Episode 16 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 16

David 'Diddy' Hamilton and Kate Silverton go in search of antiques which will turn a profit on a road trip from Newark to Chiswick, led by experts Charles Hanson and Thomas Plant.


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Transcript


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Some of the nation's favourite celebrities...

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-That is a pig for you.

-This is the pig for me.

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..one antiques expert each....

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Celebrities!

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If this doesn't work...

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..and one big challenge -

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who can seek out and buy the best antiques at the very best prices...

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Let's all just have a boogie and shake ourselves up.

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..and auction for a big profit further down the road.

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Yes! Thank you very much.

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Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

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-I tell you what, it goes with your eyes.

-Does it, yeah?

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-And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?"

-Cuckoo!

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Time to put your pedal to the metal,

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today's road trippers are veteran TV and radio presenter

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David Diddy Hamilton

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and journalist and broadcaster Kate Silverton.

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Well, we are off on our magical mystery tour.

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If you are of a nervous disposition, please look away now.

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Kate not only keeps the nation reliably informed as a regular

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BBC news anchor...

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You are watching Breakfast on BBC News.

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The main stories this morning...

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..but has brought us firsthand accounts from the front line.

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It is quite hard to overstate the danger when you consider

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the troops out here are covering an area the size of England.

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Kate has proven that she is brave enough to face her biggest fears...

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It was just so...horrible!

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..and beat them...

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I feel really good now, really calm.

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..and is always a consummate professional.

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Can I do that one again?

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So, Kate, have you got lots of antiques at home?

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I've got a bit of a mix.

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So, I don't really know what I'm doing in terms of choosing

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anything, but I know things that appeal to me.

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Kate's rival is David Diddy Hamilton,

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whose broadcasting career spans five decades.

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Your hair is standing up very well.

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I am like you, completely au naturel.

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David started his career as a rock 'n' roll DJ,

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but with a voice for radio and a face for TV, it wasn't long before

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he was blazing a trail, traversing effortlessly between the two.

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Hello, good evening, welcome once again to Top Of The Pops!

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David has presented some of the biggest shows on our screens

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and across our airwaves.

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And with over 12,000 radio shows

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and more than 1,000 TV programmes under his belt,

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David still knows how to work a crowd.

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Here we go.

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How old are you now?

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Well, it's 60-several.

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And making headlines wherever they go,

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our broadcasting buddies are cruising comfortably

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to the start of their trip

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in this rather awesome 1956 Austin-Healey 3000.

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-We have found another viewer, look.

-Oh, yes.

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-Hello!

-Hello!

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He is thinking to himself, "Blooming idiots."

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And ensuring our two broadcasters say on budget, we have two

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of the country's finest young antiques experts

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beetling towards their rendezvous in this wonderfully aqua

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1968 VW Beetle.

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It's Thomas Plant and Charles Hanson.

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Today, you and me, the young guns, we are on a mission to impress.

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You have gone for the more, I suppose, retro look today.

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Oh, Charles!

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That is a cheap shot across the back!

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It's not, I love that '70s jacket.

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So, the man in brown...

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I like the brown pinstripe and the drainpipes and the slip-ons.

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You look like a man who can't do up shoes.

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Oh, thanks!

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As a fully fledged auctioneer with a decade in antiques,

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Derbyshire dandy Charles now runs

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his own auction business just outside Derby.

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Absolutely.

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As a man who likes the very finest things in life,

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he settles for nothing less.

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There really is no time for any proper shopping,

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but I have always wanted a blue velvet jacket.

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Oh, yeah. From fine furniture and porcelain to English silver

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and even monarchs' underwear...

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Yes, that's right, Charles famously got

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£5,000 for a pair of Queen Victoria's knickers,

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and I was there!

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In my prowess around antiques,

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you know, you've got a be a bit erratic.

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Scatter-gun approach. Dat-dat-dat-dat!

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I am full of nervous energy.

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Thomas Plant has always got his eye on the main chance.

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A man who has risen through the ranks in the auction

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business from humble porter

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to becoming a prestigious auctioneer.

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I am looking to sort of try and make a profit.

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-Yes, of course, yes. So am I.

-Well, I know you are.

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Thomas believes knowing your stuff helps.

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But good luck makes all the difference.

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We ain't got a chance.

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-David is really interesting...

-Yes.

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..because he's been there at the start of,

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you know, rock 'n' roll.

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-I bet you he has got stories about parties, girls...

-Yeah.

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That's all I want to know about, really.

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-Could be chemistry there.

