Stevens Cash in the Attic


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Stevens

Antiques series. Former cabaret artist Jeannie Stevens calls in her son Mark, plus Lorne Spicer and expert John Cameron, to help raise £700 towards home refurbishments.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic,

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the show that searches out all those hidden treasures

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around your home and then we sell them at auction.

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Today, I'm going to be meeting a lady who's hoping

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that in her case, it will be out with the old and in with the new

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and we'll be learning more about her very colourful showbiz past.

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Today on Cash In The Attic,

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we struggle to keep our expert satisfied...

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John, I've found something here.

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For a minute, I thought it was something nice to go in this tumbler.

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It's all going a bit Upstairs Downstairs...

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I could see myself in the Edwardian days, pouring tea for my neighbours.

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-Absolutely, but we haven't got time for that. It's

-tea bags. Exactly.

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Come auction day, the phrase I never like to hear...

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We'll finish up owing this auction house money!

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Be there when the hammer falls.

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I'm on my way to meet Jeannie Stevens and her son Mark.

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They've called in the Cash In The Attic team to give them

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a little bit of help with a big change to the family home.

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Essex-born Jeannie has led a fascinating life,

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steeped in music and show business.

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In her cabaret career, she's appeared alongside

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dozens of famous faces at some of London's starriest clubs.

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But it's all changed now, Jeannie is retired

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and leaving her beloved house

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where she and her late husband George brought up their son Mark.

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It's staying in the family though. As mum moves out to a new flat,

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Mark's moving in.

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He has some grand plans for his childhood home.

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We have grand plans too to help this talented lady

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find a host of antiques and collectables to sell at auction.

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-Morning!

-Good morning.

-You must be Jeannie.

-I am, yes.

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-You must be Mark.

-Yes.

-Very nice to meet you.

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This is your expert, John Cameron.

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Jeannie, I'm noticing the house is rather empty.

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Am I going to have my work cut out?

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Yes. We need furniture.

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OK. Are you happy for John to have a look round?

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-Sure, absolutely.

-There you go. See what you can find.

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Not much to steal!

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You've called in Cash In The Attic so what do you want us to do?

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I would like to refurbish my home, my new home, the flat.

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I haven't got a lot of room there but I need some nice furniture.

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My old furniture won't fit in there. It's too big.

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OK. What sort of figure do you have in mind?

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Roughly 700, 750. Something like that would do nicely.

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Shall we go and see if John's done his job and found anything we can sell?

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-Come on then.

-Lovely.

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Like many others of its age, this house has been given

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lots of extensions and additions over the years.

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A bit like our expert who,

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with more than 20 years' experience in the antiques trade,

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has soon put his hands on a likely sale piece.

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Ah, John, you've found something already for us to look at?

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I have. It's a lovely Coalport, bone china breakfast tea for two,

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-or coffee for two, actually.

-Exactly.

-Where did this come from?

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This came from a friend of mine who sold a lot of china.

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I went there one day, saw that, fell in love with it,

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saw it was by David Shilling

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and I thought, that sounds an interesting name.

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I remember that name.

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Of course. And it is a lovely, lovely pattern. I've not seen this before.

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You two obviously know about David Shilling.

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-Hats, I'm thinking.

-Of course. Gertrude, his mother.

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Yes, absolutely!

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And I think the Guinness Book of Records

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has him listed as having designed

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the most expensive hat of the 20th century...

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-Really?!

-..which was diamond-encrusted.

-Really?!

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Here he's designed this rather nice bone china coffee set

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which is great. It's made by Coalport, a factory set up

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by John Rose in the 1790s.

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They are synonymous with bone china.

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For years and years, English manufacturers had struggled

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to try and make true, hard-paste porcelain.

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Somebody introduced the calcined bones,

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ground calcined bones to the clay

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and it produced this beautiful, white, translucent body.

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Bone china is something that is associated with England.

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None of the European factories made it. Well, I love it.

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There we are. Breakfast for two. This is a honeymoon set, isn't it?

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Awww, yes! It takes me back.

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What about you, love?

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I haven't had time for breakfast.

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I'm just trying to imagine what it might be like!

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I guess it's got honeymoon value?

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Well, in auction today, I'd put an estimate on that

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of about £40 to £60.

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-Does that sound good enough?

-It sounds good to me.

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A modest but useful start to the rummage

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and I would say a very fair price for that stylish coffee set.

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Our search is slightly unusual today,

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as Jeannie's belongings are in the process of being packed away.

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It means we'll have to dig deeper

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to unearth the best pieces to take to auction.

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'I'm upstairs and I've found a charming little statue.

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'This clown is keeping his dog entertained by playing a concertina.

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'The piece was made by the Spanish firm of Lladro

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'and Jeannie bought it while on holiday in Majorca.'

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As far back as the 1950s,

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Lladro products were famous for their pale, creamy finishes.

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We often see them at auction going for respectable prices.

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Taking into account their charming expressions,

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John values them at £20 to £30.

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Hello, Mark.

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-Hi.

-Have you found us something for auction

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-or is this something you're going to take?

-No, we're not taking this.

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So where did it come from?

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It came from my Uncle Jim.

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Got it from an auction house

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and gave it to my mother about 15 years ago.

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It's not one you want to give house room to?

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It's probably a bit too big for mum's flat.

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And for us, no, it's not what we would have.

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-Too old-looking?

-Just a little bit, yes.

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It's a reproduction piece. A lot of reproduction furniture now, you can't sell it.

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Some auction houses won't even accept it.

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Not because they don't like it

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but because they don't have a market, no demand for it.

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But I like it, for a couple of reasons.

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It's trying to be several different things.

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It's a walnut chest on chest which is a piece of furniture

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we start seeing at the beginning of the 18th century,

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around the late Queen Anne period, early George I.

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But they were wide, they were big things that you get in the bedroom.

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It looks almost like a Wellington chest which is a narrow piece

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that you start seeing at the beginning of the 19th century

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around the late Georgian period.

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But the little Queen Anne feet on there, those squat Queen Anne feet,

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again, that's the sort of thing you would see on the early Georgian furniture.

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A bit of a mismatch. The handles are similar to the style

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you would see in the early Georgian period, the early 1700s.

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-I still haven't sold it to you yet?

-No, you haven't, I'm afraid.

