Sturdy Cash in the Attic


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Sturdy

Antiques series. Fancy-dress aficionados Shirley Sturdy and her best friend Sheila want to raise £500 for a caravan holiday. Lorne Spicer and Paul Hayes are on hand to help.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic. This is the show that searches from the loft to the cellar

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to find collectables that we can sell at auction.

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Well, today I am going to be helping two ladies raise the money they want

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to take themselves far, far away.

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Coming up today on Cash In The Attic,

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our expert, Paul, is quite taken with this 1920s diamante necklace.

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I've got a nice little cocktail dress to go with that.

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-Have you?!

-Yeah(!)

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This 1940s exchange is almost as old as some of Paul's jokes.

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There is one thing for certain,

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we'll definitely have some telephone bidders! Wahey!

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And what would Paul know about charm bracelets snagging on tights?

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They always used to jangle a lot

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and get caught on all your clothes, didn't they?

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They used to snag your tights, maybe you don't know about that? Anyway...

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I remember snagging some tights, but that wasn't how I did it!

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Stay tuned for more revelations.

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Today I'm in Middlesbrough to help two ladies plan their great escape.

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This house and its busy little garden is just one of the two homes enjoyed by our host today.

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The other is her pride and joy, a motor caravan

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in which Shirley and her good friend, Sheila,

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explore the beautiful British countryside.

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Shirley loved driving it across Europe with her husband John,

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until he sadly passed away in 2007.

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Sheila's been a great comfort ever since.

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These ladies share a love of fancy dress parties, too.

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I'm told they're very popular with motorhome clubbers.

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There's a big trip planned,

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so we've been called in to help with the declutter and raising funds.

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We'll all be looking to our expert, Paul Hayes, for his advice.

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-Hello.

-Welcome to the north.

-Thank you very much.

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Born from a lifetime's experience in antiques, he soon gets to work.

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-Morning, ladies.

-Hello!

-How are you? All right?

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-Fine, yes.

-So who called Cash In The Attic in, and why?

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-I did.

-Ah! Hello.

-Hello.

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What made you decide to do that?

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Just so I could take Sheila away for a little holiday,

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because when my husband died,

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Sheila lived with me for six or seven months,

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just to get me over the grieving.

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She's like a daughter to me, so I'm just repaying her back a little bit.

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-That's nice, isn't it?

-It's lovely.

-OK.

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-So how much money are you looking to raise, then?

-As much as possible!

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About £500. That would do.

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-What sort of holiday have you got in mind?

-Motorhome.

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-To Ireland, Sheila has never been to Ireland.

-OK.

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-So who's going to do the driving?

-Not me!

-Me.

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Good for you! Because they're quite big things to drive, aren't they?

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They are, yes.

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-But I guess you're used to it, are you?

-Yes, after 33 years. Yes.

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In terms of the items we're going to be seeing, where are they from?

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From everywhere, car-boot sales. Skips. John was a skip man.

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And he used to come in with things,

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I didn't know what he was bringing in.

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I don't know where he got them from.

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-By the way, why have you got bear suits on?

-Just for a bit of fun.

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-Oh, OK! All right, fair enough. Come on, then.

-Anything for a laugh!

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Searching for antiques with people in giant bear suits

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could be overwhelming for all of us.

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But by the time we catch up with Paul,

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Shirley has put hers to one side.

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-Ah, hello! How are you? All right?

-I'm fine, I'm Shirley.

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-Nice to meet you, Shirley.

-Thank you.

-I'm Paul, and I found some dogs.

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Well, some fire irons.

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-These are quite nice, aren't they?

-They are, yes.

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They were my grandma's.

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I remember them by the fire, either side, the black range on the fire,

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and they were next to the fire.

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These were very useful items,

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probably why they are in the shape of the dog, you know,

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the dog's very much loyal to the family.

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If you think about it,

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the fireplace was the focal point in any Victorian house.

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Nowadays it tends to be the television.

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But the Victorians loved their fireplace.

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The dogs were often featured around the fire.

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The common one is actually the Comforter dogs

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which go inside the mantelpiece, but these would go in the hearth.

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-What about the sheep, then?

-Well, the sheep would go there as well.

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But he is just following the rest of them.

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These had a multitude of uses.

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Always found around a fireplace, and if you get two together

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sometimes they are used as a type of fire iron,

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where you put your shovel or tongs across the back of them.

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They would also help your fire go, if you put a log on its back,

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it allows air to get through, of course, the fire goes that way.

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But one of the main reasons was actually to use as a doorstop.

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-You need a draught, if you think about it.

-Of course, yeah.

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To get your fire to grow, you'd have the door open

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and you'd wedge the door open with the bottom of one of these items.

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A multifunctional item. And they're nice.

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You're never too old to learn, are you?

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You're not, teaching an old dog new tricks!

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But not new jokes. What sort of price are you going to put on these?

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And are they going to be sold together?

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Yeah, I think they are a collection, as a lot. They've stayed together.

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Do you remember your grandma blackleading them?

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-That's what people used to do.

-I've done it myself.

-Really?

-Yes, yes.

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For my grandma.

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-I'm not that old, really!

-That was the thing.

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-You used to have brass items and blackleaded items.

-Yes.

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Those three are nice examples, I could see at least £30-£50.

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-Oh, good.

-That's not bad, is it?

-Does that sound all right to you?

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-Yes.

-OK. All right. Shall we leave them here? By the fireplace.

-Yep.

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-Best place for them. Let's see what else we can find.

-Down, Shep.

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Joking aside, the fire dogs and sheep make a fine start.

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Downstairs, Sheila has also been busy.

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Once upon a time,

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this silver-topped brolly cost Shirley £1.50 from a car-boot sale.

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It is marked "London, 1963" and carries the name of J Waller.

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Paul values it at 20-£40.

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Now, where's he got to when you need him?

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-Oh, there you are.

-Hello. Found the necklace, have you?

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-Well, where did you get this from?

-I got it at a boot sale.

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-Did you really?

-Yeah, yeah. Near Croft.

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That sounds like a very nice find. How much did you pay for it?

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-A pound.

-A pound? And it was in this case, was it?

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It was, but it wasn't as battered as it is now.

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It was about six years ago.

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So, quite recent, then. What do you think, Paul?

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It always amazes me what you can still find on these car-boot sales.

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-It is, yeah.

-It's fantastic! How can it be just a pound?

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As a decorative bit of costume jewellery,

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it's worth far more than that, isn't it?

