Episode 3 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


Episode 3

Deborah Meaden and Theo Paphitis go head-to-head scouring the West Country for antiques with their antiques experts Mark Stacey and Thomas Plant. They start in Honiton, Devon.


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Transcript


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-Some of the nation's favourite celebrities...

-Sensational!

-..one antiques expert each...

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Look at this, look at this.

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..and one big challenge - who can buy the best antiques at the very best prices?

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I really have got to win.

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And auction them for a big profit further down the road?

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Yes!

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Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

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And who will be the first to say, "Do you know who I am?"?

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Time to put your mettle to the pedal.

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This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip, yeah!

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Roaring through this Road Trip challenge in a 1939 Jaguar SS

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are two fiery dragons who have left their dens for the unfamiliar world of antiques.

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- Know anything about antiques? - Not a lot.

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I couldn't tell the difference between a Staffordshire piece of pottery and a bull terrier!

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But you know what pottery is. I'm not sure I believe you.

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Gambling her multi-million-pound business reputation is Dragons' Den's Deborah Meaden,

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who got rich from the holiday business. Watch out for that famous on-screen scowl.

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I am out.

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But really she's human like the rest of us.

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-There's a fiver missing.

-I've lost £5! You can't trust me with money!

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# Money, money, money... #

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Deborah's going head-to-head with fellow Dragon and arch-rival Theo Paphitis,

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who made his millions turning round failing companies like Ryman, the stationers.

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You have just snatched defeat out of the jaws of victory. I'm out.

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But this straight-talking retail magnate is a man who knows his own mind.

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-I've told Thomas...

-You want a profit.

-I want a 100% turn.

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Now the Dragons are masters in their field, but with antiques they'd be lost without some experts.

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So joining them in a Triumph Vitesse are two very responsible helpers!

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There's Mark Stacey, veteran valuer and auctioneer with an eye for quality and a confession to make.

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I've got a secret crush on Deborah Meaden.

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-I'll be putty in her hands!

-This is a turn-up!

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And Thomas Plant, also an auctioneer, who loves jewellery and is partial to a bit of bling.

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I'm excited, actually. I hope some of their glitter comes off on me and I can make some money for once!

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That's not going to happen, Tom.

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The Dragons are used to dealing with hundreds of thousands,

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but here they've got a new mission - to turn a profit on just £400.

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So hang on to your vintage car seats because the Dragons are a-coming!

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Their Antiques Road Trip starts in Honiton in Devon and goes through Taunton and up to Dunster,

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before finishing up at the auction in Crewkerne, Somerset.

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And as luck would have it, this gives Deborah the upper hand as she's a local lass

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-and this is her patch.

-I do come to Honiton.

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- Why? - For antiques. And the cheese shop.

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In fact, Honiton has become a centre for antiques shops and antiquarian books,

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but originally it was best known for its lace and glove making.

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So it should be a treasure trove, but before a penny can be spent the Dragons need to hook an expert.

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Here they are. I can't believe it. They're here.

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- I'll race you! - Hold on! I've got traffic here!

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-Oh, go, Deborah, go!

-I'm winning. He's trapped in the car.

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Dear, oh, dear.

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-Hello! I'm Deborah.

-I'm Thomas. Very nice to meet you.

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-What are you good at, Mark?

-I'm good at it all. Suddenly, I feel like I'm in the Dragons' Den!

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-Do we have to toss a coin?

-No, Mark should go with Deborah. Mark's slightly in love with you.

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-We can't possibly deny him!

-He's been going on about you all morning!

-I'm going red now!

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-Deborah this, Deborah that!

-You ARE going red! It's a match made in heaven.

-I hope so.

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-You two lovebirds go that way...

-Oh, stop it!

-Off you go.

-Come on.

-Let's hold hands.

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# Love is in the air... #

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Ahh. Sweet.

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So, boys and girls, the shops await. What's the game plan?

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-Deborah, have you got any ideas about what you would like to find? We've got £400.

-Yes.

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-We can buy up to five items and we do want to beat them.

-Oh, absolutely we do!

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-No, we're going to.

-I like that.

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Well, that's simple enough. Theo?

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-I am a magpie.

-So you like shiny things. What else?

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Mechanical. I like things that are mechanical.

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I even like wind turbines, windmills.

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Mm. Windmills. This isn't going to be easy.

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-I like that.

-Yeah?

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-You're not giving it any love, are you?

-I tell you what, it's not got enough detail.

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-It's too basic.

-Nice try, Thomas.

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But it sounds like he's a man who knows what he wants.

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I thought that looked like something with its original box and of an age,

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but it's much younger than it looks.

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I like your definiteness about things. I like that.

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You had a look - no. Snap.

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-I got to charity shops.

-Why?

-Why does a millionaire go to a charity shop?

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-Because you want to support the charity?

-Obviously.

-Naturally.

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-What else do I go in there for?

-Er...

-I look for one thing only.

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-Go on, tell me.

-45s.

-Really?

-Vinyls for my jukebox.

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Ah, of course. Records. It's obvious, innit?

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I've got that one. Look. Got that. You get these from people's houses?

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-The Wurzels! Here we are.

-I Am A Cider Drinker!

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- This was a local home, was it? - Somerset.

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Put the records down, Theo. This isn't Desert Island Discs.

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Thankfully, up the road, our love birds Deborah and Mark are taking things more seriously

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-and the talk is all about the opposition.

-You know him quite well.

-Yeah.

-Will he be good at this?

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He's definitely a good negotiator. He drives a very hard bargain.

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-And he claims not to know anything about antiques, but that doesn't mean anything.

-I'm glad he's with Thomas,

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-who doesn't know anything!

-I have so got the best expert!

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And maybe, Deborah, Mark has the best Dragon.

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-What are you looking at?

-That cross.

-Beautiful.

-Adjustable book stand.

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That's how it looks interesting. What do you think?

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It's ivory. That's the only thing. I'm not sure I could touch it.

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Before plastic was invented, many items like piano keys and cutlery handles

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were made of ivory. Even so, Deborah will need convincing that it's fine to buy this book rest.

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Anything like that is controversial.

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It's fine... It's legal to sell these pieces if they're before 1947.

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This certainly is 19th century.

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-Try it on a table?

-So it's portable.

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-It is, almost. You can have it as low as that.

-Or flat, I guess.

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Yes, you can fold that up. Isn't that neat?

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-Again, I can see it in my house. I would buy that.

-I can as well.

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Right, well, it's £75. So what do you think?

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-Are you going to make me an offer?

-I'd love to, but I don't know how rude I can be.

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-Could we go to 50?

-I was rather hoping we'd get it for 40. I like working in round numbers.

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-So do I.

-Four is Deborah's favourite number. And zero is mine.

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-I've just adopted four.

-Is that right?

-If you let us have it for 40, four is definitely my favourite.

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-I can't let that go for 40.

-You can't?

-45?

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-I think we've got to say yes.

-Yes. It's got a four on the front.

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-That's wonderful.

