Broughton Cash in the Attic


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Broughton

Antiques series. Tracey Broughton is emigrating to New Zealand with her sons. She wants to clear her house and spend the proceeds on a kayaking day for them.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic.

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I'm sure that at sometime in our lives, quite a few us have had an ambition to do something

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really adventurous, like travel the world, maybe live in another country, perhaps somewhere where it

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doesn't rain quite as often as it does here. The thing is, often it remains just that.

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A dream. But if the dream ever does become a reality, then you have to

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decide what you're going to keep, what you're going to get rid of and what you're going to sell.

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Coming up on Cash In The Attic, everyone loves majolica, don't they?

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I can see in your eyes, she doesn't like it.

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It's got horrible eyes on it.

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And the lady of the house has another name for an oak coffer.

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Do you know what it is?

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A nuisance.

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At auction, our expert, David, just can't accept a compliment.

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-I think you're a very clever boy.

-Thank you.

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Not me, that's a very clever vase, and I love it and I hope you three now love it, too.

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But will we still be praising him when the hammer finally falls?

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Today I'm in Leicestershire where I'm about to meet

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Tracey Broughton, who's going to go to the other side of the world.

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Tracey is about to embark on a new life.

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She's leaving her home here in Leicestershire where she's lived all her life

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and moving to New Zealand with her two children, Alex and Billy.

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She's starting a new career, too, as a podiatrist, or foot specialist to you and me.

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As she can't take everything with her, it all has to go.

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Great news for our auction chances.

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I wonder how she plans to splash her cash?

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Well, helping Tracey with her search today is her Aunt Sandra, and I've

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brought along our expert valuer, David Harper, who's had a passion for antiques since the age of five.

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-Tracey, hello.

-Hello.

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-Hello.

-Who's this?

-This is my Aunt Sandra.

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Hello, Sandra, and this is David Harper, who's your collectibles guru for the day.

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OK, I better go and try and find something.

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See you later. There we are, he's off looking for stuff that we can take to auction.

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Tracey, you called in Cash In The Attic, why have you asked to us come and help you?

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I'm planning to move to New Zealand and both the boys are into outdoor pursuits and outdoor activities.

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The boys being your sons, Alex and Billy?

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Yes, Alex's now 15, Bill's nine.

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They've both had a pool session of scuba diving and both thoroughly enjoyed that.

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I would like them to have a few lessons or a few more canoeing activities.

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How much do you think it's going to cost to give the boys this adventure experience?

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I would like to raise about £600 if possible.

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Sandra, how do you feel about all the family going to the other side of the world?

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Well, I shall miss them greatly, but I will be able to visit.

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Maybe you can join them in these outdoor activities, go scuba diving.

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I'd love to see her do that.

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They'd all like to see me in a wetsuit!

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Tracey's family home is packed to the rafters with their possessions, including many that she's inherited.

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Perhaps David's found one already.

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That's a mighty piece of porcelain. Where has this come from?

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That was my great-grandma's.

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-It's been in the family for four generations?

-Yes.

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And extraordinary that there's not a chip on it.

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How have you managed to keep it in such good condition?

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I don't know with having two boys bouncing around.

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Do you love it, Tracey, because I think it's...

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I can see it in your eyes,

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-she doesn't like it.

-It's got horrible eyes on it, something I don't like.

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It's majolica, you either love it or hate it, I've always loved it.

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Now, there is maiolica, majolica. What's the difference?

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Maiolica is the earlier form of this kind of vibrant,

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whacky colourful pottery that comes from Portugal, Spain, Italy that part of Southern Europe.

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It was copied and made by potteries in England

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and they corrupted the word and came up with majolica.

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-Who made this one?

-This is by Brannam, and it is signed.

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-Who?

-Brannam Pottery, formed in 1850 by Thomas Brannam.

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The provenance that goes with it, goes back four generations, so we can say that

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-we're talking about something that's 100 years old.

-Absolutely.

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The style is screaming Art Nouveau.

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I'm going to say 150 to 250

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in the hope we get a couple of good dealers there and collectors.

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It might just fly.

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If they pick up on David's enthusiasm, the bidders won't be able to keep their hands off it.

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We're keen to start exploring Tracey's house, and I soon find

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a collection of Pendelfin figures that she's had for years.

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Named after Pendle Hill near Burnley in Lancashire,

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the Pendelfin range started as a hobby for two women in a garden shed in 1953.

