Episode 15 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 15

Journalists Bill Turnbull and Louise Minchin battle it out in the antique bargain hunt competition with the aid of experts Philip Serrell and David Barby.


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-Some of the nation's favourite celebrities.

-That's the pig for you.

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-One antiques expert each.

-Celebrities(!)

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-It's made of wood.

-And one big challenge -

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who can seek out and buy the best antiques at the very best prices?

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-See? I'm worth £5.

-Nice to know!

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-And auction for a big profit further down the road.

-Oh!

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-Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

-It goes with your eyes.

-Does it?

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And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?!"

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Tonight's Celebrity Antiques Road Trippers usually keep us company while we crunch on our cornflakes.

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Taking a break from the BBC Breakfast couch, it's Bill Turnbull and Louise Minchin...

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Here we go! Ho ho!

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..currently roaring towards their challenge in this beautiful Triumph TR5.

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-So, antiques, eh?

-My mum used to sell antiques.

-Did she?

-Yes.

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-You'll have picked up a lot from her.

-What about you?

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I can't do antiques. Can you really see me picking out little treasures?

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Well, he might not "do" antiques, but he does do the news and really rather well.

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Good morning. This is Breakfast with Louise Minchin and Bill Turnbull.

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Bill's been with the BBC for over 25 years.

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So, Professor, I hope you are here ready to rap

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or you might have to do a tap... dance. On your head. Instead. 'Nuff said?

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And when he's not battling rappers, Bill is busy keeping bees.

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Whenever I get taken in to an antiques shop, as I am occasionally,

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there's an automatic egg timer going in my head thinking,

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"The oxygen will run out in about 45 seconds."

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And Bill's competition on the Road Trip is his co-presenter, lovely Louise Minchin.

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It's six o'clock. We've been here for 24 hours, but we're fine.

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Covering all the main news stories of the last decade,

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Louise has also found time to race across Mongolia with Bill.

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The actual route is approximately 10,000 miles.

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And present the award-winning Real Rescues.

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-What are you going to buy? Furniture?

-I mustn't discuss too much strategy with you.

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-We are competing against each other.

-You've just noticed that?

-You've been milking me for secrets!

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While the competitive spirit kicks in early with our celebrities,

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let's see which experts will be lending them a hand.

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News just in - it's Philip Serrell and David Barby, currently enjoying the delights

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of British summertime in a car that is a firm favourite among our experts - the Citroen 2CV.

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-#

-There's a bright golden haze on the meadow...

-#

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This is what I really like about the English summer, really. Clouds, not a bit of blue sky,

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puddles all over the road and you as a travelling companion.

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In another lifetime, Philip Serrell was a PE teacher before leaving it all behind to become an auctioneer.

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-You are very nervous, aren't you?

-Yes. I hate feeling insecure.

-You must have had a lifetime of it.

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An early starter, David Barby entered the world of antiques from school

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and became one of the youngest people to qualify as an auctioneer...

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-Oh...

-Have we done well?

-..at just 21.

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-The proximity factor is getting to me a bit.

-Yes, I think so.

-I haven't been this close to you

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and I must say I've been happy with that.

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Drawing on expert advice and testing their powers of negotiation,

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Louise and Bill have £400 each, two days of shopping, one auction and a lot to learn - fast!

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-What kind of expert do you hope for?

-Someone who knows what they're doing.

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I think they ARE called experts.

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I feel as though I know them because they start at such an unbelievably early hour.

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-Have you got any preference?

-Somebody with a sense of humour.

-Yes, they'll need that with us.

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-She was born in Hong Kong, I think.

-How do you know that? You haven't been stalking again?

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I told you to watch doing that. You'll get into a lot of trouble.

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So as our esteemed experts make their way to meet their celebrities, let's look at the journey ahead.

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We're kicking off this Road Trip in Altrincham in Greater Manchester.

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We'll be popping into Cheshire before heading south

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for an auction showdown in Bridgnorth, Shropshire.

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Our first stop is just eight miles south-west of Manchester city centre in the lively town of Altrincham.

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Established as a market town in 1290, this delightful place was once a centre for industry.

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-Oh, hang on. I can't get out.

-Hello!

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-Philip.

-Nice to meet you.

-Hello, Louise. Hello, Bill.

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I've got a hugely wet bottom! Does it look like I wet myself? I haven't felt that since I was 3!

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When you get to my age, it happens!

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OK, enough talk about wet bottoms. It's time to pair up our experts with their celebrities.

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-Just come with me.

-OK, all right. Deal.

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I bet you say that to all the girls, don't you?

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Well, now that's sorted, it's time to start shopping.

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-Do you think Louise will really focus?

-Her mother used to sell antiques.

-Hold on! You what?!

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I know, I know. This is what we're up against here. And she's intensely competitive.

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Here's our first shop.

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Is that when you say, "How much is that doggie in the window?"?

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-Hello, little 'un.

-She's called Pandora.

-Hello. I'm Bill.

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-Val. Val Martin.

-Val, Philip.

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Now that they've met Val and Pandora, it's time for Bill and Phil to get down to business

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-and see what delights Porcupine Antiques has to offer them.

-I really like chandeliers.

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-I like these the best, which is that sort of style.

-#

-There may be trouble ahead...

-#

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-You want to buy lighting or chandelier?

-Chandelier.

-Why?

-I love them. They're beautiful.

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-They twinkle so beautifully.

-William...

-There's romance and style and elegance. Isn't there, Val?

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-Undoubtedly.

-Val, what is the price range we're talking here?

-About 500.

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-Thank you! Thank you, thank you.

-'30s and '40s.

-What a pity(!)

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-Show me a £500 chandelier.

-That one.

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-That's a nice one. How much is this?

-800.

-Why is it more expensive?

-It cost me more!

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I'm sold on this chandelier thing.

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-Look at him!

-Has anybody got my headache tablets?

-Shop number one and we've parted company!

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While the boys are divided over chandeliers, Louise and David are heading further into Manchester

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-to the suburb of Levenshulme.

-Now are you good at negotiating?

-Absolutely rubbish!

-Really?

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-Rubbish!

-What happens on holiday and you're at a market? Do you negotiate then or just hand it over?

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-I'd probably rather not buy.

-Oh...

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-We've got to buy today, though.

-Yes.

-Can you help me?

-Of course.

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-Basically, if we aim to buy things which are somewhat novel, might have a rarity value...

-OK.

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Might have a sort of worth as regards the metal, silver or gold.

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-I do love silver.

-Excellent.

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Well, let's hope there is plenty of silver at the Antiques Village.

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With over 20 antiques specialist shops spread over three floors of this old town hall,

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-there's a lot of ground to cover.

-I suggest we have a quick scan.

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-Do I go for my shopping like I do when I go into a clothes shop? I shop very quickly.

-Yes.

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-OK! Let's go.

-Start in here.

-Fantastic.

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-I can basically scan all the way round very quickly and say there is nothing in here. Agree?

-I agree.

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-OK, let's move on. ..I can't see anything here. Let's move on.

-You're brilliant at this!

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This is my kind of shopping.

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-This looks interesting.

-These are rather lovely.

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-Finally, something's caught their eye.

-Does this work?

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-What's your very best?