-So with a united front and one in the bag,

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Team Meaden head out of town in search of pastures new.

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Meanwhile, their rivals are still empty-handed.

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And there's not a wind turbine in sight.

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So they're also trying their luck in the Grove Antique Shop.

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Maybe here Thomas can find something to turn Theo on.

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It's not going to be easy.

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Good, strong design, that. Very much my type of thing.

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How's it going with Theo, Thomas?

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Very definite! Likes what he likes. If he doesn't like it, not a chance.

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I'm going to suggest a few things and, you never know, he might quite like them.

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-There's good things.

-This room's interesting, is it?

-The Arts and Crafts clock is nice.

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Still not getting awfully excited.

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-I love this Indian table.

-Hm.

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-No. It's a bit tense.

-Everything here is absolutely tops, tops, tops.

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I'm not giving up just yet, Theo. I'm not going to be beaten.

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Oh, dear. He's not keen to put his hand in his pocket, is he?

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# Money, money, money Must be funny... #

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That's a lot for a print.

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# Money, money, money Always sunny... #

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-That's what you wanted.

-Silverised bronze Spirit of Ecstasy. Is that a limited edition?

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It's new. You can see from the base.

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It's a new thing.

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And it sounds tinny, doesn't it?

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Silvered bronze, Spirit of Ecstasy. That's about as bronze as I am. That's not very old.

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-But...

-She's good.

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Owners of Rolls-Royces will know exactly what this is.

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It's called the Spirit of Ecstasy and a much smaller version sits as a mascot

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on the bonnet of every Rolls-Royce.

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The image of a woman leaning forwards with her arms outstretched behind her is modelled

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on Eleanor Velasco Thornton, secret lover of automobile pioneer Lord Montagu of Beaulieu.

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It's the first thing you've picked up and it's grabbed you.

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Someone will put that on their desk. It's decorative.

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Not at that price they won't! £175?

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-Hello.

-Hello. What have we found?

-Come here.

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-Someone's made a mistake and put a 1 in front of the 75.

-I don't think that's a mistake.

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I think it is a mistake.

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-I would like...

-To take the 1 off.

-No, I can't do that.

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It seems the dealer's not here, so it's a phone call.

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I've got Theo from Dragons' Den. They want you to take the 1 off.

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They're prepared to give you 75.

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Come on. What's your very best?

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Give him here.

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-Neil, you're a very, very nice man.

-I think that's a yes.

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Would you believe it? The owner's knocked £100 off the price and Theo's found something he likes.

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Miracles do happen!

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Well, onwards and upwards, Road Trippers.

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With Honiton behind them,

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Team Paphitis hits the road north-east to Hele near Exeter,

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giving the boys some "me" time together.

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-Do you think you are a glass half empty or half full?

-I'm always half full. That's the way I am.

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-And Deborah's the same?

-Deborah's fabulous.

-Is Duncan the grumpiest?

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"Duncan!" He's a nice fella.

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He's a nice bloke, does some wonderful things and contributes to this world.

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But my God he needs to brighten up.

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-Do you meet socially?

-We do all get together.

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Myself and Deborah are good friends and I'm sure will remain so.

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Friends they may be, but the Dragons are the last thing on Deborah's mind just now.

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She's come north to Dunster in Somerset for a spectacular trip down memory lane.

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This area holds a load of memories for me. My parents lived in Dunster, my younger sisters went to school

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and my older sister got married at the church in Dunster,

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so there's a lot of memories I'm about to walk into.

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Apart from the church,

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this medieval village also has this strange looking yarn market,

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erected in 1590, when the village was a centre of clothing production,

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for wool traders to shelter from the rain.

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But it's not here, it's up there that Deborah and Mark are heading.

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-There's the castle.

-Yes.

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Dunster Castle, with its eye-catching red sandstone and turrets, has sat high up on the hill

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overlooking the town for hundreds of years. It was the home of the Luttrell family

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and while all seems peaceful, this belies the drama and turmoil that is etched into its history.

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Oh, it's beautiful, isn't it?

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Isn't that beautiful?

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Martin Harman has agreed to take our team through the highlights.

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-Hello there! Welcome. I'm Martin.

-Pleased to meet you.

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Throughout its long history, Dunster Castle has been no stranger to sieges.

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First the Celts and Vikings, then the forces of King Stephen in 1138

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and, most memorably, the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War of 1645.

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Upstairs there's still evidence of the castle's royalist roots.

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We call this our King Charles bedroom. It's in this room that the future Charles II,

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when he was Prince of Wales, a young boy of 15,

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came here to drum up support for the royalist cause.

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-So the royal person has lain here?

-You can almost see the aura.

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-Well, steady on! And did he get the castle to support the monarchy?

-He did. The castle became royalist.

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But when Parliamentary forces laid siege to the castle, hope of a royalist victory faded.

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Five months later, the castle and its owner, the Luttrells, surrendered

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and Cromwell exacted his revenge.

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All the walls were demolished, the tower was demolished,

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and they were about to demolish the whole building, everything here.

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But the Luttrells of the day went up to see Cromwell, swore allegiance to the new parliament,

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-which was most important, paid a huge fine of millions...

-In today's money.

-In today's money.

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And came back with his letter and they stopped knocking it down.

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But the main fortifications had gone and that ended Dunster as a castle.

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Its fighting days may have been over, but the castle's place as home for the Luttrells wasn't.

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They set about modernising it with stunning results.

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-What I'd like to show you in the dining room... Look up at the ceiling.

-Look at that.

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That is probably one of the most spectacular ceilings in the country. It was done by Edward Goodge.

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He was one of the top craftsmen and it was done in 1681.

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-This is carved wood?

-No, it's plaster.

-Plaster!

-It's actually a suspended ceiling.

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They were so good, he knew if he put plaster straight onto a ceiling,

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the room upstairs would flex the floor and it would crack.

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So he built a lower ceiling, put the plasterwork on it and built it all up in layers

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-so it doesn't crack.

-Do we know how long it took?

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-A year.

-A year?

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We have all sorts of little animals and creatures on the ceiling.

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We've got lots of pigs. There's even a unicorn. Lots of cherubs.

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-Any dragons?

-Unfortunately, no dragons.

-That was nearly a perfect ceiling, but it's incomplete.

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The Luttrell family continued to make changes to the castle over the following centuries.

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Some even a little self-indulgent.

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-It's a particularly unusual room.

-Like a home.

-It is, absolutely.

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-But why is that? Why is it so different?

-Because in the 1930s,

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Alice Luttrell, the last Lady Luttrell, inherited £400

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and she decided to spend it entirely on herself and her room.

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So she did this room how she wanted it. Her colours, her furniture. This became her room.

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On £400?

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-For the same amount that we... she furnished this?

-Everything.

-Everything in this room was £400?!

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-I find it such a calm room.

-And intimate somehow.

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In a huge castle, to find a little tranquil, intimate room like this is lovely.

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In 1976, after 600 years of stewardship,

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the Luttrells handed the keys of the castle to the National Trust.

