Gray Cash in the Attic


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Antiques series. Frances Gray wants to raise £2,000 to treat her daughters to a luxury spa visit. Angela Rippon and expert Paul Hayes are on hand to help hunt for antiques.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic.

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We like nothing better than finding those antiques and collectables

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that you've tucked away collecting dust in drawers, attics, cupboards,

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and then turning them into cash.

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That's what I'm hoping to do today here in Wales, in a house that is stuffed full of...stuff!

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'On Cash In The Attic, one of our finds proves a first for Paul.'

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I've only ever actually seen this in a textbook.

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'There's a lovely surprise for the lady of the house.'

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-LAUGHTER

-Did you know that?

-Not an idea!

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That's another "wow!"

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'And at auction, a rare discovery results in an exciting revelation.'

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£650...!

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-You didn't expect that, did you?

-It's amazing.

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'Find out what it is when the hammer falls.'

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I'm in Chepstow, where I'm about to meet a mum who'd like extra cash

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because she's got a very special treat planned for her daughters.

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'Since retiring from the nursing profession two years ago,

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'Frances Gray has spent her time following another lifelong passion,

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'singing in her local Choral Society.

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'In 2000, her two grown-up daughters Sarah and Elena left home.

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'So Frances downsized from an enormous property in Crick

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'to a townhouse here in Chepstow, where she lives with her two cats.

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'Frances now thinks that it's time to declutter her home

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'of some of the things she's acquired over the years.

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'With me on today's rummage is our expert Paul Hayes.'

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-You're going to get a warm glow when you see what's inside.

-Can't wait!

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'Helping Frances is her best friend and Choral Society partner, Cynthia.'

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-Hi!

-Hello.

-I see you've already started work!

-How lovely to see you.

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-Frances and Cynthia, meet Paul Hayes.

-Hello, nice to meet you both.

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-So, good stuff that we're already looking at.

-It looks promising.

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-Would you mind if I make a start?

-Be lovely. I hope you find something worthwhile!

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He can't resist! Frances, why have you called in Cash In The Attic?

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I was hoping to get enough money to take my daughters to a spa hotel

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for a pampering day.

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That sounds absolutely fantastic!

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Cynthia's going to help you today. How do you know each other?

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We know each other through the Choral Society,

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and other times as well, so we've become great friends.

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You're singers!

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We met about ten years ago and we've been singing together ever since.

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We might get you to sing later on!

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In the meantime, how much do you think you might like to raise?

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Probably approaching £2,000.

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-Wow! A really special day out at the spa, then.

-Oh!

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While he's looking around, what sort of things is he going to be finding?

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Mostly, things I've inherited from my parents, grandparents.

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They've come down through the family.

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We ought to find Paul, see how he's doing.

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Today, we could make music as well as money!

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-Wonderful!

-Let's go!

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'£2,000 is certainly a high figure, but glancing around Frances's home

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'I see a whole range of things that will fare well at auction.'

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Paul, you found the family silver!

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Yes I have. I've made a fantastic start. Look at that silver tray.

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-What a quality item that is!

-A bit of weight in it. Where is this from?

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It was my maternal grandparents'.

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It was presented to them on their silver wedding anniversary

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by the Polysulphin Co Ltd, where my grandfather worked.

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What a wonderful thing to get.

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-Imagine that happening now!

-They thought a lot of him.

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Or a lot of the marriage. That is a very good quality tray.

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-Did your grandmother use it?

-My grandmother was very proud of it.

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She used to serve tea to all her friends and relatives.

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How about you?

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I think the days of presenting one's friends

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with tea on a silver tray are sadly gone!

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-It's tea in a mug now and be grateful for it.

-What a shame!

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-It clearly has great value, Paul.

-It is solid silver and very heavy.

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Whoever was awarded this, it's a good quality tray.

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Normally, these are silver plated.

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If you'd had the matching teapot, sugar basin, the cream jug,

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it would have been a fortune.

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You've got to be careful with the hallmark.

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You've got the crown for Sheffield.

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The lion passant, meaning it's up to standard in the UK, to sell it.

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Then you've got a date letter, S,

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which I think is about 1935, just before this tray was presented.

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Are you happy for it to go?

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I ought to feel a bit sentimental about it, but I really don't.

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They'd be wishing me well, I'm sure.

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I see you doing this with it, Paul. You're clearly weighing it!

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-The weight is important at the moment.

-It is at the moment.

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Silver and gold seem to be the material that people want to invest in.

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So that tray now, you're looking at least £500, maybe up to £800.

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Wow! Wow!

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-What a cracker, isn't it?

-That is an absolute...

-Did you know that?

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Not an idea!

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-Fantastic, isn't it? Yeah, £500, to give it a good estimate.

-Terrific!

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'Let's hope we can keep those "wows" coming, Paul.

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'We'd better push on with our search.

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'These coins that I find in one of the bedrooms might help.

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'It's a set of specimen coins from the 1930s

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'and a coin celebrating King George V's silver jubilee.

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'Together, Paul thinks we could get...'

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-Look at that!

-Look what I found.