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This looks like good quality costume jewellery.

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There are different levels, the worst being plastics and so on.

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The best being silver,

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and sometimes even nine-carat gold with semiprecious stones.

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This one is diamante,

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diamante's one of the biggest things to come out of the 1920s and '30s.

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-Yes.

-Obviously real diamonds are extremely expensive,

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so they used to make these from white zircons

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-or sometimes white sapphires, but mostly glass.

-Right.

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Then you've got a nice pearl drop there.

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The way to tell the quality is to have a little look at the clasp.

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There we are. It has the wording, "Silver." Can you see?

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Oh, good. Yes.

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So it's a silver item. That means the stones in here are semiprecious.

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They only ever put good quality stones in a high-carat gold,

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you're looking at 18-carat or platinum. That sort of thing.

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But that is beautiful, what a pound!

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I know. What a great buy.

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-Have you ever worn it?

-Yes, I did.

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But I had to put an extension in the back.

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Country and Western, a local dress-up.

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-I don't dance, obviously.

-Sounds exciting, though, doesn't it?

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But these are very popular items. This one is early '20s, I would say.

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1920s, perhaps a little bit earlier.

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The box is doing it no favours whatsoever.

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This is a very modern box.

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This is far better quality than the box itself.

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If I said £30-£50 as an estimate, does that sound all right to you?

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-Oh, yes, it sounds great.

-OK.

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I've got a nice little cocktail dress to go with that.

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-Have you?

-Yes(!)

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Sounds very fetching, Paul.

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This striking black vase is Shirley's next discovery,

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it's decorated with a floral pattern and made by Shelley,

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whose potteries have been turning out lovely collectables since 1929.

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We think this one could add another £10-£15 to our total.

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While Paul keeps rummaging,

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I am keen to find out more about our lady's passion for motorhomes.

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So what is it about having the caravan that you like so much?

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Caravan?! It's a motorhome, don't say caravan, please!

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-So what's the difference, then?

-They haven't got an engine, we have.

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-Apart from that, are you like two completely separate clubs?

-Yes, yes.

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There is the Motorcaravan Club and the Caravan Club.

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So what made you opt for a motor caravan, then?

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Well, it was my husband, actually.

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He had a stroke, and was looking in the magazines.

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Seeing the motorhome when he was going for rehabilitation,

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there was a man there selling just a small one, a van,

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and John converted it. It was the first motorhome we had. 1978.

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-So you've upgraded a bit since?

-Yes.

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This is the third larger one we've had made.

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What would you say you enjoy so much about it?

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Just the friendliness, going to different places

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and meeting different people.

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Got friends all over the country. Ireland, Scotland, everywhere you go.

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You know? They're just so friendly, it's unbelievable.

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-It is just a way of life.

-So do you get away together very much?

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Not too often because Sheila's got grandchildren,

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and she looks after the grandchildren.

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-I've other commitments.

-She has other commitments, so...

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I would love to go, I'd love to go every weekend.

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So where is it you'd like to go?

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Well, I'm hoping that we're going to be able to go to Ireland.

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I have a few friends that go quite a lot, and everything.

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And I love the Irish people.

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I went to Scotland with Shirley,

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had a lovely holiday waking up next to the lochs.

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Just take the curtain back and look out, fabulous.

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So tell me a little bit about the connection

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and how long you've known each other.

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There is a family connection somewhere, isn't there?

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Well, my mum met Robbie, who was Shirley's brother.

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-They ended up getting married, how many years ago was that?

-28?

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-30 years?

-28, 30 years ago. And we just clicked.

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But we've got closer over the years, and when John died,

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I stayed around with her for a while.

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Seven months. Seven months she lived with me, she's like a daughter.

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Right, ladies. If we're going to get the money you need

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so that you can take this wonderful thing on the road, to Ireland,

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I think we'd better get back inside, into the house, and find Mr Hayes.

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-I think so.

-Come on.

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Wherever they end up on holiday,

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Shirley and Sheila are bound to have a laugh.

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Paul's been busy, and in the hall cupboard,

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finds three brass elephant heads.

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They're brackets for a hand rail,

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but Shirley's late husband, John, never got round to fitting them.

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At auction, grouped with some other brass items,

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they could make us a further £40-£60.

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Apparently, they aren't the only oddities

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that John picked up over the years.

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What is this?

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Oh, that's an old telephone exchange from a mine in Durham.

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Who was in the mining industry, then?

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A friend of Shirley and John's, probably a motorhome friend,

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-and the man gave it to John.

-Right.

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He knew he used to like to tinker, you know?

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Do you know what mine it would have been down?

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No, just that they worked in a mine in Durham.

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In Durham, that was it. Let's just have a look. What does it say?

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There's a little inscription on there.

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It says "Cordless Magneto Mining Switchboard, Type 555." There we go.

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And it's the Ministry of Fuel and Power certificate, 11th May 1949.

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There you go. Look at that. Amazing.

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And it's an Ericsson, who,

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obviously, have gone on to make mobile phones and things like that.

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What a fantastic find. I've never seen anything like that.

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Do you know what? That should create quite a lot of interest.

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I've had early Ericsson telephones before.

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They were one of the very first pioneers of the home phone system.

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And they can command quite a lot of money.

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Early technology is extremely collectable.

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People love to find the first innovations with things.

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Thomas Edison did these wonderful original sound systems.

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People go mad for those. So, telephones, very collectable.

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I actually had quite an early example of an Ericsson telephone

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and that did very well indeed,

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so I think this could potentially be quite a good item, actually.

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-Brilliant.

-How do you think Shirley would feel about getting rid?

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I think she'd be fine about it, because, you know,

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it was John's baby.

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Right, he never got it working?

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He intended to, he did intend to, yes.

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Right. I think it's probably too old a system to use

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in our current network of phones.

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We're all onto broadband and things now.

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But I'm sure someone technically-minded

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could rewire it or keep it as an ornament, a bit of fun.

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If I said around the £50 mark, £50-£100, how does that sound?

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Wonderful.

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And there's one thing for certain.

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We'll definitely have some telephone bidders! Hey-hey!

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Sorry. Let's get some fresh jokes! Come on.

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Yes, please, Paul, that would be great. What a great find.

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Ideal for telephone collectors.

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Let's hope that switchboard will CONNECT us

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to some cash on auction day!

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35 anywhere? The bid is with me at 32. Do I see 35?

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At £32, at 32, 35, 38, 40.

