Ruskin Cash in the Attic


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Ruskin

Antiques series. Jennie Bond and expert Paul Hayes help Lesley and Phil Ruskin look through items which can be sold at auction, including a diamond necklace and a Rolex watch.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic. We're on the trail of antiques and collectables to take to auction

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so their owners can raise money for something special.

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The couple we're going to meet today have been collectors all their lives, which augurs well.

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But they're facing difficult times and they could do with some cheering up.

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So will they let some of their treasures go under the hammer?

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Coming up on Cash In The Attic,

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we discover some cigarette cases with an intriguing history.

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That belonged to my wife's grandfather.

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-He wanted to become the hangman.

-The hangman?

-The hangman for the nation.

-That's a career move!

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A market stall purchase baffles our expert Paul.

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-You're in a bazaar market?

-Yes.

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-You've paid £1,000 for something and you don't know what it is?

-No.

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And at auction, one sparkling result gets everyone into holiday mode.

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-Woo! More in the kitty. Sailing away!

-I think we're going twice!

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Stay with us as the hammer falls.

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Today I'm in a rather windy Lincolnshire

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and I'm on my way to meet Lesley and Phil Ruskin.

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With hobbies such as collecting elegant jewellery

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and taking cruises to exotic locations,

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Lesley Ruskin enjoys the nicer things in life.

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She's been married to Phil for 36 years and they have two sons,

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Alistair and Stewart.

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Home is in Lincolnshire, where Phil runs his own hairdressing salon.

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The couple have had a few tough years

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with Phil affected by health problems

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and Lesley made redundant from her pastoral work in their local school.

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Our expert Paul Hayes and I must do all we can to try to cheer them up.

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Efficient as ever, Paul gets straight to work.

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-Hello. Hi! Lesley and Phil?

-Yes, it is.

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Just having a brief look around, I can see ornaments everywhere.

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So you're quite a collector, huh?

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I think you get a big space and you fill it, don't you?

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You keep buying, putting things up on walls and places, but it's too much like hard work.

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It's got to stop now.

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I've also been told that you need a bit of cheering up. What's up?

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My mum's been poorly and Lesley's mum's been poorly.

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Lesley had problems with her workplace

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and I've got problems with my legs.

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We thought it was a bit of "us time".

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What are you going to do with the "us time"?

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We're going on a cruise from Southampton up to Iceland,

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then we're going across to America and then flying back from America to Heathrow.

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-That should put a smile on your face.

-Absolutely. Can't wait.

-Good!

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So how much money do you think you might be able to raise?

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We would like to raise £2,000, but I understand that's a lot of money.

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Anything would help towards it but 2,000 would be absolutely amazing.

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Let's see if all that collecting over the years is going to pay off.

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Phil, why don't you start rummaging? You go that way and we'll find Paul.

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OK, yes. We'll find Paul through here.

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Never one to waste time when it comes to a rummage,

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Paul's already come across a lovely little collection that's a particular passion of his.

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There we are, a man with a mission. Yes! Already at work.

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I found some of my favourite items, some Dresden porcelain.

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You've got to remember that Dresden and that area were first in Europe

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to actually produce porcelain.

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The Chinese had the secret for 2,000 years,

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then in Germany, about 1750, they developed

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this wonderful white gold, as they called it,

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and it was really considered a quality item.

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It's known as the Dresden Spray.

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-It's very unique to the Dresden area.

-Wow.

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The reason being this wonderful floral decoration here,

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and every now and again you'd have the odd flower.

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When they had these very primitive kilns,

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lots of imperfections were found in the porcelain.

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What they would do is individually disguise those

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with insects or flowers, that sort of thing.

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They're dotted all over the surface of the porcelain.

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A very impressive candelabra, two nice dishes. It's this.

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-This is called a lithophane. If I turn this on...

-Oh, I say!

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Isn't that fantastic?

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That was why I bought it, because it was so different and unique.

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How it's done is different thickness of porcelain.

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The thicker porcelain blocks the light,

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the thinner porcelain lets light through.

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Very carefully, skilled craftsmen can produce a picture

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just by that reason. I think it's fantastic.

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-Do you turn it on all the time?

-No. Never turn it on.

-Why?

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I don't know. I tend to have my candles.

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-Would you sell them as one lot?

-I don't know whether the best thing

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is to split them up. That's down to the auctioneer.

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How much would you like for them?

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I think at the time I paid about 200 for the candlestick

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and I think the lamp was about 250, mainly because it was different.

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As decorative items I don't think you've done badly.

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I can see that lamp being a couple of hundred.

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This one maybe 150-200.

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If you said around the 400 to 600 mark, is that all right?

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I like the top end! Brilliant. I think they're lovely.

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Before you part with it at auction,

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-for goodness' sake turn it on, OK?

-I will do!

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-Let's go and find something else.

-OK!

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Well, better late than never.

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Lesley's clearly keen on collecting pottery and it's not long

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before Paul comes across another set in the dining room.

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She's built up this collection

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of 19th and 20th century teapots and tureens over many years.

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Most have come from a local antique shop in the village

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and Lesley feels they're in keeping with the rustic theme of the house.

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Paul sets a price tag of £60-£80.

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-Phil?

-Hi, there. I'm in here, in the office.

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There's rooms everywhere here. Ah, look at that. Cigarette cases.

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-Are these yours?

-No, never smoked.

-Where has this one come from?

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That one is from the wife's grandfather, Alfred Greaton.

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He desperately wanted to become the hangman for England.

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-The hangman?

-The hangman for the nation.

-That's a career move!

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But at the time he was courting, and his wife-to-be said,

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"If you become the hangman, I'm not marrying you."

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-And he chose his wife.

-That's his initials on the front?

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-Alfred Greaton, yes.

-AG. Alfred Greaton.

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That's his cigarette case, which is in nice condition. Solid silver.