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I know it's an old one. It belonged to Frances's maternal grandfather.

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I think it was made for him.

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I've sat in it and I'd love to know more about it. It's beautiful.

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You're looking probably 1900, 1910.

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This is a type of X chair,

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an X-frame chair, for the way that the legs go.

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In Ancient Egypt, pharaohs used to sit on chairs very similar to this.

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-Oh, yes. They're often pictured on those.

-It's a type of throne chair.

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The late 19th century, early 1900s, there was a great revival in these styles.

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Part of the Arts & Crafts movement.

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Single chairs don't sell well, but these are meant to be on their own.

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It's showing nice patina, isn't it? The arms have been worn away.

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The darker wood at the bottom, showing a good bit of age.

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-And this is leather.

-That's right.

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You tend to find that these chairs incorporate one or two styles.

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You've got the acanthus leaf from ancient Rome.

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You've got the X shape from Egypt.

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Lots of styles.

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Of course the leather was a medieval British material.

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It has this roundel at the front. Is that part of the pattern?

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That's called a boss. That's a fake one.

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-Some of the chairs would fold up.

-Oh, I see.

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That would act like a pivot.

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But that one just adds a bit of character to the front.

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All these carvings have got a lovely patina on here as well.

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-Do you think Frances is sentimental about it?

-I think she loves it.

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But I think the time has come for her to choose other things

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-and to have less dusting to do!

-LAUGHS

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-But it is lovely.

-Yeah, it's great. It's got a lovely look to it.

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On a good day, this should bring easily over £100.

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-Oh, good!

-If I said 80 to 120?

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Wonderful. That would be lovely.

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It sounds good to me. That'll add to the total.

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'Well, tempting as that chair looks, there's no time to sit around.

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'Frances offers up these two crystal decanters for auction.

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'They were given to her by her grandparents.'

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Frances, you've been living in Chepstow for about ten years.

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What made you choose here?

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I only lived four miles away and it just seemed obvious

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to come to Chepstow, but I wanted a smaller house.

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-What was the other house like?

-Five bedrooms, a granny annexe, two acres of land, two ponies and a donkey.

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They had to go once the girls had gone on to academia.

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When you came into Chepstow, you joined the choir.

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-Is that because you'd sung all your life?

-Yes, I've always sung.

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But not always in an orderly...sort of fashion!

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-Cynthia, you must have been delighted.

-Another alto, which was lovely!

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We needed some new blood and Frances was most welcome.

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She has such a lovely voice. She also fits in nicely.

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Because she's fairly short, she goes at the front.

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-ANGELA LAUGHS

-The right voice and the right size!

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Yes, it was an ideal opportunity.

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-Frances, have you told your daughters what you're raising money for?

-I have.

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They are delighted. They couldn't believe it.

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They were convinced it was going to be stair carpet!

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So what did they say?

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-"Wow!"

-We want to put the "wow" factor into the auction.

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Shall we see what Paul is doing and find out what we're going to take?

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-See if he's going to manage the "wow"!

-I'm sure he is.

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'I knew we could rely on Paul. He's spotted something else of interest.'

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-This is where he is!

-Aren't these beautiful?

-What lovely paintings!

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Are these pictures that you've inherited?

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They used to hang in my parents' hallway.

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I believe, in grandparents' hallway as well.

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-Right.

-They're too big, really, for this house.

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Do you have any idea of what they depict?

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Someone told me that it was supposed to be the Welsh Highlands,

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-North Wales somewhere.

-Oh.

-What do you make of them, Paul?

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I actually suspect they'd be Scottish.

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Leader, that would be Charles Leader.

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He was a very famous artist working in the late 19th century.

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-He was doing Scottish scenes.

-I thought they were Scottish!

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I can't remember who told me that they were Welsh.

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They look like Highland cattle. They've got thumping great horns.

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-There is Highland cattle.

-Let's say they're Scottish, then!

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There's a couple of reasons, really, why they are.

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You've got the Scottish cattle, but Queen Victoria

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set her base in Balmoral so anything Scottish was the height of fashion.

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Lots of artists would go up and capture these wonderful scenes.

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They can range from being pretty awful to being fantastic.

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These are very well painted indeed.

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What I love about his work is the use of perspective.

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You can melt into the distance.

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That's really clever, how the artist has put this lighter background

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to give the appearance of distance.

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That is a real talent. You don't get that with an average artist.

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These frames don't look right.

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The period Charles Leader was painting, the late 19th century,

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would have been highly elaborate, the Victorians are very fussy.

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I think they're a bit later than the paintings.

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The frames are about 1900.

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-The paintings anywhere from 1860 to 1900.

-Is he collectable?

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His paintings regularly bring between £400 and £700 each.

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You've got a lovely pair here.

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I'd love to put these in between 800 and 1,000.

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-How does that sound?

-Fantastic!

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-All right?

-I meant to "wow" again!

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'Let's see how close to the mark Paul's estimate turns out to be.'

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Who'll put me in at £800 for these? £600?

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'And we won't have to wait long to find out.

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'Frances's home has a large collection of books and sheet music

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'that highlights her passion for song.