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Hmmm, looks like it's going to be a tough call!

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OK, I may be back in the bar,

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but I'm still working just as hard as everyone else here today.

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We're halfway through our rummage and our total so far stands at £170.

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That's not bad,

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but it's still short of the £500 we need for the road trip.

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I'm intrigued by a pair of early 20th-century framed prints.

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Shirley says they hung in the parlour

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of her friend's grandmother's house.

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These two elegant Edwardian ladies could prove an attractive lot

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with a £20-£40 price tag.

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In Shirley's sewing room, Paul's curious about the crockery.

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Sheila?

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Who's collecting all this blue and white, do you know?

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Erm, more or less me, I'm afraid.

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Really? Right.

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OK, so, did you buy them from individual places, or...?

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All different places, anywhere that we saw them.

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I just wanted my room to go with the blue and white

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and I have a Delft rack round the room,

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and I put them all, strategically placed.

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Right, OK, but is it a fashion that you're not really going for any more?

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No, I changed the colour scene and all the decorations.

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Well, I must admit, I went through that stage myself, actually.

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Pine and blue and white pottery seem to go together very well.

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That was very popular in the 1990s, that sort of time,

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but it's very out of fashion now,

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but the legacy that's left behind means

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there's an endless supply of blue and white pottery.

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It goes back a couple of hundred years in this country, anyway.

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What we're left with is a massive, eclectic mix

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of all different factories.

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This one was made by Spode. A British design called Spode's Tower.

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It's very much a European design

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rather than the Chinese-inspired pieces that we have here as well.

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We've also got the willow pattern. Numerous factories made that.

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That's one of the major patterns that we find here in the UK.

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And then we've got some things from Holland, the Delft ware.

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That's like a very thick pottery, to imitate the Chinese porcelain.

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So, there's something for everybody here, really.

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Are there any full sets, or are they all sort of oddments?

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No, they are just mainly oddments. I have a few favourites.

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-That's one of them.

-This is nice quality, actually. Do you know what it is?

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Erm, I used it for a plant pot!

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THEY LAUGH

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Well, it's actually for your bowl.

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It's a bowl chiller for your wine, so your wine glass would go in there

0:16:000:16:04

and the actual bowl would be chilled.

0:16:040:16:06

They made all sorts of, well, everything for anything, really.

0:16:060:16:11

How do you feel about parting with these?

0:16:110:16:13

Well, I don't use them any more.

0:16:130:16:14

They would be in the loft, and I need to get rid of them, really.

0:16:140:16:18

Well, if I said around the £40 mark, sort of 40-60? How does that sound?

0:16:180:16:22

That would be fine. That would be lovely.

0:16:220:16:24

OK. Well, let's leave those for now.

0:16:240:16:27

-And let's keep looking. But we'll put that on the list.

-OK.

0:16:270:16:31

Blue and white transfer-printed crockery

0:16:310:16:33

is a common sight in general sales, but, hopefully, Paul's strategy

0:16:330:16:38

of combining these items into one lot will pay dividends.

0:16:380:16:41

Shirley's home is full of surprises,

0:16:410:16:44

but the most interesting one is the discovery

0:16:440:16:46

that her husband, John, built it.

0:16:460:16:48

Electrician, joiner, painter and upholsterer.

0:16:480:16:51

He was clearly a man of many talents.

0:16:510:16:54

So, how long were you and John together?

0:16:560:16:59

We were married 50 years.

0:16:590:17:01

-Long time.

-Very long, yes.

0:17:010:17:03

I've known John since I was 16.

0:17:030:17:05

And he was cremated on our golden wedding anniversary,

0:17:060:17:10

but he had a really good send-off,

0:17:100:17:13

because the cowboys came dressed up,

0:17:130:17:14

all the friends were there, and it was fantastic.

0:17:140:17:17

Left about four o'clock in the morning, some of them. It was good.

0:17:170:17:20

That must have been quite hard to go through, though.

0:17:200:17:23

It was, very hard. But Sheila helped me. Sheila did help me a lot.

0:17:230:17:28

So, how did you two meet?

0:17:280:17:30

We met at a dance. I was 16.

0:17:300:17:34

Ah! And was it love at first sight?

0:17:340:17:37

No. He had ginger hair!

0:17:370:17:39

Me mam said, "Never marry a man with ginger hair!"

0:17:390:17:41

So, what happened?

0:17:410:17:43

-Well, I did.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:17:430:17:46

They just, they just grow on you, don't they?

0:17:460:17:49

Well, some people do. Some don't. But he did. We were happy.

0:17:490:17:52

So, you obviously shared a real enjoyment of dance,

0:17:520:17:56

because that continued through your marriage, didn't it?

0:17:560:17:59

Well, we used to go to the dances every week, you know,

0:17:590:18:01

and that just carried on, and when we started motor caravanning,

0:18:010:18:04

we have dances at the rallies,

0:18:040:18:06

we call them rallies, the meetings, and we'd just do fancy dress

0:18:060:18:10

and things like that, and then we started country and western,

0:18:100:18:13

and we got dressed up for that, and it was great.

0:18:130:18:16

During the time that you were together, not only did you have

0:18:160:18:20

these hobbies, but at one time, you ran a shop, didn't you?

0:18:200:18:23

Yes, we did have a shop, a fruit and veg and general shop

0:18:230:18:26

and John worked as well.

0:18:260:18:28

I looked after the shop.

0:18:280:18:30

And he bought a mobile X-ray unit from work

0:18:300:18:33

and converted it into a mobile shop,

0:18:330:18:35

self-service, the biggest in the north of England at the time.

0:18:350:18:39

It's probably quite hard for any youngsters watching this

0:18:390:18:42

to comprehend, really, because they have 24-hour supermarkets,

0:18:420:18:46

but, at one time,

0:18:460:18:48

the shops were open for a very short amount of time, weren't they?

0:18:480:18:51

Yes, they were.

0:18:510:18:52

And on the new estates, where the younger people were,

0:18:520:18:55

there was a lot of spending on the shops,

0:18:550:18:57

because there was no supermarkets.

0:18:570:19:00

So, what made you decide to sell it in the end?

0:19:000:19:02

Well, John went for a ride one day and seen the land here for sale.

0:19:020:19:07

So, we sold the shop and lived in a caravan on the land

0:19:070:19:11

while he built the house, you know.

0:19:110:19:13

One final question I must ask. What is it with these teddy bear suits?