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I like the way it's curved to fit in your pocket.

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-And this one, CJ?

-JG. That one was Lesley's uncle.

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-Do you know where that one came from?

-Not sure about that one.

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It came as the set. Uncle Jeff gave the set of three to us.

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These really were very much for ceremony.

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You carry them around, but the art of smoking was to share them.

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This is called engine turning

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and that appeared in 1900, 1910, done by machine.

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-Do you know how to read hallmarks?

-No, I don't.

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What we've got here, these are solid silver,

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and we have the lion passant, the British mark for silver.

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Then you have an anchor. That means this was made in Birmingham

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or assayed in Birmingham.

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Then you've got a date letter. They work like car registration numbers.

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That's in a lowercase, T,

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so you're looking some time around the First World War,

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1910, 1920, that sort of time.

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This one's about 1930 and so is this one.

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-If we said 60-100?

-Excellent. First class.

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-Sound all right to you?

-Definitely.

-Put that in your pipe and smoke it!

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There are plenty of places to search here

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and Lesley comes across four serigraphs or silk screens,

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featuring a variety of beauty spots including Lake Como.

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She loves to travel and it was on her cruises that she picked them up

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to remind her of the places she's visited.

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She says there's no room for them in the downsize

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so it's time for someone else to enjoy them.

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At least with Paul's estimate of £50-£100,

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they'll help towards her next cruise

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and there'll be some new landscapes to enjoy.

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One of the great things about having a large house as you have,

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is Paul has absolutely got his work cut out

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and I can sit down and learn a bit more about you.

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That's the way it should be!

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I love this wedding picture. You look very young. How did you meet?

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That was quite a story, really.

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The first time I met Phil, I was going by the bus stop

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on my bicycle in the village.

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Because I was a friendly sort of person, I said hello to him

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and he actually thought I was speaking to him because it was him.

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Then shortly after that - at the time Philip was a lay preacher,

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and for Christian Aid we did a Christian Aid fast.

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There was a whole group fasting

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but I'm afraid they all went home at lunchtime except for us two.

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That was how we got talking and a couple of nights after

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you rang up and invited me to the cinema, didn't you?

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-And you declined.

-No, I didn't!

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The funny thing is most people meet over perhaps a meal

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and do their romancing, but you met over a fast.

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-Well, it was cheaper.

-We've made up for it since!

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I never like to splash the cash too early in a relationship in case it doesn't last!

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-36 years later, is it?

-Still married. Yes.

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Of course you, Phil, have got some major medical problems.

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-Tell me about them.

-I've got problems with my legs.

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I have ulcerated legs and painful legs.

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No valves in the deep veins so the blood circulation is pretty poor

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and there's a slight possibility, possibly more than a slight possibility,

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that we may be looking at an amputation in the near future.

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How are you facing that kind of prospect?

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I think one has to be philosophical.

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I've been in a tremendous amount of pain for a long time now.

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I see it as a release from the pain

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and hopefully with modern prosthetics and modern limbs,

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it's not the end. It's the beginning of a new life, in a sense.

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How are you coping, Lesley?

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I don't think it's going to be a barrier for us

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because we're the sort of people

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who pick ourselves up, dust ourselves down and start all over again.

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We will conquer. We will find ways around. It's not a problem.

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-We'll manage.

-We will.

-Stay positive, that's the thing.

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-And get on that cruise.

-Yes, that's the big thing.

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Lovely to hear more about you but now we ought to go back to Paul.

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It's awfully mean to leave him all alone.

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-I think he's had long enough.

-Back to the grindstone.

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While we've been chatting, Paul's been keeping up the good work,

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though I'm not sure THAT goes with his tie!

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-Lesley?

-Yes?

-Now, then.

-What have you found now?

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I thought I'd found a lot of costume jewellery but this looks real.

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What a strange item. Where's this come from?

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Well, that, I went on a conference in Doha.

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We happened to go out one afternoon into a souk,

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which is like a bazaar or a market,

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and just saw it, liked it and bought it.

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It seemed like a good idea at the time

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but I think I've probably worn it once.

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I thought it was costume jewellery

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but I've had a look and the stones look real. Those are diamonds.

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I wasn't actually really aware that it is real.

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I know I paid about £1,000, so quite a lot of money for it,

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but I couldn't have stood here and said to you it's diamonds or gold.

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Hang on. You've gone to Qatar, you've gone to a local market?

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-Yes.

-You paid £1,000 for something and you don't know what it is?

-No.

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Was that the sort of thing you did regularly?

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I told you I bought it because I liked it. It was just there.

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Actually, I think you've done quite well.

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If you look here, there's a little hallmark at the end. It says 18K.

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That's a continental way of marking 18 carat.

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They only ever put good quality stones in high-carat jewellery.

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You don't know what the other stones are?

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-These are diamonds, the white stones.

-No.

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-You didn't ask?

-No!

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The auctioneer could tell us 100%.

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They have a heat gun, it's a technical electronic device.

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What they do is place the needle on each stone

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and the reaction that the stone gives to the heat

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-tells you whether an item is a diamond or not.

-Wow.

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It's a simple process. You can do each one.

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If we try to get your money back, how would that sound to you?

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It would be brilliant.

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-If I said £800-£1,200?

-Fabulous.

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-We might put a reserve on it of 800.

-Yes, can do.

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-That's the minimum we would accept.

-Brilliant. Lovely.

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She seems to have a natural eye for quality.

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There's more proof when I discover this little gem,

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a sapphire and diamond cluster ring.

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Lesley picked it up at an antiques fair in Wainfleet in the mid-1990s.

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The ring's 18-carat gold, and this oval sapphire

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is surrounded by 22 diamonds set in 18-carat white gold.

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With an estimate of £200-£400,

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it would make a fabulous gift for someone.

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-Hello? Jennie?

-Oh, hi!