-Do you think there could be?

-Absolutely.

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BOTH: Going, going, gone!

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This Celebrity Antiques Road Trip will get going in Newark-on-Trent

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and wind up in London's well-heeled Chiswick

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for the all-important auction.

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This stunning market town of Newark-on-Trent

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is where their story begins.

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Each team has £400, two days to turn

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the spotlight onto any unsuspecting antiques

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and one crucial auction to see who can turn the biggest profit.

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This is nice.

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I hope they are impressed with us, these celebrities.

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-Where are they?

-Well, exactly.

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We're smoking.

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-Poor old girl.

-I think she's getting a little bit hot.

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-Are you feeling strong?

-Yeah, I think so.

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-How are your muscles?

-They're quite muscly.

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-Not bad, not bad. Hi.

-What has happened?

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Charles. Good to see you.

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Hi, nice seeing you. Hi, David.

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I can feel the heat.

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David, stay in, we'll push you.

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That's very kind of you.

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One, two, three, go!

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That's right.

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Sorry. There we are.

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-Good job.

-They are young men after all.

-It is a real pleasure.

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Who's got the short straw?

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The short straw? There is no short straw.

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We could actually be the only double act with two straight men.

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Well, you could be, but would you get a laugh?

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OK, come on.

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Both teams are kicking off here, at Newark Antiques Centre,

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which houses dozens of dealers under one roof

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and has a fantastic mixture of antiques and collectibles.

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Have you got any strategy?

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No, I'm going to leave it all to you because you are the expert.

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No, I don't want that to happen.

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I want you to be a winner.

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It is meant to be a team effort, David.

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Are you a shopper? Do you enjoy shopping?

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I do, but I find I get very overwhelmed in places like this.

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Do you collect antiques?

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I don't know about collect, but I do... I can appreciate them.

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In the house that I am in, I've got a nice mixture.

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And if I see things, like a desk or something...

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-I like pieces that have history to them.

-Yeah.

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So, despite being a modern lady, you know, a young lady,

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-you do appreciate the old things.

-I do.

-That's fantastic.

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So, what sells well at the moment are Chinese objects, Oriental.

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-Think Far Eastern.

-Why is that?

-Because the market is a buoyant

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of all things Far Eastern.

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-Nice. A little bit of sort of exotic.

-Exactly.

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What I would like to ask you, Thomas, is this.

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You know, things have their day, don't they?

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What is a good bet nowadays?

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At the moment, anything with an unusual,

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novelty aspect to it.

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Something which has got something extra to it. Because what

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you've got to think about is our market

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in antiques is quite mature.

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A lot of collectors have filled the collections up.

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They want the rare things.

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Sometimes one has to play it safe.

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I don't like to play it safe.

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That's what I like to hear.

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Let's go and look for the unusual.

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I don't want to buy knobbly knick-knacks,

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which are odds and ends.

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-I'd rather...

-We don't do knobbly knick-knacks.

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No. You know, I'd rather buy of a quality rather than

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live in the hope that a knick-knack might make a profit.

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What is a knobbly knick-knack?

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Cheap and nasty. Something like that.

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-That is definitely.

-It is an advertising piece.

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Or, you know, a little duck like that, which is brand-new.

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-I really like that.

-Do you really?

-No.

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I might just throw a few googlies in there.

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I've noticed. Exactly, yeah, be careful.

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-Because sometimes I won't know.

-You might call my bluff.

-Exactly.

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Like the boy who cried fox.

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Yeah.

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Is it not the boy who cried wolf?

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Never mind, Charles, we knew what you meant.

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We are looking for a bargain. A bit of Art Deco?

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I'm not good on... I don't like Art Deco.

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Art Deco is all about the angularity of jazz.

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I think you are a bit of a jazzy lady.

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I'm...I like...simplistic or sort of traditional English.

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Art Deco, I don't know, it gives me the heebie-jeebies.

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-Does it really?

-I don't know why.

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And not Art Nouveau? You prefer Art Nouveau?

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-It reminds me of dark houses.

-Really?

-Yeah, and clutter.

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-I think Chiswick is all about style.

-Yes.

-Chiswick is all about Eastern.

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So, I think we will try and put those two factors together -

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Eastern and style.

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Here we are, now this is what we want.

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-A vintage Playboy. What year is it, 19...?

-1967.

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There might be some of my old girlfriends in there.

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-Did you ever date a Playboy model?

-Did I?

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-Did you date a Playboy model?

-I used to live with a Page 3 girl.

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-You didn't!

