-Fair or sunny...?

-Fair. Fair will do, thank you.

-Fair will do.

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'And at the auction, emotions run high after a sentimental sale.'

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I can't believe that. Can you believe that? I can't believe it.

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'Be there when the hammer falls.'

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All done?

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Today I've come to the Lea Valley in Hertfordshire to meet a former social worker and her husband.

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They hope we can help them light up their lives. Well, a small corner of the sitting room.

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'Frances and Ian Blackaby aren't new to the world of collectables.

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'They regularly hold charity garage sales at their house, where they've lived for 40 years

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'and brought up their three sons.

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'They have spent much of their married lives helping others,

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'whether through their work for animal charities or fostering children with learning difficulties.

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'Now both retired, they enjoy nothing more than spending time in their impressive garden

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'with former painter and decorator Ian also keeping his hand in with a spot of DIY.

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'And Jonty Hearnden will be keeping an expert hand in today on our rummage round their spacious home.'

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-Good morning!

-Oh, hello!

-How are you?

-Not so bad.

-Good.

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-This is Jonty.

-Hello, Jonty.

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-Are you happy if he has a good look round?

-Absolutely.

-Yes.

-See you later.

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You've called in Cash In The Attic. Why did you want us?

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Well, our television blew up, so therefore we need to replace it as soon as possible.

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-Do you watch the programme?

-We do, so we need to get a new television.

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-What sort of money are we talking about?

-Well, I reckon you're looking at £300-£400.

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-Give or take.

-All right, then. Shall we see if Jonty's found anything?

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-Yes.

-Come on, then. Follow me.

-Careful you don't spill your tea.

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'The house is crammed with all sorts of pieces, so we've got our work cut out today.

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'Luckily, with a long career in antiques, our expert is the man to take us to our target.'

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Lorne? Ian? Are you there?

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-Ah!

-Look what I've found.

-Is it silver?

-It certainly is.

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We've got wonderful hallmarks.

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-Goodness!

-Pretty clear, aren't they?

-So where did this come from, Ian?

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We found it up in the loft. I don't know where it came from.

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Probably my wife's relatives. It's been put away and forgotten about.

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-So you brought it down from the attic for Jonty.

-Yes.

-Lovely.

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Very nice indeed. We've got the hallmarks here. The hallmark is 1900.

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-That's lower case E.

-Does it tell us where it was made?

-Yes.

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If you look very closely, it says G&S Company Limited.

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That's the Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Company.

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They were based in Regent Street.

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They were formed in 1800,

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but they amalgamated with Garrard's in the '50s

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so that's when the name left us.

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But they had a Royal warrant so they were a very important business.

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At auction, that little bowl there, which I think is really delicate and pretty,

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-£100-£150.

-That sounds good.

-Are you pleased with that?

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-I'm surprised.

-So can it go?

-Yes, it can.

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We're going to trade some silver for the silver screen! Let's see what else we can find.

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'That's a great start to our rummage, but our £400 TV target

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'means there's no time to waste.

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'Frances has already turned up another likely lot in the shape of this tea set by Shelley.

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'The factory had been producing fine china since the 1820s

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'and still attracts a healthy collectors' market.

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'This example dates back to the mid-20th century.

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'A price tag of £30-£50 is good news for us.

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'There's such a variety of bits and pieces collected by Frances and Ian over the years,

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-'it's not long before Jonty spies something else to spark his interest.'

-Oh, I say, look at this.

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Are all of these lighters?

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Ah. Some of them aren't. They're for making cigarettes

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-and storing cigarettes in there, but the majority of them are.

-All different shapes and sizes.

-Yeah.

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-Where do they all come from?

-We've picked them up over the years at the car boot sale.

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-That one I remember buying because of the colour of it.

-Look!

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-We've got one here in the shape of a one-armed bandit.

-That's definitely a car booty!

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Oh, look at that!

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-Yes, pretty cute, isn't it?

-Lovely.

-Yeah.

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Now cigarette lighters can be worth a small fortune.

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If you've got a retro 1970s Dunhill lighter in good condition,

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-you'd be surprised how much it's worth.

-Oh, I say.

-They're all sorts of different shapes.

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There's one in the shape of a pipe. If you're a pipe smoker, you can have your lighter as a pipe, too.

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-There are all sorts of other forms. What's your favourite?

-That's cute.

-The hand grenade?

-Yes, chuck that!

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-I like that.

-The ultimate disposable.

-Yes!

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-Can we sell this collection?

-Oh, yes. It's not doing anything. It's just sitting there.

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I think we've got - what? We have 15, 20 lighters there.

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Definitely worth putting those into sale. You don't sell them individually, but as a collection.

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-Let the dealers decide, but I suspect we've got £40-£60 there.

-Right. Great.

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-Excellent, yes.

-Excellent. It's another find. What's over there? You show me.

-Yes, of course.

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'Another decent amount, but there's still work to do to reach that £400 target.