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So the family may be long gone, but the history of Dunster Castle lives on.

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Now that's all well and lovely, but it's time to get back to reality and build that working relationship.

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I cannot tell you the joy of doing what we're doing today with you.

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Because normally I've got my husband sitting there going, "One more place, then we're going. One more place."

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If I can't walk in and spot the exact thing I want to buy immediately, we leave.

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So as this couple head south to the village of Hele in Devon,

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for a rendezvous with Fagin's Antiques, rivals Theo and Thomas are already there rooting about.

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Frankly, if they can't find something in this massive emporium, I'll eat my hat.

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-Rod Stewart, Nana Mouskouri...

-Not records again, Theo(!)

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Thomas sure has got his work cut out here.

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-Phil Collins! No Jacket Required.

-No, that's it!

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Phil Collins, come on. Mention his name and it's over.

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-Hello, Chris.

-How are you?

-Very well.

-Hello! Nice to meet you, Chris.

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-Where does he get most of his stuff from?

-Burglary.

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Burglaries!

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-This is quite fun. Is it one of those carousel horses?

-Absolutely. It is, yeah.

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Cast iron. It weighs a ton!

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It's a good doorstop.

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This cast-iron beast may have come from a playground,

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but it's more likely to be from a fairground carousel or merry-go-round.

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What is this? A painted ostrich egg? Or emu's egg.

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"Merry... Merry Natives." Eh?

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Oh, yes.

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Merry natives. "SA" it says, so that must be South Africa.

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It may look fragile, but this painted ostrich egg is as tough as old boots.

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Because of its strength and size, it's perfect for the age-old art of egg decoration.

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Apparently, one 60,000 years old was found in South Africa, but I don't think this is it.

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-It's different, isn't it?

-It is.

-This I think is..

-But I think it's doable.

-I agree with you.

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-If I was putting that into one of the general sales, I'd put £30-£50 on it.

-Yeah.

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-If we could get it for 30, there's a chance. But that's just come in also, apparently.

-Right.

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Again, he's got quite a cheeky face, hasn't he?

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-You can have it at cost price.

-Which is?

-40.

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-65.

-Oh, no, that's too...

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-We like the egg as well.

-We do.

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-80 quid for the two.

-No.

-Oh, I thought we had a deal then.

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-So...

-Go on, then.

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-Do that.

-80 quid?

-Yeah. And you'll double up on it.

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-Good man!

-All right? A good cause.

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So another two investments in the bag for Team Meaden and a couple of oddities to boot.

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Meanwhile, fellow Dragon Theo is upstairs, but he's not happy.

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-The other team have found things and are haggling. We, on the other hand, are...

-Faffing?

0:22:350:22:41

What about those books?

0:22:410:22:44

This is Midsummer Night's Dream. Shakespeare.

0:22:450:22:50

-Who's illustrated it?

-Arthur Rackham.

0:22:500:22:52

They used to rip all these out and just frame them.

0:22:520:22:57

Chris is right. And Arthur Rackham's work is no exception.

0:22:570:23:01

He was a Victorian illustrator known for his pen and ink drawings, who famously illustrated classics

0:23:010:23:07

like Alice in Wonderland and this, Midsummer Night's Dream.

0:23:070:23:13

So what do you think, boys? Worth a punt?

0:23:130:23:17

-What can you do this for?

-You can have that for 80 quid and make a profit. Rackham fetches money.

0:23:170:23:24

It's the Rackham I'm going for. At £40, I'd be really happy.

0:23:240:23:28

-I'll split it with you - 45.

-What do you think? 42.

0:23:280:23:33

-45.

-42.

0:23:330:23:36

-Aw, listen, he's... I've told Thomas.

-You want profit.

-I want a 100% turn on the money.

0:23:360:23:42

No pressure, Thomas.

0:23:420:23:44

Peter Pan. That's not Rackham, is it?

0:23:440:23:47

-Mother Goose. It's nursery rhymes.

-What, more Arthur Rackham?

0:23:470:23:51

Could this help the master plan?

0:23:510:23:54

I'll do that for a fiver for you.

0:23:540:23:57

Time to pay some cash to this man. 20, 40. And look at this.

0:23:570:24:03

-Well done.

-A £5 note.

-Pleasure.

-Thank you very much, sir. Well done.

0:24:030:24:08

So after a wobbly start

0:24:090:24:12

our celebrities have succeeded in splashing some cash. Now that's worth celebrating!

0:24:120:24:18

And, as luck would have it, there's some local scrumpy at hand to end the day with.

0:24:220:24:28

-- Here's to the end of a lovely day. - Fabulous day.

-Another one tomorrow!

0:24:280:24:32

It's early to rise and the Dragons are on the road again,

0:24:410:24:45

crossing the county lines into Somerset. It's Meaden country.

0:24:450:24:50

They're Taunton bound and Thomas is still grappling with his Dragon.

0:24:500:24:56

Theo is desperate to make money, so anything I show him, he's not interested.

0:24:560:25:01

It's got to be big, brassy and showy. And he wants it for nothing.

0:25:010:25:06

So I'm quite pleased with our negotiating tactics.

0:25:060:25:10

But we need to buy more. I need to buy more.

0:25:100:25:14

Yes, you do, Thomas, because you and Theo have only parted with £120

0:25:140:25:21

and bought just two lots - the Spirit of Ecstasy

0:25:210:25:25

and the Arthur Rackham books. So with £280 left,

0:25:250:25:29

there's still work to be done.

0:25:290:25:32

Meanwhile, Deborah and Mark have spent £125 on three items -

0:25:350:25:40

the ostrich egg, the cast-iron horse head and the ivory folding book rest -

0:25:400:25:46

leaving them £275 to trade with.

0:25:460:25:50

And Taunton awaits.

0:25:500:25:54

This urban centre gets its name from the River Tone and was once known as Tone Town.

0:25:560:26:03

It's been the county town of Somerset since 1935 after snatching the title

0:26:030:26:09

from Weston-super-Mare.

0:26:090:26:12

Likewise, Team Paphitis is keen to get the upper hand in this Dragons challenge.

0:26:120:26:17

But thankfully there's one antiques emporium here which has rules against any monkey business.

0:26:170:26:24

This is in incredibly good nick. It's a Wilkinson sword.

0:26:250:26:30

-I don't know about the dating or...

-It's George V.

-Yeah.

0:26:300:26:35

-A good, manly object.

-This dress sword dates from 1910

0:26:350:26:40

and would have been used by soldiers on parade.

0:26:400:26:44

So, 100 years on, it's no surprise they're still sought after for those formal occasions.

0:26:440:26:50

So, at £220, time for the Dragon to cut a deal.

0:26:500:26:55

David, what's your best on this one?

0:26:550:26:57

-180 would be the best on that.

-Really?

-We'd struggle to get that.

0:26:570:27:01

-Yeah, I think...

-If I did 150, that's the absolute... the absolute bottom line.