-I did, yeah.

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That must have been a bit of fun.

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-A gentleman never tells.

-I completely agree.

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As I am no gentleman, I'll tell you.

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THEY LAUGH

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Plates.

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Step away from the collector's plates.

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I think we will avoid those.

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-Lovely.

-Come on.

-I like those.

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No, Thomas is going another way, he is not interested in plates.

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Where is your nose leading us, Thomas?

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-HE SNIFFS

-I can smell burning toast.

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-David!

-Yes, sir.

-Something which every house needs.

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-Oh, yes.

-A bloody good stick stand.

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Oops! Mind the roof.

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Good 19th-century Victorian umbrella stand.

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Yeah, I could do with that at home. I've got some sticks.

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-I like it.

-I like the design.

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They've got these stylized leaves, these ovals here.

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-What sort of price are you looking at?

-£58 he's got on it.

-58?

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-Yeah.

-Mm.

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Young David is on hand to help.

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I like that, but do we both like the price?

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-I can try them for you.

-Do you mind giving them a call?

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I'll give them a call and I will come back to you then.

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-Thank you very much. I like it.

-That is quite good fun.

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OK, for the first time, I'm seeing some Chinese works of art.

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Oh, hello. Wow!

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Oh, they are neat, aren't they?

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They are probably Chinese.

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They are late Qing dynasty, probably around 1900.

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And they catch, don't they, that delicacy

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of fine embroidery on silk.

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-I love those.

-Turn them upside down to have a look at their base

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and see what is all there. Look at the old studded soles.

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I'm amazed they are in really good condition. There is no...

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Obviously, they weren't really worn, apart for maybe ceremonial purposes.

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But they are quite sweet. How much do you like them?

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They are £29, so I'd like to see how much the gentleman

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would sell them for?

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Young David will also keep them right on price,

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on behalf of the dealer-owner.

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The best I could do on the news would be 26.

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And if we threw in an extra nice smile,

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would that give us any more money off?

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The lowest is 26, I'm afraid.

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I know these people whose the stall is, and they are very strict.

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-Not even 25?

-No, they are extremely strict with their prices.

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You look a bit scared.

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They are really sweet and...

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-I can feel a drum roll coming up.

-They have got... Yes, yes.

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-Yes?

-Yes. Yes, we'll take them, please.

-OK.

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Thank you very much.

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And with only the briefest of dithers,

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Kate and Charles have bought the charming Chinese child slippers

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for £26. Size 1.

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-OK.

-So, have we got an answer on the stick stand?

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I've spoken to them. Because she says they have already been reduced,

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she said 55 would be death on them.

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They wouldn't do 50?

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No, she can't do much more on it, afraid.

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-I think we should do it.

-Well, go for it.

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-I think we should do it.

-OK. Let's go for it. We'll go for it.

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David, good man.

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Driven a hard bargain, but there we are.

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And again, with no chance for face-to-face haggling,

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Thomas and David have shaken on £55 for the Victorian stick stand.

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-Is that it?

-Our first kill.

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With haggling briefly on hold,

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Kate and Charles are travelling 20 miles southwest to Ruddington.

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And Charles is trying his hand at a probing interview.

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Kate, can I ask you a question?

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You can.

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-How did you come to read the news?

-When I was a young girl,

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I really wanted to be a war correspondent.

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And I used to go off travelling to all sorts

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of weird and wonderful places. And so, at 17, I hitch-hiked

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across Israel and got tear-gassed in Bethlehem.

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And I finally realised my war correspondent dream

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-when I went to Iraq.

-Yes.

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We came under direct mortar fire whilst I was on air.

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As this mortar landed, me

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and my cameraman and producer were left running in a circle,

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not quite knowing what we were doing.

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And I have to say, in that situation, dangerous as it was, they took

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the mickey out of me something chronic, as you might imagine.

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Taking a break from shopping,

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Charles has brought Kate to the Framework Knitters Museum,

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once one of the hubs of the industry which put Nottinghamshire

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on the map.

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-Oh, look at this!

-It is ever so sweet.

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That's gorgeous!

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-Who'd have thought such a thing existed?

-I know.

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Framework knitting refers to the first machines built

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to mass produced knitted garments which had previously only been

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afforded by the wealthy.

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-Hello.

-Hi, Paul, Charles Hanson.

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Welcome to the Framework Knitters Museum.

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Kate and Charles have come to meet museum manager Paul Baker

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to unravel the history of this fully restored site,

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which captures the conditions of the workers here

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throughout the 19th century.