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'Ian heads to the kitchen and spots this Carltonware Guinness-branded teapot,

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'milk jug and sugar basin, handed down to Frances by her parents.

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'Probably Carltonware's most famous novelty range was the Guinness toucan figurine.

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'Original examples can now fetch hundreds of pounds,

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'but there's a high number of fakes out there.

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'You can always check authenticity by looking at their online collectors' gallery.

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'This lot is the real thing, so Jonty values it at £20-£40.'

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I don't think we've ever been called in to raise funds for a TV before.

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-I take it you watch quite a bit?

-Yes, I do. Usually antique programmes and cookery programmes.

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I really enjoy watching those.

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Ian, do you go out to antiques shops and fairs?

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Yes, we do. Mostly we look at Rupert Bear books for my wife's collection.

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-Why Rupert?

-I inherited some from my brother when I was younger.

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From then on, my parents used to buy me one every year.

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Then I've done exactly the same with my children. I bought them one every year.

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-So we've got quite a collection.

-So how did you two meet?

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I first saw Ian on a Sunday afternoon as he came out of Bible study.

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I liked the look of his white raincoat and his green felt hat.

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And then I actually got introduced to him outside the tennis courts in Berkeley Park.

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I was with my friend. She went up to him and asked him whether he was going to go out with me.

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-Something must have clicked! How long have you been together?

-Together, about 60 years,

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but we've been married 44 years.

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-So what's your key to success?

-Give and take.

-Yes. He's very laidback.

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And I'm just the reverse.

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-So therefore we seem to hit it off.

-I tend to think things through and she jumps straight in.

-Yeah.

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We get a balance.

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-And you also got involved in foster caring?

-Yes.

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-How did that start?

-Well, I started off as...

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I used to take care of elderly people. I used to visit them

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and make them teas and things.

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Then I moved on and did children with learning disabilities.

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And then I saw an advert in the paper for foster carers.

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So I decided...WE decided that we had a home big enough to take in one or two.

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And that's how we did it. We did the fostering for children, emergency fostering.

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-Sometimes we'd get perhaps half an hour's notice.

-Yeah.

-And in they would come.

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I'm sure they all benefited hugely from your experience,

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-but we need to benefit from Jonty's valuation experience. Shall we go in?

-Yes, of course.

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'Frances and Ian have spent so much of their lives helping others,

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'I'm glad we have the opportunity to help them make some money for their dream TV.

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'But we've only made £190 of our £400 target, so we'd better get a move on.

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'Jonty's back in the garage where he finds a Scalextric set, bought by Frances for her sons.

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'Scalextric is still very popular.

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'There's also plenty of interest in TV-related merchandise.

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'This boxed Dukes of Hazzard electric slot car racing set should make a tidy sum.

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'Although both sets are almost 30 years old, they'll put us on the right track at £30-£60.'

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Frances. I see you're busy over there.

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But I have found this lovely barometer here.

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-Does this have a story?

-Yes.

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-It used to belong to an elderly lady called Squirrel.

-Was she nuts?

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-No, not at all. She used to hoard everything she could.

-That's why she was called Squirrel.

-That's why.

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And before she died she gave that to my husband as a gift.

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He used to do odd jobs for her when she wanted something done.

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-The first thing I'm impressed with is that it's a lovely day outside and it says, "Fair."

-That's true.

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-I hadn't noticed it working. I can see the mercury going up and down.

-Absolutely.

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It's actually a stick barometer. This is what it's known as.

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Now, when this barometer was made, the fashion was to have a wheel down at the bottom.

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They were known as banjo barometers. But these were the forebears.

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They were fashionable in the 18th century,

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-but it isn't 18th century.

-Oh.

-But it is still probably a good 150, 140 years old.

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-Is it?

-Yes. So it's very mid-19th century.

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It's a lovely, lovely object.

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Now, the timber that's used for this is rosewood, a very dense material.

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-Have a feel of that.

-Ooh, yes. It is, isn't it? Very heavy.

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That's all down to the density of the timber used.

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The timber needs a bit of TLC. It needs to be revived, cleaned.

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And there's a bit of cleaning to be done on the fascia here and here.

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But it will come back and is worth putting into auction.

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-You're looking at £70-£100.

-Mm.

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-Right.

-Are you happy?

-Yes, I think so.

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-Fair or sunny...?

-Fair. Fair will do, thank you.

-Fair will do.

-Yes.

-Excellent.

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Off to the fair it goes.

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'How high will the bidding go on that barometer?'

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- 200. - I don't believe it!

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I can't believe that.

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'Find out when we get to auction a little later on.

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'Everybody's certainly working hard on today's rummage.

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'It's always fascinating to see the things people have collected,

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'but with a TV to be paid for, there's no time to waste.

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'I found these bound sets of vintage educational comics including Look And Learn and Treasure.

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'Both were published by the British Fleetway company and proved very popular in the '60s and '70s.