0:27:010:27:07

That seems like a 125 deal to me. At more than 125, I might as well just blow in the wind.

0:27:070:27:14

-Oh, he's a hard man.

-Go on, David, 125.

0:27:140:27:18

-The other stallholders will crucify me.

-Look at this.

0:27:180:27:23

-Good man!

-Well, he's certainly a man who gets what he wants.

0:27:250:27:30

Meanwhile, more gentle natured Dragon Deborah and expert Mark

0:27:330:27:38

are down the road at the Cider Press meeting up with Norman.

0:27:380:27:41

-Do have a good look round and if you want to go into any of the cabinets, help yourself.

-Thanks.

0:27:410:27:48

-It is a lovely thing.

-Magnificent thing.

-Oh, yes.

0:27:500:27:54

This is called a tig, a three-handled mug.

0:27:540:27:58

-It would certainly be £300-£500.

-Oh.

-It is delightful.

-Yeah.

0:27:580:28:04

-But I don't think, even with our legendary skills at negotiating...

-He did say, "Help yourself."

0:28:040:28:11

I distinctly remember Norman saying that. Norman, cheers!

0:28:110:28:16

Thank you.

0:28:160:28:18

Er, now what about something a bit more affordable, like that strange-looking bit of silver?

0:28:200:28:28

Oh, that, I think, is a wager cup.

0:28:280:28:31

They tend to be continental. Normally Dutch.

0:28:310:28:36

Silver-plated. Well, loving cup it says here.

0:28:360:28:40

In fact, this is known as both a wager cup and a loving cup.

0:28:400:28:44

The wager is to drink from the larger cup, the lady's skirt,

0:28:440:28:49

whilst balancing the small cup below so you don't spill anything.

0:28:490:28:54

And in marriage the bride would drink from the small cup and the groom from the larger one.

0:28:540:29:01

Doesn't seem fair really, does it?

0:29:010:29:03

-Do you like it?

-I... I do.

-It's interesting.

0:29:040:29:09

As we walked past, it caught my eye.

0:29:090:29:11

At the moment it's saying £125.

0:29:110:29:14

That's a bit of a wager for us.

0:29:140:29:17

Boom-boom!

0:29:170:29:20

It looks like a little lady's slipper to me.

0:29:220:29:26

Oh, how... What is it?

0:29:260:29:28

-I don't know. There's something interesting about it.

-It's very, very pretty.

0:29:280:29:33

This silver slipper is a wall pocket, a decorative item usually filled with scent or dried flowers

0:29:330:29:39

that was an interior design must-have for your wall in the 1940s and '50s.

0:29:390:29:45

A must-have then and I sense a must-have now.

0:29:450:29:49

-I like this.

-You do?

-More than the wager cup.

0:29:500:29:53

Norman, £165?

0:29:530:29:56

-Yes...

-How cheeky can we be with you?

0:29:560:29:59

I think you can be quite cheeky.

0:29:590:30:01

Actually, even better, stop us being cheeky. What's the most amazing thing you can do on that?

0:30:010:30:07

As you're honorary members and anybody that's a member of Cider Press gets 20% automatically,

0:30:070:30:13

but we are double that for you.

0:30:130:30:16

-That's £100.

-100 quid.

0:30:160:30:19

-Norman, you've been very generous. I completely get that.

-Yes.

0:30:190:30:23

-There's a "but".

-There is a "but" because we really have to make a profit and I really have to win.

0:30:230:30:29

-£80. I couldn't do it for any better than that.

-Norman...

-We'll try that.

0:30:290:30:34

And the wager cup?

0:30:340:30:36

As for you, we'll do it for £50 because we'd like you to win.

0:30:360:30:40

I won't kiss you, but I'll shake your hand, Norman.

0:30:430:30:47

Wow, £130 for both! Good work, Deborah.

0:30:470:30:52

Back down the road, Thomas seems to be bringing Theo round to his way of thinking.

0:30:530:30:59

I like it because it's Art Deco, but that's a centrepiece bowl just for a table.

0:30:590:31:05

This is what we call opalescent.

0:31:050:31:07

And it's £114. Wow!

0:31:070:31:10

-Very stylish.

-You wouldn't want to be paying that for it. It's not new, is it?

-No, it's not new, no.

0:31:110:31:17

That was a Del Boy moment.

0:31:170:31:19

I want to have it for £60, but they're not here.

0:31:190:31:23

-I don't know, where's my mate Dave?

-Where's Dave?

-Dave!

0:31:230:31:27

Poor old Dave. He's back for another grilling.

0:31:270:31:30

Get a phone call on. Say, "There's a handsome young man...and me who are prepared to offer 50 quid for it."

0:31:300:31:37

-I don't think that will be acceptable.

-But it's cash.

-Let me see if I can get her on the phone.

0:31:370:31:43

The French bowl, £114, you know?

0:31:430:31:47

-'114?'

-Yeah.

-'Right.'

0:31:470:31:49

Do you want to take £50 cash for it?

0:31:490:31:52

-'70?'

-Hang on a minute.

0:31:520:31:55

-70?

-It won't work. It just won't work.

0:31:550:31:57

-She's sweet, she's having a hard time...

-I know she's lovely and she's a lovely lady.

-Give her £60.

0:31:570:32:04

We're meant to be making a profit.

0:32:040:32:06

-I tell you what. Can we do it for 50 or not?

-50 quid in my hand, darling.

0:32:060:32:10

-'All right, if you can get any more, get it.'

-I'll try.

0:32:100:32:14

-Thank you, girl. Love you!

-Bye-bye.

0:32:140:32:16

I don't think she loves YOU, Theo.

0:32:160:32:18

So with our Dragons replete from the morning shop, they hit the road once more,

0:32:230:32:29

this time heading west through scenic Somerset to the small village of Williton,

0:32:290:32:34

another one of Deborah's old stamping grounds.

0:32:340:32:37

-I have a little bit of history in Williton.

-Yes.

0:32:370:32:40

That little cottage there...

0:32:400:32:42

-That's the first house I ever owned.

-Gosh!

0:32:420:32:45

One room downstairs, two bedrooms upstairs

0:32:450:32:48

-and a tiny little bathroom. I had to work blinking hard to keep that going.

-I bet you did.

0:32:480:32:53

Well, I'm guessing she's gained a few more bedrooms since then.

0:32:530:32:58

So, with the final shop beckoning, it's off round the corner to West Somerset Antiques.

0:32:590:33:05

A galvanised bin.

0:33:050:33:07

Well, there we are.

0:33:070:33:09

-You could probably put an old watering can with it.

-True. Then you've got a collection of garden...

0:33:090:33:15

That's 28 as well, a nice watering can.

0:33:150:33:19

That sounds perfect for the auction in rural Somerset.

0:33:190:33:23

And would you believe it? Outside, there are a couple of old scales for weighing sacks of potatoes.

0:33:230:33:30

This could be the seed of an idea.

0:33:300:33:33

-They'd make a wonderful feature in the garden.

-I would buy them for my garden.