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It features some nice things. If you have a look down here,

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you've got these nice burr walnut panels in here which are mirrored.

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-Can you see that?

-Oh, yeah!

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How they do that...Take a piece of wood, a sliver of wood,

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with a nice thick grain in it, they slice it through

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and open it up like a butterfly painting.

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If you look down the drawers, that 's actually been mirrored

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all the way down, you get that echo down the drawers.

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It's a nice sign of quality. 1950s or '60s, I would have said.

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Normally, you wouldn't take this piece to auction,

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-but it's a good colour...

-Yes.

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..nice condition, nice proportions,

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a little functional piece of furniture.

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So I'm going to say, let's take it

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and let's put £50 to £100 on it.

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Not bad for a piece of reproduction furniture

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and another £50 in the pot for us.

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We'll see just how well that cabinet does

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when it goes to auction.

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Will the bidders recognise a bargain when they see one?

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Keeping busy in Essex,

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John spots these two canteens of silver-plated cutlery.

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Made in Sheffield by Smith Seymour Limited,

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they were wedding presents to Jeannie.

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Sheffield plating was the very first kind of silver plating,

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but from the mid-19th century, it was replaced by a new process

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known as EPNS or electro-plated nickel silver.

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It's this mark which distinguishes the silver plate from the real thing.

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There's usually a market for sets like this so let's hope they sell

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with an elegant £60 to £80 price tag.

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-Jeannie?

-Yes.

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-You've got some very famous people in these pictures, haven't you?

-Yes.

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That looks like...

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-Des O'Connor.

-It is.

-He probably won't thank me for this,

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but actually, he looks younger now than he does in that shot!

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-Who's this up here? Very famous!

-That's Geoff Hurst and Bobby Moore.

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This looks like it was taken

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around the time of the famous 1966 World Cup victory for England.

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It was. They were celebrating that night, actually.

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-You must have sung at some very A-list clubs?

-Yes.

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Well, the Astor, Churchill's, Jack of Clubs.

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Ooh, I've forgotten some...

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The Embassy Club. Lots of lovely clubs.

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All the London clubs, basically.

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How did you get into doing this?

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My mother sent me to dancing classes and, as I grew older,

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I was more interested in singing than dancing.

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So I had a wonderful dance teacher

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and she used to put on local shows and one thing and another.

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She eventually got us into pantomime at the age of 12

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and I took up singing more from then on in.

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In my teens, I started to do a bit of cabaret work,

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singing with bands, jazz bands, and things like that.

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What was it like in the days when you were singing?

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It was very glamorous, of course.

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Well, front stage, it was very glamorous!

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Backstage, very grotty, quite honestly.

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But they were good days. I loved them, I loved every moment.

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So when did you stop singing and why?

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Well, I suppose...I eased off, shall we say,

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when Mark was born, when my son was born.

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But when he was born, I used to take him with me in the carrycot

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and he'd be in the dressing room, other people making a fuss of him.

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He loved the noise. Get him home, put him into bed, cried his eyes out.

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-Too quiet?

-Too quiet, exactly.

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It was a life that I enjoyed

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and I feel very privileged to have done it really.

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I don't think they'll ever going to come back again, those sort of times.

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They were quite glamorous times, I guess.

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Well, I still don't know quite how John Cameron got into the business,

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but shall we go and see what he's been up to? Come on.

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Happily, our own song and dance man has been busy.

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He's noticed some more reproduction furniture in the form of these two Georgian style corner cabinets.

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They were made for Jeannie and her late husband, George,

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by a carpenter friend they met while they were on honeymoon.

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The Georgian style was named after King George I and is actually a combination of other styles,

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such as Rococo and Gothic.

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The heady mix has had a significant effect on almost all furniture styles since.

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If this were original, we'd be looking at a large amount of money.

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But, as they're reproduction, it's nearer £40 to £60.

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-Ah, there you are! I wondered where you'd got to.

-Yes, I'm rummaging.

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-Treasure trove.

-Is it silver or silver plate?

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-It looks silver-plated to me.

-Yes, I think it is, isn't it?

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It's a very large collection. Where did it all come from?

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Silver wedding presents and things like that.

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Odd bits and pieces we picked up from auctions.

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-Have you ever used any of it?

-No.

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I always swore, I could see myself in the Edwardian days, pouring tea for my neighbours.

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-Absolutely. We haven't got time for that now. It's tea bags.

-Yes, exactly.

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-That's a very modern-looking piece.

-Yes, it is actually.

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That's like some sort of hors d'oeuvres serving dish.

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-I used it for peanuts and stuff like that.

-It's got a real modern look to it.

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We can see, looking at it even at a glance, that condition varies and quality varies.

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If we look at this piece here, it's nice and heavy

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but we can see the plating has started to wear off.

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How this is made, it's literally a base metal.

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It's given a micro-thin electric-plated coating of silver,

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developed in the 1850s by Elkington & Co,

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which enabled them to mass-produce silver-looking items,

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or silver-plated items, to the rising middle-class market,

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that perhaps couldn't quite afford the genuine silver article.

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-Now we're changing social habits, people don't tend to use it, do they?

-No.

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What would you suggest with this lot, John?

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If I had this in auction, I would sell it as one lot.

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There's something for everyone in there.

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By keeping it together, you may well generate a bit more competition,

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if somebody wants something particular... Definitely keep that in. I like that.

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It's quite modern looking. I'd put the lot together

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-and I'd suggest an estimate of £50-£100.

-Fantastic!

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-Are you pleased with that?

-Yeah, fine. That's fine.

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This house is full of furniture that's now surplus to requirements,

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such as this mahogany corner drinks unit.

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Like those corner cabinets we saw earlier, this piece was made to order

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for Jeannie and George about ten years ago.

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Mahogany has become increasingly popular in Britain from the mid-18th century.

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It was originally used for the finest pieces.

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But mahogany is now moderately priced and much more accessible.

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John's hoping for an elegant £50-£100 when this example goes under the hammer.

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John, I found something here.

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Do you know what? For a minute, I thought it was something nice to go in this tumbler!

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Right, put that down there. Let's have a look. Wow!

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-Have you got an office, Mark?

-I have, yes.

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Don't you think that would look grand on your office desk?

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Unfortunately not, no. It's not the style of my office, I'm afraid.

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You know what it is?

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-I think it's an inkwell.