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'Individual copies don't fetch huge amounts, but these are nicely bound

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'and should appeal to a collector. Frances picked this lot up at a car boot sale.

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'We hope a price tag of £40-£60 will encourage some decent bidding.'

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-Hi, Jonty.

-What have you got?

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-A box.

-You've come bearing gifts.

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I don't think there's any gifts in there, actually, but it's a box and apparently

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my wife's uncle found it in the basement of a house he was working on.

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-Have you got any idea what this material is made of?

-Mahogany?

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-Is it a veneer?

-Absolutely right. It is mahogany.

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And have a look at the detailing on the side, this cross-banding.

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It's slightly raised. That's how thin it is as well. Amazing.

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-What sort of date would you put on that?

-I'd probably give it 100 years either way

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-so you'd best tell me.

-It's probably 1820, 1830 in date.

-As old as that?

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Almost 200 years old.

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Now the shape and design is really inspired by classical referencing.

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This box has that feeling that it could easily be Roman, maybe even Ancient Greek.

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Hence also these lion feet.

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-They are lions' feet.

-Let's have a look on the inside.

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Now at some point this lining here has been replaced. This is not the original lining.

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Also what's happened here is the lock mechanism was taken out,

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-which is understandable because if you lost the key...

-Lose the key...

-..you need to get rid of the lock.

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So this little casket here has had some alteration work, but not too much.

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Now not so long ago, dealers would have paid quite good money for this,

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but today dealers and collectors will only pay very good money

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for boxes of this age if they're in pristine, mint condition.

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But it's still definitely worth putting into the auction sale

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and right now we're looking at £40-£60.

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Yeah, I'd have thought.

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'Another £40 towards that TV is a good result

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'and I feel it won't be long before Frances and Ian will put their feet up and watch their favourite shows.'

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-So, Frances, you're retired now.

-That's right.

-What do you do - apart from watching our programme?

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-Well, I go down to the gym.

-Oh, do you?

-Yes.

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Not that I like it, but I have to go because of my health and I'm told it's good for me.

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-I do quite a bit of gardening.

-The garden is lovely.

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It reminds me of really old, traditional gardens.

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-Was it like that when you first got here?

-No, when we first came here there was a great big mound of soil

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and underneath was a dugout where people used to go during the war.

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We've had quite a lot of work to level it off and we fenced it off when the children were small

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for their ducks and chickens and guinea pigs and rabbits.

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-It was like a little farm.

-Now that the children are all gone, how do you keep yourself occupied?

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You're involved in charity?

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Yes, that's right. I do quite a bit of fundraising for animal charities,

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local animal charities, that is.

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We fundraise for Blue Cross, Cats Protection League and Feral Cats, which are dearest to my heart.

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Why cats? Given all the animals you've had in the past, why centre on cat charities?

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The feral cats, particularly, nobody really recognises them and takes great care of them.

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My husband and I used to go out and trap them, get them neutered,

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feed them up and try and find homes for them. At one time here, we had as many as 30 cats here.

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-No!

-Yep, 30. And they were lovely, dear little souls.

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-What sort of things do you do to raise money?

-Well, we have our garage sale out the front.

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We have stalls all round the front and people drop off stuff and then we sell it.

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-Have you made much money that way?

-Over the course of years, quite a few thousand pounds.

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It's time somebody did a bit for you, so you can watch the telly.

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-Shall we see what else Jonty's got?

-Yes.

-Come on, then.

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'I think this caring couple deserve every penny we raise at auction,

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'but we need to get moving. Could Ian have found just the thing?

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'This child's pushalong toy dog looks like he's had many hours of use.

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'Answering to the name of Bob, he belonged to Ian's younger brother and was made in the 1950s

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'by the British toy company Pedigree, famous for Sindy dolls.

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'There's always interest in vintage toys and, with the right bidder,

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'we hope Bob will fetch £30-£50.

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'Meanwhile, Frances spots an intriguing timepiece.'

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-The clock?

-Yes.

-Whose is that?

-Em, this is my husband's clock.

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He was left it by his Auntie Maud, who received it from her husband,

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who got it from an elderly lady, about 80 she was.

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He used to do odd jobs for her and that was a gift to him.

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-So where do we stand with it? Is this an item you might sell?

-My husband says it's got to go.

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-Right. Any particular reason why?

-It's very big and it's very, very heavy.

-All right, fair enough.

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We more often see these in black.

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Yes, we do. More often than not, these are in black slate,

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but here we have this amazing translucent onyx clock.

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And these clocks are, more often than not, dated really between 1880 and 1910.

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-That's a lot older than I had anticipated.

-Is it?

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-What age did you think?

-1920s, 1930s.

-Right.

-No.

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There's a very Edwardian feel to a clock like this. Interestingly, if you look really closely,

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there's a maker's mark here. It says S Sanders and Company, Peckham.

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-Peckham?

-Not a million miles away.

-Not Peckham we usually associate with marble clocks, is it?

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Mange tout, Rodney!