0:33:330:33:38

We've got a vegetable garden and there's something about potato pots in a vegetable garden. I'd buy them.

0:33:380:33:44

Bearing in mind we're in my back yard and I have got to win this challenge...

0:33:440:33:51

Look at me, this is a pleading Dragon. You do not see a Dragon pleading very often.

0:33:510:33:56

When was the last time you saw me plead?

0:33:560:33:59

Rarer than hen's teeth, I'd say.

0:33:590:34:02

It's got to be worth a considerable... a considerably good deal, surely!

0:34:020:34:08

-£45.

-So that's 90 quid, isn't it, for the pair?

0:34:080:34:12

-Or would we just go for one?

-Or just go for one?

0:34:120:34:16

There's something crazy about them.

0:34:160:34:18

-There's something absolutely wacky about them.

-They're high risk.

0:34:180:34:22

It's the difference between someone in business and an entrepreneur.

0:34:220:34:26

This is the risky side of buying something.

0:34:260:34:29

-I wondered whether we shouldn't try, just to be completely wacky...

-Yeah?

0:34:290:34:34

-And to really make Tim work for his money...

-Yeah?

0:34:340:34:38

What about that galvanised thing and the watering can and making it a little group lot?

0:34:380:34:46

A whole little garden collection.

0:34:460:34:48

-Sounds great.

-Well, we need a price.

0:34:480:34:51

And it's not just the scales they're after

0:34:520:34:55

or that galvanised bin

0:34:550:34:57

or the watering can.

0:34:570:35:00

It turns out they want a sort of agricultural job lot

0:35:000:35:04

and that includes this sprinkler and the two augers for drilling holes.

0:35:040:35:08

No, they don't do things by halves, these two.

0:35:080:35:12

I want Theo Paphitis to think, "You are barking, you are going to make no money on that whatsoever,"

0:35:130:35:19

and I want them to go for a lot of money at the auction.

0:35:190:35:23

What's your budget and how close can you get?

0:35:230:35:26

This seriously is every last penny we've got left

0:35:260:35:30

and we'd love to buy them, we want your support,

0:35:300:35:33

and we've got left...

0:35:330:35:36

£145.

0:35:360:35:39

-Go on then.

-Are you sure, Tim?

-Yeah, that's fine.

-Deborah, are you happy with this?

0:35:390:35:44

-I'll be happy with it. Tim?

-I'll be happy.

-Promise, Tim?

-Yeah.

0:35:440:35:48

-It's a deal.

-Thank you very much.

0:35:480:35:51

With the agricultural hoard secure and the money spent,

0:35:510:35:55

Deborah and Mark can, well, drive off into the sunset together.

0:35:550:36:00

Meanwhile, Thomas and Theo are taking a break from antique shopping

0:36:010:36:05

to visit one of Williton's prime tourist attractions -

0:36:050:36:09

the Bakelite Museum, which happens to be housed in the town's old water mill.

0:36:090:36:14

-Pleased to meet you. Fantastic day.

-Thomas Plant.

-Hello.

-And your name is?

-Patrick Cook.

-Patrick Cook.

0:36:140:36:20

-Of the Bakelite Museum.

-Show us what's in here. I'm intrigued.

0:36:200:36:25

This museum is packed to the roof with every type of domestic product made from Bakelite.

0:36:250:36:31

Wow!

0:36:310:36:33

Wow!

0:36:340:36:36

An early plastic,

0:36:360:36:38

developed by Belgian scientist Leo Baekeland in 1907.

0:36:380:36:43

Indeed, the plastic proved so versatile that inventors and designers just leapt on it.

0:36:430:36:49

They used it

0:36:510:36:53

to make just about every domestic appliance you could think of

0:36:530:36:57

from hair-dryers and televisions to telephones and heaters.

0:36:570:37:02

And by the 1930s, appliances were mimicking the prevailing Art Deco style.

0:37:020:37:07

A lot of streamlined, wonderful objects.

0:37:070:37:11

-That piece looks very much like...

-Oh, it's heavy.

0:37:110:37:15

Like a satellite or something that should be flying, a bit Dan Dare.

0:37:150:37:19

-Absolutely. A bit Dan Dare, a bit "spaceshippy".

-Doesn't that top get hot?

0:37:190:37:24

It doesn't get very hot at all.

0:37:240:37:26

I remember when I was a student, I used to sit on these.

0:37:260:37:30

I did get a huge bill as well because it cost a fortune to run.

0:37:300:37:34

And from the ordinary to the extraordinary, nothing escaped the Bakelite treatment.

0:37:340:37:41

And this is a rather intriguing device.

0:37:410:37:44

As you've recognised, it is a hot-water bottle, a traditional, rubber hot-water bottle.

0:37:440:37:50

-No, it's not rubber.

-It isn't.

0:37:500:37:52

-It is an electric hot-water bottle.

-It's got a switch.

0:37:520:37:55

-Normally with a cable...

-Ah!

-Exactly.

0:37:550:37:59

-Do you know that many a person tried to fill it up with water and then they would...

-Die!

0:37:590:38:04

-Well, it would be a very lively night.

-So how old is this?

0:38:040:38:08

Um, 19... Just post-war, '46, '48.

0:38:080:38:12

-It probably...

-It's a good idea.

-Yes, because you could have warmed up the bed before you got in.

0:38:120:38:18

-Then took it out. You wouldn't want that in your bed.

-That's exactly what I do every night.

0:38:180:38:23

Every night, you warm up your bed with your Bakelite...

0:38:230:38:27

-Don't tell me you've got one of these which works!

-I do have, yes. It was a bad winter.

0:38:270:38:33

Patrick, what I want to know is, people ask me all the time,

0:38:330:38:37

"What's your best investment in the Den? What's your worst investment in the Den?"

0:38:370:38:43

-I've asked you those questions.

-You've done all that. That was you.

0:38:430:38:47

What I want to know is - what is, in your opinion, the worst ever use of Bakelite?

0:38:470:38:53

Yes, you've guessed it.

0:38:560:38:59

It was a coffin.

0:38:590:39:01

How many of these were made?

0:39:010:39:03

Not a lot!

0:39:030:39:05

-96.

-96?

0:39:050:39:08

How well does it burn?

0:39:090:39:12

-Terrible.

-Terrible.

0:39:120:39:15

-Bodies decompose underground.

-Yes.

0:39:150:39:18

TAPS COFFIN

0:39:180:39:20

This will last...?

0:39:200:39:22

-An infinity.

-Infinity.

0:39:220:39:25

But some Bakelite products weren't quite so long-lasting.

0:39:250:39:30

Are these really Bakelite teeth?

0:39:300:39:32

Intriguingly, it might be casein which is a variation on the theme.

0:39:320:39:37

And in fact, they are every variation of a tooth possible.

0:39:370:39:42

So you can imagine everyone has a colour...

0:39:420:39:46

And all different shapes. They've all got a number.

0:39:480:39:51

-But it's "Breakalite"? It would break?

-Yes.