0:19:130:19:16

When we joined the motor caravanning club,

0:19:160:19:18

we used to sell the American awnings

0:19:180:19:20

and we met the organiser, and became friends,

0:19:200:19:23

and we get complimentary tickets, and to pay Bob Griffiths back,

0:19:230:19:28

who was the organiser, we went round Shepton Mallet show,

0:19:280:19:31

giving the children lollipops.

0:19:310:19:33

Do you think they'll ever get another outing, after this?

0:19:330:19:36

I don't know. It all depends if anybody wants us!

0:19:360:19:39

SHE LAUGHS

0:19:390:19:40

I'm sure your fundraising teddy bears

0:19:400:19:43

will always be welcome, Shirley.

0:19:430:19:45

Sheila's found some silver bits and pieces,

0:19:470:19:50

including a hallmarked locket and one of Shirley's charm bracelets.

0:19:500:19:55

Silver's selling very well at auction these days,

0:19:550:19:57

so this mixed lot should easily make £30-£50.

0:19:570:20:00

Ah, there you are. You found the clock, then?

0:20:030:20:05

Yeah, it's a nice one, actually. It's a family heirloom, then?

0:20:050:20:09

No, I bought it from a lady who used to live next door.

0:20:090:20:12

Oh, right. And does it actually work?

0:20:120:20:14

It does, yes, she said it did, we've never had it working.

0:20:140:20:16

It just looks nice up there, so...

0:20:160:20:19

Right. Things go in and out of fashion, but these stay in fashion.

0:20:190:20:23

They date back to the 1600s, and it's called a Dutch clock.

0:20:230:20:29

And often they had this brass fretwork, all done by hand.

0:20:290:20:33

They were weight-driven. They use the power of weights.

0:20:330:20:35

You haven't got the weights, by any chance?

0:20:350:20:37

Yes, we've got the weights as well, yes.

0:20:370:20:39

That's actually quite a good quality movement.

0:20:390:20:42

The force of gravity is the actual main power,

0:20:420:20:44

rather than being a spring, which other clocks tend to have.

0:20:440:20:47

But they were very much reproduced in the 1950s here in England,

0:20:470:20:51

and, if you look, it says "Made in England, Dutch Clockworks Company,"

0:20:510:20:54

so somebody has reproduced the original design.

0:20:540:20:58

But the inscription on the top here, it's on most of these,

0:20:580:21:01

and it says "Nu elck syn sin," which is "every man to his taste."

0:21:010:21:06

All right? But the word "clock" is actually French for "bell."

0:21:060:21:09

-Did you know that?

-No, I didn't.

0:21:090:21:11

Where it says it's a clock on the wall, it actually refers to the bell.

0:21:110:21:14

How do you feel about letting it go?

0:21:140:21:17

Yes, that would be fine. More to the good.

0:21:170:21:19

-Are you sure?

-Yes, the more diesel, the further we go.

0:21:190:21:23

Well, it's good quality, and it's a brass movement.

0:21:230:21:25

These are solid brass. It's got an oak case,

0:21:250:21:27

and if you had the weights with them as well,

0:21:270:21:29

I'd say sort of £40-£70, you could quite easily get that sort of price.

0:21:290:21:35

That's fine, yeah. That's good, yes.

0:21:350:21:37

Right, so off this one goes, then, and let's keep looking.

0:21:370:21:40

And we'll get that trip for you, before the day's gone.

0:21:400:21:43

Well, that's what we're here for.

0:21:430:21:45

While we're beavering away, Paul makes another find in the garage.

0:21:450:21:50

No-one seems to know where these carved oak panels came from

0:21:500:21:54

or how old they might be, but Paul thinks

0:21:540:21:56

they're decorative enough to catch a bidder's eye at £50.

0:21:560:22:00

We're almost out of time today, but maybe our final discovery

0:22:000:22:03

will prove that all that glitters really IS gold.

0:22:030:22:07

Paul? I found these in the bedroom.

0:22:070:22:09

What have you found?

0:22:090:22:12

I found this bracelet.

0:22:120:22:14

-Ah, so whose was this?

-Mine.

0:22:140:22:17

Beautiful little bracelet, little charm bracelet.

0:22:170:22:19

And I've got these rings.

0:22:190:22:21

So, how old would you be when you got your first charm?

0:22:210:22:25

I was about 27.

0:22:250:22:26

Right, and, since then? We've just added onto that.

0:22:260:22:29

That must be quite sentimental, then, to you.

0:22:290:22:31

It is, really, yes, but we'd like the holiday.

0:22:310:22:35

I'd like to take Sheila a nice holiday if I can.

0:22:350:22:37

Do you remember much about each individual one?

0:22:370:22:40

Me mam bought me most of them.

0:22:400:22:42

Right. So, it wasn't bought as a whole charm bracelet?

0:22:420:22:46

No, just the chain.

0:22:460:22:48

The ship is the one that, when I retired from work...

0:22:480:22:50

This ship, that's that one, yeah? The galleon ship.

0:22:500:22:54

The car opens.

0:22:540:22:55

Oh, yeah, you can, yeah.

0:22:550:22:57

-Such detail.

-It is, isn't it?

-And do you still wear it now?

0:22:570:23:01

Not now, no.

0:23:010:23:03

The charms themselves go back quite a long way.

0:23:030:23:06

People used to wear them to protect them from evil spirits.

0:23:060:23:09

They were like a talisman, if you like.

0:23:090:23:11

But there was a massive fashion for this type of charm bracelet

0:23:110:23:14

in the 1950s and '60s. And when people started to travel around the world,

0:23:140:23:19

-they would bring back one from parts of the world and add up this huge collection.

-Very good.

0:23:190:23:24

There's quite a lot, it's all gold. You can see the hallmarks.

0:23:240:23:29

They all say 9ct, or 9375, which is another way of putting it,

0:23:290:23:34

so they are all gold items and the bracelet's gold there as well.

0:23:340:23:37

I did have it valued, actually. Two years ago.

0:23:370:23:40

And they said then it was about £150.

0:23:400:23:44

Right, well, it will have increased tremendously in value since then.

0:23:440:23:47

People are looking to invest in raw materials now,

0:23:470:23:50

things like silver, gold, copper, lead.

0:23:500:23:53

It's very much a commercial commodity at the moment.

0:23:530:23:56

So, I think, £150, two years ago,

0:23:560:24:00

you would have at least doubled that by now.