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What we have here are a series of Victorian cottages

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where the framework knitters would have lived.

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The cottages date back to 1829,

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but the industry itself goes back to the Elizabethan period.

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The first framework knitting machine was built in Nottingham in 1589,

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but it wasn't until the late 1700s that this area became

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the hub of the knitted garment industry.

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This site would've had 29 people living and working on it

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and over 50% of the local villagers would have been involved

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in the knitting industry in some way.

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The site was designed to be self-contained

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and largely self-sufficient. There were living, working, eating and

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washing areas, as well as harvesting plots allocated in the garden.

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But it was far from a utopian dream.

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Working conditions were terrible.

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And to make things worse,

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workers had to rent the machines they used, meaning

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that in quiet times it was them and not the managers who lost out.

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You hear many horror stories, don't you,

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about the Industry Revolution and working conditions,

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but here, to me, it is quite cosy.

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Don't be misled by that.

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There was a term during the 19th century -

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poor as a stockinger.

0:15:590:16:01

They were the poorest of the poor.

0:16:010:16:02

It has also got a reputation for revolt, this industry.

0:16:020:16:06

During the 19th century, a group of framework knitters

0:16:060:16:08

were so downtrodden

0:16:080:16:10

that they rebelled against their condition

0:16:100:16:12

and they broke frames,

0:16:120:16:15

they revolted.

0:16:150:16:16

They were called the Luddites after somebody called Ned Ludd.

0:16:160:16:19

It is always the workers who are suffering.

0:16:190:16:22

This site is one of the only remaining

0:16:220:16:24

of its kind in Nottinghamshire, an area once buzzing

0:16:240:16:28

with the cacophonous clattering of framework knitters.

0:16:280:16:31

What you are going to see in this room are the actual frames

0:16:310:16:34

that we associate with the Luddites and the frame breaking.

0:16:340:16:36

Oof! You don't expect to see so many of them.

0:16:360:16:39

They referred to them as cells.

0:16:390:16:42

And if you look how close you are to the machine behind you,

0:16:420:16:45

you can imagine how much noise was coming from there.

0:16:450:16:47

We are talking about 14 hours a day,

0:16:470:16:49

just sitting.

0:16:490:16:51

Because the more that you could produce,

0:16:510:16:53

the more money you can earn.

0:16:530:16:54

I just imagined someone trying to take a sledgehammer to this.

0:16:540:16:57

You'd have a hard job to break this.

0:16:570:17:00

There were obviously very angry. Very angry.

0:17:000:17:04

Come and have a look at this.

0:17:040:17:05

Andrew Bone is a traditional knitter

0:17:050:17:08

and will demonstrate how it was done.

0:17:080:17:11

I mean, without wishing to be flippant,

0:17:140:17:17

to hear that for just ten minutes

0:17:170:17:19

would be enough to drive most people of little bit crazy.

0:17:190:17:22

To have it every day, full on, in this entire room...

0:17:220:17:25

-And that was just one machine.

-Mm.

0:17:250:17:26

Paul has something else which he'd like to show them,

0:17:280:17:32

which Charles should be quite familiar with.

0:17:320:17:34

-Do you recognise these, Charles?

-Yes, I do.

0:17:340:17:36

These are stockings that belonged to Queen Victoria.

0:17:360:17:39

They were worn probably in the 1870s, 1880s.

0:17:390:17:43

The fashion for black, of course, following the sad demise

0:17:430:17:46

of her husband, Prince Albert.

0:17:460:17:47

And they are her silk stockings,

0:17:470:17:49

which I sold, which are now on loan to the museum.

0:17:490:17:53

It is wonderful to see they are being celebrated

0:17:530:17:55

-really in their historical home.

-May I ask how much they went for?

0:17:550:17:59

How much would you pay for your most expensive pair of stockings?

0:17:590:18:03

-If you wear stockings, of course.

-There is no point in asking me.

0:18:030:18:06

Who would want to...? What do you mean?

0:18:060:18:08

Do you wear stockings?

0:18:080:18:09

-Honestly.

-Yes.

-OK, I'll start again.

0:18:090:18:13

I don't know who was blushing more there, Charles,

0:18:130:18:16

you or me.

0:18:160:18:18

Well, these really are the creme de la creme

0:18:180:18:20

when it comes to the 19th century.

0:18:200:18:22

And they sold for £8,500.

0:18:220:18:24

-Wow.

-Yeah.

-Mine might be worth eight pence.