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'Apparently, her daughters Sarah and Elena are musical, too.

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'Cynthia discovered this musical cabinet that the family used to keep sheet music in.

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'Frances thinks that it's time to let this go.

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'Paul's either dismantling the furniture,

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'or he's spotted something that we might take to auction.'

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-Place your bets now, Frances.

-You've found the games table!

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This is fantastic, isn't it?

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Red number three. I've lost all my money!

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I lost a fortune.

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This was a complete surprise. It looks like an ordinary table.

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Where has this come from?

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It's been in my family as long as I can remember.

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I don't know where my parents got it from. Probably grandparents.

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-I don't know which side of the family.

-Did you ever use it?

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-Never been used!

-Really?

-I don't think my parents used it.

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They had another card table.

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So they didn't use this. I've got a card table so I don't use it as a card table.

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If I'd had sons instead of daughters,

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we might have used it.

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There's a game for everybody. It's a compendium.

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There's two checkerboards - one for draughts, one for chess.

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Inside, we've got the card table and the roulette betting board.

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What great fun!

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And not a bad looking piece of furniture, either.

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It looks fairly recent. This was maybe 1900, 1920, that sort of time.

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The golden age, really, for the card table was the 18th century.

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If you lived in a very large house,

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you'd have half a dozen games tables.

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You'd all gather round on a weekend and play your cards.

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But as time progressed,

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the casino became more available, things like roulette appeared.

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They've all got something in.

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-It's a ready-made starter kit for somebody interested in games.

-Yes.

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If you look at the front,

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it's made from oak, but the way it's done

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is quarter veneering.

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The same piece of veneer is transferred and put either side,

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so you get this wonderful diamond or herringbone effect.

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That's typically 1900, 1920. That helps to age it.

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How do you feel about parting with it?

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It might as well go to somebody who's going to make use of it.

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These are good fun items for people to enjoy without gambling large amounts of money.

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-It's fun, that's the idea.

-Yes.

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It's a nice light colour, which fits in with the modern look.

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It's not too dark. Needs a bit of work on the legs.

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-What's happened there?

-I know. I think the bits are in the...

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-That would help tremendously. It looks like they've been cut off.

-No.

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My mother had someone who helped her in the house and she was a bit heavy handed with the hoover.

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-Did she use a sledgehammer?

-LAUGHS

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-"Oooh!"

-She must have done!

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Joking apart, it's a lovely table.

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In great condition, you could be towards the 500 mark here.

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The legs need a bit of restoration,

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a bit of tender loving care to be brought back to life...

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-..Is that a safe bet?

-Yes! Sounds wonderful.

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'We're over halfway through our rummage and going by Paul's lower estimates,

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'so far, we could raise as much as £1,850.

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'Cynthia notices this decorative paperweight.

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'It belonged to Frances's grandmother...'

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Frances, so many things you've inherited from grandparents.

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You were particularly close to one set of grandparents?

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My father's parents, yes, paternal grandparents.

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When the war came - and I was born in 1938 -

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the two elder ones had already gone to my maternal grandparents.

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It got to the stage of, "What shall we do with Frances?"

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Then I was evacuated to the other grandparents in Clevedon.

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You went on to train as a nurse. You became, not just a nurse.

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You were a midwife and a district nurse and then went into the navy.

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-What made you make that career choice?

-My brother-in-law said, "Apply to the navy.

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"And when you go, don't forget to wear a hat!"

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You used to wear those wonderful big nursing caps the naval nurses wore.

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Came out here, didn't they?

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It was not the done thing to go unhatted.

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But I got in and then I met and married a surgeon lieutenant.

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-Neither of your daughters have followed you into nursing.

-No.

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I think, really, when the time came,

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my option to go into nursing was because my father was a doctor

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and I felt I would like to become a nurse.

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Do they not want any of the things you're taking to auction?

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Both of them said, "No.

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"If it can help make you happier

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"and more comfortable in the house you live in, so be it."

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-They may not want the items, but they want to go to the spa.

-Indeed, they do! They can't wait.

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-We ought to go and find Paul and see how he's doing.

-Wonderful.

-After you.

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'Whilst we've been chatting, Paul has been all around the house

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'looking for other items to sell.

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'Amongst his discoveries, this set of Chester silver apostle spoons

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'Frances bought some years ago.

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'The spoons date to 1896 and come with sugar tongs.

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'Complete with their original box, Paul thinks...'

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-Paul, what about this?

-Ah! Now, let's have a look!

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-Look at that, a map of Somersetshire.

-Isn't that a beauty?

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I know a little about it.

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-OK.

-It was bought by Frances's parents.

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Her mother and father met at university in Bristol.

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Father was born in Clevedon, mother in Bristol.

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When they moved to Oxfordshire, they took this as a souvenir.

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Part of the charm with these maps

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is seeing which village was around in the 18th century or earlier.

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You can see your town, if it existed at all!

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-Some of those names on there are amazing.

-That's right.

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You've got one of Britain's best known cartographers, John Cary.

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The Cary family were world-renowned for making wonderful maps.