0:24:000:24:03

I'd imagine now, with those little bits and pieces in there,

0:24:030:24:05

if I said at least the 300 mark, maybe up to 500.

0:24:050:24:09

-That would be better still, yeah.

-Excellent.

0:24:090:24:12

Let's tell the rest of them.

0:24:120:24:14

I found a lovely charm bracelet here with other bits and pieces.

0:24:140:24:17

And what sort of value has that got nowadays?

0:24:170:24:19

You could say at least 300 here.

0:24:190:24:21

Oh, that's good news. So, how do you feel it's gone, so far, today?

0:24:210:24:24

That's wonderful, yes, had a great day. Really good, yeah.

0:24:240:24:27

And, have any of the valuations surprised you?

0:24:270:24:31

Yes, that silver necklace.

0:24:310:24:32

Yeah? That was a good buy, a pound from a car-boot sale, wasn't it?

0:24:320:24:35

Right, now, this morning when I spoke to you, by the way,

0:24:350:24:38

what happened to the bear suits?

0:24:380:24:40

They've gone back to the zoo.

0:24:400:24:43

-Have they?

-Having a picnic!

0:24:430:24:45

You've got to bring them to the auction.

0:24:450:24:48

You said you wanted at least £500, didn't you?

0:24:480:24:52

And obviously, hopefully, the more money, the further you could go.

0:24:520:24:56

Well, the value of everything going to auction comes to £640!

0:24:560:25:02

We could go to Scotland as well!

0:25:020:25:04

That's great!

0:25:040:25:05

Well, that wraps up our day here in Middlesbrough,

0:25:050:25:09

with plenty of goodies destined for the auction.

0:25:090:25:12

I can't wait to see whether that 1920s silver and diamante necklace

0:25:120:25:16

makes Paul's confident £30-£50 estimate.

0:25:160:25:20

And what about Sheila's collection of blue and white pottery?

0:25:200:25:22

With names like Spode and Royal Worcester in the mix,

0:25:220:25:25

it should have a broad appeal at £40-£60.

0:25:250:25:29

Finally, with a price tag of £30-£50,

0:25:290:25:31

the Victorian cast iron fire dogs might warm things up a bit.

0:25:310:25:35

Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:25:370:25:39

it's important to make a note of the details.

0:25:390:25:42

Type number 555, code M566A1, Ministry of Fuel and Power!

0:25:420:25:49

Sounds like something out of Harry Potter!

0:25:490:25:51

But is Paul paying attention?

0:25:510:25:54

It's an Ericsson. What did you say it was...?

0:25:540:25:56

Don't make me say it all again!

0:25:560:25:58

Be there when the final hammer falls.

0:25:580:26:01

Now, it's been a few weeks

0:26:060:26:08

since we met Sheila and Shirley's bear alter egos,

0:26:080:26:10

but we had a great time around their home and found plenty of items

0:26:100:26:14

to bring here to Thompson Auctioneers near Harrogate.

0:26:140:26:17

Let's just hope that today all the bidders are feeling very hungry.

0:26:170:26:21

Paul's already settling into the busy saleroom along with our ladies.

0:26:230:26:27

I hope Shirley isn't regretting selling that lovely gold charm bracelet.

0:26:270:26:33

You're not tempted to keep it?

0:26:330:26:34

No.

0:26:360:26:37

That was a very long pregnant pause, that, wasn't it?

0:26:370:26:41

Now, what did we put on the gold?

0:26:410:26:42

Between 300-500 on that one, nice little charm bracelet,

0:26:420:26:45

it's worth it, isn't it?

0:26:450:26:46

Now, how do you value the weight of these things?

0:26:460:26:49

These are very easy to work out, because they have their bullion value

0:26:490:26:52

but also, there's a value there as a charm bracelet.

0:26:520:26:54

People tend to forget that - that's a nice example.

0:26:540:26:58

Is there anything you're a bit hesitant about selling?

0:26:580:27:00

-Anything you've put reserves on?

-Yes.

-What's that?

0:27:000:27:04

Right, what reserves have you put on?

0:27:040:27:07

The charm bracelet, the silver necklace and the mining exchange.

0:27:070:27:12

What happens with reserves? Can you put reserves on, on the day?

0:27:120:27:16

You can put reserves on anything,

0:27:160:27:17

as long as you're prepared to have the thing back if it doesn't fetch that reserve.

0:27:170:27:22

What about the bear suits? Are they coming as well?

0:27:220:27:24

We didn't, not this time.

0:27:240:27:25

-Well, shall we go and sell our stuff, then?

-Come on, then.

0:27:250:27:29

Thank you.

0:27:290:27:30

Shirley has put reserves on four lots.

0:27:300:27:33

Her silver charm bracelet needs to go for £50.

0:27:330:27:37

She's also put low-end reserves on her diamante necklace,

0:27:370:27:40

gold jewellery and the 1949

0:27:400:27:43

Ericsson telephone exchange.

0:27:430:27:44

Let's hope Lady Luck is with us as our first lot goes under the hammer.

0:27:440:27:47

It's the black and floral patterned vase by the popular maker, Shelley.

0:27:470:27:53

The estimate is a low £10-£15 but, hopefully,

0:27:530:27:56

that will encourage the bidders.

0:27:560:27:58

Nice vase there, start me at £15, then, 18 anywhere?

0:28:000:28:02

The bid is with me at 15, do I see 18?

0:28:020:28:06

15, here we go.

0:28:060:28:07

Any advance on 15? Any advance on 15? 18, at £18. Any advance on £18?

0:28:070:28:13

Sold, at 18.

0:28:130:28:14

18. Very good, isn't it? You happy with that?

0:28:140:28:17

-Yes, very happy with that.

-Good.

0:28:170:28:19

A delightful vase, and a good first result.

0:28:190:28:23

£3 over our highest estimate.

0:28:230:28:26

Our next lot is the silver hallmarked diamante necklace

0:28:260:28:29

with pearl drop from around the 1920s.

0:28:290:28:31

It's a very pretty piece.

0:28:310:28:33

Do you think we might get more interest in that?

0:28:330:28:35

This is a really attractive item.

0:28:350:28:36

It's something for the height of glamour.

0:28:360:28:38

Somebody going out this evening might like this.

0:28:380:28:41

Diamante's very popular. Lovely pearl drop as well.

0:28:410:28:43

I know this is something that you really like.

0:28:430:28:46

So, we've looked after this with a reserve.