0:18:240:18:27

Thanks to Paul's hard work and continued local support,

0:18:290:18:34

we are afforded a glimpse into an almost forgotten time

0:18:340:18:38

where communities really did live to work.

0:18:380:18:41

David and Thomas are making their way 20 miles south from Newark

0:18:430:18:47

to Nottingham.

0:18:470:18:48

Historically nicknamed the Queen of the Midlands,

0:18:480:18:52

this beautiful old place was granted city status as part

0:18:520:18:55

of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebrations in 1897.

0:18:550:18:59

You all right, duck?

0:19:000:19:02

-Have you worked here?

-I have. I worked in radio up here years ago.

0:19:020:19:06

Men were outnumbered seven to one by women.

0:19:060:19:09

Wow! You could've had some real fun!

0:19:090:19:12

-Here comes a hump.

-BOTH: Whoa!

0:19:120:19:15

And there are riches aplenty for our two merry men at their second shop -

0:19:150:19:20

Treasure Chest Of Sherwood. Right, Robin?

0:19:200:19:23

Thomas, what about...? Look.

0:19:230:19:25

How about that for an old rock 'n' roll DJ? What do you think?

0:19:250:19:29

When I was a boy growing up, we had a wind-up gramophone

0:19:290:19:32

and I remember these with the needles.

0:19:320:19:36

-Yeah, people collect needle boxes.

-Yeah.

0:19:360:19:39

And I was very, very intrigued with it.

0:19:390:19:40

Listened to my father's record collection.

0:19:400:19:43

It was things like How Much Is That Doggie In The Window and,

0:19:430:19:47

a real winner, Feet Up, Pat Him On The Po-Po.

0:19:470:19:50

-It is in need of a little TLC.

-What is your name?

0:19:520:19:55

-Sorry, I'm Steve.

-Steve, Thomas.

0:19:550:19:57

-Hi, Steve.

-David, how are you? Nice to see you.

-Does it work?

0:19:570:20:01

Geisha gramophones were produced by Gilbert Gramophone Makers

0:20:010:20:05

between the years of 1922 and 1931.

0:20:050:20:09

HUMMING AND WHISTLING

0:20:090:20:13

Get down and boogie.

0:20:130:20:16

It's easy listening.

0:20:160:20:17

More like sway and swing.

0:20:170:20:19

Although well-made, they weren't considered to be terribly exciting.

0:20:190:20:24

But at the cheaper end of the scale,

0:20:240:20:26

these gramophones achieved fairly wide sales.

0:20:260:20:28

Shall we ask how much it is?

0:20:280:20:30

I'm asking 110 for it.

0:20:300:20:32

-What is your best figure?

-Well, the best for me would be 110.

0:20:320:20:35

All right. I think we'll have a look round the rest of the shop.

0:20:350:20:40

-Yes, let's do that.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:20:400:20:42

That price, clearly not hitting the right note for our pop picky pair.

0:20:420:20:48

But something else has got their...attention!

0:20:480:20:50

-I am liking this, though.

-Yeah, you like that, don't you?

-I do.

0:20:500:20:54

RSM Prichard.

0:20:540:20:56

Presented by the officers of Burma Railways, 1932.

0:20:560:21:02

-You can imagine a sergeant major with that.

-Yes.

0:21:020:21:05

-You know, marching across the parade ground.

-Yeah.

0:21:050:21:09

And it has got the crest here.

0:21:090:21:10

It has got the George V crest.

0:21:100:21:12

Something I have just seen over here, look, is this.

0:21:120:21:15

And I've always been fascinated by these.

0:21:150:21:17

I think we had one as a kid.

0:21:170:21:19

How do they get the ships in the bottle?

0:21:190:21:21

Do you know the answer to that?

0:21:210:21:22

That has been blown in there like that.

0:21:220:21:24

-Has it?

-That is amazing. Because what the other ones...

0:21:240:21:26

They put them in flat and they lift them up with string.

0:21:260:21:29

But that is in glass. They must've had to blow the glass around it.

0:21:290:21:32

-Yeah. Do you like it?

-Um... Yes and no. Yes and no.

0:21:320:21:35

-OK, I'll take that as a no.

-Yeah, absolutely, take it as a no.

0:21:350:21:40

Not terribly tactful, Thomas.

0:21:400:21:43

We've got to get down to serious business now

0:21:430:21:46

because we are running out of time

0:21:460:21:47

and we need to really decide on two or three things.

0:21:470:21:52

-So, it's all down to you, buddy.

-It's not all down to me!

0:21:520:21:55

Basically, if this doesn't work, I'm going to kick your shins.