-My very best is 75.

-Ooh! He's got it on for 65.

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-My very best is about...20.

-Oh, behave!

-This from the woman who claimed she can't negotiate.

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Are you trying to kill me? My God. 45.

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OK, we'll come back to that. ..I didn't know I could do that! I lost £20 off the price in one go.

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-I literally can't believe I did that.

-Just shows how good you are.

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As Louise and David head off to explore another floor, Bill's still chasing his chandelier dream.

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£500. That is surely not your best price, though, is it, Val?

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-Shush! Shush!

-It's the indigestion!

-Stop it! I'm trying here.

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-£200.

-Are you joking?

-No.

-I know you're not, but the answer is no.

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-Honestly and truly, no chance.

-150.

-Is he always like this?

-He's only just met me.

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One legal issue is any electrical goods at auction have to be tested. Or they cut the flex off it.

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So if the electricity's a problem, how about...? This is a real sort of gas light.

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-A paraffin lamp.

-Paraffin.

-And that would be what? 1870? 1880? This is the chimney.

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And then this is the reservoir. This would contain paraffin.

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That's the wick. Hence the expression, "Gets on your wick." What's lovely about this is

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that it's all complete. And that's just a really nice thing.

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-Is the base original to the bowl?

-Yes.

-I bet that would be all of 40 quid, wouldn't it?

-Ah!

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-Val, how much is it?

-80.

-Trouble is, this old stuff doesn't make money.

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-Now let's...

-I'm not going down to 50.

-I haven't said a word.

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-Have I said anything?

-Look at him!

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Yes! Because it's you two, I'll let it go for 60.

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-I don't think we'd make a profit. I think we would at 40.

-Look at the colour of his money.

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-Lovely. This is...

-No.

-Have you seen how wonderful the Queen looks on these notes?

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She looked better on the Jubilee.

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-Didn't she?

-Did you do commentary on that?

-I didn't.

-Keep her talking!

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I'm not sure you'll get that lamp past Security, Phil.

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It's on its way out of the shop. Here's the money. We're so nearly there, Val.

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£40. We love you. Go on!

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-Sold!

-You're an angel.

-Thank you.

-He's cold as well!

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-You are wonderful.

-You're a pain in the butt!

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Kisses for the dog?

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With the boys bagging their first lot for auction,

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it's time to check on Louise's hidden haggling talents.

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That Humpty Dumpty teapot. It's quite fun. And it's quirky.

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He's sort of screaming.

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To the rest of the world, the British obsession with tea seems bizarre,

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but our love affair with it has produced a whole range of interesting collectables,

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-none more so than the novelty teapot.

-What price range would you have to pay for that?

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-Oh, that one. A Sadler one. That's probably 1920s. I could do you that for £40.

-40?!

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-I think it's got to be half that.

-Half that?

-15.

-You're a hard man.

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Well, Louise has mentioned £15.

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Eh? I thought you'd have to resuscitate me, then! £20, then.

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-I'll meet you halfway. I've got to make a profit.

-Halfway would be 18.

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-Look at me. 18...18...18...

-Buy us a cup of tea afterwards and you can have it for 18 quid.

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When I look at it, it makes me smile. The only thing I want to check is the lid.

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-And the spout.

-As far as I know, it's OK. We haven't had any accidents like Humpty Dumpty!

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-There's a big bit there. It's chipped.

-Where?

-There.

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-You've got better eyesight than I have!

-Yeah, it's chipped.

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-What about £15, then?

-Let's see if there's something to combine with it.

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As they hunt for all the king's horses and all the king's men,

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-Louise and David have stumbled upon something else.

-So this is where you put the flowers in.

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-It goes into here.

-If you look at the bottom, you can see the wear.

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-It's been around a long time! Since the 1930s.

-I like it.

-It's geometric. There's the faceting.

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If you took the centre out and filled it with lemons or tangerines, it would look devastating.

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-I'm learning loads!

-And my charges are very reasonable.

-I'm sure!

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-So we go for this and the teapot?

-Yep. Special price. £30?

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-£30 for the two, that's fine.

-28 with a cup of tea.

-£30.

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-29 with a cup of tea?

-No, no.

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-She's trying so hard, she really is.

-I know. Very trying.

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So Louise and David have their first lot for auction - the glass flower bowl

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and the chipped Humpty Dumpty teapot. Let's hope they haven't set themselves up for a great fall.

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Back on the road with the boys and Bill gets his excuses in early.

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I know nothing about antiques. News I can do. That's my thing.

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-You deal with items of value. That's how you make your living.

-So you've dropped the whole lot on me.

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-I drive and make the mistakes. You dig us out.

-Thanks, Bill. That's going to work really well.

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The boys are heading 18 miles west to the picturesque town of Frodsham in the county of Cheshire.

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Famous faces from Frodsham include Daniel "007" Craig, Gary Barlow

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and, um, Bob Carolgees.

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Bill and Phil are hoping to find some lots for the auctioneer

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at Lady Heyes Craft and Antiques Centre, where there are over 40 antiques dealers.

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Bill makes me laugh. He does need reining in a bit.

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His enthusiasm sometimes gets away.

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-Phil?

-Oh, look, he's off again.

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What I've really got to try to do is just keep him well away from...

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And...

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And...

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Well, you might be in luck, Phil.

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He's got his hands on something and it's not a chandelier. Wow!

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Look, look, look. No, you come here. Phil!

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Come here. History. Fitzroy MacLean. Do you know who Fitzroy MacLean was?

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-No.

-No.

-Very well known figure from World War Two and beyond. What do you think?

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I think it's worth a pound.

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-Phil? How much is that?

-Uh-oh. Bill's spied the you-know-whats.

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-The mini chandeliers.

-No...

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Why not? They're lovely. Mrs Turnbull loves chandeliers.

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-Oh, lord...

-Look at this one! It's 40 quid.

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OK, let's go.

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-Where are we going?

-Let's go... No, this one. I hate indecision.

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Moving on from the chandeliers...

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-My wife loves blue and white dishes.

-But your wife loves...

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-Chandeliers. And blue and white dishes.

-I've got to rein you in.

-Right, Phil. You rein him in.

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-I can trust you?

-To do what?

-Not to buy anything.

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-Do you know why I can trust you?

-Because you've got the money.

-Right.

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-History. That's history.

-I know.

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The one thing that we really ought to try and stay away from is furniture.

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-Why?

-Cos furniture is not going to be in our part of the auction.

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-OK, so no furniture.

-Whatever we do, no furniture.

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OK, so that's agreed. No furniture.

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I like this. A pitch pine pew.

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Pitch pine is typified by these dark strands here and there.

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-These would have been a lot longer.

-Yes.

-They cut them in half to be usable.

-So it's been altered?

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-Yeah, well you can see there.

-Well, doesn't that normally reduce the value?

-It does,

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but it makes them usable. Is there a lot of movement in these?

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-What sort of price are you looking at?

-You've got 180 quid on it.

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-It is...was 1850, Phil.

-We couldn't countenance buying that for any more than 60 quid.

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-I could knock 90 off it.

-How much is that in proper money?

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-That would leave it at £90.

-£90 off that is 60 quid, isn't it?

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-Yeah!

-Is it?