0:28:460:28:48

It's going to go for a minimum of £30.

0:28:480:28:50

Let's hope that somebody wants to go out this evening

0:28:500:28:52

and fancies a nice necklace.

0:28:520:28:54

With a black dress.

0:28:540:28:55

With a black dress!

0:28:550:28:56

Start the bidding here with me at £25. 28 anywhere?

0:28:560:28:59

We've got 25 anyway.

0:28:590:29:00

Do I see 28?

0:29:000:29:02

At 25, 28, 30, 32.

0:29:020:29:05

Any advance on £30?

0:29:050:29:07

Any advance on £30? Are we all done at £30?

0:29:070:29:10

You bought that necklace for a pound,

0:29:100:29:13

and it sold for £30, and you're still not happy?

0:29:130:29:16

Only joking!

0:29:160:29:17

THEY LAUGH

0:29:170:29:18

I think that's a right result, Shirley,

0:29:180:29:20

but all power to you for spotting the bargain in the first place.

0:29:200:29:23

Next up is another of Shirley's bargain buys from a car-boot sale,

0:29:230:29:27

the silver-topped brolly, hallmarked 1963.

0:29:270:29:30

Very Mary Poppins.

0:29:300:29:33

The estimate is £20-£40.

0:29:330:29:36

-Just £20. That's not a lot of money, is it, really?

-No, not a lot, no.

0:29:360:29:40

-So, is this from one of the family members?

-No, boot sale.

0:29:400:29:44

-I doubt you paid £20.

-No, £1.50.

-£1.50.

0:29:440:29:48

And she's so upset, "Oh, no, no, no!"

0:29:480:29:51

I think the thing about this actually is it's quite late, 1960s

0:29:510:29:54

is like yesterday in the antiques world, but £1.50, what a bargain.

0:29:540:29:58

We're looking for about £20.

0:29:580:30:00

-Start the bidding at £15, 18, anywhere?

-Come on.

0:30:000:30:03

-18, do I see 18?

-18, we're in.

0:30:030:30:06

Any advance on 18?

0:30:060:30:07

Cheap umbrella, at £18.

0:30:070:30:09

At 18, any advance? All done, selling at £18.

0:30:090:30:13

Not a bad return, that. Very, very good.

0:30:130:30:16

You can say that again. The last two lots have made £48.

0:30:160:30:22

And that's not bad for an original outlay of £2.50.

0:30:220:30:25

Next up, the cast-iron Victorian fire dogs.

0:30:250:30:29

£30-£50, Paul?

0:30:290:30:30

Yes, they're nice items, actually,

0:30:300:30:32

designed to go around the fireplace

0:30:320:30:34

and to hold the door open for draughts.

0:30:340:30:37

They're useful antiques. Antiques have to be useful.

0:30:370:30:39

And look good.

0:30:390:30:41

And look good. We try.

0:30:410:30:43

Start the bidding here at £12, 15 anywhere?

0:30:430:30:45

15, 18 and 20, in the room at £20.

0:30:450:30:48

20, he'll let them go, I think.

0:30:480:30:50

At £20, if you're all done, all done, selling at £20.

0:30:500:30:54

-Oh, that's disappointing, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:30:540:30:57

I was a bit disappointed.

0:30:570:30:59

I thought we would have got more for those. But never mind.

0:30:590:31:01

It all adds to the pot.

0:31:010:31:03

And what a pot we're growing.

0:31:030:31:05

But will our next lot swell the coffers any further?

0:31:050:31:09

Or next lot are those two oak panels.

0:31:090:31:12

Obviously off a piece of furniture. How come you've got them?

0:31:120:31:15

John brought them in.

0:31:150:31:16

And where do you think he got them from?

0:31:160:31:18

Maybe from a skip.

0:31:180:31:19

Even if they were from a skip, it doesn't really matter

0:31:190:31:23

because we could still get £30-£50 per them.

0:31:230:31:25

Do you know what? I really like these, actually.

0:31:250:31:27

If you're into your joinery and able to do something with them,

0:31:270:31:30

you could incorporate them into another piece

0:31:300:31:32

for a really authentic looking item.

0:31:320:31:34

Well, I can start the bidding straight in at £65.

0:31:340:31:37

We've made 65 for them!

0:31:370:31:39

At 65, do I see 70? At £65, are we finishing at 65?

0:31:390:31:43

Very good!

0:31:430:31:45

Selling, then, at £65.

0:31:450:31:47

Well, that's good.

0:31:470:31:49

Just think, somebody out there has got a cupboard with no doors!

0:31:490:31:52

THEY LAUGH

0:31:520:31:55

That was amazing, that. Where we got them from, I don't know.

0:31:550:31:58

John brought them in. I didn't think they'd get 20,

0:31:580:32:01

but there you go, you don't know, do you?

0:32:010:32:04

It depends who's there on the day.

0:32:040:32:06

Our next lot takes us to the halfway stage in our auction.

0:32:060:32:10

We're after £40-£60 for this combined lot of brass items

0:32:100:32:13

including some rather strange wall brackets.

0:32:130:32:16

These are unusual, these elephants' heads.

0:32:160:32:18

They've obviously been off something.

0:32:180:32:21

-Off a bar.

-Off the bar? Ah, is that what it's from?

0:32:210:32:23

I think he intended to put them on their bar in the living room, but didn't get round to it.

0:32:230:32:28

You can put them on a coffee table or do something with them,

0:32:280:32:31

and you've got the fire irons, which are always popular brass items.

0:32:310:32:35

So, yes, let's see how we get on.

0:32:350:32:37

I can start the bidding, with me at £40.

0:32:370:32:39

Isn't that brilliant? We're in at 40.

0:32:390:32:41

40, do we see 42?

0:32:410:32:42

At £40, at 40.

0:32:420:32:44

Are we all done at £40? Selling, then, at 40.

0:32:440:32:46

Right on our lowest estimate of £40,

0:32:470:32:50

our brass items didn't disappoint, so how are we doing so far?

0:32:500:32:54

Now, do you remember you wanted £500? So far, we've made £191.

0:32:560:33:00

Brilliant.

0:33:000:33:01

Still got quite a few lots to go.

0:33:010:33:03

Now, I know that you would like a cup of tea. So would we.

0:33:030:33:06

-Follow me and we'll get you a cup of tea.

-Come on, then.

0:33:060:33:09

As we search for refreshments, Paul takes an opportunity

0:33:090:33:12

to check out some of the good deals on offer in the saleroom today.