-Yeah, it's a desk set.

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An inkstand dish. Let's turn it over and have a look at the bottom.

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It's gilt and it's cast, it's a modern thing.

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-This is probably 1950s.

-Right.

-Quite popular then.

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-It's very feminine, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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The style is actually Rococo.

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That was a style that started in France around the 1730s and is typified by

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lots of ornate scrollwork, scrolling foliage, shell work.

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-We've got a shell in the centre of this well. Not everyone's cup of tea.

-No.

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But it's still a decorative style.

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It's 1950s as we've said. No-one's using fountain...

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Not the ones you dip in, anyway, in this period. This is purely a decorative thing.

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On the right sort of furniture, nice Kingwood and gilt-mounted French desk, bureau plat,

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this would look the part.

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But, seeing as you don't want it, we'll try at auction.

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A good desk set like this should find a home. It is repro.

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I'm not going to put a high estimate on it but I still think £30-£40.

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-Excellent.

-Happy with that?

-Yeah.

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-Are you sure you don't want it for your desk?

-Definitely.

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-Well done! Come on.

-Thank you.

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Now, that's not a bad addition to our home furnishing fund.

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Even as we are finding plenty of items,

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they do seem to be of relatively low value.

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We'll need to up our game if we're going to make that £750 for Jeannie's plans.

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For now though, I want to find out a little bit more

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about what the future holds for the Stevens' residence.

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Ah, there you are. You've got the plans out.

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I've left John upstairs having a rummage around.

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-I'm delighted to see these. Is this what it will look like?

-Please God, yes.

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-What are you doing?

-If you can see the dotted lines here.

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-That's the original roofline as it is.

-Right.

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Take off the top floor completely and then go up into a five-bed house.

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Now, these look fantastic.

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Is this your idea of how you want the house to be

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-or did the architects and builders come up with this?

-A bit of both.

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I sat with the architect and said, "This is what I'd like to do,"

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and then there was a lot of his ideas as well.

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-We threw some ideas together and he came up with this.

-When did you two

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get together and decide to keep this property in the family?

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Basically, mum has lived here for 50-odd years and never wanted to move.

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Still doesn't want to move.

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The only way we can keep the house and keep it in the family

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is for us to move in and have it.

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So, how do you feel about this?

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Obviously, this has been your home for 56 years,

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-and now it's all changing.

-Yeah. I'm thrilled to bits, absolutely thrilled to bits.

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Him making that decision to do it made me decide, "Yes, I'll move."

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I wouldn't have liked to leave it to strangers.

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It must be quite exciting though...

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I really am excited, I must say.

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I'm happy with my flat, I'm happy with the fact I'm just two or three minutes away from Mark,

0:16:470:16:52

so that's what really has made my life much easier now.

0:16:520:16:56

I think we'd better leave the plans alone and go and see

0:16:560:16:59

whether we can get you sorted out with some new furniture and the funds for it.

0:16:590:17:03

Shall we see if John's found anything?

0:17:030:17:04

-We'll go upstairs, shall we, before it disappears?

-Yes.

-Come on.

0:17:040:17:09

It's good to see Jeannie so excited about this new phase in her life.

0:17:090:17:15

I'm glad we're able to help her find comfort in her new home.

0:17:150:17:18

Now, Mark's getting into the swing of things.

0:17:180:17:22

And John, he looks like he's spotted another likely lot.

0:17:220:17:25

Will we be toasting an impressive estimate?

0:17:250:17:28

Ah, Jeannie!

0:17:280:17:30

Now, I'm wondering why these decanters are left here like this.

0:17:300:17:34

-I'm hoping they're redundant.

-Yes, they are.

0:17:340:17:38

They've done their duty - well and truly done their duty over the years -

0:17:380:17:42

but they have to go now. I haven't got room for them where I'm moving to.

0:17:420:17:45

-Do any of them have a special story at all, where they came from?

-Those particular two, yes.

0:17:450:17:50

My uncle, who lived in Bournemouth, he was always round at the local auctioneers.

0:17:500:17:56

He picked them up - always picking something up -

0:17:560:17:58

and he made them as a gift to me, gave them as a gift to me.

0:17:580:18:01

That's good. We've got a couple of decent pairs there.

0:18:010:18:04

If I can start with this one first, people don't realise,

0:18:040:18:07

when they pick something like this up, how much work's gone into it. From the start,

0:18:070:18:11

the vessel has to be produced in this traditional way by a glass-blower.

0:18:110:18:16

They have to have the decoration marked out - the pattern -

0:18:160:18:19

which is another man's job. Then they cut that in.

0:18:190:18:21

If you have a look.

0:18:210:18:23

-Look at my eye through there! Can you see there's a V-section?

-Oh, yes.

0:18:230:18:28

That's created by a circular abrasive wheel. It has a disc on the edge.

0:18:280:18:33

These wonderful fruiting grape vines have been cut in and etched.

0:18:330:18:37

See, they're frosted. You can't see through those bits.

0:18:370:18:40

I've never looked at them so closely. You've made them more interesting!

0:18:400:18:43

-You've got another two processes.

-Yes.

0:18:430:18:46

We've got these wonderful grapevines, so we know these are claret decanters.

0:18:460:18:50

-OK.

-I think they're nice.

0:18:500:18:52

You've got a pair of those and a pair of nice whisky or brandy decanters

0:18:520:18:55

and a couple of three other odd ones. They'll be all right at auction.

0:18:550:18:59

If I put them in at £60-£80, would that be OK?

0:18:590:19:02

That's fair enough really these days. Yes.

0:19:020:19:05

I'll put those back up there before you change your mind.

0:19:050:19:08

-Come on. Let's go and see what else we can find.

-OK.

0:19:080:19:11

Well, Jeannie knows she won't have room for all these pieces in her new flat.

0:19:110:19:16

At least she'll be able to use the proceeds for some brand-new furniture.

0:19:160:19:20

Mark's search has reached the attic

0:19:200:19:22

where he finds this Capodimonte biscuit porcelain figure of an old vagabond,

0:19:220:19:27

which Jeannie bought at auction some years ago.

0:19:270:19:31

Capodimonte was first produced in Naples is in Italy in the mid-18th century.

0:19:310:19:35

Although pieces like these are collectable, they do come up

0:19:350:19:39

regularly at auctions, and can struggle to make a decent price.