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Their rabbit family quickly became popular, and now the figures are

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mass-produced in China, but early models are still much sought-after.

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This collection includes a rabbit called Poppet,

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originally made in 1964, which could be of great interest.

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David's estimate for the lot is £40 to £70,

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and when they get to the saleroom, will it be exciting news?

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Includes Poppet, which is the rarest one amongst them.

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I can start at £50. 55, do I see?

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We'll have to wait a little longer to see just how popular Poppet really is.

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As our search continues in Leicester,

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Auntie Sandra looks like she's come across an intriguing collection.

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Could this be something to send to auction?

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What have you found, then, Sandra?

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I've found this box with cards and medals.

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And medals, OK. Who do the medals relate to?

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These are Alex Parker's medals, Tracey's great-grandfather.

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What we've got there, all First World War medals,

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we've got the trio, these are the standard to the right-hand side.

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We have the Star, the First World War Star,

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then we've got the British War Medal

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and British Victory Medal.

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-However, this one here, do you know what that is?

-No, I don't.

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Distinguished Conduct Medal,

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given only to men for gallantry and bravery.

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So this character won that DCM for what, anything in here?

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Cos it's vital. What have we got?

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Oh, they're sweet. These are little postcards back to family.

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Happy Christmas and all that.

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What's this?

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Private A Parker. Is that him?

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That's Alex, yes, Alex Parker.

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Wow, Private A Parker,

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"1st/4th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment,

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"for conspicuous gallantry when

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"he assisted to uncharge an enemy mine

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"which he discovered ready for explosion."

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Oh, gosh.

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That's amazing.

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It really is quite emotive, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-So, we have to look at value, haven't we?

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We have, really, because that's what we're here for, isn't it?

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It is. So, valuation for that set

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I would think £150 to £200 in auction.

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How wonderful it would be if the collection and story

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of her grandfather's bravery can attract high bids

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and help her with her plan to cross the world.

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It doesn't take Sandra long to discover something else that could do well.

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It's a silver cigarette case and vesta case.

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Vestas were small matches,

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named after the Roman goddess of the hearth.

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The cases were intended to keep them safe and dry.

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These belonged to Tracey's great-grandfather again

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and are both hallmarked,

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one Birmingham and the other Sheffield.

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The estimate is £20 to £40.

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It looks like Sandra may be about to break into song.

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Could it be because, going by David's lowest estimates on

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the mementos we've found so far, we stand to make £360?

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David, Tracey.

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Tracey, forgive me for saying it, but this does not fit with this.

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No.

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-Where does it come from?

-My mother's.

-Why have you got it?

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She kept it in the hallway, she kept banging her legs on it, she's had

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numerous accidents, and I said it's one of the things that has to go.

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-So you are very happy for it to go to auction?

-Please.

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I'm very pleased for it to go.

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Well, I'm at your service. Now do you know what it is?

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A nuisance.

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-You could call it nuisance, but we call it a coffer.

-Right.

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The coffer is one of the oldest pieces of furniture we have,

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used to store clothing, food, treasure.

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Many coffers have been buried particularly during

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the Civil War with gold and silver, waiting to be discovered.

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Kids could sleep in them, they'd be used as a cradle.

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You could use them as a seat.

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An all-purpose bit of furniture.

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-You don't need anything else in the house.

-Are you sure you want to get rid of it?

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We can put mother in it and take it to auction.

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Guess what, they used to use them as coffins as well.

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Now, how old do you think it is?

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Ooh. Now you're asking, I should say

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about 50 or 60 years old.

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Bang on. I thought you were going to fall into the trap and say it was medieval or something. Damn it.

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You're right. 1930s, 1940s.

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So how much might it make at auction?

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After all that, the big build-up on coffers, that's worth about £20 or £30.

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Sorry!

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Oh, I don't know. The description was worth at least a tenner.

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David and Sandra keep up with their searches, but I want to

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know a bit more about our host who's enjoyed a varied career.

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I finished school with no qualifications as such and needed to do something.

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I specialised in cakes, or tried to,

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and still make wedding cakes and birthday cakes, any cakes, really.

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Then you had another job which was quite different.

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Yes, from the kitchens, at the fire brigade

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I went on to the Prince's Trust where we'd take 16-25-year-olds on a personal development programme.

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I enjoyed that that much, I stayed there for six years.

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I've got this here because when we came in and saw this skeleton,

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I thought, "What's that all about?"