-Isn't it?

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-Can we think about it?

-Certainly.

-Let's sow that seed. Sow the seed.

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-We shouldn't buy...

-Furniture!

-But life's a gamble.

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Well, I think the boys might just need some divine intervention with this decision.

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-Dearly beloved, we're gathered here today...

-To work out whether we want to pay 60 quid for this.

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-Are you getting any feelings yet?

-If I sit here, I'll lose all feeling!

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I just... It doesn't seem right to spend all that money on something that's not the real deal.

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It's not a proper antique. It's been messed about.

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-What are we going to do?

-Maybe we should buy the pew.

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-Louise, can I ask you to do us a real favour?

-No problem.

-Can you put it by for us?

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-I'm not putting my phone number on it!

-OK. I like that.

0:18:350:18:39

Thank you very much. I think that's a good result.

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So with the pew reserved for 24 hours, it's time for a celebratory sing-song.

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# I remember you-ou

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-#

-You're the one who made...

-Who broke my heart in two... #

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-"Made my dream come true," isn't it?

-# I don't know! #

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-Just don't give up your day jobs.

-I really enjoyed the shopping.

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I thought it was going to be - no offence - a bit boring!

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-Ha! Thank you(!)

-No, but I just liked the way you approach it - go in, have a quick look, focus.

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Louise and David have had enough antique buying for the day, even though they only bought one lot.

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They're heading to the Victoria Baths in Chorlton, Manchester.

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-"Manchester's water palace".

-Oh, how wonderful!

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Built in 1906, when indoor bathrooms were still very rare,

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these public baths were a practical necessity as well as a luxury.

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Used initially for washing, not swimming, they were a central part of the community

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until closure in 1993.

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What a superb building, isn't it?

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Showing Louise and David around is Building Officer Neil Bonner.

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-Hello. How do you do? I'm Louise.

-Welcome to Victoria Baths.

-David Barby.

-Hello.

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Neil has been involved in the campaign to save Victoria Baths for almost 15 years.

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The baths were built with three distinct sections. First Class Males, Second Class Males

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and a third pool for Females.

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Each class of users had their own entrance, swimming pool and wash baths.

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-This is the Second Class pool. This has been floored over.

-Right.

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And made into a sports hall.

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-Very different from when I swam in it.

-You actually learned to swim right here.

-That's right, in 1961.

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I got my 25-yard lengths certificate.

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Wonderful.

0:20:420:20:44

Thanks to years of campaigning and work by the Friends of Victoria Baths and Victoria Baths Trust,

0:20:440:20:51

the building has been partially restored to its former glory.

0:20:510:20:54

-This is the First Class Males.

-First Class Males and Second Class Males. What's the difference?

0:20:540:21:02

-If you got a bit more in your wage packet that week, you could be a First Class Male...

-For a week.

0:21:020:21:08

The difference was in the bathrooms as well.

0:21:080:21:11

The First Class Males' had taps on so they could turn the water on and fill it as often as they wanted.

0:21:110:21:18

-Right. What about Second Class?

-Second Class Males had to shout

0:21:180:21:23

and say, "More water, please, for Number Three!"

0:21:230:21:27

And they'd come along and turn the water on and fill it up.

0:21:270:21:31

If you asked too many times, they'd turn on the cold water and that used to get you out!

0:21:310:21:37

They used to come for their weekly bath and then used to go out on the town afterwards,

0:21:370:21:43

after being dolled up and cleaned for a change.

0:21:430:21:47

There has been over £5 million spent on the restoration of Victoria Baths so far.

0:21:470:21:53

The hope is to restore the building fully and to bring at least one of the swimming pools back into use.

0:21:530:22:00

So this is the female pool.

0:22:010:22:03

Before chlorination, they used to empty the whole pool at once.

0:22:030:22:08

The First Class Males got fresh well water, then after three days

0:22:080:22:12

it went back to the tanks, was aerated, filtered and heated and went into the Second Class Males

0:22:120:22:18

and then after three days it went back to the tanks and then back into the Females.

0:22:180:22:24

That's appalling!

0:22:240:22:26

-So the females got third-hand water.

-Oh, no! That's disgusting!

0:22:260:22:31

-But after all the circulation...

-Did they know?

-Yes, they did.

0:22:310:22:36

It's not only the surroundings that have been saved.

0:22:360:22:40

Victoria Baths is also home to photographs and objects from its past, including this old swimwear.

0:22:400:22:46

What do you think?

0:22:470:22:50

-Oh, look at this little number!

-Just your colour, dearie.

0:22:500:22:55

-That's about 1930s, isn't it?

-Oh, my goodness. That is just really beautiful.

0:22:550:23:01

It's got wires and everything. You wouldn't want to wear that in a pool. It'd ruin it.

0:23:010:23:07

-Now this looks kind of a bit more familiar to me.

-I'd think that's 1950s, wouldn't you?

0:23:070:23:13

-So something maybe my granny might have worn, do you think?

-Yes.

0:23:130:23:17

My mother... would have worn that!

0:23:170:23:21

And on that note, it's time to say goodbye.

0:23:210:23:24

-It's been the most wonderful experience.

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

0:23:240:23:30

As the sun sets on day one of our Road Trip, for Louise and David it's all gone rather swimmingly.

0:23:300:23:37

And it's time for both teams to find a place to lay their weary heads. Night night.

0:23:380:23:45

As a new day dawns on our Celebrity Road Trip,

0:23:480:23:52

Bill and Louise are slightly distracted from antique buying.

0:23:520:23:56

What's that big bright thing in the sky getting in my eyes?

0:23:560:24:01

-How's it going?

-David is brilliant. He does my style of shopping.

0:24:010:24:05

-You go into a shop...

-Yeah.

-..and you just go zzzzzzzp! "I like that one!"

0:24:050:24:10

Louise is absolutely charming. She is delightful.

0:24:100:24:15

-She's so decisive and she knows her own mind.

-Yeah.

0:24:150:24:18

Did many people think it was a young girl out with her father?

0:24:180:24:23

-Is that the same for you?

-No! I say I like something and I get harrumphing and frowning.

0:24:240:24:30

All that sort of thing. There's a deep respect and affection growing between us.

0:24:300:24:35

He just has to be very patient.

0:24:350:24:38

But Bill is mad keen. If it's blue on white or a chandelier, he's in heaven.

0:24:380:24:44

In an ideal world, if it was a blue and white chandelier, that would be the ultimate to him.

0:24:440:24:50

David, the trouble is, I reckon, that he's got a soft heart.

0:24:500:24:54

-Has he?

-Yeah.

-Oh, right. Maybe he can take it out and lend it to Phil for a while!

0:24:540:25:01

So far, both teams have barely touched their original £400 stake.

0:25:050:25:09

Phil and Bill parted with £40 on one auction lot - the Art Nouveau glass oil lamp.

0:25:090:25:15

And despite deciding not to buy furniture, they put a reserve on a refurbished pine church pew.

0:25:150:25:21

-It's just an excuse for your phone number!

-I'm not putting it on it!

0:25:210:25:25

As for Louise and David, they spent even less than their competitors - just £30 for one auction lot,

0:25:260:25:33

the 1930s glass flower bowl and the novelty Humpty Dumpty teapot,

0:25:330:25:38

leaving them with a whopping £370 still to spend.