0:33:120:33:15

So, what's his top tip?

0:33:150:33:17

I thought I would show you this little beauty here.

0:33:170:33:20

It's a Victorian umbrella stand.

0:33:200:33:23

Now, I must say, I do like these but I can never tell

0:33:230:33:26

which are antique and which are reproduction.

0:33:260:33:28

Basically, it's in the weight This is a very heavy item.

0:33:280:33:31

It takes quite a lot to lift it.

0:33:310:33:32

The modern ones tend to be cast from a cheaper material.

0:33:320:33:35

Remember the fire dogs that we had at Sheila and Shirley's place?

0:33:350:33:39

-This is a very similar era, looking at 1870-1900.

-Right.

0:33:390:33:43

So, they would have been used as doorstops, at the fireplace.

0:33:430:33:47

This would be used next to the front door

0:33:470:33:49

for your umbrellas or walking sticks.

0:33:490:33:52

And, with that, of course, then you can pour the water away.

0:33:520:33:55

Exactly. Water from the umbrella would catch in this dish

0:33:550:33:57

-then you could chuck it all away. So a very useful item to have.

-OK.

0:33:570:34:00

What sort of price do you think it might make?

0:34:000:34:03

This is very affordable. It's in the auction for between £30-£50.

0:34:030:34:06

It's a bargain for somebody. It's an original item, not a recast.

0:34:060:34:09

Some of them can get as tall as me, very elaborate ones.

0:34:090:34:11

Look out for a firm called Coalbrookdale,

0:34:110:34:13

who did all these wonderful things.

0:34:130:34:15

You can get them blasted, can't you?

0:34:150:34:17

You can, you can bring them back to life.

0:34:170:34:19

Sometimes, with coats of paint, you can lose some of the crispness of the decoration.

0:34:190:34:22

But, this is fine, just leave it as it is, really.

0:34:220:34:25

Just a good, honest Victorian item.

0:34:250:34:27

The stand later sells for £38. A cast-iron result.

0:34:280:34:31

If you've been inspired to buy or sell at auction,

0:34:310:34:36

remember, various fees are involved, such as commission.

0:34:360:34:38

Your local saleroom will advise you on any extra costs.

0:34:380:34:42

Plenty still to come, and already under the hammer

0:34:420:34:45

is this reproduction Dutch wall clock with brass decorations.

0:34:450:34:49

The estimate is £40-£70.

0:34:490:34:51

And I can start the bidding here with me at £28.

0:34:510:34:55

28, we're in.

0:34:550:34:56

The bid is with me at 28. Do I see 30?

0:34:560:34:58

30, 32, 35, I have to go 38 and 40.

0:34:580:35:00

38 with me, one more, you might be lucky.

0:35:000:35:03

At £38, at 38, any advance on 38? At 38, are we all done at 38?

0:35:030:35:08

Selling, then, at £38.

0:35:080:35:09

"To each his own", it says below the crest.

0:35:090:35:12

We're happy the clock was to someone's taste at £38.

0:35:120:35:16

Just below our lower estimate.

0:35:160:35:17

Time now for the silver jewellery which Sheila found,

0:35:170:35:20

including two watch chains, a ring and a locket.

0:35:200:35:23

We're starting to get to some precious metals here.

0:35:230:35:26

This is the collection of silver, including a charm bracelet. £30-£50.

0:35:260:35:30

-Have you worn these items?

-Yes. I don't now, but I used to.

0:35:300:35:34

Some of those charm bracelets, they used to jangle a lot

0:35:340:35:37

and get caught in all your clothes, didn't they?

0:35:370:35:40

Used to snag your tights. Maybe you don't know about that, but anyway!

0:35:400:35:43

-I remember snagging some tights, but that wasn't how I did it!

-Lordy!

0:35:430:35:47

We can start the bidding here with me at £32.

0:35:470:35:49

32, we're in.

0:35:490:35:51

-The bid is with me at 32. Do I see 35, 38? 38, 40, 42, 45.

-That's good.

0:35:510:35:56

50. In the room at £50. At 50.

0:35:560:36:00

In the room now, all done, selling now, at £50.

0:36:000:36:04

Lordy! That was good, wasn't it?

0:36:040:36:07

Very good. Pleased with that.

0:36:070:36:09

Good, I'm glad.

0:36:090:36:11

No more snagging tights with the silver charm bracelet.

0:36:110:36:14

And it's great to see that it went for Paul's higher estimate.

0:36:140:36:18

Now then, here's a tongue twister you don't hear every day.

0:36:180:36:22

Right, the Ericsson Cordless Magneto Mining Switchboard,

0:36:240:36:29

type no. 555, code M566A1, Ministry of Fuel and Power.

0:36:290:36:33

Sounds like something out of Harry Potter!

0:36:330:36:37

From a nostalgic point of view,

0:36:370:36:39

anyone that's interested in technology, that's a great item.

0:36:390:36:42

I really like it. It's an Ericsson, what did you say it was, a type 555?

0:36:420:36:46

Don't make me say it all again!

0:36:460:36:48

Whatever it is, it's £50. Let's see how we get on.

0:36:480:36:50

Something a bit different there.

0:36:500:36:52

Start the bidding with me at £32. 35, anywhere?

0:36:520:36:55

The bid is with me at 32, do I see 35? £32, at 32.

0:36:550:36:58

35, 38, 40, 42, with me.

0:36:580:37:01

At £42, with me at 42.

0:37:010:37:03

Any advance at £42? All done at 42.

0:37:030:37:06

There definitely wasn't anyone interested in here today,

0:37:060:37:09

so we don't want to let it go for less than we wanted,

0:37:090:37:12

so that's fine.

0:37:120:37:13

I was happy the mining exchange didn't sell because it was worth

0:37:130:37:17

a lot more than that, so I'll sell it somewhere else.

0:37:170:37:21

We've not quite made £300 yet,

0:37:210:37:23

so that no-sale could harm our chances of reaching the target.

0:37:230:37:28

Let's see whether some Edwardian elegance will attract our buyers.

0:37:280:37:31

Now, you put just £20-£40 on our ladies.

0:37:310:37:34

I quite like them, but Edwardian, they're a bit old-fashioned.

0:37:340:37:37

I know it's a long time ago, but they were common items at the time

0:37:370:37:40

and they're not particularly rare nowadays

0:37:400:37:42

and the fashion's moved on, I'm afraid.