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But of course, this is representative

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of the next phase in your life, isn't it? Tell me about that.

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We used to go to Winged Fellowship,

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which is caring for people with physical disabilities on holiday.

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I wanted to go into the caring profession.

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I didn't want to go back into the Prince's Trust

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after I had the children, so podiatry was the answer.

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So now you are a fully qualified podiatrist,

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hoping to work not just here in Britain but also in New Zealand.

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Where did the idea of going to New Zealand come from?

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There will be a lot of opportunities for the boys with outdoor pursuits and everything.

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Really, you are doing this for your sons?

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As well as myself, but I think they'll have a better life out there

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and more prospects out there than over here.

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All being well, the collectibles we find today should make more than

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enough on auction day to pay for that adventurous day out.

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We don't want to miss anything that could help the cause.

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Tracey wonders if an oil painting commissioned by her grandmother might be worth something.

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She tells us the artist is a Mr Baxter, but he's unknown in the art world.

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It gets an estimate of £20 to £30.

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Oh, my goodness me. Sandra, why is there a Victorian miniature sideboard in the broom cupboard?

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I don't know. I remember seeing this round at Tracey's mum's.

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I think it was made by an old gentlemen, a friend, after the Second World War.

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Do you know the story of miniatures?

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I would assume they were sort of apprentice pieces or perhaps sales, for sales.

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They could be, they could be that,

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but also, there's another train of thought.

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Often these miniature pieces of furniture were given as wedding gifts. So, you get married,

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and on your wedding day, you would be given this sideboard

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in miniature form, but you would know, when you go off on

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your honeymoon, when you come back, the real one, the big one,

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will be in the place of the miniature one.

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-Oh, wow. That's wonderful.

-A lovely story.

-Mmm.

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Something like this would be cheap, £50 to £80,

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but that would be its auction estimate.

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That's very good.

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-You think that's OK?

-Yes, I do.

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-Shall we include it?

-Yes.

-Come on, then, let's continue.

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I think we've examined almost every knick-knack in Tracey's home, but

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David is not content until he has had a good root around in the loft.

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I decide to head back upstairs too and see if there's anything I may have missed.

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Our expert's persistence pays off when he comes across something that could be quite special -

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a set of illustrations from children's books which he thinks date from the 1930s to '40s.

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David wants to do a bit of research on them

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before he gives us an estimate.

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Ooh!

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Tracey, David, Sandra!

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Oh.

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Now the gang's all here, where's this from?

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That was again from my great-granddad Parker, Alex Parker.

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It was his original watch chain.

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So David, take a look at that. Certainly two quite interesting little charms, aren't they?

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We've got some nice weight as well, as good as gold.

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Gold is a very lovely material.

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It's doing so well now.

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So well, let's see.

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Yes, obviously, originally a watch chain. That'll be nine carat.

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Two gold coins, a gold sovereign,

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dated 1907, so Edwardian, then we've a gold American coin.

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It's a 5 coin, which makes it a half eagle.

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-And that's gold.

-Solid gold.

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What are we talking about in value, if we were to take this to auction?

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Well, I would think quite a lot.

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Gold has absolutely rocketed, and in times of hardness and strife, people

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put money into tangible assets, and gold being one of the most important.

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I would say £300 to £400.

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Wow. Lovely.

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If we take that as the last item we're going to look at today

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let me tell you how much you think you are going to make,

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because you want to raise £600 on these different adventures.

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I can't add into this those amazing pictures that you looked at that we

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think are, what, children's illustrations?

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Well, they have got to be blown-up children's illustrations from a book.

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I don't know. I've never seen them before.

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I'm going to discount them from the total because we're not sure

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what they are and therefore how much they are likely to make.

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What I am going to do is tell you that by adding this to what we've already looked at and taking

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the lowest estimate on everything that David has looked at, we should confidently be able to make £750.

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-Lovely.

-I tell you what, never mind the adventures you're going to take

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the boys on, I think our auction's going to be a bit of an adventure.

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I for one certainly can't wait to find out

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how the auction pans out for everything that we've found today.

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Like that Victorian-style miniature sideboard made by a family friend in

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the 1940s, we're hoping it's going to bring in £50 to £80.

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Or the medals belonging to Tracey's great grandfather.

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They're valued at £150 to £200.

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And what about that majolica vase?

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Tracey really wants rid of it, so finger crossed,

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a bidder will like it and pay between £150 to £250 for it.