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-But does it work?

-Ah. That I can't be sure. It has a key.

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I'm not quite sure where that is.

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So if we don't know the condition of the workings, I'm going to err on the side of caution on value.

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-I think we should make more, but I'll put £40-£60 on it.

-Very good.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Very.

-What value did you think it might have?

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-I thought we'd be very lucky to get £40 for it.

-Right.

-Very lucky.

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-I wouldn't have given you £40.

-Let's hope someone will!

-Yes!

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Come on, then. That can go.

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'There's a timely addition to today's haul, but it's not over. Jonty find yet another lighter,

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'in the form of a lady in a crinoline dress and bonnet.

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'Given to Frances as a gift, it dates from around the 1930s

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'when cigarette smoking was de rigueur. It's a desirable piece of memorabilia.

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'It's not in the best condition, but with the right buyer Jonty thinks it could make £30-£50.

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'Our day is nearly over, but in the workshop Ian and the ever-watchful Jonty are unearthing

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-'all sorts of artefacts.'

-Hang on.

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-Look, I've got some tools down here.

-Have you?

-Yeah. Quite a few.

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-They're quite old.

-Yeah?

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-Mind your fingers.

-Yeah. ..Wow, look at that.

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-How extraordinary.

-There's a good old plane in there.

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-That's very nice.

-And this American tool here I've used many a time for planing off doors.

0:21:150:21:21

-Wonderful.

-There's a jointer.

-Let's take them outside for a look.

0:21:210:21:25

Ready? Oh, my word! That's heavy.

0:21:250:21:28

That really is heavy.

0:21:280:21:30

It's heavy enough. Where are we going?

0:21:300:21:33

I think my one arm will be longer than the other. Put it up here?

0:21:330:21:38

-Yeah, up here.

-You said you had something to show us.

-Look.

0:21:380:21:43

-Is that it?

-What do you think?

-I'm not impressed.

-Look inside.

0:21:430:21:47

-I'm still not impressed!

-Yeah? Look at that.

0:21:470:21:51

24-inch plane. Isn't that beautiful? Ian, where did this come from?

0:21:510:21:55

From Squirrel. Same place as the barometer came from.

0:21:550:21:59

She had a cupboard with boxes full of tools and she said, "Dump them."

0:21:590:22:05

That's absolutely superb. What else have we got? This has had some real wear to it.

0:22:050:22:12

It's well used, I must admit.

0:22:120:22:15

This I found in a wheelbarrow in a shed at my aunt's house.

0:22:150:22:19

She asked me to do some work for her and I found that. I said, "Can I have it?" She said, "Of course."

0:22:190:22:27

-That is quite a nice plane.

-Interesting shape.

-Also very usable.

0:22:270:22:32

It's got its original blade, which is not unique, but unusual.

0:22:320:22:37

-Number 22 on there and on the blade.

-Well, this time we have

0:22:370:22:42

an English-made plane. Norris, London. That's really interesting.

0:22:420:22:47

They produced planes from 1880.

0:22:470:22:50

The original factories were in Lambeth, then New Malden.

0:22:500:22:54

That's gorgeous as well. Let's consider value.

0:22:540:22:58

If you just include those three items, and a few other items,

0:22:580:23:02

-I would suggest that we're looking at at least £100 here.

-Yes.

-£80-£120 at auction.

0:23:020:23:09

And if you were to add some more, the value just goes up.

0:23:100:23:13

Well, what we do want to know is have we enough for a TV set?

0:23:130:23:17

This morning you wanted to make £400 for the new TV.

0:23:170:23:21

The value of everything going to the auction house comes to £550!

0:23:210:23:26

-I'm very surprised.

-That's good.

-So you can have a remote as well!

0:23:260:23:31

-Very surprised.

-The next time we'll see you and your items, Ian,

0:23:310:23:36

-will be at the auction house.

-Right. I'll look forward to that.

0:23:360:23:40

'Well, it's been quite a day here with Frances and Ian.

0:23:400:23:44

'There was no shortage of worthwhile pieces to take to auction.

0:23:440:23:48

'Their Victorian silver bowl, hallmarked G&S of London, should shine at an elegant £100-£150.

0:23:480:23:56

'There's a market for novelty lighters.

0:23:560:23:59

'At £40-£60, let's hope for some heated bidding for this collection.

0:23:590:24:04

'The Victorian barometer that belonged to Frances's friend Squirrel.

0:24:050:24:10

'£70-£100 should help take the pressure off our couple's quest for a new TV.

0:24:100:24:16

'Still to come:

0:24:170:24:19

'there's a surprise for Frances and Ian.'

0:24:190:24:23

-I didn't expect that. Did you?

-No way.

-Double what you wanted!

0:24:230:24:27

'And could one piece prove too baffling for the buyers?'

0:24:270:24:31

I wonder if whoever bought it knows what it's for!

0:24:310:24:35

'Find out when the hammer falls.'