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-I'm mystified by this. Is it a crown?

-Er, no!

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I'll tell you exactly what that is. This is trench art.

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It's a relic from the First World War. This is an army tank shell.

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-Really?

-Yes. While they were in the trenches,

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the troops would make these items into different things

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to keep them occupied while they were there.

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You've got April 1918, that's when this dates from,

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right at the end of the First World War.

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So these are spent shells that would just be lying all over the place?

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That's right. There were millions of them. What do you do with them?

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They're brass, they polish up nicely, easy to work with.

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People just made all sorts of things out of them.

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-It's quite a collectable area.

-And this one, too.

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-That's a small one.

-You know more than me. What's this?

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That's a small shell or large bullet, I suppose.

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-It came out of a semi-automatic machine gun thing, I imagine.

-Yes.

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-Would you part with them?

-Oh, yes.

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-Anything else? Because there's a lot of brass.

-The copper kettle.

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-Oh, OK.

-I found that. That was absolutely black.

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I brought it home and Lesley said I could go quite quickly.

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She was not impressed.

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So I spent some time polishing it, trying to retrieve it.

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-I see this fire set. Could that go?

-That could go.

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I've been hit over the head with that many times.

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I'd be pleased to see the back of that, to be honest!

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You've got some great items.

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Some shells, a log box, a couple of warming pans,

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your poker set, the kettle. You must have £100 worth.

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If I said 80-120, how does that sound?

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That sounds excellent. Very good.

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That's OK. That's fine.

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Let's put them down and plough on and see what else we can find.

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So far our rummage seems to be turning up treasure after treasure.

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Paul finds this stainless steel Breitling watch complete with its original box.

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Phil bought this second-hand in a shop in Nottingham

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for just over £1,300.

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There are a few scratches on the face

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so Paul puts a price tag of £350-£450

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on this classic timepiece.

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But what will the bidders make of it when it goes to auction?

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At £320. £50. £380. £400, I'm bid.

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Will it make enough for Lesley and Phil's dream holiday?

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-We'll find out soon enough.

-Finished?

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It seems their home still has plenty of artefacts to offer for auction.

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Paul, I'd like you to come and have a look at these teapots over here.

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Ah, look at these. These are great fun.

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Novelty teapots, aren't they fantastic?

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You can buy anything and everything. What was the attraction?

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That it's aviation-related or just a novelty teapot?

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Just collecting teapots, really. Just the fact that I have four spaces

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so I had to have four to fill them.

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What's nice about these is that they're made by Carlton Ware.

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They produced all ranges of quality porcelain and pottery items.

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-Probably the most famous is the Rouge Royale range. Heard of that?

-Yes, I have.

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It's a burgundy colour with lots of gilding. They made lots of vases and plates.

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But they did go into these novelty teapots.

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Sort of a late venture, the 1950s up to the 1990s.

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What's really good is that this one was based on a particular character from the First World War.

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-Have you heard of the Red Baron?

-Definitely.

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He was the ace of aces.

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He was world renowned as being the best pilot that ever lived.

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He was a German pilot and he won 80 victories in dogfights

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but he died at the age of 25.

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-Did he?

-He did all that before he was 25!

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-I think that's incredible.

-Was he killed, then?

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-He was killed in action just before the end of the war.

-I wondered.

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I think you've got three collectors potentially for this.

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You've got the fact it's Carlton Ware,

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the fact it's aviation-related and the fact it's a novelty teapot.

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You've got a real chance at the auction.

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You've got four of them, all different characters.

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If I said 60-100 for those four, I think you could do well on that.

0:17:360:17:40

-That's good.

-How does that sound?

-Brilliant.

0:17:400:17:43

-I must admit auctions can be a bit of a dogfight.

-Absolutely.

0:17:430:17:47

-You've got to watch the shrapnel!

-Absolutely.

0:17:470:17:49

OK, let's keep looking. Well done.

0:17:490:17:52

Talking of tea, while the two men carry on with the rummage,

0:17:530:17:57

I think it's time I had a brew and a little break with our host.

0:17:570:18:02

Lesley, you strike me as a very active lady.

0:18:020:18:05

I know you've had a busy working life but a bit of a setback, I gather now.

0:18:050:18:09

Just at the moment. I've worked for 24 years in the local school.

0:18:090:18:15

What's happened?

0:18:150:18:17

What's happened, I think due to the financial situation at the moment,

0:18:170:18:22

my role as pastoral manager was made redundant.

0:18:220:18:27

What kind of job might you look for now?

0:18:270:18:29

I'm passionate about helping people

0:18:290:18:33

and I want a job in the caring profession of some sort.

0:18:330:18:37

I'm very, very passionate about working with the Eastern Europeans

0:18:370:18:43

and helping them to settle into the local community,

0:18:430:18:46

particularly in a village like this, where it's almost unheard of.

0:18:460:18:50

Have you befriended any already?

0:18:500:18:53

I have one really special friend called Bojenna.

0:18:530:18:57

She had some hard times.

0:18:570:18:59

We didn't share a common language so it all started with me hugging her

0:18:590:19:04

and saying we smiled in the same language.

0:19:040:19:06

We have a house at the other end of the village

0:19:060:19:09

and we put her up there for a time

0:19:090:19:12

until she could get herself back on her feet again.

0:19:120:19:15

Only this week has she moved out into her own house.

0:19:150:19:19

-She calls me her English mama.

-That's sweet.

-She's absolutely lovely.

0:19:190:19:24

It's been a difficult old time for you

0:19:240:19:27

but we want to cheer you up by sending you on that cruise.

0:19:270:19:30

-Absolutely.

-And cheer you up by making lots of money, I hope.

0:19:300:19:33

-Sounds even better.

-You know what that means? Back to work.

-Off we go.

0:19:330:19:37

With all the help she gives to other people, Lesley really does deserve a break for herself and Phil.