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Still to come on Cash In The Attic, David has no need to be so defensive.

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I didn't make it, you know.

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I just looked at it.

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The majolica vase is still causing discord.

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You three have no taste whatsoever.

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Will we be back in harmony when the hammer finally falls?

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It's been a couple of weeks since we were with Tracey when she told us

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all about her plans to take her boys out on an adventure day

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by selling some of the items that she's inherited.

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Before the adventure of the day, we've got the adventure of the auction.

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There might be a few thrills and spills, but importantly

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at the end of it, we will have that £600, so she can fund that day.

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The county town of Derby, home to one of the great pottery

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companies, Royal Crown Derby, lies on the banks of the River Derwent.

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It's here that Bamfords hold their regular general auctions.

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Hi, Tracey, Auntie Sandra.

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I seem to remember, David, that you were the only person who actually liked this vase.

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I still like it. I love it to bits.

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Not my taste, and second thoughts about it?

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I still don't like those eyes.

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-So, it's definitely going.

-It is.

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Is there anything you haven't brought?

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We haven't brought the war medals.

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-Why was that?

-With the valuation, I thought, with the family

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history and everything, that they were more precious at home than at the auction.

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-It's a nice thought, isn't it, to keep it in the family.

-It is, yes.

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Oh, dear, but that has reduced our possible takings by at least £150

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and alas, the crowd is a little thin on the ground today.

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We can but hope for a good result.

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The first lot to come up is the coffer

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that Tracey referred to as a nuisance.

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I do love the description of this item, it's

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-the 1940s oak three-panelled coffer, linen fold-top with bun feet.

-Hmm.

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It makes you hungry, just in the shape of buns, as simple as that.

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I have 20 and 2, do I see? 22, 25, 28 has it.

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At £28, 30 do I see?

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-New bidder.

-Top end of the estimate, David.

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32, 35, 35, 38.

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-38 and 40.

-Yeah.

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Near me at £38.

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501.

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-Clever boy.

-Thank you very much. I didn't make it, you know.

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I just looked at it.

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What a great start to the day.

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Almost double David's lower estimate.

0:18:070:18:11

Will her great-grandfather's silver vesta case and cigarette case

0:18:110:18:14

do as well here at £20 to £40?

0:18:140:18:16

They have always been really nice tactile things and very collected.

0:18:160:18:21

So it doesn't make any difference whether it's got a smoking-related

0:18:210:18:24

feel to it at all, it's silver,

0:18:240:18:26

it's hallmarked and it's collected and it will always do well.

0:18:260:18:30

I can start the bidding here at £35, 38 do I see?

0:18:300:18:34

Already a bid in.

0:18:340:18:36

45, 50, at 45 here.

0:18:360:18:40

50 at the back. 55.

0:18:400:18:41

At £50 at the back.

0:18:410:18:44

50 and 5, new place. At 55, are you sure?

0:18:440:18:46

55.

0:18:460:18:48

Terrific, a good result.

0:18:490:18:51

That's way over your top limit.

0:18:510:18:53

Someone obviously wanting to collect the pieces rather than just buy it for the silver scrap value.

0:18:530:18:58

Absolutely right. You've hit the nail on the head.

0:18:580:19:00

-The beauty of the piece has overtaken the value in weight.

-Exactly!

0:19:000:19:05

I wonder if the buyer intends to use them for storing matches or just to make a fine display?

0:19:050:19:10

Either way, a very good result.

0:19:100:19:13

Now it's the turn of the Pendelfin figures, which Tracey's collected the since the age of eight.

0:19:130:19:18

One of the rabbits is an early example of this make

0:19:180:19:20

and has a very cute name.

0:19:200:19:23

Includes Poppet, which is the rarest one amongst them

0:19:230:19:26

and sad that I know that, really, but there we are.

0:19:260:19:29

And 24 of them altogether.

0:19:290:19:32

-And one, two, three, four, five bids.

-Good.

0:19:320:19:36

-We will start at £50.

-Oh, yes.

0:19:360:19:38

-Great.

-At 50 and 5 now.

0:19:380:19:41

At 50 and 5 anywhere? 55.

0:19:410:19:44

-60 with me.

-Come on.

-65 for you.

0:19:440:19:47

-65, the lady's bid. 70 we're bid.

-Yes!

0:19:470:19:52

£70 takes it. £70.

0:19:520:19:55

How wonderful if this delightful set

0:19:550:19:58

is intended to join a larger collection.