0:21:550:21:59

Really? Oh, God, the pressure is on.

0:21:590:22:01

This, by the way, giving us tea,

0:22:010:22:03

doesn't make the haggling more difficult, does it?

0:22:030:22:05

It does.

0:22:050:22:07

-I'm having a look. You just relax.

-I am.

0:22:070:22:09

Nothing like teamwork, eh, Tom?

0:22:160:22:20

Thomas, can you get a move on? I've got another booking in February.

0:22:210:22:25

What are you asking for your stick?

0:22:270:22:28

Somewhere in the region of 100 would buy it.

0:22:280:22:32

In the region of 100?

0:22:320:22:34

-Ah-ha.

-And I am on my knees,

0:22:340:22:35

praying that the price comes down a bit.

0:22:350:22:38

I could probably go 90.

0:22:390:22:42

Years of wearing headphones, so I'm going a little bit deaf,

0:22:420:22:44

-did he say 30 quid?

-He did.

-Take it.

0:22:440:22:47

Loving your work, David.

0:22:480:22:50

Right, I've seen one more thing, which is this Art Deco lamp base.

0:22:500:22:55

-What can you tell me about that?

-Well, she's 20th-century,

0:22:550:22:58

obviously, and she is moulded glass. She is like a nymph.

0:22:580:23:01

But what is lovely is you've got this original shade here.

0:23:010:23:05

So, what is the best price on that one?

0:23:050:23:08

150 is the going rate.

0:23:080:23:10

I'd like to offer you 80 for the stick, 80 for the lamp,

0:23:100:23:14

I'm really cautious about the gramophone.

0:23:140:23:17

-Mm-hm.

-I want to offer you 70 on that.

0:23:170:23:20

I'd be happy if I could walk away with

0:23:200:23:23

230 for the lot.

0:23:230:23:26

250 and I'd be willing to do a deal.

0:23:260:23:28

What do you think, David?

0:23:280:23:29

When this negotiation began, I was still a matinee idol.

0:23:290:23:33

Yeah, all right.

0:23:330:23:34

Well, why don't you go somewhere between the two of you and say 240?

0:23:360:23:41

240, Steve?

0:23:410:23:43

-Abs... Yeah, I'll go for that.

-OK, shall we shake hands on it?

0:23:430:23:46

-You've got a deal, senor.

-Thank you, David.

0:23:460:23:48

And like music to their ears,

0:23:480:23:50

the boys grabbed the gramophone for £80,

0:23:500:23:53

the parade stick for £80 and the Art Deco lamp for £80,

0:23:530:23:57

bringing their trio of treasures to £240.

0:23:570:24:00

Woo-hoo!

0:24:040:24:05

Our brave broadcasters' boundless energy has seen them

0:24:050:24:08

through their first day.

0:24:080:24:10

Go now and rest and sharpen your minds, for tomorrow we'll see

0:24:100:24:14

who is going to hit the headlines and be crowned number one.

0:24:140:24:18

Nighty-night.

0:24:190:24:21

Good morning, and this is just in,

0:24:230:24:25

both teams are continuing on their road trip around Nottinghamshire,

0:24:250:24:30

their aim to uncover antiques in the hope of turning a profit.

0:24:300:24:34

Yesterday, our king and queen of the airwaves

0:24:340:24:37

used everything they had.

0:24:370:24:39

While Kate launched a charm offensive to get the best deal...

0:24:390:24:43

And if we threw in an extra nice smile,

0:24:430:24:45

would that give us any more money off?

0:24:450:24:47

..David piled the pressure onto Thomas to find treasure.

0:24:470:24:51

Basically, if this doesn't work, I'm going to kick your shin.

0:24:510:24:54

Oh! Kate and Charles jumped in with both feet and bought some

0:24:540:24:58

beautiful embroidered Chinese children's slippers

0:24:580:25:01

for £26, leaving them with a massive £374 still to spend.

0:25:010:25:06

-Yes.

-Yes?

-Yes.

-Yes!

0:25:060:25:08

And with David's unwavering support...

0:25:080:25:10

-So, it's all down to you, buddy.

-It is not all down to me!

0:25:100:25:14

..Thomas did all he could to haggle the prices down.

0:25:140:25:17

I am on my knees here.

0:25:170:25:18

And they bought a Victorian stick stand,

0:25:180:25:21

a sergeant major's parade stick,

0:25:210:25:24

a Geisha gramophone and an Art Deco lamp,

0:25:240:25:27

spending £295 and leaving them with £105

0:25:270:25:31

out of their original £400 budget to spend today.