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They also made globes that you find in libraries,

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terrestrial and celestial globes.

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What was unique about the Cary is that they were extremely accurate

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-and that they didn't incorporate religious effigies.

-Right.

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Before the Carys came along, you'd have huge illustrations,

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gods and everything round it.

0:20:150:20:17

-This is very plain, very simple, very precise.

-Fashionable.

0:20:170:20:22

It became the standard of its day. Quite simple, isn't it?

0:20:220:20:26

Yes, in some ways, but detailed. So many things on there.

0:20:260:20:30

And they're all hand-coloured, which is nice.

0:20:300:20:33

This would have been a book from the late 19th century.

0:20:330:20:37

-It would have had the whole British Isles.

-Oh, they've taken pages out.

0:20:370:20:42

-Would Frances be all right letting that go?

-She probably would.

0:20:420:20:46

It's one thing that you may need to check with her, but I'm pretty sure she would let that go.

0:20:460:20:52

OK. It won't take up a lot of room. I think it's quite nice.

0:20:520:20:56

If I said £40 to £70,

0:20:560:20:59

-how does that sound?

-That sounds good.

0:20:590:21:03

Might get us on the map as well!

0:21:030:21:05

-THEY LAUGH

-It might do.

-Let's keep looking.

0:21:050:21:08

'Paul, your determination to deliver a pun for every occasion is...

0:21:080:21:13

'almost impressive.

0:21:130:21:15

'Some nooks and crannies are easier to get into than others.

0:21:150:21:20

'Paul has discovered more silver.

0:21:200:21:23

'Not quite as grand as the tray,

0:21:230:21:25

'but this silver-plated teapot, jug and sugar bowl should add...

0:21:250:21:29

'They belonged to Frances's mother,

0:21:320:21:35

'who added a silver-plated pot for holding the hot water.'

0:21:350:21:41

-Paul, what do you think of...?

-These are Royal Doulton figurines.

0:21:410:21:46

-Where are these from?

-Inherited from my maternal grandmother.

-Right.

0:21:460:21:51

Doulton figures are highly collected.

0:21:510:21:54

It depends on the characters.

0:21:540:21:56

The funny thing is, the ones that didn't sell in huge numbers,

0:21:560:22:00

ones that weren't popular, tend to be ones that collectors go for now.

0:22:000:22:05

I did notice that this one here has been broken at some point.

0:22:050:22:09

That makes a big difference for collectors.

0:22:090:22:12

That one, pretty run-of-the-mill. This one is quite special.

0:22:120:22:16

This is fabulous. Look at the colours. Where did he come from?

0:22:160:22:21

Again, same place. He was inherited from my grandmother.

0:22:210:22:25

-I don't think he's got anything wrong with him.

-No, he's perfect.

0:22:250:22:30

-Do you know the character?

-Underneath he says One Of The Forty.

0:22:300:22:34

I would put him as one of the 40 thieves from Alibaba.

0:22:340:22:38

From 1001 Arabian Nights.

0:22:380:22:40

This is such a rare thing that Royal Doulton did.

0:22:400:22:45

One of the major designers for Royal Doulton was Harry Tittensor.

0:22:450:22:50

He did these wonderful glazes.

0:22:500:22:52

Oriental pottery and porcelain often had this mottled effect,

0:22:520:22:57

caused by hundreds of years of natural build-up of oils

0:22:570:23:01

and the way the ceramic goes.

0:23:010:23:03

They tried to recreate it and called it a Chang glaze.

0:23:030:23:08

This glaze is one of the rarest things that Royal Doulton did.

0:23:080:23:13

Not many have survived. I've only ever seen this in a textbook.

0:23:130:23:17

-Have you any idea how much these are worth?

-Not at all.

0:23:170:23:21

Right, I think I might surprise you. Angela! Cynthia!

0:23:210:23:24

I've found some Doulton figures.

0:23:240:23:26

We see quite a lot of those, don't we?

0:23:260:23:29

You've never seen one like this.

0:23:290:23:32

-We're going from purple up to... It looks like a sunset!

-Glorious!

0:23:320:23:37

That's very rare indeed. You've cracked it.

0:23:370:23:41

You've got a fantastic thing here. Falstaff is a little bit damaged.

0:23:410:23:45

-He would bring around the £50 mark.

-Tell us the good news about this.

0:23:450:23:51

This one is such a rare item. It really is.

0:23:510:23:54

It's an absolute cracker.

0:23:540:23:56

You could be looking...£300, £400 for this one on its own.

0:23:560:24:01

-LAUGHTER

-That's nice.

0:24:010:24:03

I've never seen one sold.

0:24:030:24:05

I've only seen these illustrated in catalogues and Doulton price guides.

0:24:050:24:10

-That's super!

-Oh, my goodness!

0:24:100:24:12

-Oh, my goodness!

-Fantastic. If I said at least £400 for these two,

0:24:120:24:17

we're plain sailing.

0:24:170:24:19

-It's a "wow"!

-A definite "wow"!

-All I can say nowadays is "wow"!

0:24:190:24:24

We might get another "wow" in a moment.