0:25:380:25:43

-She's trying so hard, she really is.

-I know, she's very trying.

0:25:430:25:48

Back on the road and with money burning a hole in their pockets,

0:25:480:25:52

both our teams are heading to East Cheshire to an antiques fair in the lovely village of Mobberley.

0:25:520:25:58

Oh, hello!

0:26:000:26:01

The Mobberley Village Antiques Fair takes place once a month in the Victory Hall

0:26:010:26:07

with over 20 stallholders, so there should be plenty for our teams to splash their cash on.

0:26:070:26:12

-Ah, how are you?

-Dear me.

0:26:120:26:15

-Shall we go shopping?

-Yes.

-Let's have a look.

0:26:150:26:19

With both teams diving straight in, this competition is heating up.

0:26:190:26:23

-Phil? I've got something that might come in handy for you.

-Excuse me.

0:26:230:26:28

Oh, Bill's spotted something. Surprise, surprise - it's blue and white.

0:26:280:26:33

-Not a chandelier, please.

-It's not. It IS blue and white.

0:26:330:26:37

-But even you can find a use for this.

-You know what the problem is?

-What?

-There's no saucer.

0:26:370:26:43

What do you think, though? It's unusual.

0:26:430:26:46

-I'll tell you what I really think. You won't be satisfied until we get a piece of blue and white.

-No.

0:26:460:26:52

-It's a gazunder, or chamber pot. Goes under the bed.

-Oh, I see.

0:26:520:26:57

The gazunder is probably more popular as a plant pot in today's homes.

0:26:570:27:02

-This is...

-It's got a nice design on it.

-Yeah, like a blue dragon

0:27:020:27:07

-almost aping the Chinese of 200 years earlier.

-But more modern.

0:27:070:27:12

-It's what the price might be. The lady here is slightly camera-shy.

-Well, it's £28.

0:27:120:27:17

If we could get it to perhaps... £12 or £15?

0:27:170:27:21

-Oh, look at that look. That wince.

-You've hurt her!

0:27:210:27:25

Cut to the quick. £15? If you could do that, it'd be fantastic.

0:27:250:27:29

-£15?

-You're an angel.

-There we are.

0:27:290:27:33

The boys have bought their second lot. £15 on the chamber pot and it's blue and white, Bill!

0:27:330:27:39

-I saw you! You just bought something.

-I might have.

-What was it?

-It was a little nothing.

0:27:390:27:46

Look out. Eagle-eyed Minchin is about.

0:27:460:27:49

Oh, turn around. That is nice.

0:27:490:27:52

-Silver mounted.

-That's pretty.

0:27:520:27:55

You've got trailed, looped glass. That's quite unusual.

0:27:550:27:59

-I like that.

-You do? 48. What's the very best you can do on that, sir?

0:27:590:28:04

-30.

-30.

0:28:040:28:06

-The Birmingham frame.

-I love silver frames. When I was little, my mum used to buy these

0:28:070:28:13

-and buy really damaged ones. I used to try to restore them for her and make the backs.

-Oh, right.

0:28:130:28:19

-And what's your best on the frame?

-Are we buying two items or one?

-We might buy two.

0:28:190:28:24

-I'd like to see the two for 50.

-I'll do the two for 60.

0:28:240:28:28

-Would you split the difference at 55?

-It's my lucky number.

0:28:280:28:33

-I suppose so, seeing it's you.

-See? I'm worth £5!

-That's nice to know, isn't it?

0:28:330:28:39

-OK, we'll have those, thank you.

-Finally, a purchase for Louise and David.

0:28:390:28:44

And silver, too, giving them their second lot for auction.

0:28:440:28:49

-Don't you like this?

-Yeah, I do.

0:28:490:28:51

Back with the boys and a different sort of frame's caught their attention.

0:28:510:28:56

I've got at home a section of a quilt done by my grandmother.

0:28:560:29:01

-Really?

-She was of Swedish heritage, born in Wisconsin. She made a quilt for the family.

0:29:010:29:06

-I like that, quilting.

-Can we have a look at it?

0:29:060:29:10

-This seller is popular today.

-It says here 1880s textile panel

0:29:100:29:16

-in an early-19th-century maple frame.

-I'm not sure it's maple, actually.

0:29:160:29:21

I think that might be yew wood. Yew wood is scarce. If you think about it, there's an obvious reason.

0:29:210:29:28

It goes back to the Agricultural Holdings Act. Yew trees weren't planted everywhere.

0:29:280:29:33

The berries are poisonous to cattle so the only place you find yew trees is churchyards or country gardens.

0:29:330:29:39

And because yew takes such a long time to reach maturity, compared to ash or chestnut or whatever,

0:29:390:29:45

it's a rare timber and it commands a premium.

0:29:450:29:49

-So I am hoping that might be yew wood.

-You would, wouldn't you?

-I just love yew.

0:29:490:29:55

-So it's worth more money.

-Well, the issue is that.

0:29:550:30:00

-Damaged.

-That's the real issue. What's the best you can do?

-The very best is 65.

0:30:000:30:05

-BILL MUMBLES

-I thought he said 55.

-55.

0:30:050:30:08

-55?

-We'll split it in the middle. 60.

-60.

-Do you like it?

-I do.

0:30:080:30:13

News just in, then - Bill Turnbull likes something that isn't blue and white.

0:30:130:30:19

-I think that's a gamble, but I would love to own it.

-Let's do it.

-Excellent. £60.

0:30:190:30:26

Thank you very much indeed.

0:30:260:30:29

So while the boys take a gamble on the frame, Louise is sniffing out more silver.

0:30:290:30:34

-Oh, silver!

-Right. We're just looking at that propelling pencil.

0:30:340:30:40

-It's rather nice, isn't it? Do you like that?

-I said I like chunky things, but that's delicate.

0:30:400:30:46

-And something else delicate has caught the girl's eye.

-It's quirky.

0:30:460:30:51

-Quirky colour, yeah. It could either be for ladies...

-For ladies?

0:30:510:30:55

Or for gentlemen. And you took that...

0:30:550:30:59

And you thread it through. For those high-necked blouses.

0:30:590:31:04

We're just contemplating possibly buying the two. This one is interesting. It's not hallmarked.

0:31:040:31:10

That really knocks the value.

0:31:100:31:13

I was hoping that we could negotiate probably round about... What? 40?

0:31:130:31:20

-Yeah, maximum.

-40 for those. And I'd like to see that around 38, so we're looking at 78,

0:31:200:31:26

Oh.

0:31:260:31:27

Eighty.

0:31:270:31:30

-I'm still thinking in terms of 78.

-OK.

-78.

0:31:300:31:35

-78.

-Louise, would you like to shake the lady's hand?

-Thank you.

0:31:350:31:39

And one for luck.

0:31:390:31:41

And luck might just be on their side.

0:31:410:31:46

-Go on, tell me. You think they're a bit more special.

-I think they're citrine, a semi-precious stone.

0:31:460:31:52

-Oh, really?

-With a gold stud. A little bit better than we thought.

0:31:520:31:57

Oh, I love working with you. I want to show you something you might hate.