0:19:380:19:44

All we have to do is raise £2,000

0:19:440:19:46

to help them on their way to a luxury cruise.

0:19:460:19:49

Phil's obviously keen on the idea, as he's just spotted

0:19:490:19:52

this large Capodimonte figure of a poacher, along with two others.

0:19:520:19:55

They were made in the 1950s and apparently

0:19:550:19:59

Lesley was given her first one as a reward for losing five stone.

0:19:590:20:03

Hopefully we'll be gaining at auction

0:20:030:20:06

as Paul reckons these should make £80-£120.

0:20:060:20:09

Nice watches here. Huge ring. Do you collect watches or what?

0:20:100:20:15

I'm just heavy-handed, tend to break them too often.

0:20:150:20:18

-This one might be of interest.

-That's nice. Where's it come from?

0:20:180:20:21

We bought it in Sheffield for my wife's 25th wedding anniversary.

0:20:210:20:27

I think we paid about £3,000 for it.

0:20:270:20:30

-You can't let that one go.

-Why?

0:20:300:20:32

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:320:20:33

Doesn't she like it?

0:20:330:20:35

-She does but she's got another one she wears most of the time.

-Has she?

0:20:350:20:40

I think we should get Paul in. Hey, Paul? Lesley?

0:20:400:20:43

I don't believe this.

0:20:430:20:45

We have got a beautiful Rolex

0:20:450:20:47

which apparently ungrateful madam doesn't want!

0:20:470:20:51

That one is probably surplus to requirements.

0:20:510:20:54

Isn't that beautiful? You can feel it's dead right to start with.

0:20:540:20:58

This is solid gold. You can feel the weight is there. It's very heavy.

0:20:580:21:02

18 carat, so the top end of the gold market.

0:21:020:21:05

How can you tell whether it's a fake or not?

0:21:050:21:08

-There's a huge market in fake Rolexes.

-You're right.

0:21:080:21:12

People think, "Is it a real Rolex?" There's lots on the market.

0:21:120:21:16

-Do you have any authenticity?

-I've got the box and some literature.

0:21:160:21:21

You've got the original wallet. What will happen,

0:21:210:21:24

on the watch itself there will be a serial number.

0:21:240:21:26

Each Rolex is instantly identifiable.

0:21:260:21:29

Was it new when you bought it?

0:21:290:21:31

No, we bought it second-hand in a jeweller's in Sheffield.

0:21:310:21:35

So it was £3,000 second-hand. Do you know what the new price is?

0:21:350:21:38

I think last time I looked on the internet,

0:21:380:21:41

they're about 8,000 to 9,000 now.

0:21:410:21:44

I could see that around the 2,000 mark.

0:21:440:21:48

If we said 1,500-2,500 as an estimate, how does that sound?

0:21:480:21:53

-Happy with that, definitely.

-Excellent.

0:21:530:21:56

You wanted £2,000 at the start of the day,

0:21:560:21:59

so you can go on your lovely cruise.

0:21:590:22:01

We hope, based on Paul's lowest estimates,

0:22:010:22:04

that you will make on the auction day £3,640.

0:22:040:22:09

Wow. That means we can have two cruises!

0:22:090:22:12

Or I could have one with somebody else.

0:22:120:22:14

Or you could have one with somebody else!

0:22:140:22:17

-Why could you possibly want a new woman?

-I couldn't.

0:22:170:22:20

-Absolutely gorgeous.

-Correct response.

-Absolutely.

0:22:200:22:23

Now, that is an impressive total.

0:22:230:22:26

Maybe Lesley and Phil can travel first class if we make that much.

0:22:260:22:30

Our success on the day will depend on what the bidders are looking for.

0:22:300:22:34

There's Lesley's Dresden pottery, including a candelabrum

0:22:350:22:39

and that intricate lamp.

0:22:390:22:41

Paul reckons the collection should fetch £400-£600.

0:22:410:22:45

There's also Phil's Breitling wristwatch.

0:22:450:22:48

Valued at £350-£450, it's a classic make that will catch the eye

0:22:480:22:53

of any watch lovers in the room.

0:22:530:22:55

And let's not forget Lesley's diamond necklace.

0:22:550:22:59

She may not have known much about it when she bought it, but this piece

0:22:590:23:02

is of excellent quality and Paul's given it an estimate of £800-£1,200.

0:23:020:23:08

Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:23:100:23:13

one of Lesley and Phil's items is just refusing to sell.

0:23:130:23:17

-It's not going home, is it?

-Blast!

0:23:170:23:20

She's just been saying how she really wanted to take it home.

0:23:200:23:25

And which sale brings out the colour in Lesley?

0:23:250:23:28

-Is that OK?

-Well, I'm shocked.

-You've gone a bit red.

-I know!

0:23:280:23:33

Find out at the final drop of the gavel.

0:23:330:23:37

Well, it's been a while now since we were with Lesley and Phil,

0:23:420:23:45

and today's the day we're going to try to realise that hefty target of £2,000.

0:23:450:23:50

We've brought everything we found here to Tring Market Auctions in Hertfordshire

0:23:500:23:55

and we're hoping that the bidders will have a fine eye for some really lovely pieces

0:23:550:24:01

when their items go under the hammer.

0:24:010:24:03

Lesley and Phil have got some lovely items today.

0:24:040:24:07

Since the rummage, they've decided to put a reserve

0:24:070:24:10

of £2,500 on that Rolex watch

0:24:100:24:14

and a reserve of £800 on Lesley's diamond necklace.

0:24:140:24:17

-Hi.

-How are you two?

-They are lovely.

0:24:170:24:22

Are you feeling sad now they're going to go away?

0:24:220:24:25

Not really. Not too attached to them.

0:24:250:24:27

I do know there is one item in particular

0:24:270:24:29

that's plucking at the heartstrings and that's that Rolex watch.