0:37:420:37:44

-Start the bidding here with me at £18. 20 anyone?

-£18.

-do I see 20?

0:37:440:37:49

-At £18, 18.

-No, they're selling for that.

-Are we all done?

0:37:490:37:52

Nice pair of prints there at £18,

0:37:520:37:54

20 has it, well done, at £20, at 20.

0:37:540:37:57

Well done at £20. Selling at 20.

0:37:570:38:00

-£20.

-That's what we were looking for.

0:38:000:38:02

You disappointed with that?

0:38:020:38:04

A little bit. Yeah, not too bad.

0:38:040:38:06

Shirley's not impressed.

0:38:060:38:07

But the framed prints matched our lowest estimate.

0:38:070:38:10

Now, Sheila collected the blue and white crockery.

0:38:100:38:12

Let's see if it can do any better.

0:38:120:38:14

Names like Willow, Delft and Meissen

0:38:140:38:16

should attract the attention of the dealers.

0:38:160:38:19

Do you know what? This is exactly where we want to be.

0:38:190:38:21

Anyone that's got a Welsh dresser or a country kitchen.

0:38:210:38:24

Blue and white's really popular.

0:38:240:38:25

You've got some Booths, you've got some Spode,

0:38:250:38:28

quite a lot of different examples, most of them in good condition,

0:38:280:38:31

so, hopefully, let's see if someone agrees.

0:38:310:38:33

Start the bidding here with me at £12.

0:38:330:38:37

Straight in at £12.

0:38:370:38:39

-20, in the room at £20. Any advance on £20?

-Let it go.

-Yeah.

0:38:390:38:44

Any advance on 20? 22, new bidder, thank you.

0:38:440:38:47

25, 28, 30, no, 28, with you, sir, at £28, at 28. Any advance on 28?

0:38:470:38:52

-All done, selling at 28.

-There you go.

0:38:520:38:56

£28. That's a bit of a disappointment.

0:38:560:38:58

It is, isn't it?

0:38:580:39:00

-You're constantly, if you want rid of them, it's £28.

-OK, good.

0:39:000:39:05

It'll get a gallon of diesel.

0:39:050:39:06

A gallon of diesel, it is!

0:39:060:39:08

We're further on the way.

0:39:080:39:10

Whatever the price of diesel,

0:39:100:39:12

the crockery has played its part in the planned road trip.

0:39:120:39:15

That just leaves one last item to sell,

0:39:150:39:17

and it could make all the difference.

0:39:170:39:19

Shirley's nine carat gold charm bracelet,

0:39:190:39:23

plus the locket and various rings, were valued together at £300-£500.

0:39:230:39:28

There's a reserve on the bracelet alone of £300.

0:39:280:39:32

Now, I think they've had a bit of interest in this, Paul.

0:39:340:39:37

I think anything that says "gold" gets people's interest.

0:39:370:39:40

This will be no problem at all. And we have a reserve of 300.

0:39:400:39:43

But, do you not wear this any more?

0:39:430:39:46

I have, for a few years, but not a lot. On the odd occasion.

0:39:460:39:50

Do you have a favourite charm?

0:39:500:39:52

Yes, I think the galleon and the car, the one that opens.

0:39:520:39:55

All right, let's hope there's an auctioneer's gavel on there as well.

0:39:550:39:59

Good lot of gold there.

0:39:590:40:00

Start the bidding with me at 150,

0:40:000:40:02

160 anywhere?

0:40:020:40:04

160, 170, 180, 190, 200.

0:40:040:40:06

220, 240, 260, 280, have to go 290 and 300.

0:40:060:40:10

300. That's what we wanted.

0:40:100:40:13

310, 320, 330? At 320, are we all done?

0:40:130:40:19

Selling, then, at £320.

0:40:190:40:23

-Oh, good.

-It made estimate.

0:40:230:40:25

It had a bit sentimental value, the gold, me mam bought me the bracelet

0:40:250:40:29

and some of the charms, but it was good, it was a good result.

0:40:290:40:33

£320 is just above the reserve and below our estimate.

0:40:340:40:38

A great way to end our sale, so it's time for the final score,

0:40:380:40:42

and I wonder how close we've come to Shirley and Sheila's target.

0:40:420:40:46

Now, bearing in mind you wanted £500 for your trip, didn't you,

0:40:480:40:51

at least, how do you think it's gone today?

0:40:510:40:54

I think we've made that.

0:40:540:40:55

If you've made more, what will you do with the money?

0:40:550:40:58

-Go further.

-Ha! Excellent.

0:40:580:40:59

Well, in that case, this afternoon,

0:40:590:41:01

you can work out how far you can go with...

0:41:010:41:05

..£647!

0:41:050:41:07

Oh, that's great, isn't it? We can go to the Isle of Skye now!

0:41:070:41:10

That's brilliant! The Isle of Skye!

0:41:100:41:13

After making their target, the ladies are preparing

0:41:170:41:20

for their big trip with a trial run to Scarborough.

0:41:200:41:24

You've got to make sure the water tanks are filled,

0:41:240:41:26

the diesel tank's filled, food's on board. That's what you need.

0:41:260:41:31

As long as you've got your food and your diesel, you're fine.

0:41:310:41:33

And, like we said, every pound we made,

0:41:330:41:36

took us a little bit further, you know,

0:41:360:41:38

so, we went quite a bit, didn't we?

0:41:380:41:40

We did, yes. We done all right.

0:41:400:41:42

Scotland is next, with Ireland still very much on the cards.

0:41:420:41:45

With a motor caravan, the world's your oyster.

0:41:450:41:49

I've been to quite a few places...

0:41:490:41:50

And everybody's so friendly.

0:41:500:41:53

Just waking up next to the lochs.

0:41:530:41:56

Nice campsites in Scotland.

0:41:560:41:58

I've not been to Ireland.

0:41:580:42:00

And I think the Irish people are lovely, as well.

0:42:000:42:03

Well, I've been 12 times, at least 12 times,

0:42:030:42:07

the South and the North, and it's absolutely fantastic.

0:42:070:42:11

-We won't get lost.

-No, we won't get lost!

0:42:110:42:13

THEY LAUGH

0:42:130:42:16

Fancy-dress aficionados Shirley Sturdy and her best friend Sheila are looking to take a motor caravan holiday. They want to raise £500 towards the costs and invite Lorne Spicer and expert Paul Hayes to help them out. Could a vintage 1940s mining telephone exchange bring them the cash they need?