0:31:570:32:02

Oh.

0:32:040:32:05

Oh, the disappointment!

0:32:050:32:08

-What would you do with it?

-Is that even an antique?

-The most dreadful colour imaginable!

0:32:080:32:14

It's got a lot of scrapes and scratches. The thing I like about it is it's typical 19th-century glass

0:32:140:32:21

and the technique of the glassmakers at that time. Probably Stourbridge.

0:32:210:32:26

-Right.

-To create that crimpled edge and then apply that looped handle

0:32:260:32:31

-when the metal - we call glass metal - was still molten.

-You're talking yourself into it!

0:32:310:32:37

I'm just talking about techniques!

0:32:370:32:39

I sort of love that you hate it.

0:32:390:32:42

While Louise tries to convince David about the glass bowl,

0:32:420:32:46

the boys are... having a tea break.

0:32:460:32:50

How do you think they're getting on? Have they bought anything?

0:32:500:32:54

The thing about Louise is she's always very confident.

0:32:540:32:58

That's funny. She said exactly the same thing about you!

0:32:580:33:01

Right. So I think we need to make a decision on the old pine pew.

0:33:010:33:05

-60 quid, that's cheap.

-Given the pressure that we're coming under, we should probably go ahead.

0:33:050:33:11

-I'll phone her up and see what she'll do.

-With Bill and Phil decided on the pine pew,

0:33:110:33:17

Louise is still trying to talk David into buying that glass bowl. Pass the sick bag.

0:33:170:33:23

-I love it.

-You want it?

-It's really quirky and funky and crazy.

0:33:230:33:27

How much for this?

0:33:270:33:29

-28.

-I'd like it for less, see.

0:33:290:33:32

-26.

-Oh, there you go. It's lovely to meet you.

-Cheers.

0:33:320:33:36

-Thank you.

-So as Louise and David buy another lot for auction,

0:33:360:33:41

let's hope Bill and Phil haven't left it too late for the pine pew.

0:33:410:33:46

-Did you get my voicemail?

-I did.

-And was £60 OK?

0:33:460:33:49

-That's OK, yes.

-That's fantastic.

0:33:490:33:52

# Hallelujah! #

0:33:520:33:54

-If we can get someone to pick it up.

-We'll meet you halfway with it.

-What - £30?!

0:33:540:33:59

-No, not the price, you monkeys!

-Sorry!

0:33:590:34:04

-Thank you ever so much.

-Thank you!

0:34:060:34:09

Bye-bye.

0:34:090:34:11

After securing the deal on the pine pew, Bill and Phil have four lots for auction and £225 still to spend.

0:34:110:34:18

-Yeah, yeah.

-Have you finished shopping?

-You can never finish.

0:34:210:34:26

-That's right.

-How much have you spent in here?

-Too much, really.

0:34:260:34:30

-That last book... Oh.

-I know. And that chandelier was really expensive, but gorgeous.

0:34:300:34:36

-Was it a blue and white one?

-Time to hit the road and time for the boys to change tactics.

0:34:360:34:43

I think for it to be a proper test I have to do the next negotiation on my own.

0:34:430:34:48

-You can mutter, you can roll your eyeballs a bit.

-Yeah.

0:34:480:34:52

You can quiver a little bit. All that sort of thing, bur you've got to let me do it

0:34:520:34:59

or I won't have learnt properly from you as a master unless I am tested.

0:34:590:35:04

# Everybody was kung fu fighting Deedle-eedle-ee-dee-de-de-de... #

0:35:040:35:10

On that note, Bill and Phil are moving not fast as lightning,

0:35:100:35:14

but within the legal speed limit eastwards for a full 10 miles to the town of Macclesfield.

0:35:140:35:21

-I'm in charge now.

-I'll ask you questions.

-Yes.

0:35:230:35:27

And with the boys swapping roles, let's hope Hidden Gems Antique Shop has plenty for Bill

0:35:270:35:33

-to cast his expert eye over.

-Hello. This is Phil.

0:35:330:35:37

I'm Bill. Let's have a look and see here.

0:35:370:35:41

-Straight away, he's in there.

-This is an interesting piece.

0:35:410:35:45

What timber is it made of?

0:35:450:35:48

-It's made of wood.

-I quite like that, Bill.

0:35:480:35:51

Well, that is... It's a wardrobe. Really useful.

0:35:510:35:54

You hang things in there. There's a drawer down there. And you can put suitcases on top.

0:35:540:36:01

-You're picking this up, honestly.

-Oh, he knows his stuff.

0:36:010:36:05

-Andrew, anything you'd particularly like rid of?

-I've got that charming gentleman over there.

0:36:050:36:11

-The charming gentleman.

-He could be a fiver.

-Six quid too much!

0:36:110:36:15

-It has a certain negative quality I find attractive.

-Really?

-No.

0:36:150:36:20

-I think we'll leave that one.

-Are you sure?

-Very kind, but no.

0:36:200:36:24

-Probably a wise move, Bill.

-I do rather like that piece.

-You do?

-I do.

0:36:240:36:30

You put your umbrellas and walking sticks in there and when you have a party, you can roll it out!

0:36:300:36:36

-Roll out the barrel!

-You really are scraping it now.

-Scraping the bottom of it.

0:36:360:36:42

-What do you think that might be worth?

-There's what it's worth and what we'd pay for it. A fiver.

0:36:420:36:49

-A fiver?

-Yes.

0:36:490:36:51

I'll take 15.

0:36:510:36:53

Andrew, meet you halfway. A tenner. Five, fifteen - £10.

0:36:530:36:58

-Fair dos.

-£10?

-£10 and it's...

-OK.

0:36:580:37:01

-Well done.

-As it's you.

-As it's me, thank you very much.

0:37:010:37:05

-Thank you.

-Deal.

0:37:050:37:07

-You're a star. You can come with me again.

-I don't think so.

-Well done, you.

0:37:070:37:13

Bravo, Bill, for bagging the barrel for a bargain £10, but he's not finished yet.

0:37:130:37:18

With Phil outside and Bill left to his own devices, what's the worst that could happen?

0:37:180:37:24

-See our friend over there? I think he needs a good home.

-Definitely.

0:37:250:37:29

Definitely worth every penny.

0:37:290:37:32

Oh, no. He's bought that ghastly figurine!

0:37:320:37:37

Down the road in the town of Knutsford, Louise and David check out Knutsford Antiques Centre.

0:37:370:37:43

-Hello. Louise.

-My name's Gordon.

-Nice to meet you.

-I'm the manager.

0:37:430:37:48

-And it's not long before they stumble upon something.

-Look at the bottom.

0:37:480:37:53

A little character underneath. "Keep me clean and use me well

0:37:530:37:57

"And what I see I will not tell."

0:37:570:38:00

That really is lovely, isn't it? It's pearlware, but there's a crack down there. Can you see that?

0:38:000:38:06

-And this is...

-Restored. You can feel it.

0:38:060:38:09

Common in the days of the outside loo, a chamber pot would save a trek in the middle of the night.

0:38:090:38:16

Pots like this one made very popular wedding gifts.

0:38:160:38:21

"Dear lovely Wife pray rise and..." What?!