0:24:240:24:27

-You want to raise £2,000.

-Yes.

0:24:270:24:30

Well, we should be able to raise, taking Paul's lowest estimate on everything,

0:24:300:24:36

£2,410!

0:24:360:24:38

Oh, my golly!

0:24:380:24:40

Wow!

0:24:400:24:42

-You can have two days at the spa!

-And a holiday!

-There you go!

0:24:420:24:47

'That's a truly impressive total we've made at Frances's home.

0:24:500:24:54

'I think we're in with a good chance of booking that luxury spa.

0:24:540:24:58

'Amongst today's finds, the solid silver tray with a weighty estimate.

0:24:580:25:05

'Those two oils by British artist Charles Leader

0:25:050:25:09

'depict some magnificent Scottish Highlands scenes.

0:25:090:25:15

'And, of course, we've got those lovely Royal Doulton figurines.

0:25:150:25:19

'There's Falstaff and one of the 40 thieves from Alibaba.

0:25:190:25:24

'Let's hope that the bidders are as enthusiastic as Paul.

0:25:240:25:29

'Still to come, will the bidders go for all of our stunning lots?'

0:25:330:25:37

Any more? It sells at £15...

0:25:370:25:40

-There you go.

-It's not your fault.

0:25:400:25:43

'And which of Frances's items exceeds everyone expectations?'

0:25:430:25:48

£300...

0:25:480:25:50

Wow!

0:25:500:25:51

-Fantastic!

-It's lunch on me, then!

0:25:510:25:54

'Be there for the final drop of the gavel.'

0:25:560:25:59

It's been a week or two since we were with the Gray family in Chepstow.

0:26:030:26:08

They had some lovely items, so I can't wait to see what today's bidders are going to make of them.

0:26:080:26:14

We brought everything here to the Welsh town of Carmarthen,

0:26:140:26:18

to the Peter Francis auction room.

0:26:180:26:20

Let's hope there are some serious bidders around today.

0:26:200:26:24

'Frances has got quite a variety of items with her today.

0:26:240:26:28

'We're especially excited to see how much that silver tray will fetch.'

0:26:280:26:31

-Frances, lovely to see you again. Who have you got with you?

-Elena.

0:26:310:26:36

My daughter who wasn't well on the day.

0:26:360:26:38

You've been hearing about your ancestors?

0:26:380:26:42

I have. My great-grandparents, I believe. You've been telling me about the history behind it.

0:26:420:26:48

-You didn't know much about them before?

-Not at all, so a real learning curve!

0:26:480:26:54

This, we know we're going to sell.

0:26:540:26:56

-Silver is fetching such a high price, Paul.

-There's two values.

0:26:560:27:01

The value for its silver content, which is very high. All metals are.

0:27:010:27:06

Then you've got the value as a nice intrinsic tray. You've got no problem with that at all.

0:27:060:27:12

-You've got a fixed reserve on the paintings.

-£1,000 on them.

0:27:120:27:17

-And 400 on the Arab.

-I've had a chat to the auctioneer.

0:27:170:27:21

He's advertised it on three different websites.

0:27:210:27:25

You've got a good chance of a good price. We put £400 reserve on it.

0:27:250:27:29

Look out for the guy with the magic carpet.

0:27:290:27:32

'It sounds like the auctioneer's using some pretty hefty sound gear.

0:27:320:27:37

'We'll have to concentrate to hear ourselves.

0:27:370:27:41

'First up is that pair of fetching decanters that Frances got from her grandmother.'

0:27:410:27:46

People don't put booze in them any more.

0:27:460:27:50

I did have booze in them but we drank it!

0:27:500:27:53

There they go at 30. 35 is with me. At 35.

0:27:550:27:58

40 at the very back. 45.

0:27:580:28:01

-AUCTIONEER LOUDLY ON SPEAKER:

-Standing at the back at £50.

0:28:010:28:05

They go in the room at 50. Is there no more? Going at £50...

0:28:050:28:09

-That's disappointing.

-Mm. Very.

0:28:090:28:12

That's the way that things go now.

0:28:120:28:15

-We've seen beautiful crystal decanters go for even less.

-Yes.

0:28:150:28:20

'Crystal decanters weren't in fashion with our bidders.

0:28:200:28:23

'Maybe we should have left some spirit inside them!

0:28:230:28:27

'However, we have all got high hopes for our next lot.

0:28:270:28:31

'The auctioneer split these into separate lots

0:28:310:28:34

'to maximise their potential.'

0:28:340:28:36

Our rarity coming up,

0:28:360:28:38

this wonderful Royal Doulton "china figure of an Arab, One Of The Forty".

0:28:380:28:44

One of the 40 thieves! He is rather special. He was rather special in your house.

0:28:440:28:49

I didn't realise how special he was until Paul came and valued him.

0:28:490:28:55

Ordinary Doulton figures have been selling for £10 or £20.

0:28:550:28:59

A couple of rarities for £140, so there are Doulton buyers here.

0:28:590:29:03

With a bit of luck, someone will pick up on this.

0:29:030:29:07

I can start the bidding at 300. 350 with me.