0:24:290:24:32

Just a bit, even bearing in mind the price of gold going up at the moment.

0:24:320:24:38

I just feel if it doesn't reach that reserve

0:24:380:24:41

it's worth more for me to take it home for possibly future generations.

0:24:410:24:45

-What's the reserve on that one?

-2,500.

-Wow.

0:24:450:24:48

When I saw it originally I said between 1,500 and 2,500,

0:24:480:24:52

so you're right at the top of the estimate, which is fine.

0:24:520:24:55

The only problem you can have is if you put a reserve higher than the estimate. That's a problem.

0:24:550:25:00

There's a good buzz in the room.

0:25:000:25:02

-I think it's going to start any minute. Shall we get our place?

-Let's get ready. OK.

0:25:020:25:07

There's quite a high target for us to raise so let's cross our fingers

0:25:090:25:12

that the crowd are looking for the sort of things we brought along.

0:25:120:25:16

First up is Lesley's classic blue and white pottery.

0:25:160:25:19

She's always enjoyed collecting these pieces.

0:25:190:25:22

In fact her house is crammed with them

0:25:220:25:24

so I don't think this set will be missed too much.

0:25:240:25:27

-Where did it come from?

-I just collected it over the years

0:25:270:25:31

-from different antique shops and car boot sales.

-You?

-Yes, me.

0:25:310:25:34

It's a good quality blue and white set for anyone looking for antiques.

0:25:340:25:38

These are proper antique items.

0:25:380:25:41

£50 for it, £30 bid.

0:25:410:25:43

At 30 I'm bid for it.

0:25:430:25:45

£30. Five anywhere?

0:25:450:25:47

At £30 and five. 35. £40. And five. 45, is it? No.

0:25:470:25:51

45 bid. At 45.

0:25:510:25:53

£50 now. At 45 I sell that collection of blue and white. 45, thank you very much.

0:25:530:25:58

-Is that all right with you?

-That's fine.

0:25:580:26:00

-That's all right?

-Not far off.

-You're easily pleased. Excellent!

0:26:000:26:05

Well, they both seem in high spirits with that first result,

0:26:050:26:08

even though we came in under estimate.

0:26:080:26:11

Our next lot is the cigarette cases which belonged

0:26:110:26:14

to Lesley's grandfather and then her uncle.

0:26:140:26:16

Sterling silver, they're Birmingham hallmarked from the 1930s.

0:26:160:26:21

-Do you mind parting with these?

-Um, not really.

0:26:210:26:25

It's another item that just sits in the drawer

0:26:250:26:28

and never actually ever comes out.

0:26:280:26:30

-OK. We're looking for about £60 for these.

-Here we go.

0:26:300:26:35

What about those? Are we going to get close to £100? £100 bid.

0:26:350:26:38

Wow! Straight in.

0:26:380:26:42

120, I'm bid. 120. £30. £40. £150.

0:26:420:26:46

145, OK. 150?

0:26:460:26:48

145. Then I sell at £145. Thank you.

0:26:480:26:54

-Thank YOU!

-Yes! Yes!

0:26:540:26:57

It just goes to show how the price of silver has influenced things.

0:26:570:27:01

-Absolutely.

-Wow.

0:27:010:27:03

We took it locally to one of these buy-for-cash things

0:27:030:27:07

and I think they offered us £20 for the three.

0:27:070:27:10

-Really?

-Yes.

-Goodness me. That's incredible.

0:27:100:27:13

It's a good thing that offer wasn't taken up.

0:27:130:27:16

We've beaten Paul's top estimate by £45,

0:27:160:27:19

proving that the market for silver is healthier than ever.

0:27:190:27:23

We're looking for £50 for these serigraphs,

0:27:230:27:25

which I must admit is new to me. Tell me about them.

0:27:250:27:29

Well, they are paintings, basically,

0:27:290:27:32

that we've bought whilst we've been cruising.

0:27:320:27:35

Because we're looking to eventually size down the house,

0:27:350:27:38

we've got too many.

0:27:380:27:41

So we brought four of them along with us today.

0:27:410:27:44

-But you've got a whole lot more?

-Yes, a whole lot more.

0:27:440:27:48

What about £100 for those?

0:27:480:27:49

£100. Shall we start at 50 or 40? Thank you.

0:27:490:27:53

40 I'm bid. 50 I've got. 60 I'm bid.

0:27:530:27:56

60 bid.

0:27:560:27:57

At 70 we're bid. £80 perhaps. £80.

0:27:570:28:01

Two of you at £80. 85. £80. And five?

0:28:010:28:04

Yes or no? 85, there you go.

0:28:040:28:07

£85, then. Thank you. At £85. Thank you.

0:28:070:28:11

-Great.

-Is that OK?

-Yes.

-It's more than we were expecting.

0:28:110:28:16

What would you have paid for each one roughly?

0:28:160:28:20

-Oh, they would have been a good £100 each.

-So you've taken a loss.

0:28:200:28:26

Yes. Then we had to have them framed afterwards as well.

0:28:260:28:30

-But you're still smiling.

-Yes, still smiling.

0:28:300:28:33

That's the going rate for them. Things go out of fashion. It's time to let go.

0:28:330:28:38

It is time because when we size down we won't have room for them.

0:28:380:28:43

Given the original outlay for each one, we might have hoped for more

0:28:430:28:47

but Lesley and Phil are being realistic.

0:28:470:28:50

They know that dealers at auction have to

0:28:500:28:52

buy at a price which allows them to sell on at a profit.

0:28:520:28:55

I wonder what they'll make of our next offering.

0:28:560:28:59

It's certainly a bit quirky. It's that set of novelty teapots.

0:28:590:29:03

Mainly Carlton Ware, there's a whole assortment of themes,

0:29:030:29:06

including that classic-looking Red Baron plane.

0:29:060:29:10

-Novelty sets, very attractive, bit of fun, really.