0:24:350:24:38

We certainly had a great time visiting Frances and Ian's home

0:24:430:24:47

and we found lots of lovely items to bring to the auction house,

0:24:470:24:52

including that wonderful silver bowl. So I'll be very intrigued to see how much money we make.

0:24:520:25:00

'Frances and Ian are here bright and early for a final look at their diverse collection.'

0:25:000:25:07

-Hallmark's gone.

-Turn it round.

0:25:070:25:10

-Goldsmiths Company...

-'Fingers crossed they'll make their £400 target today.'

0:25:100:25:16

-Good morning!

-Hello!

-How are you? All right?

-Yes, fine.

0:25:160:25:22

-You're looking at your piece de resistance.

-I'm sorry to see it go.

0:25:220:25:27

-I'd forgotten where the hallmarks were.

-Yeah.

-I thought they were underneath!

0:25:270:25:33

-I have seen a lot of tools around.

-Mm, yes.

0:25:330:25:37

I've noticed one of the planes we looked at has been split up.

0:25:370:25:41

-You're selling that separately?

-The rarer ones they thought should be a separate lot.

0:25:410:25:47

-That's their advice.

-They obviously know the customers they've got.

-That's right. I understand that.

0:25:470:25:53

-You won't miss the tools?

-No, no, no. 'Fraid not.

0:25:530:25:57

-Shall we go and make some money from them?

-Please!

0:25:570:26:00

'As the auction gets underway, first up is that rather demure lady

0:26:010:26:06

'in a crinoline dress and bonnet.

0:26:060:26:09

'Dating from around 1930, she's not just a pretty face.

0:26:090:26:13

'She's also a cigarette lighter.'

0:26:130:26:15

-Where did she come from?

-Well, a friend of mine gave it to me some time ago now.

0:26:160:26:22

-It's been sat in the fireplace for some long time.

-It was years before we realised what it was!

0:26:220:26:28

-Oh, really?

-You never used it?

-I just thought there was a hinge!

-It's true, yeah.

0:26:280:26:34

Well, I put an estimate of £30-£50 on it,

0:26:340:26:37

which I think might be a little bit steep. So if we don't get there, don't be too disappointed.

0:26:370:26:44

20 to start? £20 anywhere? £20.

0:26:440:26:47

£20 is bid. 22. 25. 28.

0:26:470:26:51

30.

0:26:510:26:53

£30, gentleman in the corner. 32 anywhere else?

0:26:530:26:56

Good-looking lot there. £30 is bid. 2?

0:26:560:27:00

In the corner, selling at £30. All finished at 30?

0:27:000:27:04

-£30.

-I think that's very good.

-Yeah, very good. Very pleased.

0:27:040:27:08

I think we set the room alight.

0:27:080:27:11

-I wonder if whoever's bought it knows what it's for!

-This is true.

0:27:110:27:15

'They'll figure it out eventually. Not a bad start to today's auction.

0:27:150:27:19

'But will we need the luck of the Irish with this next lot?

0:27:190:27:23

'The genuine Carltonware Guinness tea set.'

0:27:230:27:27

In terms of brand name, you can't get much more collectable.

0:27:270:27:31

-Where was this from?

-From my mother's cabinet.

0:27:310:27:35

I've only ever seen it in there until we cleared it out.

0:27:350:27:40

-That's probably why it's in such good condition.

-Good lot there.

0:27:400:27:45

Who'll start me at £30?

0:27:450:27:47

Guinness tea set for £30.

0:27:470:27:50

-For 20, then. £20 anywhere?

-Oh, dear!

-Who wants it at 20?

0:27:500:27:55

10? 10 is bid. £10 is bid. Take 12 now.

0:27:550:27:59

£10 is bid. I'll take 12.

0:27:590:28:01

10. 12. 15.

0:28:010:28:04

18. 20.

0:28:040:28:06

22. £22. Are we all done at 22?

0:28:060:28:09

All finished at £22. All done.

0:28:090:28:11

-That's quite disappointing.

-Win some, lose some.

0:28:130:28:16

'I'm glad to see Ian is keeping positive.

0:28:160:28:20

'It doesn't matter how good your pieces are if the right bidder isn't in the room.

0:28:200:28:25

'Let's hope someone has their eye

0:28:250:28:28

'on those novelty lighters.'

0:28:280:28:31

A quantity of cigarette lighters and cigarette cases.

0:28:310:28:35

Who'll start me at £30?

0:28:350:28:37

£30 to start. Any interest at £30?

0:28:370:28:39

20, then? No interest at £20? Anybody want them? £20?

0:28:390:28:45

No? No interest at all?

0:28:450:28:48

I'll pass on this lot if I don't get a bid.

0:28:480:28:51

-Not sold.

-Unsold.

-Unsold.

0:28:510:28:54

-So all those cigarette lighters go home with you.

-I'm afraid so.

-Is that all right?

0:28:540:29:01

'Oh, dear. Two unsolds in a row is slightly concerning.