0:19:390:19:43

We think this modern example could still manage £20-£30.

0:19:430:19:47

And Jeannie's sported these three interlinked bangles

0:19:470:19:50

made of nine-carat gold.

0:19:500:19:53

They were given to her by a relative when she was little girl.

0:19:530:19:56

Gold items like these may look very attractive but,

0:19:560:19:59

with the rising price of scrap gold,

0:19:590:20:01

most dealers now buy the precious metal simply to melt it down.

0:20:010:20:05

They're still very saleable though,

0:20:070:20:09

so John estimates a hammer price of £80-£120.

0:20:090:20:13

Our day here with Jeannie and Mark is almost over.

0:20:140:20:17

But, have we really discovered all their treasure?

0:20:170:20:21

John...

0:20:210:20:24

-what have we got there?

-Four gold coins.

0:20:240:20:27

Ah, they look interesting. Definitely something we can sell at auction.

0:20:270:20:31

Where did these come from?

0:20:310:20:33

These are, I think, handed down through the family

0:20:330:20:37

from my grandmother, my grandfather, and my mother.

0:20:370:20:41

For me, I think, for a sort of inheritance, to be honest.

0:20:410:20:45

-So, you'd give up your inheritance?

-I would. Of course.

0:20:450:20:48

-What a nice lad you are! We could split these.

-OK.

0:20:480:20:52

They're gold sovereigns. We've got three half sovereigns

0:20:520:20:56

and one full sovereign. The full sovereign weighs about 3.9g to 8g.

0:20:560:21:02

The three halves, half that amount.

0:21:020:21:05

So, they are a bullion weight and bullion value,

0:21:050:21:07

based on the current gold fix.

0:21:070:21:09

The sovereign usually comprises, you know, the reverse and the obverse.

0:21:090:21:14

On the reverse, we've got the very iconic image of the George and Dragon there.

0:21:140:21:19

On the obverse, we've got the reigning monarch's head

0:21:190:21:22

which, on the full sovereign, is a young Queen Victoria.

0:21:220:21:26

Then it changed to, on this one here,

0:21:260:21:29

the other half here, we've got an older Queen Victoria.

0:21:290:21:32

On these two here, they're both Edward VII, which was her son.

0:21:320:21:36

Those would be between 1901 to 1910.

0:21:360:21:38

I'm going to put a bottom estimate of £300 on them. Top estimate 400.

0:21:380:21:43

-They'll make somewhere between 380 and 400.

-Fantastic!

0:21:430:21:46

-Say 300 to 400 as an estimate.

-Fantastic!

0:21:460:21:48

All right? Are you sure you want to give up your inheritance?

0:21:480:21:51

-I'm sure.

-What are you trying...? What is he trying to get you to give up now?

0:21:510:21:55

-He's kindly donated these three sovereigns. Three halves and a full sovereign.

-Ooh, gold sovereigns!

0:21:550:22:01

They should do quite well. What have you put on those?

0:22:010:22:04

I've estimated them at £300-£400, to get the bidding started.

0:22:040:22:07

-I hope they'll make towards our top estimate.

-We've had a very interesting day.

0:22:070:22:11

-Although you are clearing out, there's still plenty to find.

-Yeah, it's amazing.

0:22:110:22:16

You wanted £750, didn't you?

0:22:160:22:18

Do you think we've come anywhere near that amount?

0:22:180:22:21

-How much do you think we might have made?

-I have no idea.

-No?

0:22:210:22:24

-OK, the value of everything going to auction comes to £800.

-Wow!

0:22:240:22:28

-Fantastic!

-That's terrific.

-Are you pleased with that?

-Absolutely, yes.

0:22:280:22:32

Next time we see you

0:22:320:22:33

-all that stuff will be at the auction house!

-Fantastic!

0:22:330:22:36

What a great end to the day!

0:22:360:22:39

Those gold sovereigns really made a difference

0:22:390:22:41

and we're taking a good variety of items to auction,

0:22:410:22:44

including

0:22:440:22:46

that Queen Anne-style walnut chest

0:22:460:22:48

is just the thing to get the bidders

0:22:480:22:50

buying, especially with a teasingly nice £50-100 price tag.

0:22:500:22:54

The jumble of silver-plated tableware,

0:22:560:22:58

which has hardly been used,

0:22:580:22:59

at £50-£100, hopefully, it will shimmer for us.

0:22:590:23:04

Those interlinked bangles, which Jeannie's had since a child,

0:23:040:23:09

fingers crossed,

0:23:090:23:11

they really are worth their weight in gold, £80-£120.

0:23:110:23:14

Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:23:180:23:20

John's prepared to put his reputation on the line.

0:23:200:23:24

-If that hadn't have sold...

-You'd have resigned.

0:23:240:23:26

I'd have changed my profession, I think.

0:23:260:23:28

And it all gets a bit too much for Jeannie.

0:23:280:23:32

-Are you pleased with that?

-I can't believe it!

0:23:320:23:37

Be there when the final hammer falls.

0:23:370:23:40

Now, it's been a few weeks since we had a good look through Jeannie's house in Brentwood.

0:23:450:23:50

She had a clear-out but, together with her son, Mark,

0:23:500:23:52

and us, of course, we managed to find quite a lot of items to bring here,

0:23:520:23:56

to Chiswick auction rooms in West London.

0:23:560:23:58

Remember, she wants to raise £750.

0:23:580:24:02

So, let's just hope that today, the bidders are feeling very generous.

0:24:020:24:06

Well, the saleroom is already busy with a variety of buyers

0:24:060:24:09

casting their eyes over what's on offer.

0:24:090:24:11

Jeannie and her son, Mark, are here in good time,

0:24:110:24:14

with that honeymoon breakfast set that we hope will find

0:24:140:24:18

an appreciative new home.

0:24:180:24:21

-Good morning! How are you?

-Good.

0:24:210:24:24

-Is there any hot tea in there at all?

-Coffee.

-That's even better, isn't it?

0:24:240:24:29

-Only two cups though.

-Exactly!

-Do you miss this set?

-Sort of.

0:24:290:24:32

It's very pretty. I'm very fond of it. I like it.

0:24:320:24:36

Hopefully, someone will get it who likes it as much as I do.

0:24:360:24:39

-Do you think it might do well?