0:29:070:29:10

350! There you go.

0:29:100:29:12

400. 450. 500.

0:29:120:29:15

550. 600.

0:29:150:29:18

And 50. 650.

0:29:180:29:20

On the book at £650. Selling with me at 650. Any more?

0:29:200:29:24

At £650...

0:29:240:29:27

LAUGHING: Fantastic!

0:29:270:29:30

-How's that?

-650?

0:29:300:29:33

-You didn't expect that, did you?

-Amazing!

0:29:330:29:36

'I don't think any of us saw that coming.

0:29:380:29:42

'I bet Frances wishes she could lay her hands on the other 39 thieves!

0:29:420:29:46

'Not quite as rare is the Falstaff figure,

0:29:460:29:49

'who only manages to make £40, but Frances is happy with the result.'

0:29:490:29:53

That's a good "wow"!

0:29:530:29:55

'Now, we're not quite sure as to the make of this fetching paperweight,

0:29:570:30:03

'but Paul reckons it's an item of good quality.'

0:30:030:30:06

Lots of the glass-makers would put hidden symbols in the cane work.

0:30:060:30:11

-Right.

-You'd get little a horse or little animal.

0:30:110:30:14

I can't see anything in it at all.

0:30:140:30:17

We can say possibly Baccarat but we can't say for definite.

0:30:170:30:21

Two bidders here with me. At 100. 110 I'm bid.

0:30:210:30:24

Before we even start!

0:30:240:30:27

At 110. 120. 130.

0:30:270:30:30

£130 on the book. 130. At £130...

0:30:300:30:36

-Wow!

-Wow!

-Crikey!

0:30:360:30:38

-LAUGHTER

-Brilliant.

0:30:380:30:40

-Grandfather would have been proud of that, wouldn't he?

-He would.

0:30:400:30:44

'The absence of a maker's name didn't put our buyers off at all!

0:30:440:30:50

'That was well over Paul's lower estimate. Tea's up!'

0:30:500:30:54

My mother used to use it a lot and when she put it away,

0:30:540:30:59

she used to put a sugar lump inside the teapot to keep it sweet.

0:30:590:31:05

They also put it in there to stop the thing corroding inside.

0:31:050:31:10

-What the sugar cube does is absorb all the moisture.

-There you go.

0:31:100:31:16

A nice set, but only restaurants and hotels tend to use these nowadays.

0:31:160:31:21

£30 away on that? 30, surely? 20 to go, then? At ten only.

0:31:210:31:26

15. At 15. 20 may I say? 20 on the back row.

0:31:260:31:29

At £20. Selling it in the room. Is there no more?

0:31:290:31:33

-Going at £20...

-BANGS GAVEL

0:31:330:31:36

-It's not everyone's cup of tea!

-ANGELA LAUGHS

0:31:360:31:40

'Our silver plated wares may not have proved successful,

0:31:400:31:45

'but this tray is solid silver, weighing more than 40 ounces.'

0:31:450:31:50

-It's an important piece of your family history, Elena.

-Yeah.

0:31:520:31:56

It was given to my great-grandfather by the company that he worked for,

0:31:560:32:00

so strong family history there.

0:32:000:32:03

42 ounces, so we know it's going to make between £500 and £800.

0:32:030:32:08

A couple of years ago, this would have brought £300, £350.

0:32:080:32:13

500 to put me in? 300. 320 I've got. 350. 380. 400.

0:32:130:32:18

-400.

-420. 450. 480. 500.

0:32:180:32:23

£500 sitting on the back row. 520 standing. All in the room. 550.

0:32:230:32:27

580. 580 now, the gentleman's bid. Against you, madam, at 580.

0:32:270:32:33

Selling to the gentleman at 580. Here it goes. £580...

0:32:330:32:37

-Wow!

-Wow!

-Terrific, yes?

0:32:370:32:40

FRANCES LAUGHS

0:32:400:32:42

'That proves that with the current price of silver being strong,

0:32:420:32:46

'it was a good time for Frances to sell.'

0:32:460:32:49

-These little apostle teaspoons were very popular at one time.

-Yeah.

0:32:490:32:55

People tend to give items like this for a silver wedding anniversary, for 25 years.

0:32:550:33:01

When you've got something boxed, mint condition, it's nice to give.

0:33:010:33:05

At 20 only. At 20 only bid. 25. At 25 on the back row.

0:33:050:33:09

30 is it? 30 standing. 35 in the second row.

0:33:090:33:13

At 35. 40 still there in the middle.

0:33:130:33:15

-45 fresh blood on the left. At 50 in the centre aisle...

-Going up.

0:33:150:33:19

..60. 65.

0:33:190:33:22

70. 75.

0:33:220:33:24

80. At £80 in the centre aisle. All done...?

0:33:240:33:27

-That really is a fantastic price.

-..At £80...!

0:33:270:33:31

-That was a surprising price.

-Yeah. Very, very good.

-That was excellent.

0:33:310:33:37

'Another good result for Frances's silver.

0:33:370:33:40

'Now that we're halfway through our auction, it might be worth totting up how we're doing.'