-Yes.

0:29:100:29:14

Out of all your items, these are the ones you've missed the most, Lesley.

0:29:140:29:18

Certainly at the moment. From bringing them here earlier this week,

0:29:180:29:22

it seems a great big empty space at the moment.

0:29:220:29:24

-I need to buy something else to fill it now!

-No, you don't. No!

0:29:240:29:30

What about those? Are we going to get close to £80 for them? £80? £50?

0:29:300:29:34

£40. Got it. 40 I'm bid for those. There's a whole collection there.

0:29:340:29:38

At £40.

0:29:380:29:39

And five, you, sir. £50 and five.

0:29:390:29:41

£60. And five. £70. And five.

0:29:410:29:44

And £80, madam. £80. Going down, the teapots.

0:29:440:29:48

Yes, you have them for £80.

0:29:480:29:52

-Wow!

-There you go.

-Lovely.

-£20 over.

-Excellent.

0:29:520:29:55

-Flying high, weren't we?

-Absolutely!

0:29:550:29:59

Things are really taking off for us now

0:29:590:30:02

as that sale keeps us firmly within Paul's estimate.

0:30:020:30:05

If we stay on course there's every chance of making our target

0:30:050:30:09

of £2,000 for that luxury cruise.

0:30:090:30:12

So we've got your Capodimonte figures, three of them. Rather nice, I think.

0:30:120:30:16

Well, there were three. There are only two now because I chose to leave one at home.

0:30:160:30:20

That's going to knock it. How much are they now?

0:30:200:30:23

Realistically now we're looking at 60-100 for these two.

0:30:230:30:26

Let's hope they go but we have told the auctioneer.

0:30:260:30:30

-So let's see what happens.

-OK.

0:30:300:30:32

What about £50 for them?

0:30:320:30:34

£30. £20 is it now? Anybody got £20 for them? Surely. £20.

0:30:340:30:38

Five at the very back. £30 now.

0:30:380:30:40

£30. Five I'm bid. 35. £40 now. £40. Five I'm bid. £50? No.

0:30:400:30:46

At the very back, I sell at £45.

0:30:460:30:49

-He's going to let them go.

-AUCTIONEER: Thank you.

0:30:490:30:52

-Yes, they've gone.

-That's why I kept the poacher.

0:30:520:30:56

I think it was the right choice to leave that one at home.

0:30:560:30:58

The sale of just two Capodimonte figures will affect our total

0:30:580:31:03

so it's important that our next lot makes its estimate.

0:31:030:31:07

I remember very clearly finding

0:31:070:31:10

these lovely pieces of brass around your fireplace in your lounge.

0:31:100:31:13

-That's right.

-What does your lounge look like now without them?

0:31:130:31:17

-Naked.

-THEY LAUGH

0:31:170:31:19

-Does it? Oh, dear. You missing them?

-No.

0:31:190:31:23

-Well, I won't do when it comes to cleaning them.

-That's true.

0:31:230:31:27

-That was your job, was it?

-That was my job.

0:31:270:31:30

We ought to be looking somewhere in the region of, what, £50 for it?

0:31:300:31:33

At least.

0:31:330:31:35

£30 I'm bid. £30 for all that copper and brass. £30 I'm bid.

0:31:350:31:39

And the kettle's included, madam. At 35, £40. At £40. And five.

0:31:390:31:43

We know it's not very good. Another fiver?

0:31:430:31:46

Can I interrupt? I know it's not my say-so

0:31:460:31:48

but there are some First World War shells here as well.

0:31:480:31:51

There are some shells in there, sir.

0:31:510:31:53

Any militaria guys... Sorry about that.

0:31:530:31:56

That's moved it on a tenner. £50.

0:31:560:31:57

Moved it on a tenner. There you go.

0:31:570:31:59

£50. You're out. You're going to lose it there for £50. It's gone.

0:31:590:32:04

Thank you anyway. We tried our best.

0:32:040:32:06

-£50.

-What did we want?

-We were looking for 80, so that's less than we wanted.

0:32:060:32:11

That wasn't anywhere near as much as we were hoping for.

0:32:110:32:15

At least Paul's interjection helped add another tenner to the total.

0:32:150:32:19

Right, we've reached the halfway point. How do you feel it's going?

0:32:190:32:23

OK. I think the copper and brass was a bit disappointing

0:32:230:32:28

but other than that... Also the Capodimontes, too.

0:32:280:32:31

But other than that I think we're doing OK.

0:32:310:32:33

You've got a target of £2,000, a big, big target.

0:32:330:32:36

I'm sounding a bit hesitant because at this point because we'd like to be at 1,000 and we're not.

0:32:360:32:41

-We're at £450.

-Right, OK.

0:32:410:32:46

I think we might be all right.

0:32:460:32:48

-But I think I need a cup of tea before we continue.

-Absolutely. Me too.

-Come on.

0:32:480:32:53

If you'd like to sell some of your belongings,

0:32:530:32:55

remember auction rooms charge commission fees, so it's best to check what they are in advance.

0:32:550:33:01

While we take a short break, Paul's taking the opportunity

0:33:010:33:04

to have a browse around some of the other lots on sale today.

0:33:040:33:07

What are you doing down there, young man?

0:33:070:33:10

-I might need a hand up actually.

-It's your age!

-Getting that way.

0:33:100:33:14

I want to show you these because they are quality, quality, quality.

0:33:140:33:18

Quality always stands out.

0:33:180:33:19

If you want a pair of figures to give that wonderful 18th-century look to a house,

0:33:190:33:23

these are the ones to have.

0:33:230:33:25

19th century. Continental, it says in the catalogue,

0:33:250:33:28

so it could be any number of European factories.

0:33:280:33:31

I love the beautiful white porcelain and the honey gilding.

0:33:310:33:35

With the gilding, they used to mix in real honey.