0:25:310:25:35

-I think so.

-Let's go.

0:25:350:25:37

Kate and Charles are making their way half an hour west

0:25:390:25:42

to Wheathills, just outside Derby.

0:25:420:25:44

There we are.

0:25:460:25:47

Charles has brought Kate to a particularly fine

0:25:470:25:50

antiques haven, which might make up for the shocking weather.

0:25:500:25:54

Quick dash.

0:25:540:25:56

This looks like a very small place you've brought me to, Mr Hanson.

0:25:570:26:02

Only the best for you, OK?

0:26:020:26:03

What they have done so well here, Kate, is in this old Regency

0:26:030:26:06

country house, all the objects within here are real antiques.

0:26:060:26:11

Kate, tell me, the definition of an antique is?

0:26:110:26:13

Something very old.

0:26:130:26:15

But how many years old? How many years old?

0:26:150:26:17

Um... Does it have to be 100?

0:26:170:26:20

Well, thanks for coming. Yeah, 100 years old.

0:26:200:26:22

-Yeah, exactly.

-Am I learning?

0:26:220:26:24

You are learning.

0:26:240:26:26

-This is beautiful.

-Yeah, it's lovely, isn't it?

0:26:260:26:29

"An Edwardian sovereign vesta case, hallmark -

0:26:290:26:32

"Birmingham, 1905. Maker's..." 225!

0:26:320:26:35

That is a quality item.

0:26:350:26:36

You strike your match on the end of this lid

0:26:360:26:39

and then on the inside, you would support your sovereign.

0:26:390:26:43

-That's sprung.

-Sprung.

0:26:430:26:44

-I thought that was a modern invention.

-No.

0:26:440:26:46

That's gorgeous.

0:26:460:26:48

So, it really is heightened Edwardian elegance.

0:26:480:26:50

Really, 225, you know, the scope there...

0:26:500:26:54

-If we were to maybe...

-I think we can bargain.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:26:540:26:57

That is the first thing I've seen, so I'm going to have to have a bit

0:26:570:27:01

more of a... But it's nice, really nice.

0:27:010:27:03

And with a nice price tag, so keep looking.

0:27:030:27:06

Goodness, Charles, look at this.

0:27:060:27:08

Goodness me, what is that?

0:27:080:27:10

-You tell me. That looks...

-Is it?

-..a pretty serious piece of kit.

0:27:100:27:14

It is quite odd, you've got this harness on here.

0:27:140:27:16

I thought at first... Are these rubber?

0:27:160:27:18

No, they really were... Whatever they are, they're quite sharp.

0:27:180:27:21

Goodness me. Goodness me. I think... Goodness me!

0:27:210:27:25

Well, what would...?

0:27:250:27:26

I'm just trying to think what you would...

0:27:260:27:28

It's some sort of...

0:27:280:27:29

Like a cockfighting sort of collar, like a dogfighting collar, isn't it?

0:27:310:27:35

I don't want that, thank you very much.

0:27:350:27:37

Yeah, I don't think that would go down well with the dog lovers

0:27:370:27:40

of Chiswick, or anywhere, actually.

0:27:400:27:42

This I like.

0:27:420:27:44

That's a shaker....

0:27:440:27:45

Sorry. Yes, it was. I shook it too hard.

0:27:450:27:48

Sorry about that. It is.

0:27:480:27:50

I'm so glad you did that.

0:27:500:27:51

-Do you like it?

-Personally, I would use it.

0:27:510:27:54

It's the sort of thing you think,

0:27:540:27:56

"I'm putting it to use and bringing it to life."

0:27:560:27:58

I am so pleased. So, will you use things like fish forks and knives?

0:27:580:28:00

-Absolutely.

-Good for you.

0:28:000:28:02

-It'd be lovely to have that on the table.

-Exactly.

0:28:020:28:04

There is just something I have seen.

0:28:040:28:06

-I am so excited about this place.

-Good.

0:28:060:28:07

It's not breakable, is it, Kate?

0:28:070:28:10

Charles, I was just spotting this. This could be really cute.

0:28:100:28:13

Look, "To Toddles from Dad, January 1, 1905."

0:28:130:28:19

I think that is beautiful.

0:28:190:28:20

That little baby now might be 110 years old.

0:28:200:28:22

Isn't that wonderful?

0:28:220:28:23

It is obviously quite clearly a caddy spoon or a christening spoon.