0:38:210:38:25

I don't think Mrs W would approve of that.

0:38:250:38:30

We're looking at something in the region of about 1810.

0:38:300:38:34

But it's been dropped and completely smashed.

0:38:340:38:38

-Does it matter that it's that damaged?

-A perfect one would probably be about 800.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:38:380:38:44

-It's risky.

-It's got to be under 100.

-I'd get it for under 100!

0:38:440:38:50

Someone's confident, eh? The price on the tag is £180.

0:38:510:38:55

-Let's hope the dealer is in a generous mood.

-Just hold on a moment.

0:38:550:39:00

-There you go.

-It's Louise Minchin here.

0:39:000:39:04

We're looking at this Victorian pot. Basically, we'd like to know what price you can do it for.

0:39:040:39:10

That's what's worrying us, that it's broken. Hold on.

0:39:100:39:13

He says he paid 120 and he could sell it for 120.

0:39:130:39:18

-I still think, because of the damage, it's a little bit expensive.

-I'll put you over to David.

0:39:180:39:24

Hello! You wouldn't let it go, if we split the difference, for 100?

0:39:250:39:30

-You'd be prepared to accept £100? All right. I'll put you on to Gordon.

-180 to 100.

0:39:300:39:37

We're tough, aren't we?

0:39:370:39:39

So after successful negotiations, Louise and David have secured a 19th-century chamber pot for £100.

0:39:390:39:45

Now that's taking the urine.

0:39:450:39:48

This is a huge, huge risk.

0:39:480:39:50

Huge risk!

0:39:500:39:52

It's a risky business.

0:39:520:39:55

With six lots in total for the auction, Louise and David call it a day on their antique buying.

0:39:550:40:02

A treat lies ahead for Bill and Phil. They're making their way to Atcham in Shrewsbury

0:40:020:40:07

to indulge in one of Bill's passions - bee keeping.

0:40:070:40:11

You have a level of expertise in an area not known to many people.

0:40:120:40:17

-Expertise is putting it very strongly.

-Expertise.

0:40:170:40:22

Bill's kept his own bees for over 10 years and has even published a book on the subject.

0:40:220:40:28

Today they're at Attingham Park to meet Brian Goodwin, President of the Shropshire Beekeepers Association.

0:40:280:40:36

-Hello, Brian. This is Phil.

-Brian. Lovely to see you.

0:40:360:40:39

Historically, bees have been of interest to man for over 5,000 years, mainly for their honey.

0:40:390:40:46

Humans have eaten it, bathed in it, fixed their wounds with it and traded in it

0:40:460:40:54

since history was recorded.

0:40:540:40:57

-Well, this is a marvellous-looking little building they've got here.

-It's quite attractive, really.

0:40:570:41:03

It's a bee house and it's built to house straw baskets, which in fact need protection from the rain.

0:41:030:41:10

This 19th-century Regency bee house is one of only two in the country.

0:41:100:41:16

Before wooden-framed hives, many British bee keepers used these straw woven skeps.

0:41:180:41:25

In contrast to the 18th and 19th-century hives,

0:41:250:41:29

we're now using a modern, moveable-frame hive

0:41:290:41:32

where the frames are made of wood and you can lift them out

0:41:320:41:36

so you can examine what's going on and perhaps influence the colony.

0:41:360:41:41

These cells are made of beeswax and the bees make that themselves

0:41:410:41:46

and place it inside that wooden frame. Later in the season,

0:41:460:41:50

they fill the cells with nectar, which they turn into honey and they process it

0:41:500:41:56

and then they seal it in the frame. This is a typical example...

0:41:560:42:01

where the bees have put honey in those cells

0:42:010:42:07

and sealed it over with a layer of beeswax. That preserves it.

0:42:070:42:11

When did they first start using beeswax to polish furniture?

0:42:110:42:15

Beeswax has been used not only for polishing furniture, but if you go back many centuries

0:42:150:42:21

all the abbeys and churches had to use candles made of beeswax

0:42:210:42:26

because it was produced by pure, virginal insects, which the bee is or was thought to be.

0:42:260:42:33

The honey made by the bees on the estate is sold locally.

0:42:330:42:38

Did you know that a spoonful of honey made from your local bees can help you cure hay fever?

0:42:380:42:43

I'm not just a pretty face, you know.

0:42:430:42:47

-Shouldn't we be dressed up like Darth Vader at this point?

-We're going to go commando today.

0:42:470:42:52

-You can do that when the bees are in a good mood.

-You can, yes.

0:42:520:42:56

-They're not in a good mood very often.

-But they know you're coming.

0:42:560:43:01

-Great stuff(!)

-Last year, I went to see my bees when I was dressed up in suit and tie

0:43:010:43:07

and I thought, "It's a nice day, I'll just give them a quick check."

0:43:070:43:11

Lifted off the lid and then all was fine until one said, "What's he doing?" and smacked me on the nose!

0:43:110:43:17

-You're bonkers! These blokes are mad.

-That's true, too.

0:43:170:43:21

Well, let's hope these bees aren't as curious as Bill's.

0:43:210:43:26

-How many bees would be in there?

-Probably in excess of 60,000.

0:43:260:43:31

Now you're looking nervous, but this is a nice, calm, slightly overcast day. It's warm,

0:43:310:43:37

the bees are flying, minding their own business.

0:43:370:43:41

And this is, to me, the perfect country setting.

0:43:410:43:46

-Exactly.

-A lovely day and the beauty of nature at work.

0:43:460:43:49

And it's a pleasure to keep bees when they are calm and placid.

0:43:490:43:54

Bees are not super-aggressive, like wasps. They are relatively quiet.

0:43:540:43:59

I like bees calm and placid, but the perfect place to keep them is probably about 10 yards back.

0:43:590:44:05

Thank you. Thanks for asking me along.

0:44:070:44:11

Yeah. Wasn't that a sweet treat? But it's time for the boys to buzz off and meet with the competition

0:44:110:44:18

-to reveal all.

-Are you ready?

0:44:180:44:21

-We shall reveal...

-What have you got?

0:44:210:44:25

So how many pieces have we got?

0:44:250:44:28

-Five.

-Oh, hang on. There's one missing.

0:44:280:44:32

There we are. My masterstroke. Don't you love it, Phil?

0:44:330:44:37

-Just a fiver. We'll make a profit on that.

-Really?

-Trust me.

0:44:370:44:40

-I think this is...

-Horrible.

-..the epitome of courage.

0:44:400:44:44

DAVID: It's the epitome of your taste, Bill.

0:44:440:44:48

- What do you think of the barrel? - Super. How much?

0:44:480:44:51

That'll make a hell of a profit. People collect walking canes.

0:44:510:44:56

Bung it in there. One thing I think is absolutely super is the Victorian patchwork.

0:44:560:45:02

-What's so special about that?

-It's the actual colours and fabrics that were used in the 19th century.

0:45:020:45:08

-It's damaged, though.

-Do behave.

0:45:080:45:10

-It's characterful.

-I've been trained.

-Clearly not very well.

0:45:100:45:15

-This is a little pew, then?

-It's very nice, stripped down.

0:45:150:45:19

It's a lovely, cosy chair to sit with your beloved.