0:19:580:20:00

But now for that majolica vase which David loves so much.

0:20:010:20:05

It's gorgeous. You three have no taste whatsoever.

0:20:050:20:08

He's going to smile because it sells well.

0:20:080:20:10

-You're going to smile because it's not going to go in the house any more. True?

-Quite right.

0:20:100:20:15

You've put a reserve on it. You do realise if it doesn't

0:20:150:20:17

make that, you've got to take it home?

0:20:170:20:19

I think we can have an accident on the way back with it.

0:20:190:20:22

-No, no, no accidents. Just a very happy result when the hammer comes down. Here it goes.

-Yes.

0:20:220:20:28

-Lots of bidding.

-A phone bidder.

-Lots of bidding.

0:20:280:20:32

I can start at, well, we will start at the low-end estimate of 150, 160 now.

0:20:320:20:36

160 in the room. At 150. 160 on the phone.

0:20:360:20:41

160 bid. 170 with me. 180 for you.

0:20:410:20:44

180 on the phone.

0:20:460:20:47

190 with me. 200 for you.

0:20:470:20:49

Yes!

0:20:490:20:51

-See, you three.

-200 bid. On the phone at 200. 210 now.

0:20:510:20:55

At £200 and 10 do I see?

0:20:550:20:57

Mid-estimate at £200.

0:20:570:21:00

Any advance on 200?

0:21:000:21:01

If you just look at it from a practical point of view, it's a great piece of work. £200.

0:21:010:21:08

Yes, 200, Sandra, what do you think about that?

0:21:080:21:10

-I think you're a very clever boy.

-Thank you.

0:21:100:21:12

Not me, that's a very clever vase.

0:21:120:21:14

I love it. I hope you three now love it, too.

0:21:140:21:17

That phone bidder certainly did,

0:21:170:21:19

and that's added a healthy amount to our running total.

0:21:190:21:22

Well, you're over the halfway point at the halfway point!

0:21:220:21:27

We've got in the kitty so far, £363.

0:21:270:21:30

-Fantastic.

-Brilliant.

0:21:300:21:32

And a couple of really nice pieces to come.

0:21:320:21:35

If you'd like to raise money by selling at auction, do remember

0:21:350:21:38

that charges such as commission will be added to your bills, so it is best to check these fees in advance.

0:21:380:21:43

The sale continues with the painting Tracey's grandmother commissioned in 1962.

0:21:430:21:48

Will it reach the £20 to £30 estimate?

0:21:480:21:51

£20 for it. 20.

0:21:510:21:53

-It's got no bids, has it?

-£20 for it.

0:21:530:21:56

15.

0:21:560:21:59

-10, then.

-Oh, dear.

0:21:590:22:00

Oh, dear.

0:22:000:22:02

No.

0:22:020:22:04

I think granny's painting's going home with you.

0:22:040:22:05

Oh dear, another no-sale.

0:22:050:22:08

Mind you, family heirloom or not, it is a rather challenging picture

0:22:080:22:12

to love, certainly as far as the auctioneer is concerned.

0:22:120:22:15

It is great to know that the people of Derbyshire have taste.

0:22:150:22:19

If anyone had bid on that picture, they not only needed a new pair of glasses, they also needed to go and

0:22:190:22:24

see a psychiatrist, because it was awful.

0:22:240:22:26

The best thing you could have done is paint it black and cover a window with it.

0:22:260:22:30

Oh, go on, James, tell us what you really think!

0:22:300:22:33

Tracey's next lot is the mid-20th century pine sideboard.

0:22:330:22:37

The estimate is £50 to £80.

0:22:370:22:39

-And £50 I have.

-We've got 50 on it.

0:22:390:22:42

£50 and 5 do I see?

0:22:420:22:44

At £50 absentee bid, then, we'll take it. At 50.

0:22:440:22:47

Oh, 55. 60.

0:22:470:22:49

5? At £60 with me and 5 now?

0:22:490:22:52

£60.

0:22:520:22:53

All done? Finished here as well.

0:22:530:22:55

£60. All sure at 60?

0:22:550:22:58

£60.

0:22:580:23:00

After the painting, it's quite a relief to make a sale again.

0:23:000:23:04

We've got a bit of a mystery here still,

0:23:050:23:08

because that wonderful folio of 1930s and '40s children's paintings,

0:23:080:23:13

-have you found out any more about them?

-Nothing, not even the author.