-It should do. It was my favourite piece in the house.

0:24:390:24:42

Not my colour, I hasten to add.

0:24:420:24:45

That's like Mark. I said, "It is pretty." He said, "If you say so."

0:24:450:24:48

Now, Mark, you said you have been to auctions before

0:24:480:24:52

but they're car auctions.

0:24:520:24:53

-That's right, yes.

-Not something like this?

-Nothing like this at all.

0:24:530:24:57

No tyres to kick here.

0:24:570:25:00

In the antiques world, we call them drawer pullers.

0:25:000:25:03

You get tyre kickers, we have drawer pullers.

0:25:030:25:05

-Are you looking forward to today, though?

-Yes, very much.

0:25:070:25:10

OK, shall we see if we can make you some money?

0:25:100:25:12

-Smashing.

-Come on, then.

0:25:120:25:14

If anyone can, you can.

0:25:140:25:16

Oh, God. Nothing like pressure.

0:25:160:25:18

Thanks for that vote of confidence, Jeannie.

0:25:200:25:22

Let's hope we attract some decent bids today.

0:25:220:25:25

Our first lot is about to go under the hammer.

0:25:250:25:27

It's the Spanish Lladro clown figurine

0:25:270:25:29

which I found in the bedroom.

0:25:290:25:32

-Where did this come from?

-It came from Spain.

0:25:320:25:35

We used to go to Spain quite a bit, my husband and I,

0:25:350:25:38

so we liked the Lladro, it's very pretty,

0:25:380:25:40

and picked it up there many years ago.

0:25:400:25:42

We've got £20-£30 on that. Is that OK with you?

0:25:420:25:45

Well, I don't know much about pricing but I would think that's OK, yeah.

0:25:450:25:49

What's that worth? £20 for you?

0:25:490:25:51

Bruno, you like a bit of Lladro.

0:25:530:25:55

£20? £10 for it, then?

0:25:550:25:57

£10, I'm bid at 10, at £12, 12,

0:25:570:25:59

we've got competition now.

0:25:590:26:01

14, 16, 18,

0:26:010:26:03

20, 22.

0:26:030:26:04

You could have started with 20, couldn't you? 22, 24? 24, 26?

0:26:040:26:08

24 is bid, £24 there. Who else wants at? At £24...

0:26:080:26:10

HAMMER STRIKES

0:26:100:26:12

£24.

0:26:120:26:14

Lladro! Probably your judgment's quite right.

0:26:150:26:19

I knew there was a reason John was here.

0:26:190:26:22

Well, that's in the middle of his estimate.

0:26:220:26:24

I get a feeling Jeannie's not sorry to see the back of that figurine.

0:26:240:26:28

I wonder if she'll feel the same about the next one,

0:26:290:26:31

a modern Capodimonte porcelain figure of an old vagabond.

0:26:310:26:35

They don't tend to fetch the highest of prices,

0:26:350:26:38

but he may surprise us yet.

0:26:380:26:40

£20 for it?

0:26:410:26:44

£10 for it?

0:26:440:26:45

Thank you, bid at 10, give me 12.

0:26:450:26:48

£10 so far is the main bid, £10, who'll give me 12?

0:26:480:26:51

We're now at £10. Before he changes his mind,

0:26:510:26:53

£10, 211.

0:26:530:26:55

Oh, my God!

0:26:550:26:56

That doesn't surprise me. I was hoping it would be more,

0:26:560:26:59

-but it just shows you the demand for it.

-Absolutely.

0:26:590:27:02

There you go. The collectability of some items does tend to fluctuate.

0:27:020:27:07

It's good to see Jeannie's staying positive, though.

0:27:070:27:10

Next up is that reproduction Rococo-style ink stand,

0:27:100:27:13

which I should think has limited appeal.

0:27:130:27:16

Fingers crossed it's not a complete write-off.

0:27:160:27:18

John, is there any hope for this item?

0:27:180:27:20

Well, I've failed in persuading Mark to have it on his office desk,

0:27:200:27:25

but it is very decorative,

0:27:250:27:27

it is a reproduction of sorts, but it is decorative

0:27:270:27:29

and there is demand for stand dishes

0:27:290:27:32

so hopefully there's a home here for it today.

0:27:320:27:35

£30 for it?

0:27:350:27:36

It's there to be sold. £10 for it? See where it goes, £10?

0:27:360:27:39

Thank you, a bid at 10.

0:27:390:27:41

10, come on.

0:27:410:27:42

12, thank you. 15. 18?

0:27:420:27:46

At £15, it's going to go so far, at £15,

0:27:460:27:49

-a bidder at £15, all done.

-Oh, dear.

0:27:490:27:51

At £15. Nobody else wants it?

0:27:510:27:54

At £15, sold then. £15.

0:27:540:27:56

We'll finish up owing this auction house money!

0:27:570:28:00

Gosh, I hope not.

0:28:000:28:02

But if we carry on like this,

0:28:020:28:04

I think Jeannie could be shopping for a beanbag rather then a sofa.

0:28:040:28:07

Next up, it's that modern Coalport breakfast set

0:28:070:28:11

with a stylish David Shilling design.

0:28:110:28:14

Could this revive the bidding for us?

0:28:140:28:17

Generally, these sets aren't doing so well

0:28:170:28:20

but I'd be surprised if this doesn't. But I'm also surprised

0:28:200:28:23

-you're not taking it with you.

-No, again, no room,

0:28:230:28:26

and I want to furnish my little flat nicely.

0:28:260:28:30

Yeah, OK, fair enough.

0:28:300:28:32

£40 starting bid, £40 for the Coalport. £40? £30?

0:28:320:28:36

Somebody at £10, then? £10 for it?

0:28:360:28:38

Bid at 10. 12, 15? 15, 18?

0:28:380:28:40

18, 20, 22?

0:28:400:28:42

£20, give me 22,

0:28:420:28:44

22 there, 25?

0:28:440:28:45

25. 28? 28, 30? 30, 32?

0:28:450:28:48

32, 35?

0:28:480:28:50

At £32, £32, going at 32 and gone,

0:28:500:28:55

for £32 then, 211, £32.

0:28:550:28:57

-I'm surprised at that, as I thought it was a nice set.

-I did too.

0:28:570:29:01

And when you think, you know, if you work that out per piece,

0:29:010:29:05

you know, it's not a lot.