0:29:010:29:05

'We still have to make another £370 to reach our target.

0:29:050:29:10

'Surely that late-Victorian silver bowl will make an impact.'

0:29:100:29:15

Now it's from 1900, London hallmarked.

0:29:150:29:19

And very nicely hallmarked. That makes a difference.

0:29:190:29:22

It's clean, it's crisp, the hallmarks are right in front of you,

0:29:220:29:27

which is perfect. And the silver market couldn't be more buoyant.

0:29:270:29:31

Right now, a great time to sell.

0:29:310:29:34

Start me at £90.

0:29:340:29:36

£90 is bid. I'll take 100. £90 is bid.

0:29:360:29:39

Do I see 100 for the bowl?

0:29:390:29:41

£90. Do I see 100? Are we all done and finished? At £90, I'm going to sell.

0:29:410:29:47

No?

0:29:470:29:49

-£90.

-That's disappointing.

-That's very disappointing.

0:29:490:29:54

-There were no bidders in the room. Somebody must have left a commission bid.

-Yes.

0:29:540:29:59

That's left by people who have viewed the sale and left a price.

0:29:590:30:04

So there was only that one bidder and you need two bidders to get further.

0:30:040:30:10

'£10 short of our asking price is another underwhelming result.

0:30:100:30:14

'With time moving on, will that grand Victorian clock impress

0:30:140:30:19

'or just wind up going home?'

0:30:190:30:22

-I've got £40-£60 on it. Ready to see it go?

-I'll be disappointed, but it's got to go.

0:30:220:30:28

OK.

0:30:280:30:30

Let's start away at £25.

0:30:300:30:33

£25 I'm bid. I'll take 30 now. 30.

0:30:330:30:37

5. 40. 5.

0:30:370:30:40

£45. Takes it... 50.

0:30:400:30:42

5.

0:30:420:30:43

60. £60 is bid. At 60.

0:30:430:30:46

We're going to sell at £60. All done and finished at £60?

0:30:460:30:51

-That's quite a nice result.

-Yes, I'm quite pleased about that!

-Are you?

-I can accept 60.

-Good.

0:30:510:30:58

'It might not be to everybody's taste, but at least the clock made its upper estimate.

0:30:580:31:05

'Now at almost 200 years old, that inlaid mahogany work box is probably our oldest piece.'

0:31:060:31:13

-I thought it was a tea caddy.

-Right.

-You thought it was a jewellery box.

0:31:130:31:17

-And I said a work box.

-Well, it could be a universal box, I think.

-Yes, universal. Yeah.

0:31:170:31:24

A good-looking work box for £30. £30 I'm bid. I'll take 5.

0:31:240:31:29

Who wants 5? 35?

0:31:290:31:31

40. 5. 50. A good quality box. £50 is bid.

0:31:310:31:37

- 5 anywhere else now? I'm selling at £50. - I never expected that.

0:31:370:31:42

A good-looking item for £50. All done at 50?

0:31:420:31:46

-Excellent! I'm really pleased about that.

-Yeah?

-Very pleased.

0:31:460:31:50

The trouble with that is we'd got it on the side at home.

0:31:500:31:54

-And we liked it.

-We did.

0:31:540:31:57

But you'll like the money you've made better.

0:31:570:32:01

-So far we've banked £230.

-That's very good, actually, with two unsold. Excellent.

0:32:010:32:07

-Happy with that?

-Very pleased.

-OK, we've got a bit of a break

0:32:070:32:12

before the Dukes of Hazzard and the Pedigree dog, so follow me.

0:32:120:32:17

'I just hope we can keep the bidders' interest in the second half with some of our other lots,

0:32:190:32:25

'including the early Victorian barometer and that assorted collection of tools in two lots.

0:32:250:32:33

'If you're thinking about buying or selling at auction,

0:32:330:32:38

'remember charges such as VAT and commission will be added to your bill, so do check first.'

0:32:380:32:45

The Shelley tea service. Remind us where it came from.

0:32:450:32:48

Well, that came out of the loft. Before my father died he was boxing up things

0:32:480:32:54

and I remember him taping a box up and we found it in our loft.

0:32:540:32:59

-This is not the Shelley Art Deco design. It's the floral design.

-That's right.

0:32:590:33:05

Let's see what happens.

0:33:050:33:07

Who'll start me off at £30?

0:33:070:33:09

£30? £20 for the Shelley?

0:33:090:33:12

£20 is bid. I'll take 2. 22.

0:33:120:33:15

25. 28.

0:33:150:33:17

-- 30. £30 is bid.

-Wow.

-- I'm surprised at that.

0:33:170:33:21

All finished at £30?

0:33:210:33:23

-£30. That's really good.

-Very pleased with that.

-Excellent.

0:33:230:33:28

'That's bang on Jonty's lowest estimate.

0:33:280:33:32

'I don't know if this was ever man's best friend,

0:33:320:33:35

'but I'm sure Bob the dog was a much-loved plaything when he was made 60 years ago.'