0:33:400:33:47

-2,000, that's your target for your very special day out.

-Yes.

0:33:470:33:50

We're only at the halfway stage and so far, you've made...

0:33:500:33:56

-£1,550.

-Wow!

0:33:560:33:58

PAUL CHUCKLES

0:33:580:34:01

That's incredible.

0:34:010:34:03

'Things are looking good for Frances's target for £2,000.

0:34:030:34:07

'She wants to treat herself and her daughters to a spa pampering session.

0:34:070:34:13

'If you've got items you think might sell at auction, remember that fees such as commission will be added.

0:34:130:34:19

'It is best to check with your auction house.

0:34:190:34:23

'Frances's next lot is that coin collection that I found.'

0:34:230:34:27

There are lots of coins and medals here and they've been doing well.

0:34:270:34:32

There are coin dealers and collectors here.

0:34:320:34:35

The set you've got is a proof set which celebrated the coronation

0:34:350:34:40

of George VI in 1937.

0:34:400:34:42

-Let's see how we get on.

-£50 away?

0:34:420:34:45

50 I'm bid straightaway on the right. 60.

0:34:450:34:48

-70. 80. 90. 100.

-Hands everywhere!

0:34:480:34:51

Ten. 20. 130. 140.

0:34:510:34:56

-150.

-Wow!

-160. 170. 180.

0:34:560:34:59

190. 200. 220.

0:34:590:35:02

-Wow!

-Against you, madam. 240. 260.

0:35:020:35:06

280, fresh blood in two places.

0:35:060:35:08

300, I've taken.

0:35:080:35:10

300 with you, holding the catalogue. Fresh blood at the last minute.

0:35:100:35:14

Selling at £300...

0:35:140:35:17

-Wow!

-Fantastic!

0:35:170:35:19

It's lunch on me, then! LAUGHTER

0:35:190:35:23

'Another spectacular result.

0:35:230:35:25

'Coin collecting is big business and Paul was right about today's crowd,

0:35:250:35:29

'in that it might include collectors.

0:35:290:35:33

'Next, a map that Frances is pretty sure belonged to her mother.

0:35:330:35:37

'Published by the English cartographer John Cary,

0:35:370:35:41

'it dates back to the early 19th century.'

0:35:410:35:44

I like this. It's a nice small map.

0:35:440:35:47

Normally, the maps are massive size.

0:35:470:35:49

Very old, interesting item. Do you know who lived in Somerset?

0:35:490:35:54

Both my parents were born in Somerset, in Clevedon.

0:35:540:35:58

This was a particular favourite of my father's.

0:35:580:36:02

What's that worth? £30, away? 30 for that, surely?

0:36:020:36:06

Ten to get on, then. A little map of Somerset. Ten for the map.

0:36:060:36:10

Five, as bad as that! Eight on the right.

0:36:100:36:13

Ten. 12 for you, sir? 12.

0:36:130:36:15

15? 15. 18? At 15, the lady's bid on the back row.

0:36:150:36:19

-18 may I say? Any more? It sells at £15...

-Sorry.

0:36:190:36:24

-There you go.

-It's not your fault!

0:36:240:36:27

-It's all those people from Somerset!

-Who aren't here!

-Yes!

0:36:270:36:32

'We were a bit out with that result, but at least the £15

0:36:320:36:36

'takes us closer to our £2,000 target.

0:36:360:36:40

'These two Charles Leader oils were estimated by Paul at £800 to £1,000.

0:36:400:36:44

'Frances has decided to put a fixed reserve of £1,000 on the pair.'

0:36:440:36:49

Paul, explain the difference between a fixed reserve

0:36:490:36:53

and a reserve at the auctioneer's discretion.

0:36:530:36:56

Both come up from time to time in the programme.

0:36:560:36:59

A discretionary reserve means that the auctioneer uses his discretion.

0:36:590:37:03

Say you had £1,000 and it reaches 800, 850,

0:37:030:37:07

he thinks that's a reasonable price and something you'd be happy with,

0:37:070:37:11

he uses his discretion, lets it go.

0:37:110:37:14

A fixed reserve means it has to fetch exactly what you want for it.

0:37:140:37:18

In your case, if it went for £999, he won't sell it. But let's see.

0:37:180:37:23

Who'll put me in at £800 for these? £800 for these?

0:37:230:37:27

-600 to put me in, then?

-Doesn't look like it, does it?

-600?

0:37:270:37:31

-No.

-We'll leave those to another day, ladies and gentlemen.

0:37:310:37:34

It would have been terrible to have let them go for 600 or even less.

0:37:340:37:39

-You were right to put your reserve on it.

-Yes.

-Absolutely.

0:37:390:37:43

'At least they'll get to enjoy those canvases for a while longer.

0:37:430:37:48

'Frances has also put a reserve of £100 on the games table,

0:37:480:37:52

'but we're looking for more,

0:37:520:37:55

'so let's hope these bidders are up for a gamble.'

0:37:550:37:59

This is one of my favourite items, a great useable piece of furniture.

0:37:590:38:03

That fantastic games table. It's got chequers.