-But you'd get another one. They don't cost a lot.

0:39:510:39:57

-You'd get them from the "Gnashional" Health.

-"Gnashional" Health!

0:39:570:40:01

You can see, when you've got a product that's so usable,

0:40:030:40:07

joking apart, why people would want to use it and try it for everything.

0:40:070:40:12

-Yeah.

-And then some just would not get it.

0:40:120:40:15

They may not shake Theo's boat, but even today, Bakelite still has its commercial uses

0:40:150:40:21

and for collectors, it remains an iconic part of 20th century design.

0:40:210:40:27

-Brilliant. Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much, Patrick.

-Thank you.

-Take care. Bye-bye.

0:40:280:40:34

With the day drawing to an end, Theo and Thomas have one more stop to make in Williton

0:40:360:40:42

and Theo seems keen to bare his soul.

0:40:420:40:46

You know I told you that I am the world's worst loser?

0:40:460:40:50

-I think I under-egged it. I'm much worse than that.

-Oh, really?

0:40:500:40:55

-Yes. And I've got £105 left.

-Yes.

-And we need to spend it.

0:40:550:40:59

I don't want to take any chances.

0:40:590:41:02

-No.

-So we need to go and buy at least one, if not two more products that will double that 105 quid.

0:41:020:41:10

He's not making it easy, is he?

0:41:100:41:13

Why not try West Somerset Antiques? It worked for Mark and Deborah.

0:41:130:41:17

But hey, we're talking about Theo here!

0:41:170:41:20

-Pleased to meet you.

-Tim, I'm Theo. Pleased to meet you.

-And you.

-How are you?

-Very good.

0:41:200:41:25

-We're looking for a bargain of all bargains.

-Have a look round and see what you can find.

0:41:250:41:31

-Silver, silver...

-Put your finger on that.

0:41:350:41:38

Well, I feel a Theo moment coming on.

0:41:380:41:42

I'm struggling. I would have loved to have bought something mechanical, but I'm not seeing anything.

0:41:420:41:48

If Deborah was here, she would buy something like this.

0:41:480:41:52

This is what she would buy.

0:41:520:41:54

Vintage Staffordshire-style dogs.

0:41:550:41:58

Nope, she wouldn't.

0:41:580:42:00

What would this have been made for?

0:42:000:42:03

It's hand-made, I think.

0:42:030:42:05

-Copper and brass. It's, um...

-Hand-made.

0:42:050:42:09

For what?

0:42:090:42:11

It's hot, so it's got to be hot for hot water of some description.

0:42:110:42:15

-What would you keep hot?

-Hot water or a tea of some description like a samovar, but it's not that big.

0:42:150:42:21

Unless it was going to be a punch, some hot wine.

0:42:210:42:24

-Yeah, hot wine, mulled wine?

-Something like that maybe.

-On the cooker?

0:42:240:42:29

Guys, let's face it, you don't know.

0:42:290:42:32

That copper and brass barrel in the other room with the tap on, what's it for?

0:42:320:42:37

I think it's hot water.

0:42:370:42:40

Tim doesn't sound so sure either.

0:42:410:42:43

It's not going to give us a profit.

0:42:430:42:45

Well, not unless it's a really reduced fee.

0:42:450:42:49

Well, it's £55, so what are you thinking?

0:42:490:42:53

-I like things like that.

-I know you like it. I can see you like it.

0:42:530:42:58

-Because it's got uses.

-It's unique as well. You're not going to find another ten of those.

0:42:580:43:03

I doubt if you'd find another one, never mind ten.

0:43:030:43:06

I want to give you 30 quid for it. That's what I want to give you.

0:43:060:43:11

I'd meet you at 35.

0:43:110:43:13

I'd be happy at 30, honestly.

0:43:130:43:15

-30 works.

-Go on then.

0:43:150:43:18

-Oh!

-Go on then.

-What a man! Thank you very much.

0:43:180:43:21

The shopping is over, so it's time for our Dragons to reveal their hardware to each other.

0:43:210:43:28

Thomas, let the lady loose.

0:43:280:43:30

-What is it, Thomas? A reproduction?

-Yes, it is.

-There's nothing old about it.

-No.

0:43:320:43:38

-It's aspirational, it's got a good look.

-It's a decorative piece.

-Absolutely.

0:43:380:43:43

-It's a big decorative piece. How much did you pay?

-£75.

0:43:430:43:47

-That was only £70 too much.

-Oh, listen to this rubbish!

0:43:470:43:51

Ooh! So how about the merry-go-round piece?

0:43:510:43:55

-Right...

-Cast-iron and painted and we think it's from the 1930s.

0:43:550:44:00

It's a big piece, it's a great big piece.

0:44:000:44:03

It's showy, a bit like our Spirit of Ecstasy.

0:44:030:44:06

-It's that kind of thing.

-Yeah...

0:44:060:44:08

I think that's a "no", don't you?

0:44:080:44:10

Please pass it over.

0:44:100:44:12

I could have this in my bed

0:44:120:44:15

or a horse's head. LAUGHTER

0:44:150:44:18

-You make the choice.

-No, listen... Theo...

0:44:180:44:21

What about the two Rackham illustrated books?

0:44:210:44:25

I love the cover. The cover looks like one of those lovely samplers.

0:44:250:44:29

-Yeah, absolutely.

-I just adore that.

-It's lovely.

-It's of its period, I love it.

0:44:290:44:34

-I would put them in at £50 to £80.

-£45 paid.

0:44:340:44:38

You should double your money. It's good to work on a principle - we'll see what happens on the day.

0:44:380:44:44

Fair enough. Now, what about this curio?

0:44:440:44:48

-Theo, do you like it? Would you buy it?

-I wouldn't buy it.

0:44:480:44:51

It just doesn't do it for me. It's just an odd...

0:44:510:44:55

I've seen millions of ostrich eggs painted.

0:44:550:44:59

It's not your cup of tea and not necessarily our cup of tea,

0:44:590:45:03

but a collector might like that.

0:45:030:45:06

So can the same be said about the sword?

0:45:060:45:10

-What I want you to look at is the quality and the condition of this fine instrument.

-Good condition.

0:45:100:45:16

-As I pull the blade...

-Oh, don't slay the dragon just yet!

0:45:160:45:20

You'll be fine, you'll be fine. It's pretty blunt.

0:45:200:45:23

-So look at that...

-What is it exactly? Is it a dress sword?

-It's a dress sword.

0:45:230:45:28

It's in excellent condition, made by Wilkinson. Wilkinson Sword, you remember the...?

0:45:280:45:35

-Yeah.

-If you had two like that?

-They're not rare, are they?

0:45:350:45:39

-No, you see them in most sales. They have a collectorship appeal.

-Yeah.

-The scabbard is in good condition.

0:45:390:45:45

A lot of army officers like to buy the second-hand ones.

0:45:450:45:49

-What do you think, Deborah? Do you like it?

-I like it.

0:45:490:45:52

You're looking puzzled, boys.