0:45:190:45:23

- With our friend here. - Oh, yes! That's three gnomes.

0:45:230:45:27

And on to Team Minchin.

0:45:290:45:32

Whoo-hoo!

0:45:320:45:33

Right. There we are.

0:45:330:45:36

A chamber pot! Gosh, they're all the rage these days!

0:45:360:45:41

If we joined forces, we could do buy one get one free.

0:45:410:45:44

-What did that cost you?

-Em, we paid £100 for that.

0:45:440:45:49

-That's good, I think.

-Do you?

-Yeah, cos it should make 30.

0:45:490:45:53

That's what I fear!

0:45:530:45:56

-It looks more cracked than when we bought it.

-That's a cracking lot.

0:45:560:46:01

Phil, leave the jokes to me, eh?

0:46:020:46:05

Think it'll make it to the auction?

0:46:060:46:09

-And the little green treasure here. Is that Humpty Dumpty? The colour is a bit firm.

-Gaudy. Firm!

0:46:100:46:17

-But I'm sure somebody will like it.

-Thanks, Bill.

0:46:170:46:20

-This is not my choice, I might add.

-You're trying to distance yourself from it.

0:46:200:46:25

-It's not my choice.

-We both went out on a limb.

0:46:250:46:29

- How much did you pay? - A fantastic amount.

0:46:290:46:32

-£26.

-£26?

-Yeah.

-Good Lord!

-Well, let battle commence.

0:46:320:46:36

So what do they really think about each other's lots? Louise?

0:46:380:46:44

Bill's statue... Oh, it's awful! Isn't it?

0:46:440:46:49

-I like their little green teapot. It's nice.

-Yeah.

0:46:490:46:52

Chamber pot - they'll make a profit.

0:46:520:46:54

-Next to ours it looks pristine!

-God! Why did I buy it?! Why did we buy it?

0:46:540:47:00

-You know what'll be the winner?

-Cheerio.

-Our friend.

0:47:000:47:04

Well, good luck, everyone.

0:47:040:47:07

So after kicking off the Road Trip in Altrincham, outside Manchester,

0:47:080:47:13

sadly our celebrities' adventures come to an end at our final stop,

0:47:130:47:17

Bridgnorth, Shropshire.

0:47:170:47:20

And it's here at Perry and Phillips Auctioneers that our teams will go head to head.

0:47:200:47:26

-Barbs, you just stop there. Seriously.

-This is incredibly kind.

-What time is it?

0:47:260:47:32

Well, it's getting on for the auction. So where are they?

0:47:320:47:37

Well, no celebs. Breaking news in Bridgnorth - celebs miss auction.

0:47:370:47:42

-They might be inside.

-Fingers crossed.

0:47:420:47:45

Yes, fingers crossed indeed.

0:47:450:47:48

-18. 20.

-While our experts wait for our celebrities,

0:47:490:47:52

auctioneer John Ridgway has a look over each team's purchases.

0:47:520:47:57

We've got a challenge with the shooting gentleman. He's carrying a sawn-off shotgun

0:47:580:48:04

and is probably going to rob a bank.

0:48:040:48:06

To comply with the rules on the propelling pencil, we have to sell it as white metal,

0:48:060:48:13

but it's pretty in a nice case.

0:48:130:48:15

Chamber pots aren't a good selling line. The lustre chamber pot will do better.

0:48:150:48:20

Although it's been badly damaged, it'll still sell well. £30-£50. Something like that.

0:48:200:48:26

No, no!

0:48:260:48:28

Both teams began this journey with £400 in their pockets

0:48:280:48:32

and two days later Phil and Bill have spent £190 on six auction lots.

0:48:320:48:37

Wonderful.

0:48:370:48:39

Louise and David, meanwhile, have parted with an impressive £289

0:48:390:48:45

also on six auction lots.

0:48:450:48:47

I sort of love that you hate it.

0:48:470:48:49

What time is it?

0:48:510:48:53

It's going on.

0:48:530:48:56

This cuts it a bit fine. But it does have its plus points.

0:48:560:49:01

-What?

-They can't blame us!

0:49:010:49:03

With time running out, our experts take their seats. And where are our celebrities?

0:49:030:49:10

That's not them!

0:49:100:49:12

Oh!

0:49:160:49:17

Newsflash - Louise Minchin and Bill Turnbull make it to auction by the skin of their teeth.

0:49:170:49:22

-Well, hello and welcome.

-How sweet. Time to kick off.

0:49:220:49:27

First up, it's Louise and David's novelty Humpty Dumpty teapot

0:49:270:49:32

and green glass flower bowl. Together forever.

0:49:320:49:35

20 I've got. Thank you. At £20.

0:49:350:49:38

At £20. I'm bid 25.

0:49:380:49:41

£30. At £30 I'm bid. I'll take 5 anywhere now.

0:49:410:49:45

Well, ladies and gentlemen. All done at £30.

0:49:450:49:49

Well, not as great a fall as Humpty, perhaps, but sadly no profit for Louise and David.

0:49:500:49:57

Next up is Old Etonian Turnbull's Art Nouveau oil lamp.

0:49:570:50:02

£30. Any more somewhere?

0:50:020:50:04

At £30 I'm bid only. At £30 only.

0:50:040:50:08

Are you all done at £30?

0:50:080:50:11

Uh! It's a blow for the boys. The oil lamp made a loss of £10.

0:50:140:50:18

You are beating us 1-0.

0:50:180:50:21

So with Louise and David in the lead it's time for their second lot, the silver photo frame and vase.

0:50:220:50:30

£30 to get them away. At 30 I have. And 35.

0:50:300:50:33

40. 45.

0:50:330:50:35

50. 5. 60. 5.

0:50:350:50:38

-Oh, you're in profit, Barbs!

-They're worth more.

0:50:380:50:43

All done at £70?

0:50:430:50:45

Ee, bah gum! That's good.

0:50:460:50:48

Ee, bah gum! Selling the lot for £70 means a £15 profit before commission.

0:50:480:50:55

-Don't worry, Bill. Everything's under control.

-Of course it is.

0:50:550:51:00

-It's like a game of football. You go a goal down, it doesn't mean you've lost.

-A game of two halves.

0:51:000:51:07

Well, let's hope Bill and Phil have better luck with the blue and white purchase - the chamber pot.

0:51:070:51:13

Can't tempt you with this for 10? I heard a fiver.

0:51:130:51:18

At £5 I'm bid. I'll take 8 anywhere now. At a fiver only.

0:51:180:51:21

All done? That's a disappointment.

0:51:210:51:24

-Not half as much as for us.

-How could anybody not want to buy a blue and white chamber pot?

0:51:240:51:30

I have no idea, Bill. But I do know that selling it for £5 keeps the boys behind Louise and David.

0:51:300:51:37

-Wipe the smile off your collective faces!

-Do I have a supercilious smile?

-Yes, all the time!

0:51:370:51:43

Well, let's see if David's still sporting his super-silly smile after their next lot,

0:51:440:51:50

the unmarked silver propelling pencil in its case.

0:51:500:51:54

£30 to get it away somewhere? At £30 I'm bid.

0:51:540:51:58

35.

0:51:580:52:00

40. At £40, I have the propelling pencil. 45.

0:52:000:52:06

At £45 now. At £50.