0:33:350:33:41

Tell me the story about him.

0:33:410:33:43

Bob, he was my brother's dog.

0:33:430:33:46

And he's...64.

0:33:460:33:49

And he's been up in my mum's loft since he grew out of him.

0:33:490:33:54

And so she said, "You're going to an auction, take it away."

0:33:540:33:59

So, yeah, he's pretty old, but a Pedigree.

0:33:590:34:04

-And you don't have to feed him.

-True.

-Only one careful owner.

0:34:040:34:09

That's right, yes.

0:34:090:34:12

-Here's Bob.

-There he is. £30 for it?

0:34:120:34:15

-20?

-That's cheap for a Pedigree dog! They're about £1,000 these days.

0:34:150:34:21

20 I'm bid. I'll take 2. I have £20 bid.

0:34:210:34:24

Anyone else? 22. 25.

0:34:240:34:27

-- Gentleman's bid at £25. - 25?

-25 he's selling for.

0:34:270:34:32

At £25.

0:34:320:34:34

-25.

-Very pleased with that.

-I'd be very pleased if I could get a pedigree dog for £25 as well!

0:34:340:34:40

-Yes, yes.

-So there you go. Bob's gone to a new home.

-Gone.

0:34:400:34:45

Bye-bye, Bob.

0:34:450:34:47

'Well, Frances and Ian don't seem too upset to see the back of Bob.

0:34:470:34:51

'I think £25 is a very reasonable price for a vintage toy Pedigree.

0:34:510:34:56

'Next up is that collection of tools spotted by Ian and Jonty when they were doing manly things in the shed

0:34:560:35:03

'and now in two separate lots.'

0:35:030:35:06

I have used them, but not often, so they can go.

0:35:060:35:10

-And there's a lot of other tools to go as well.

-As I recall, you had a good time going through these.

0:35:100:35:17

-We were there for quite some time.

-There's a whole shedload!

0:35:170:35:21

-They're worth a lot of money, Jonty.

-This is a big collection,

0:35:210:35:25

so we've got £80-£120 just for this lot.

0:35:250:35:30

Who'll start us away at £45?

0:35:300:35:32

At 45. I'll take 50.

0:35:320:35:34

At £45. For all the old planes there. At £45.

0:35:340:35:39

50 anywhere in the room now? At £45. All done?

0:35:390:35:42

50. 5. 60. 5.

0:35:420:35:46

70. 5. 80.

0:35:460:35:48

On my left here at £80. I'm selling at £80. No more?

0:35:480:35:53

-£80, all done.

-£80. Pleased with that?

0:35:530:35:57

-Right on estimate.

-I can't believe they found another man to sell them to!

0:35:570:36:02

'It just goes to show there's a buyer's market for everything.

0:36:020:36:06

'Vintage tools seem like a good bet.

0:36:060:36:10

'Time now for those two vintage racing sets,

0:36:100:36:13

'the Scalextric and the Dukes of Hazzard, which takes me back to my girl racer days.'

0:36:130:36:19

Now one of my favourite TV programmes. I used to love this!

0:36:190:36:24

The Dukes of Hazzard! Where's this from?

0:36:240:36:28

The children were interested in it.

0:36:280:36:31

-Was it ever played with?

-Oh, yes.

0:36:310:36:34

-They looked after it very well.

-Which is surprising, really!

-Yes.

0:36:340:36:40

Who'll start me at £10 for it?

0:36:400:36:42

£10 is bid.

0:36:420:36:44

I have £10 bid. 12 for the Scalextric? £10 bid. 12 where?

0:36:440:36:49

12. 15.

0:36:490:36:51

£15 is bid. 18 now? £15 is bid.

0:36:510:36:55

Do I see 18 anywhere else? Selling at £15. All finished?

0:36:550:36:59

At £15.

0:36:590:37:01

-Pleased with that?

-Quite happy.

-What did you pay for it?

-Not much.

-Not £15?

-Good Lord, no!

-OK.

0:37:020:37:08

-Then that's a bargain.

-I'm a bit disappointed for you. I put £30-£60 on it.

0:37:080:37:14

-You raised our expectations.

-Sorry about that!

0:37:140:37:18

'I think we can forgive Jonty this time. Even he can get it wrong.

0:37:180:37:22

'There's certainly a mixed bunch of bidders here today.

0:37:220:37:26

'Let's hope one of them likes this bound collection of children's magazines.'

0:37:260:37:33

Lot 100. Who'll start me? £20 for them?

0:37:350:37:39

Bound editions here. £20 for them.

0:37:390:37:42

-Any interest? 10?

-Oh, come on! £10?

0:37:420:37:46

-No-one wants to look and learn!

-£10 is bid. 12. £10 is bid. Do I see 12 anywhere?

0:37:460:37:52

Oh, no...

0:37:520:37:55

At 10.