0:29:050:29:07

Unfortunately, it just shows how much markets have changed.

0:29:070:29:11

-Yeah, absolutely.

-They're all like him.

0:29:110:29:15

Oh, dear. Our £750 target seems a very long way away.

0:29:150:29:20

The bidding feels lacklustre today

0:29:200:29:23

and I'm not going to hold my breath for our next lot,

0:29:230:29:26

the reproduction Georgian-style corner units.

0:29:260:29:29

We'll start at £20.

0:29:290:29:32

Thank you, a bid at £20, £20, 22? 22, 25?

0:29:320:29:34

25, 28, 30?

0:29:340:29:37

30, 32, 35, 38, 40?

0:29:370:29:40

40, bid there at £40,

0:29:400:29:43

£40 for the pair. At £40.

0:29:430:29:45

All done at £40, last chance, going, £40 and gone.

0:29:450:29:48

We got those away at the bottom estimate, but trust me,

0:29:480:29:51

there are auction houses that don't accept them these days.

0:29:510:29:54

So that's a good result, isn't it?

0:29:540:29:56

At least they made their bottom estimate

0:29:560:29:58

and Jeannie doesn't have to take them home again.

0:29:580:30:01

Now, at £50-£100,

0:30:010:30:02

I think this 1950s Queen Anne-style chest is well worth the money,

0:30:020:30:07

but will the bidders think that too?

0:30:070:30:10

As I said to Mark on the day, nice proportions,

0:30:100:30:13

functional piece of furniture, and a good colour.

0:30:130:30:16

Condition's not bad as well

0:30:160:30:17

-so I'll put my neck on the line...

-What do you mean, not bad?

0:30:170:30:20

Condition's very good, very good.

0:30:200:30:23

£50 for it?

0:30:230:30:24

£30? Bid at £30, 32 there.

0:30:240:30:26

35, 38, 40?

0:30:260:30:29

£38, we got 40 over there.

0:30:290:30:31

40, 42, 45, 48, 50,

0:30:310:30:33

55, 60-5,

0:30:330:30:36

70-5,

0:30:360:30:38

80-5, 90-5. At £90.

0:30:380:30:41

£95? Still cheap at £90, all done at £90,

0:30:410:30:44

95 back in, 100.

0:30:440:30:46

Whoa. Good, we're over 100.

0:30:460:30:48

120, 130?

0:30:480:30:50

120, bid at 120, the bid's there at 120, done for 120,

0:30:500:30:54

last chance, it goes at 120 and gone.

0:30:540:30:56

-Wow, now that's a bit better, isn't it?

-Slightly vindicated.

0:30:560:30:59

-What was it?

-£120.

-That's better.

0:30:590:31:02

I said, didn't I? I'd stick my neck on the line with this piece,

0:31:020:31:05

and it really was on the line, and if it hadn't sold...

0:31:050:31:08

-You'd have resigned.

-I was going to change my profession, I think.

0:31:080:31:11

£20 over our upper estimate is an encouraging result.

0:31:110:31:16

I'm not sure if John should think about re-training just yet.

0:31:160:31:19

Let's see how he fares in the second half.

0:31:190:31:22

You wanted to raise £750, didn't you? That was the target.

0:31:220:31:26

And we've sold half our lots now

0:31:260:31:28

so we've a bit of a break until this afternoon's session, all right?

0:31:280:31:31

Now, bearing in mind this afternoon we have the gold sovereigns to sell,

0:31:310:31:35

and gold's very strong... You can tell where I'm going with this.

0:31:350:31:39

-We're not halfway there.

-No.

-No.

0:31:390:31:41

So far we've made £241.

0:31:410:31:44

-That's not bad, is it?

-You pleased with that?

-Yeah, it's not bad.

0:31:440:31:48

You've got to look at it from the point of view,

0:31:480:31:50

it's all stuff you'd have paid someone to take away

0:31:500:31:53

-at the end of the day.

-Exactly, yes.

0:31:530:31:55

It'll buy me a few toilet rolls!

0:31:550:31:57

I think you need to start upping the stakes a bit, my dear.

0:31:570:32:01

A nice bottle of champagne, that's what you need to think about.

0:32:010:32:04

She'll be buying those to throw at me, I think.

0:32:040:32:06

-No.

-Come on, let's go and get a cup of tea.

-OK.

0:32:060:32:10

Now, if you've been inspired to try buying or selling at auction,

0:32:100:32:14

bear in mind that there are charges such as commission,

0:32:140:32:17

that will be added to your bill,

0:32:170:32:19

so it's always worth checking them with the saleroom beforehand.

0:32:190:32:22

There's no shortage of bidders here today.

0:32:220:32:24

We can only hope our remaining lots catch their eye.

0:32:240:32:27

Meanwhile, John looks like he's getting all theatrical.

0:32:270:32:32

-Hi, John.

-Hey, Lorne.

-So, what have you found of interest?

0:32:320:32:35

I've been having a look at this little collection. It's a group lot.

0:32:350:32:38

We've got a bunch of early Edwardian postcards,

0:32:380:32:42

all sorts of topographical, mostly holiday scenes,

0:32:420:32:45

but this is what really caught my eye. It's a whole bunch

0:32:450:32:48

of early theatre publicity photos from the turn of the last century.

0:32:480:32:52

But there was one in particular, this one here. Look at that.

0:32:520:32:55

That looks rather uncomfortable, doesn't it?

0:32:550:32:57

Certainly does, although I do admire her skill!

0:32:570:33:00

Yes, I'm sure Louis Spence can do that, but I can't, sadly.

0:33:000:33:04

That, you can see, "La Sylphe,"

0:33:040:33:06

who was a very famous exotic dancer. a childhood star,

0:33:060:33:11

actually born Edith Lambelle,

0:33:110:33:13

from the continent, travelled the world,

0:33:130:33:15

with her exotic dance routines, often causing a bit of an outrage

0:33:150:33:19

as to what she was wearing, or rather wasn't wearing.

0:33:190:33:22

Look at that, it's been signed.

0:33:220:33:24

Fantastic. What sort of estimate is there on this lot?

0:33:240:33:27

The auctioneers have £80-£150 here.

0:33:270:33:29

I think postcards and things like this are great speculative lots,

0:33:290:33:32

you really don't know what's in here, it's easy to do the research.