0:23:130:23:16

I suppose, £30-50, which is what you have put on them,

0:23:160:23:19

you have taken a bit of a flier there.

0:23:190:23:20

That's a good thing with an auction. Hundreds of people

0:23:200:23:23

have looked at that, not just us, so someone might have more knowledge.

0:23:230:23:26

Three bids on them. One bid of 30, one of 38 and one higher.

0:23:260:23:31

So £40 has it. At 40, 42 do I see?

0:23:310:23:34

At £40, 42 anywhere?

0:23:340:23:37

At £40, absentee bid.

0:23:370:23:39

All the bids on the book, then, at 40.

0:23:390:23:42

-GAVEL BANGS

-40 takes it.

0:23:420:23:44

Somebody must have seen them and recognised where they came from

0:23:440:23:47

-or thought that individually they will make wonderful prints for a children's bedroom.

-Yes.

0:23:470:23:52

So it was well worth David scrambling around

0:23:520:23:56

in the loft for them.

0:23:560:23:57

That's brought us

0:23:570:23:58

to the final lot of the day, and it's the big one -

0:23:580:24:01

the gold chain and the two gold coins

0:24:010:24:03

which belonged to Tracey's great-grandfather.

0:24:030:24:06

We're hoping they're going to fetch between £300 and £400.

0:24:060:24:09

Let's hope they pay more than the scrap value,

0:24:090:24:11

because it's a lovely thing, and they want to wear it or sell it on.

0:24:110:24:15

Here it goes.

0:24:150:24:17

Gosh, lots of bids, and with all the gold, bids are always close together.

0:24:170:24:21

-320 bid.

-Yes!

-320.

0:24:210:24:24

So we've already made more than your reserve.

0:24:240:24:27

340. 350.

0:24:270:24:28

355. 360. 365 anywhere?

0:24:280:24:32

365 do I see?

0:24:320:24:35

At £360?

0:24:350:24:37

Come on.

0:24:370:24:38

All sure at £360?

0:24:380:24:40

Bang in the middle again.

0:24:410:24:43

Terrific.

0:24:430:24:45

A big smile on your face.

0:24:450:24:48

-I can relax now.

-Both of you have a smile on your face.

-Yes.

0:24:480:24:51

That's the last thing we brought to go under the hammer, and £600 was what you wanted?

0:24:510:24:57

-What are you going to do with that, exactly?

-We are going white-water canoeing.

0:24:570:25:01

Kayaking, as the boys keep telling me.

0:25:010:25:04

Well, if that's what you're planning to do with £600,

0:25:040:25:07

what are you going to do with nearly a third more, £823?

0:25:070:25:11

Oh, my goodness! That's amazing!

0:25:110:25:14

Wonderful, well done.

0:25:140:25:16

Well done, you two.

0:25:160:25:17

Auntie Sandra going as well?

0:25:170:25:20

Auntie Sandra in a canoe, with the boys?

0:25:200:25:23

I think we'll both be in a canoe.

0:25:230:25:25

Tracey plans to emigrate to New Zealand where she hopes her two sons

0:25:290:25:34

will be able it make more of the active hobbies they currently enjoy.

0:25:340:25:37

With her auction earnings, she's brought them to

0:25:370:25:40

the National Water Sports Centre in Nottingham

0:25:400:25:42

for a day of kayaking practice.

0:25:420:25:44

I like to keep them entertained and active and fit and out in the fresh air.

0:25:470:25:52

Bill's been paddling now for about a year, but he's not

0:25:520:25:55

been on white water before,

0:25:550:25:57

so I thought it would be a good experience for him.

0:25:570:26:00

Alex has been kayaking now for about four years, I think it is.

0:26:000:26:04

He's really passionate.

0:26:080:26:10

We go three times a week, which is just on the rivers or a few weirs.

0:26:100:26:14

We'll shoot down this flow here and try and stop where the guy in the blue and white is.

0:26:140:26:18

It's an expensive hobby.

0:26:180:26:20

The kit is quite expensive. I'm glad I called Cash In The Attic to help us raise some funds to keep the boys

0:26:200:26:27

equipped with all the things they need and to keep them out in the fresh air and enjoying themselves.

0:26:270:26:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:26:520:26:56

Tracey Broughton is emigrating to New Zealand where her sons will be able to develop their skills in outdoor pursuits. She wants to clear her house and spend the proceeds on a kayaking day for them. Angela Rippon and expert David Harper help her sort through her Leicestershire home.