0:38:030:38:06

It's got draughts. It's got roulette.

0:38:060:38:09

Is this something that you've ever played with?

0:38:090:38:13

I haven't, but I really like it.

0:38:130:38:15

It's something I'm going to be really sad to see go, actually.

0:38:150:38:19

150 for the games table? Surely?

0:38:190:38:22

100 to put me in, the games table. 100? 50 to start me? There it is.

0:38:220:38:27

-50 I'm bid.

-No.

-60 down here on the front.

0:38:270:38:30

70 at the very back. 80. 90?

0:38:300:38:33

80 standing at the front here. Against you at the back. £80 only.

0:38:330:38:37

90 he says. At 90. £100?

0:38:370:38:41

£90, standing at the back. I'm selling it, make no mistake.

0:38:410:38:44

Going at the back. £90...

0:38:440:38:48

He has let that go for 90. He's used his discretion on the reserve.

0:38:480:38:53

'That is a shame that this lovely piece of recreational furniture

0:38:530:38:56

'failed to impress.

0:38:560:38:59

'Our last three lots haven't been successful, so if we are to make Frances's target of £2,000,

0:38:590:39:04

'we really do need a good price on her music cabinet.'

0:39:040:39:09

-You had your music in there, Elena?

-I did. I played the piano and cello.

0:39:090:39:13

-All my books were in there.

-Why are you getting rid of it, then?

0:39:130:39:17

I play the cello now, but the piano's gone.

0:39:170:39:21

I keep the music in a pile in my house now! The music cabinet's been left behind.

0:39:210:39:26

50 for that? There it is, surely, at 30? 35 down here.

0:39:260:39:30

40 I've got on the book. 45. 50. 55 now...

0:39:300:39:34

Yes.

0:39:340:39:35

..Any more? Against you all here at £55...!

0:39:350:39:39

-There we are. 55. That's all right, isn't it, really?

-Yes.

0:39:390:39:43

'That result was one we definitely needed.

0:39:430:39:46

'It's now down to our final lot,

0:39:460:39:48

'and one that's apparently been in the family for years,

0:39:480:39:52

'the leather priest's chair.'

0:39:520:39:54

-Whose chair was this?

-It was my grandfather's.

0:39:540:39:58

-Do you remember him sitting in it?

-Yes.

0:39:580:40:01

And then when it came to my parents,

0:40:010:40:04

it used to sit in the corner and nobody sat on it except at Christmas

0:40:040:40:08

when there were too many people in the house!

0:40:080:40:11

50 to go? 30 only. 40 the lady down here. At 40.

0:40:110:40:15

50 on the front. 60. 70.

0:40:150:40:19

90, fresh blood in two places. 100...

0:40:190:40:22

Two places!

0:40:220:40:24

..Against you both. 110...

0:40:240:40:26

Oh, wow!

0:40:260:40:28

..120, still there. 120. Is there any more? £120...

0:40:280:40:35

-Wow!

-There you go! It's like a roller coaster, isn't it?

0:40:350:40:39

'That's a great finish to our day here with Frances and Elena.

0:40:390:40:43

'Has that last sale taken us to our target?'

0:40:430:40:47

-You wanted to raise £2,000. A huge chunk of that depended on those paintings.

-Yes.

0:40:470:40:52

Even without the paintings... When you do sell them, that will be a lovely extra bonus.

0:40:520:40:58

Remind us what you want to spend the money on.

0:40:580:41:01

Myself and Elena and her sister,

0:41:010:41:04

we're going to have a full day's massage and sauna and swim

0:41:040:41:11

and lovely lunch as well.

0:41:110:41:14

-You looking forward to that, Elena?

-Yes. A nice relaxing day.

0:41:140:41:19

You'll still be able to have a pretty super day, the three of you.

0:41:190:41:25

Because you've managed to raise...

0:41:250:41:27

£2,140.

0:41:270:41:31

That's incredible! Fantastic! We can have a massage every hour!

0:41:310:41:36

-Congratulations!

-Lovely. That's fantastic.

0:41:360:41:39

'Eldest daughter Sarah can't make the spa break now,

0:41:430:41:47

'so the girls' pampering session is on hold.

0:41:470:41:50

'Until then, Elena and Frances have decided to treat themselves to a mini day out at a spa.'

0:41:500:41:56

We've booked in for a facial and an Indian head massage.

0:41:560:42:00

'Today, I had a facial, which was most relaxing.'

0:42:010:42:05

How are you going, Elena?

0:42:050:42:07

I'm nearly asleep. It's lovely.

0:42:070:42:10

Never had a head massage at all. Feel nice and chilled-out now.

0:42:100:42:16

Taking part in Cash In The Attic has been an immense joy.

0:42:170:42:22

I thoroughly enjoyed it.

0:42:220:42:25

Turning it into money has been fantastic.

0:42:250:42:29

Frances Gray wants to raise £2,000 to treat her daughters to a luxury spa visit. Angela Rippon and expert Paul Hayes help them hunt for antiques and collectables around their home and discover a rare Royal Doulton figurine that could cause quite a stir at auction.