0:33:320:33:36

You could find something special among this lot.

0:33:360:33:38

Well, it seems there was a show business enthusiast at the auction,

0:33:380:33:43

because the collection of postcards

0:33:430:33:45

went under the hammer for a whopping £180.

0:33:450:33:48

As the sale continues,

0:33:480:33:49

let's hope we can really put our stamp on things with our next lot,

0:33:490:33:53

that variety of silver-plated pieces

0:33:530:33:56

which Jeannie has collected over the years.

0:33:560:33:58

Some of it was very nice quality,

0:33:580:34:00

including that very modern-looking piece. Remember?

0:34:000:34:03

You're right, Lorne. There's a lot in there, condition is superb,

0:34:030:34:07

so we should be happily getting towards our £50-£100 estimate.

0:34:070:34:10

£50, please?

0:34:100:34:12

Come on.

0:34:120:34:13

Lorne's saying come on. £50 for it? £30 for it?

0:34:130:34:17

Bid at £30, £30, give me 32, a lot for the money.

0:34:170:34:22

32, 35, 38, 40, 42?

0:34:220:34:24

£40 bid there, £40 today all done.

0:34:240:34:28

At £40, the bid's there at £40,

0:34:280:34:30

sold at £40 and gone. £40.

0:34:300:34:32

I think it's becoming quite clear

0:34:330:34:36

the right bidders just don't seem to be in the room today. What a shame.

0:34:360:34:39

Those corner units did reasonably well earlier on,

0:34:390:34:42

but will this reproduction drinks cabinet manage to do the same?

0:34:420:34:46

We're looking for £50-£100.

0:34:470:34:49

Reproduction mahogany, but good quality,

0:34:490:34:51

the joinery is superb condition.

0:34:510:34:53

It's solid mahogany, and I just thought it would be tragic

0:34:530:34:57

if it got left in a house. I know you didn't want to take it.

0:34:570:35:00

-I couldn't take it.

-So we brought it.

0:35:000:35:02

I hope somebody will see it over £50.

0:35:020:35:03

£50 for it?

0:35:030:35:05

£30 for it? £30?

0:35:070:35:10

£10 for it?

0:35:110:35:12

I'm bid at 10, £10, bidder at £10.

0:35:120:35:15

Who'll bid 12? £10.

0:35:150:35:18

Going to be sold at £10. At £10, your last chance, going at £10,

0:35:180:35:21

all done at £10, 12. 15.

0:35:210:35:23

You're saying no?

0:35:230:35:25

Where do you buy your corner cabinets, I wonder? I'm bid at £12,

0:35:250:35:29

£12, 214, £12.

0:35:290:35:31

-Oh, dear, £12.

-Do you know what?

0:35:310:35:33

You couldn't buy the mahogany in it for that.

0:35:330:35:36

-Not for that money.

-No.

0:35:360:35:38

That's a real disappointment,

0:35:380:35:40

and some lucky bidder

0:35:400:35:43

now owns a piece of solid mahogany furniture for £12.

0:35:430:35:46

The price of gold is currently very healthy

0:35:460:35:48

and we hope that will be reflected in the bidding on our next item.

0:35:480:35:52

It's those three interlocking gold bangles.

0:35:520:35:55

So where are these from? Are these yours?

0:35:550:35:57

Well, from what I can remember, long way back,

0:35:570:36:01

-I think the smallest one was mine as a child.

-Right.

0:36:010:36:04

The other couple I thought were maybe given as I got older.

0:36:040:36:08

£50. Where are the gold buyers? £50.

0:36:080:36:10

Thank you, a bid at £50, £50, 55,

0:36:110:36:14

60-5, 70-5, 80?

0:36:140:36:17

£75, 80 there, 85,

0:36:170:36:20

90-5?

0:36:200:36:22

90 bid, at £90, we got 95,

0:36:220:36:23

£90 all done, £90 for this gold and going, all done at £90,

0:36:230:36:27

for £90, then, going.

0:36:270:36:28

And that's £10 above John's lowest estimate.

0:36:280:36:32

Finally, a result we can be pleased about.

0:36:320:36:35

But will today's cautious bidders

0:36:350:36:37

find this collection of cut glass quite so appealing?

0:36:370:36:41

-I like a nice cut-glass decanter, don't you?

-I love it.

0:36:410:36:44

A bit of posh. Now, what do we want for these, John?

0:36:440:36:48

Well, we've got two good pairs amongst our seven.

0:36:480:36:51

A square pair of Waterford,

0:36:510:36:53

and a nice ruby-flashed pair of wine decanters, which are quite nice.

0:36:530:36:57

Then the three odd ones. They're not terribly in vogue,

0:36:570:36:59

but I think they should make £60-£80.

0:36:590:37:01

Nice old lot £50?

0:37:010:37:03

£30 to go.

0:37:030:37:05

Bid at £30, 32, 35, 38,

0:37:060:37:09

40, 42, 45, 48?

0:37:090:37:12

48, 50, 55? 55, 60.

0:37:120:37:16

And £55, bid at £55, 60, 65,

0:37:160:37:19

70, 75.

0:37:190:37:21

-That's better, yes.

-At least we've got 75.

0:37:210:37:23

At £75, the bid's there at £75, give me 80 now, at £75, we're done.

0:37:230:37:27

Finished at 75, last chance, going at £75, bid's there.

0:37:270:37:30

211, £75.

0:37:300:37:31

-£75.

-That's better.

0:37:310:37:33

15 more then you reckoned.

0:37:330:37:35

Yeah, 60-80, so we're in there.

0:37:350:37:37

-Yes.

-Good.

-That's better.

-That's very good.

0:37:370:37:39

Things are looking up.

0:37:390:37:41

Jeannie's right. It looks like we've finally turned a corner.

0:37:410:37:44

With two lots still to go, we've got £458 in the kitty.

0:37:440:37:49

So we still need £300 to make her target.

0:37:490:37:52

Will the canteen of cutlery bring us any closer?

0:37:520:37:56

So was this a wedding present?

0:37:560:37:57

Yes, I think it was, or a silver wedding present, possibly.

0:37:570:38:02

I have to say, I had a set of this myself, and it was a bit of a pain

0:38:020:38:06

having to polish it all the time, or it gets very tarnished.