0:37:550:37:57

-You got back what you paid for them!

-£10. Yes.

-I didn't want to take them home.

0:37:570:38:02

'That's a disappointing £30 under our lowest estimate,

0:38:020:38:06

'but at least they won't have to take them home again.'

0:38:060:38:10

-The next lot is the barometer. Where is this from?

-From Squirrel,

0:38:100:38:15

-an old lady I used to take care of.

-She had some lovely items.

0:38:150:38:19

-Yes, she was a lovely old lady.

-OK.

0:38:190:38:22

-So £70-£100.

-Let's hope so. It does need a bit of a clean,

0:38:220:38:26

but it's a lovely old shape. Stick barometers tend to be 18th century, but this is 19th century.

0:38:260:38:32

Lot 108. We're going to start away at £100. £100 is bid.

0:38:320:38:37

-Straight in.

-£100 straight in?

0:38:370:38:42

Really?

0:38:420:38:43

170. 180. 190. 200.

0:38:430:38:47

-200.

-I don't believe it.

-I can't believe that!

0:38:470:38:51

At 300.

0:38:510:38:53

We're selling at £300.

0:38:530:38:56

All done and finished at £300? All done?

0:38:560:38:59

-It was Squirrel's...

-Aww.

0:38:590:39:02

-That's good.

-Yes. It's lovely. Thank you, Squirrel.

0:39:020:39:07

-Why do you feel so emotional about it?

-She was a lovely old lady. She really was a sweetheart.

0:39:070:39:13

Bless her. I can't believe that. Can you believe that? I can't.

0:39:130:39:18

-£300.

-£300?!

0:39:180:39:21

-£300.

-I can't believe it.

0:39:210:39:23

-Honestly. You said...

-70.

-75?

0:39:230:39:27

'Auctions can be an emotional rollercoaster and today is no exception.

0:39:270:39:32

'We'll all raise a glass

0:39:320:39:34

'to the memory of Frances's late friend. I have a feeling that barometer's saved the day.

0:39:340:39:41

'The first set of vintage tools did well earlier.

0:39:410:39:44

'Fingers crossed that this final lot will get them a super, swanky TV.'

0:39:440:39:50

OK, now it's a Maples brass and ebonised brace. Bear with me.

0:39:500:39:55

A 24-inch steel joint plane, a Norris number 22 plane and two others.

0:39:550:40:00

-We know what we're talking about.

-Does that mean anything to you?

-Nothing!

-What does that mean?

0:40:000:40:06

All you need to be concerned about is that we get £100-£150 for these.

0:40:060:40:11

So we start Lot 116 at £120.

0:40:110:40:16

£120 is bid. 130. 140.

0:40:160:40:19

150. 160.

0:40:190:40:21

170. 180.

0:40:210:40:23

190.

0:40:230:40:25

At 190. Do I see 200 anywhere? At £190. 200 anywhere?

0:40:250:40:30

Selling at £190. All done at 190?

0:40:300:40:34

-£190!

-Yeah, well done, Ian.

-Goodness me.

-Oh, my word.

0:40:340:40:38

-You do know what you're talking about, don't you?

-Right.

0:40:380:40:44

'A great end to a varied and rather poignant day.

0:40:440:40:48

'The auction eventually picked up with a couple of healthy sales.

0:40:480:40:53

'How much have we managed to make?'

0:40:530:40:56

You wanted £300-£400, didn't you?

0:40:560:40:59

I have to say I think Squirrel, that lovely old lady, has done you proud.

0:40:590:41:04

-You've made...£880!

-Never! We've not done that?

-You have.

0:41:040:41:08

-Really?!

-Yes, I'm not making it up. I promise. 880.

0:41:080:41:13

-I didn't expect that. Did you?

-No way.

-It's more than double.

0:41:130:41:17

-Are you sure you're all right?

-Absolutely.

-You don't look happy.

0:41:170:41:21

No, I'm very happy!

0:41:210:41:23

'It's a few days after the auction and Frances and Ian are shopping for a brand-new TV

0:41:270:41:32

'after their old one blew up.'

0:41:320:41:35

It'll be so nice to actually turn it on and for it to work,

0:41:350:41:39

-without all the fizziness...

-And losing channels.

0:41:390:41:43

Yes. Oh, I can't wait.

0:41:430:41:46

-All right, so that's it.

-Thank you very much.

0:41:460:41:50

'Deal done, our couple can look forward to hours of happy viewing.'

0:41:500:41:56

-At long last we'll be able to actually watch Cash In The Attic on it.

-And see Lorne in HD!

0:41:560:42:02

And see Lorne, yes. And Jonty.

0:42:020:42:05

So we're looking forward to that.

0:42:050:42:08

Garage sale regulars Frances and Ian Blackaby pin their hopes on a somewhat larger venue, to part with family heirlooms at auction. They hope to raise £400 to buy a high-definition TV. Will Lorne Spicer and expert Jonty Hearnden bring their world into sharp relief?