0:33:350:33:39

-What year do you think they were made?

-About 1870 to 1900.

0:33:390:33:44

They were copying earlier figures.

0:33:440:33:46

If these were period figures from the 18th century,

0:33:460:33:49

then you'd be talking a lot of money.

0:33:490:33:51

They're in today between £300 and £500. An absolute bargain.

0:33:510:33:54

I haven't seen any of this quality for ages. They're fantastic.

0:33:540:33:58

We'd better go back if you can manage it, old man?

0:33:580:34:01

-I think so. That's me and you. Look at that. Which one are you?

-Oh!

0:34:010:34:05

These two handsome figurines ended up selling for £270 on the day.

0:34:050:34:10

We've still got half of Lesley and Phil's items to auction,

0:34:100:34:14

so let's hope we can make the £1,500 still needed to make their total.

0:34:140:34:18

Surely this sapphire and diamond ring

0:34:180:34:21

will give us a big boost in the right direction.

0:34:210:34:24

Was this an engagement present or a dress ring you used to wear?

0:34:240:34:28

Just a ring that Philip has bought me on one of the times over the years.

0:34:280:34:32

-Was it another argument?

-Probably. Another one I lost!

0:34:320:34:37

I think we ought to get a couple of hundred pounds for that one.

0:34:370:34:40

£100 bid. 110.

0:34:400:34:42

I'm bid 20. 40, 50, 60, 70, 90 bid.

0:34:420:34:46

£200 I'm bid. £200.

0:34:460:34:49

Come along, girls. No?

0:34:490:34:51

£200 and I'm selling it.

0:34:510:34:53

For £200. Thank you.

0:34:530:34:57

-What do you think?

-Yes.

-That's OK?

-Yes. That's OK.

0:34:570:35:00

Haven't worn it for a long, long time.

0:35:000:35:03

£200 is a good sum, really.

0:35:030:35:04

That was bang on the money, really. I said between £200 and £400...

0:35:040:35:08

Times are hard.

0:35:080:35:10

-Absolutely. I think that's it. Definitely.

-Good. OK.

0:35:100:35:13

The jewellery Lesley and Phil have brought here today

0:35:130:35:16

is all good quality,

0:35:160:35:17

so it's a relief we made the estimate there.

0:35:170:35:19

But will her collection of Dresden pottery prove as successful?

0:35:190:35:24

I wonder if we have some Dresden lovers here.

0:35:240:35:26

This is a rather fine collection

0:35:260:35:28

you've picked up over the years, the two of you?

0:35:280:35:30

Yes, we have. We've collected them at different times

0:35:300:35:33

when we've gone to antique fairs and things.

0:35:330:35:37

How does it feel to part with things you've collected so lovingly?

0:35:370:35:40

A little bit sad on that one.

0:35:400:35:41

OK. Well, I hope you won't be too sad. Let's see how it goes.

0:35:410:35:45

What about that one?

0:35:450:35:47

I work that lot out at about £300.

0:35:470:35:50

£200, then?

0:35:500:35:51

£200 I'm bid for that lot over there.

0:35:510:35:55

£220, £40,

0:35:550:35:56

£50, £80? At £280, £300, I'm bid.

0:35:560:35:59

£320, you're out!

0:35:590:36:03

At £320, then.

0:36:030:36:05

At £320. £50 now.

0:36:050:36:06

No? At £320?

0:36:060:36:07

Sorry, we leave that one.

0:36:070:36:10

Oh, there you go!

0:36:100:36:12

You seem quite relieved there?

0:36:120:36:15

-Yeah, that's OK. Quite happy to take that home.

-Are you?

-Yes, yes.

0:36:150:36:19

We're all glad she isn't too disappointed with the result.

0:36:190:36:22

And we still have some of our best pieces to come.

0:36:220:36:25

Moving on to one of Phil's contributions,

0:36:250:36:28

will his Breitling watch tempt the crowd?

0:36:280:36:30

-Was this a treat, or was it an argument that you won?

-I won it! The only one, I think.

0:36:300:36:35

Well, it's quite a nice one. How old is this one, then?

0:36:350:36:38

We've had it probably about five to ten years,

0:36:380:36:42

and we bought it second-hand.

0:36:420:36:44

-So it could be an '80s one, that sort of thing?

-Could be.

0:36:440:36:47

£500 for it?

0:36:470:36:49

500?

0:36:490:36:51

400 for it?

0:36:510:36:53

300? Thank you. 300, I'm bid, then.

0:36:530:36:55

320, I have it.

0:36:550:36:56

At £320, £50,

0:36:560:36:58

£380, £400...

0:36:580:37:00

-£400! Ooh!

-Ooh!

0:37:000:37:02

450, I'm bid, then. 480.

0:37:040:37:06

500. Yes or no?

0:37:060:37:08

£500, it is.

0:37:080:37:10

-HE GASPS

-Come on!

0:37:100:37:12

520. You've got to keep going.

0:37:120:37:14

Finished? 520, then. 550 bid.

0:37:140:37:17

550. £580...£620, I'm bid.

0:37:170:37:21

620, I'm, bid. 650.

0:37:210:37:22

-PAUL GASPS

-£650...

0:37:220:37:26

No more? 650's got it, then.

0:37:260:37:28

I shall sell it at £650.

0:37:280:37:30

Yup. Thank you!

0:37:300:37:32

What d'you think?

0:37:320:37:35

I can take my Rolex home now, can't I?

0:37:350:37:39

It would cost you a fortune to buy that in the shops, wouldn't it?

0:37:390:37:43

It's great, Jennie. What d'you think of that?

0:37:430:37:45

I'm astonished people have this much money, I really am!

0:37:450:37:48

That's more like it.

0:37:480:37:49

Real quality ALWAYS shines through,

0:37:490:37:52

and Phil's watch certainly impressed the bidders.