0:38:060:38:09

-Yes, and I got fed up with cleaning it.

-Yeah, of course.

0:38:090:38:11

-No.

-I'm not going to ask you.

0:38:130:38:15

John?

0:38:150:38:16

Well, gladly, ours hasn't tarnished. It's been well looked after.

0:38:160:38:20

-Thank you.

-I guess once it's been used,

0:38:200:38:22

-it's been polished and put back in its canteen.

-Thank you, John.

0:38:220:38:25

You're welcome, Jeannie. It's all there and in good condition.

0:38:250:38:28

You are now seeing the way I housekeep.

0:38:280:38:30

Do you want a job?

0:38:300:38:32

-You didn't pass it on to him, did you?

-No!

0:38:320:38:35

£50?

0:38:350:38:36

£40? Bid at £40 there,

0:38:360:38:40

£40, 42?

0:38:400:38:41

42, 45. 48,

0:38:410:38:44

50, 55, 60-5,

0:38:440:38:47

70-5,

0:38:470:38:49

80-5, 90-5, 100, 110.

0:38:490:38:53

The bid's for £100, I'll take 110, who else wants it?

0:38:540:38:57

Are we done for £100? £100 in,

0:38:570:38:59

-to buyer 176. £100.

-Fantastic.

0:38:590:39:01

-£100.

-And that was valued at what?

0:39:010:39:03

60-80. Go and have a word with him.

0:39:030:39:06

That's better.

0:39:060:39:07

I don't mind getting it wrong in Jeannie's favour.

0:39:070:39:10

It's the other way I don't like.

0:39:100:39:11

That's a great result, £20 above John's best estimate.

0:39:110:39:16

Gives us the glimmer of hope that we'll reach our target yet.

0:39:160:39:19

Our final lot is the set of four gold sovereigns,

0:39:190:39:22

which were passed down to Mark,

0:39:220:39:24

but will they give us the result we desperately need?

0:39:240:39:28

John, I must ask, about ten years ago, what were these selling for?

0:39:280:39:32

Because it was only about £30-£40, wasn't it?

0:39:320:39:34

I certainly remember in recent years,

0:39:340:39:37

we're talking just a few, four, five years ago,

0:39:370:39:39

the full sovereigns were making about £55, £60,

0:39:390:39:42

and the halves about 30,

0:39:420:39:44

so, yeah, it has been a considerable and sustained rise in recent years.

0:39:440:39:49

Whilst economies are uncertain around the world,

0:39:490:39:51

they seem a good investment.

0:39:510:39:53

£300 for the lot, please, £300?

0:39:530:39:55

Bid at £300,

0:39:550:39:57

£300, anyone 310? £300, 310 there,

0:39:570:39:59

320, 330,

0:39:590:40:00

340, 350,

0:40:000:40:02

-360, 370?

-Ooh.

0:40:020:40:04

370, 380?

0:40:050:40:07

The bid's there at 370, who'll give me 380? 380, 400.

0:40:070:40:11

380, bid at £380.

0:40:110:40:14

£380, bid at 380, all done for 380 and gone.

0:40:160:40:19

£380!

0:40:190:40:21

-That's good, isn't it?

-That's all right. Well done.

0:40:210:40:24

You pleased with that?

0:40:240:40:26

Absolutely. It's fantastic.

0:40:260:40:29

-I think you've reaped your rewards there.

-Yes, yes.

0:40:290:40:32

I'll pay it in kind, John.

0:40:320:40:35

Whoa-ho. There's an offer you can't refuse, John.

0:40:350:40:37

What a brilliant result. That could well be the sale

0:40:370:40:40

that makes all the difference.

0:40:400:40:43

The question now is, just how much have we made?

0:40:430:40:45

-You wanted to raise £750, didn't you?

-Yes.

0:40:450:40:49

Do you think, after some pretty disastrous results

0:40:490:40:52

in one way or another, we've got anywhere near that target?

0:40:520:40:55

-I have no idea what we've got.

-The sovereigns have helped.

0:40:550:40:58

Absolutely, the sovereigns have helped a lot.

0:40:580:41:00

The sovereigns have helped to bring the total amount to...

0:41:000:41:03

-£938.

-No!

0:41:030:41:06

-Yes!

-Oh, my God!

0:41:060:41:09

-Nearly £1,000.

-My God! Fantastic.

0:41:090:41:12

So are you pleased with that?

0:41:120:41:15

-I can't believe it!

-I know. I can't, especially with his valuations

0:41:150:41:19

and you not being interested at all, so well done. I'm pleased for you.

0:41:190:41:22

That is a real big surprise.

0:41:220:41:24

-Will you spend that money on the flat?

-I'm teary, I'm sorry.

0:41:240:41:27

Oh, God, yeah. And I think I'll have to

0:41:270:41:30

take my family out to dinner or something, won't I?

0:41:300:41:33

-Aw, that'll be lovely.

-Will you come?

0:41:330:41:35

Oh, yes, I'll come. I'm only down the road. I'll drag him along too.

0:41:350:41:38

He can pay the other half of the bill.

0:41:380:41:40

Well, it's a few weeks since we were at auction

0:41:440:41:46

and Jeannie's moved into her new flat.

0:41:460:41:49

I'm in the same area, which is nice.

0:41:490:41:53

I still get to see my neighbours, my old friends and my neighbours.

0:41:530:41:56

I know the shops, they know me and this sort of thing,

0:41:560:41:59

having lived in the area for so many years.

0:41:590:42:01

Looking around, I think

0:42:010:42:02

she's already spent her takings from the auction house.

0:42:020:42:06

Delighted with my new furniture, I really am.

0:42:060:42:08

It's lovely, it's very comfortable.

0:42:080:42:11

In fact, they're all recliners,

0:42:110:42:13

and so I just sit there, push my recliner,

0:42:130:42:15

up go the feet and I fall asleep.

0:42:150:42:17

I miss many the end of a programme on my television

0:42:170:42:20

but no, it is very comfortable,

0:42:200:42:21

and yeah, very, very happy with it, very happy with it.

0:42:210:42:26

Former cabaret artist Jeannie Stevens calls in her son Mark, plus Lorne Spicer and expert John Cameron, to help raise £700 towards home refurbishments. Could four gold sovereigns bring them the auction result they are hoping for?