0:52:060:52:08

Is there 5 anywhere now? At £50.

0:52:080:52:11

Are you all done at £50 this time?

0:52:110:52:14

-We're getting hammered here!

-No...

-We're getting hammered.

0:52:140:52:18

The propelling pencil makes Team Minchin a £12 profit before auction costs.

0:52:190:52:25

It's just a really good job that Bill and I aren't competitive.

0:52:250:52:30

And on to Bill and Phil's early 20th century bargain barrel.

0:52:310:52:35

At £20 I'm bid. I'll take 5 anywhere now. At 25.

0:52:350:52:40

£30 I've got. 35. 40.

0:52:400:52:44

All done at £40?

0:52:440:52:46

-That's a relief, matey.

-A relief indeed, boys. The barrel has made

0:52:460:52:50

a £30 profit before commission. Wow.

0:52:500:52:53

Next up, Louise's Victorian coloured glass.

0:52:530:52:58

-I feel a bit sick.

-£20 to start? £20 I'm bid.

0:52:580:53:02

- At 20 I have. I'll take £25. - Come on, come on.

0:53:020:53:06

At £20 I'm bid. All done? Maiden bidder at £20.

0:53:060:53:11

There was a lady there bidding.

0:53:110:53:14

-Sorry?

-Hammer's fallen.

-She bid.

0:53:140:53:16

My apologies. I keep asking you to wave your card, not your finger.

0:53:160:53:21

Start again at £20. 25. Thank you.

0:53:210:53:26

At 30. At £35 only.

0:53:260:53:28

All done at £35 this time? Thank you.

0:53:280:53:32

-Start the car, Bill. We're going.

-Just as well David's hawk-eye spotted that. It saved a loss.

0:53:320:53:38

In a football game, when the referee makes a decision, that's it.

0:53:380:53:42

You don't get the offside again.

0:53:420:53:45

Time for Bill's figurine.

0:53:460:53:49

-If that makes a profit, I'll whistle three choruses of Rule Britannia after three...

-Cream crackers.

0:53:490:53:55

..cream cracker biscuits, dry.

0:53:550:53:57

-We'll hold you to that, Phil.

-Is there 20 for him?

-Surely!

0:53:570:54:01

-I can't believe it(!) Well, we'll take 10.

-Ssh!

0:54:040:54:08

Is there £10? Thank you. I can see you this time.

0:54:080:54:13

-Get in there, Bill!

-HAMMER FALLS

0:54:130:54:16

-Get in there!

-Thank you very much.

-I knew that would do well.

0:54:160:54:21

-That is a 100% profit!

-I said it's a banker.

0:54:210:54:25

-100% profit.

-I knew it.

0:54:250:54:27

So with the figurine selling for £10, the boys make a £5 profit before auction costs.

0:54:270:54:33

Cream cracker, anyone? Phil?

0:54:330:54:35

The next lot for auction, Louise and David's case of citrine and gold buttons. Or are they yellow glass?

0:54:350:54:42

£50 to start me for them? £30 I'm bid. At £30.

0:54:420:54:46

Come on, come on.

0:54:460:54:48

At 35. £40.

0:54:480:54:50

- At £40 I'm bid. - Oh, they're so cheap!

0:54:500:54:53

All done at £40.

0:54:530:54:56

Oh, dear. David had such high hopes for those.

0:54:560:55:01

-I'm finding this more stressful than my day job.

-Maybe stick to the BBC Breakfast couch, Lou Lou.

0:55:010:55:07

Now could the boys' Regency, framed textile give them a chance to take the lead?

0:55:070:55:14

£30 to start me, someone? £20 I'm bid.

0:55:140:55:17

At 20. 25. 30. 35.

0:55:170:55:21

40.

0:55:210:55:22

-You might get more.

-It won't.

-At £40, then.

0:55:220:55:26

All done with them at 40.

0:55:260:55:29

This is a wicked business.

0:55:290:55:32

Maybe not. Phil and Bill lose another lot in this wicked business.

0:55:320:55:37

Everything hangs on your chamber pot.

0:55:370:55:39

Louise and David's final lot is their big spend.

0:55:390:55:44

The late-Georgian chamber pot, bought for £100.

0:55:440:55:48

£30 to get it away. Thank you. £30 I'm bid. 35.

0:55:480:55:51

40. 45. 50.

0:55:510:55:54

At £50 I'm bid. 55.

0:55:540:55:57

60. No? At £60 I'm bid.

0:55:570:56:00

At £60 in the room. 5 anywhere? This is a little disappointing.

0:56:000:56:05

All done with it at £60? Thank you.

0:56:050:56:08

-The pew now!

-Oh, it's awful, isn't it?

0:56:080:56:12

A disappointing loss for Louise and David.

0:56:120:56:14

-I feel really bad for them(!)

-It's broken my heart!

0:56:140:56:19

So it's all eyes on the final lot for today.

0:56:200:56:24

The 19th-century pine pew. Could this win it for Bill and Phil?

0:56:240:56:29

Very pretty.

0:56:290:56:31

You can start at £30 again. 30 I see. I'll take 40 anywhere now.

0:56:310:56:35

At £40 I'm bid. 50. 60.

0:56:350:56:38

At £60. 70.

0:56:380:56:40

At £70 I'm bid. £80 anywhere? At £70.

0:56:400:56:44

-All done with it at £70.

-Despite not being a furniture auction,

0:56:440:56:49

the pew makes a small, but tidy profit of £10 before commission,

0:56:490:56:53

keeping them in the lead and giving them a victory!

0:56:530:56:57

You have good luck in life and bad luck. That was really bad luck!

0:56:570:57:02

Both teams started their Road Trip with a £400 budget.

0:57:030:57:07

After paying auction costs, Louise and David have lost £55.30,

0:57:080:57:13

giving them £344.70 at the finishing line.

0:57:130:57:19

Bill and Phil also made a loss - £30.10 after auction costs -

0:57:220:57:26

leaving them with a total of £369.90,

0:57:260:57:30

making them the winners!

0:57:300:57:33

Well done, Bill and Phil. And commiserations to Louise and David.

0:57:330:57:39

It was a close-run race, but sadly no profits were made this time.

0:57:390:57:44

We had a lucky charm that made all the difference.

0:57:450:57:49

I'm glad that I persuaded you to buy it.

0:57:490:57:53

Now before these Road Trippers head for home, there's one last thing...

0:57:530:57:58

-Here you go, yes!

-The biscuits!

0:57:580:58:01

Yes! Rule Britannia!

0:58:010:58:03

There you are.

0:58:030:58:06

Rule...

0:58:060:58:09

Cheerio!

0:58:090:58:11

-Bye!

-Bye!

0:58:120:58:14

-It's been illuminating.

-Really fun.

-Do you want silence?

-Yes!

0:58:170:58:22

BOTH LAUGH

0:58:220:58:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:400:58:42

Journalists Bill Turnbull and Louise Minchin are both more used to the BBC Breakfast couch than antiques yet in this programme they battle it out alongside their antique experts, Philip Serrell and David Barby. Their journey starts in Greater Manchester and ends up with an auction showdown in Bridgenorth, Shropshire.