0:37:520:37:55

Let's hope Lesley's jewellery proves as successful.

0:37:550:37:59

I think, out of all these items,

0:37:590:38:01

this is the one that could either sell or not.

0:38:010:38:04

It's not an acquired taste, but it's very fancy, isn't it?

0:38:040:38:07

Remember, you bought this jewellery, a lovely necklace from Doha?

0:38:070:38:11

Yes. On a trip to Doha.

0:38:110:38:12

-Did you actually ever wear it?

-Er...once, I think.

0:38:120:38:17

Yes, I think once.

0:38:170:38:19

There you are. You need a special occasion for this, madam.

0:38:190:38:22

What about £1,000 for it?

0:38:220:38:24

Shall we start at 500, then?

0:38:240:38:26

400 bid. 420. I'm bid 480.

0:38:260:38:29

£500.

0:38:290:38:31

550, 60, bid.

0:38:310:38:33

650 bid. 700.

0:38:330:38:35

At 700, I'm bid.

0:38:350:38:38

700, I'm selling. Out!

0:38:380:38:40

Madam. At £700...

0:38:400:38:42

At £700, I'm going to sell...

0:38:420:38:45

He's going to let it go.

0:38:450:38:46

I'm going to sell, for £700... Thank you very much, sir.

0:38:460:38:51

What he's done here is used his discretion.

0:38:510:38:54

-Is that OK?

-Yes, that's fine.

0:38:540:38:58

Whee! More in the kitty!

0:38:580:39:00

You're sailing away!

0:39:000:39:02

I think we're going twice!

0:39:020:39:04

It's great to see that nothing seems to be dampening

0:39:040:39:07

Lesley and Phil's spirits.

0:39:070:39:09

Our final item is crucial to our success today.

0:39:090:39:13

It's the most valuable, and will make all the difference

0:39:130:39:16

to that holiday fund.

0:39:160:39:18

Since our rummage, Lesley's decided to put a reserve of £2,500

0:39:180:39:21

on her Rolex watch.

0:39:210:39:25

OK, this is the big one.

0:39:250:39:26

-It's your Rolex watch.

-Yes.

0:39:260:39:29

I'm a wee bit full of trepidation,

0:39:290:39:31

because you put a whacking great reserve on it.

0:39:310:39:33

It's top of the estimate. two and a half grand, eh? Here we go!

0:39:330:39:36

Where do we start, then? 2,000?

0:39:360:39:38

1,500?

0:39:380:39:40

1,500, we're in. That's the bottom of the estimate.

0:39:400:39:44

1,800 bid.

0:39:440:39:46

1,900 bid. 2,000.

0:39:460:39:48

In the corner...

0:39:480:39:51

She doesn't really want to part with it!

0:39:510:39:54

2,500, 2,600...

0:39:540:39:56

-It's gone!

-It's gone!

0:39:560:39:58

At 2,600. Make no mistake!

0:39:580:40:00

You're going to lose it.

0:40:000:40:02

I sell, then, at £2,600. Thank you!

0:40:020:40:04

-It's not going home, is it?

-No! Blast!

0:40:040:40:08

SHE LAUGHS

0:40:080:40:10

She's just been saying how she really wanted to take it home!

0:40:100:40:14

It was only a joke!

0:40:140:40:16

-How d'you feel about that? Is it OK?

-Well, I'm shocked.

0:40:160:40:20

-You've gone a bit red.

-I know!

0:40:200:40:22

Let's hope I have grandsons and not granddaughters, then!

0:40:220:40:27

Well, what a way to end our day. Despite a slow start,

0:40:270:40:31

those last three sales

0:40:310:40:33

added an impressive amount to our total.

0:40:330:40:35

So, just how much have we made towards that luxury cruise?

0:40:350:40:39

WHAT an exciting day it's been!

0:40:390:40:43

-It really has!

-LESLEY LAUGHS

0:40:430:40:45

-You've changed several colours during the course...

-I have.

0:40:450:40:48

I can feel my colour there, now.

0:40:480:40:50

At the halfway point, I really was worried.

0:40:500:40:52

You'd only made £450.

0:40:520:40:54

Because you've got this VERY big target.

0:40:540:40:56

£2,000 to go on a lovely, luxurious cruise.

0:40:560:40:59

Big, ambitious target.

0:40:590:41:01

You have made £4,600!

0:41:010:41:04

-Wow!

-£4,600!

0:41:040:41:09

-That's amazing! Wow!

-It IS amazing!

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you so much.

0:41:090:41:14

We can have two cruises now. We'll come back off that one,

0:41:140:41:17

and then book the next one.

0:41:170:41:19

-Brilliant idea. Just go round the world!

-Yes!

0:41:190:41:22

It's been two months since our auction, and during that time,

0:41:250:41:29

Lesley and Phil managed to get away on that cruise.

0:41:290:41:32

Back on dry land, with Lesley's mum and her friend,

0:41:320:41:35

who went on the cruise with them,

0:41:350:41:38

they're reminiscing about the holiday of a lifetime.

0:41:380:41:41

We've been on our cruise, which we were planning to do.

0:41:410:41:45

We went to Iceland, and Norway, to Canada,

0:41:450:41:48

and then on to America.

0:41:480:41:51

We finished the cruise in Fort Lauderdale,

0:41:510:41:54

and went down the Everglades.

0:41:540:41:55

-That was absolutely brilliant.

-Something we'd always wanted to do.

0:41:550:42:00

And if it hadn't been for the success on Cash,

0:42:000:42:02

-we probably couldn't have done that.

-Probably not.

0:42:020:42:05

-It was really excellent.

-Yes.

0:42:050:42:06

Lesley and Phil Ruskin are in need of a cruise, which could set them back around £2,000. Jennie Bond and expert Paul Hayes join them to look through family items which can be sold at auction, including a diamond necklace and a Rolex watch.