0:45:540:45:57

-Theo, what do you think?

-It just doesn't attract me.

0:45:570:46:00

-The slipper is very girly.

-I've not seen something like this for a long time.

0:46:000:46:06

-The slipper is quite sweet.

-You see wager cups occasionally, but they're not everyday objects.

0:46:060:46:11

My prediction is you might scrape the 130 you paid. I don't know if you'll make a profit on those.

0:46:110:46:18

We'll see. Thoughts on the opalescent bowl, anybody?

0:46:180:46:23

-Pretty.

-Pretty.

-I thought, "I really like the opalescence."

0:46:230:46:27

-That's very "me". I love Art Deco.

-I know you like Art Deco.

-It's very "me".

0:46:270:46:32

That is pretty and I'd put it in my home.

0:46:320:46:35

Again that's the point. If I would buy it, somebody would want to sell it to me.

0:46:350:46:40

Fair point. Now, boys, a book rest.

0:46:400:46:43

-It's ivory?

-It is ivory.

-It's going to be obviously...

-It's ivory and late 19th century.

0:46:440:46:50

The simplicity of the design is actually quite something.

0:46:500:46:55

It's antique ivory, but it's ivory.

0:46:550:46:57

-So I probably wouldn't have given it time to spend on it...

-OK.

0:46:580:47:03

-We did exactly have that discussion.

-We discussed that very idea.

0:47:030:47:07

-It was your initial reaction.

-It was absolutely my initial reaction.

0:47:070:47:12

-It's lovely. It'll make up for your losses on the cup and the silver.

-That'll do us.

-That will do us.

0:47:120:47:18

-The barrel itself is really nicely made.

-It is.

-It's well balanced, it's of nice quality.

0:47:180:47:24

-This will appeal to a country market.

-I think so.

-It really will.

0:47:240:47:28

If I saw that and it was around about the £30 mark, then I might have been tempted as a punt on it.

0:47:280:47:35

We paid...

0:47:350:47:37

-£30.

-£30.

-There we are.

-Well done, Mark. Well done.

0:47:370:47:42

And now for the ultimate job lot.

0:47:420:47:44

-Can I just ask a question? Have you ever picked potatoes?

-No.

0:47:440:47:49

Those are instruments of torture in my life. I would never want to see those again.

0:47:490:47:54

-Calm down.

-For too long on my father's farm...

0:47:540:47:58

-Shall I show you how they work?

-No, don't.

0:47:580:48:02

-RATTLING

-That sound, that sound!

0:48:020:48:06

-We loved them, didn't we, Deborah?

-I think that is a great collection of garden miscellanea.

0:48:060:48:13

So what do they really think about each other's lots? Go on, Theo, let rip!

0:48:130:48:19

Their stuff lacks imagination.

0:48:190:48:21

I think they're going to lose definitely on the silver.

0:48:210:48:25

-They are. That horse's head?

-Lose.

0:48:250:48:28

-They've got a lot of risks.

-That's a dangerous game to play at auction.

-It could be classed as reckless.

0:48:280:48:35

To me, I wouldn't have touched it if it had been £20,

0:48:350:48:40

the Spirit of Ecstasy, because it's a reproduction.

0:48:400:48:44

I suspect anybody who looks at it is going to feel disappointed in the way I felt disappointed.

0:48:440:48:50

Will Theo's game plan of doubling his money pay off

0:48:500:48:55

or will Deborah's potato scales tip the balance? Ha!

0:48:550:48:58

It's the final showdown for our fire-breathing celebrities

0:49:040:49:08

as the teams head 25 miles east to Lawrences Auctioneers in Crewkerne.

0:49:080:49:14

Team Meaden started today's road trip with £400

0:49:160:49:21

and spent every penny on five auction lots.

0:49:210:49:25

Team Paphitis also started the day with £400 and spent £325 also on five lots.

0:49:260:49:34

The auction house is located in Linen Yard in Crewkerne, once a thriving centre for cloth-making.

0:49:390:49:46

So with the spirit of entrepreneurship in the air, our Dragons should feel right at home.

0:49:460:49:52

The anticipation of it all!

0:49:520:49:54

This is the moment. This is the moment! Can you say that word? >

0:49:540:49:58

-There's only going to be one result.

-I fancy your chances. It's the sort of place that tat sells really well.

0:49:580:50:04

Does that include your stuff too, Theo?

0:50:040:50:08

Thankfully, the auctioneer Richard Kay is putting a brave face on things.

0:50:090:50:14

The thing that catches my eye is the silvered bronze statue of the Spirit of Ecstasy.

0:50:140:50:20

And I think that's a very stylish piece of 1930s artwork.

0:50:200:50:26

The most bizarre item, I think, in the sale

0:50:260:50:29

is this painted, cast-iron head for a seesaw, possibly from a fairground.

0:50:290:50:34

It's got great novelty appeal, it's eye-catching and it could make £60 or £70 or so.

0:50:340:50:40

So there's all to play for.

0:50:410:50:43

The Dragons are used to calling the shots, but now the tables have turned.

0:50:430:50:48

Who's going to be in and who's going to be out of this Dragons' Den?

0:50:480:50:53

Let the bidders decide.

0:50:530:50:56

First up, at the starting gates, the horse's head.

0:50:560:51:00

- It'll either not sell at all... - Is there much value in scrap?

0:51:000:51:04

- It's not scrap. - You bought it by weight?

0:51:040:51:07

It's a decorative antique.

0:51:070:51:09

-I'm bid £40 here. £40 I have.

-Come on.

0:51:090:51:12

45. 50. 55.

0:51:120:51:14

Are you bidding? 60. 65.

0:51:140:51:17

70. No? £70 seated. 75...

0:51:170:51:21

No, £75, the gentleman's bid, standing.

0:51:210:51:24

I'm selling at 75. Are we done at £75...?

0:51:240:51:28

-80 just in time.

-Oh, 80.

-85. 90.

-Yes!

0:51:280:51:32

-I don't believe it!

-Come on.

-95? £95, the gentleman standing.

0:51:320:51:36

-At £95 and I'm selling.

-One more!

-Last time...

0:51:360:51:39

Yes! I'm sorry.

0:51:390:51:41

LAUGHTER So we were a bit excited then?

0:51:410:51:45

Well, it's a galloping start for Deborah.

0:51:460:51:50

But can Theo really double his money

0:51:500:51:52

on the Spirit of Ecstasy?

0:51:520:51:55

The bids start me here at £60 on this one. 65. 70. 5.

0:51:550:52:00

80. 5. 90. 5. 100.

0:52:000:52:02

And 10 now. At £110.

0:52:020:52:05

120, new bidder. 130.

0:52:050:52:08

140. 150.

0:52:080:52:10

It's 150. Standing at £150

0:52:100:52:12

and I'm selling at £150 now, last time...

0:52:120:52:16

Well, who'd have thought it?

0:52:160:52:19

-Yes!

-Doubled money.

-Doubled our money.

0:52:200:52:23

Next, the wager cup and silver wall pocket.

0:52:230:52:27

This is the risky one.

0:52:270:52:29

The bids start me on this at £60.

0:52:290:52:32

-That's not good, is it?

-No.

0:52:320:52:34

£60 is bid. 65. 70. 5. 80.

0:52:340:52:38

5. 90. 5. 100.

0:52:380:52:40

And 10. 120. No, it's 120 nearer the door.

0:52:400:52:43

-Come on, a bit more.

-I'm selling at £120 for the last time...

0:52:430:52:49

That's a bit disappointing.

0:52:490:52:51

-But it could have been worse.

-It could have been worse.

0:52:510:52:54

Oh, dear. Oh, dear.

0:52:540:52:57

Next, the Art Deco bowl

0:52:570:53:00

and another test for the Theo game plan.

0:53:000:53:03

The bids start me here at £30.

0:53:030:53:06

£30. 35. 40.

0:53:060:53:08

45. 50.

0:53:080:53:10

55 now. At £55.

0:53:100:53:12

- At 55. I'm selling at £55... - Oh, come on!

0:53:120:53:16

-It's a profit.

-Yes, but hardly the double you wanted.

0:53:160:53:21

Still, it gives Theo a £45 lead.

0:53:210:53:25

Time for a fightback, Deborah, and it's down to the ostrich egg.

0:53:270:53:32

I'm bid £30 for this. £30.

0:53:320:53:35

35. 40. 45. 50.

0:53:350:53:37

-55 and I'm out.

-55. We paid 30.

-55 now.

0:53:370:53:41

To my right and I'm selling at 55. Any more?

0:53:410:53:44

It's 55. For the last time at £55... Thank you.

0:53:440:53:47

-You made a profit on that.

-Nearly doubled it - £25 profit.

0:53:470:53:51

But Mark, that's Theo's plan. Get your own!

0:53:510:53:55

Still ahead in the competition, the sword could deliver the fatal blow.

0:53:570:54:01

Oh, this could be bloody!

0:54:010:54:04

£80 starts me here.

0:54:040:54:06

£80 I have. 85. 90. 5. 100.

0:54:060:54:09

110 and I'm out. It's £110.

0:54:090:54:12

-I'm selling in the room at 110.

-More, more!

0:54:120:54:16

Are we done at £110...?

0:54:160:54:19

-Oh, Theo, sorry about that.

-We went down...

-Sorry about that.

0:54:190:54:24

A loss, by Jove, but only a flesh wound.

0:54:240:54:27

That puts the Dragons virtually neck and neck,

0:54:290:54:33

so can the controversial ivory book rest tip the scales for Deborah?

0:54:330:54:38

The bids start me here at £60 on this one. £60 is bid.

0:54:380:54:42

At £60...

0:54:420:54:44

65. 70. 75. 80.

0:54:440:54:47

85 now. To my right, I'm selling at £85.

0:54:470:54:50

At 85, the bid's in the room

0:54:500:54:52

and I'm selling at £85. Last time at 85...

0:54:520:54:56

-That's disappointing.

-What do you mean, it's disappointing?

0:54:560:54:59

-You paid 45 for it.

-It should have made more.

0:54:590:55:02

A profit catapulting Team Meaden into the lead!

0:55:020:55:07

The boys will need a prayer to get out of this one.

0:55:090:55:13

The book of A Midsummer Night's Dream

0:55:130:55:15

and also a nursery rhymes book. The bids start me here at £20.

0:55:150:55:20

-Illustrated by Rackham.

-And written by somebody called Shakespeare.

0:55:200:55:24

-I know.

-The less important part(!)

-Well, you know...

0:55:240:55:28

£20 I'm bid for it.

0:55:280:55:30

£20 I'm bid. £20 I have.

0:55:300:55:33

-It's on commission at 20.

-No, more!

0:55:330:55:36

At £20 and I'm selling if you're all done in the room? Last time, £20.

0:55:360:55:40

You see, you put them off, you put them off!

0:55:400:55:43

- That'll teach you. - That's a disaster.

0:55:430:55:46

Oh, disaster!

0:55:460:55:49

This Dragon's on his knees.

0:55:490:55:52

So can Deborah snatch victory

0:55:530:55:55

with her agricultural bits and pieces?

0:55:550:55:58

I'm bid £110.

0:55:580:56:00

120. 130. 140. 150.

0:56:000:56:03

160. 170. 180.

0:56:030:56:05

190. No, 190, lady's bid by the pillar.

0:56:050:56:09

Selling at £190... At 190.

0:56:090:56:12

200. 210.

0:56:120:56:14

-220.

-Yes!

0:56:140:56:16

-230.

-What?!

-Yes!

0:56:160:56:19

-One more!

-240...

0:56:190:56:21

No, lady's bid seated at £240 and I'm selling.

0:56:210:56:25

For the last time at 240... Thank you very much.

0:56:250:56:28

Deborah...

0:56:280:56:30

Hold the celebrations. Theo's got one more offer up his sleeve,

0:56:320:56:37

but he needs to make £166 to win.

0:56:370:56:40

I'm bid £20 on this. £20 I have.

0:56:410:56:45

-More, more!

-At £20, at £20. It's on commission.

0:56:450:56:48

An absentee bidder at £20 and I'm selling. Are you all done?

0:56:480:56:53

£20. For the last time then at £20...

0:56:530:56:55

Oh, no, it's a wash-out for Theo's plan,

0:56:570:57:00

but a victory for Deborah.

0:57:000:57:02

It was a jolly good effort, Mr Paphitis.

0:57:030:57:07

-If only you kept more money in your pocket.

-Congratulations, Deborah. Congratulations.

-Well done.

0:57:070:57:13

So both teams started today's road trip with a £400 budget.

0:57:150:57:21

After paying auction costs,

0:57:210:57:23

Theo and Thomas have lost £33.90,

0:57:230:57:26

giving them £366.10 at the finishing line.

0:57:260:57:31

Deborah and Mark had a late surge,

0:57:350:57:38

making a valuable £87.90 profit after auction costs,

0:57:380:57:43

crossing the finishing line with a winning £487.90.

0:57:430:57:48

Well done, everyone, and all the money our celebrities and experts raise will go to Children In Need.

0:57:520:57:58

Deborah, if I had to lose to somebody, I wish it wasn't you!

0:57:580:58:02

Theo, if I had to win to somebody, I'm so glad it was you!

0:58:020:58:07

-LAUGHTER

-Yes!

0:58:070:58:09

So another Antiques Road Trip draws to a close and our Dragons can return to their Den,

0:58:100:58:16

Deborah having vanquished her foe and Theo with this tail between his legs.

0:58:160:58:21

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

0:58:450:58:49

Email [email protected]

0:58:490:58:52

Deborah Meaden and Theo Paphitis go head-to-head scouring the West Country for antiques with their antiques experts Mark Stacey and Thomas Plant. They start in Honiton, Devon, and end up at an auction in Crewkerne, Somerset.


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