0:28:230:28:27

You have got the sovereign's head, George III,

0:28:270:28:29

the date code for the year, 1798.

0:28:290:28:32

So, this previously undecorated caddy spoon in 1905 has obviously

0:28:320:28:36

been personalized and inscribed and kept that story of its life going.

0:28:360:28:41

That makes me feel quite emotional.

0:28:410:28:44

Well, exactly.

0:28:440:28:45

It's silly, I know, but just the thought of a father,

0:28:450:28:49

"To Toddles," giving a gift on January 1.

0:28:490:28:52

I find that really...

0:28:520:28:54

-It's the dawn of the last century.

-I know.

0:28:540:28:56

I'm surprised at how affected I was.

0:28:560:28:59

It's not appropriate.

0:28:590:29:01

I am a bit embarrassed about welling up over a spoon.

0:29:010:29:05

No, it's great.

0:29:050:29:07

I think the best thing I have seen so far, Kate,

0:29:070:29:09

is probably the first thing you picked up, the vesta case.

0:29:090:29:13

However, let's get down to the hard finance.

0:29:130:29:16

The christening spoon is marked at £125

0:29:160:29:20

and the vesta sovereign case is £225.

0:29:200:29:23

It is negotiation time with proprietor Nigel.

0:29:230:29:26

Come on, Nige.

0:29:260:29:28

Nigel, I love this little sovereign vesta case here.

0:29:280:29:31

-From anywhere interesting?

-Not particularly. It's got

0:29:310:29:34

a couple of dents on there, as well, which let you down a little bit.

0:29:340:29:37

No, talk it down, it helps.

0:29:370:29:39

-Keep talking it down.

-Keep talking.

0:29:390:29:40

What would be your best price?

0:29:400:29:43

-Say 200.

-£200.

0:29:430:29:44

-I can't do any better than that.

-Look at me.

0:29:440:29:46

-I'm looking at you now.

-Look at us.

0:29:460:29:49

-130 on that then.

-Let's come back to it.

0:29:490:29:53

We are on quite a tight budget, that is the thing. But we will drive

0:29:530:29:56

you hard, Nige, because I've got this spoon, as well.

0:29:560:29:58

It did make me cry a little earlier, this spoon.

0:29:580:30:01

£80.

0:30:010:30:02

So, if we buy the spoon and the vesta case, what would we get?

0:30:020:30:06

-180.

-190.

0:30:080:30:10

No, no, no, I still think it's strong.

0:30:100:30:13

I don't like this, I need to take a break.

0:30:140:30:16

I know, it's tense!

0:30:160:30:18

165.

0:30:180:30:20

Oh, Nigel, let's go 160.

0:30:200:30:23

All right.

0:30:230:30:24

-Gone, sold!

-I can do it!

0:30:240:30:26

Thanks, Nigel, we've done it ever so subtly.

0:30:260:30:29

That was good hard work.

0:30:290:30:32

Finally, some good old-fashioned haggling.

0:30:320:30:35

They got the sovereign vesta case for £100

0:30:350:30:38

and the silver christening spoon for £60.

0:30:380:30:41

-I'm exhausted!

-I know!

0:30:410:30:44

I'm all done.

0:30:440:30:45

Meanwhile, David and Thomas are on their way to explore

0:30:470:30:49

more than just local legends.

0:30:490:30:52

# Feared by the bad

0:30:520:30:54

# Loved by the good

0:30:540:30:56

# Robin Hood

0:30:560:30:57

# Robin Hood, Robin Hood! #

0:30:570:31:02

The boys have come to meet tour guide Gary Holmes to uncover

0:31:020:31:05

a hidden Nottingham with a fascinating history.

0:31:050:31:08

There is a man here with a hardhat. A hardhat at a shopping centre.

0:31:080:31:12

-Hi, my name is Thomas.

-Hi, Thomas.

-Hi, I'm David.

0:31:120:31:14

Hi, David, I'm Gary.

0:31:140:31:16

-You will need these.

-What do we need these for?

0:31:160:31:19

Well, all will be revealed.

0:31:190:31:20

-Let's go.

-Follow me.

0:31:200:31:23

A shopping centre? I know what you're thinking, but bear with me.

0:31:230:31:28

The hardhats are not required

0:31:280:31:30

because there's a big sale on, no,

0:31:300:31:32

the boys are descending to one

0:31:320:31:33

of Nottingham's best kept and most incredible secrets.

0:31:330:31:37

From the ground floor of the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre,

0:31:380:31:41

access can be gained to the vast network

0:31:410:31:44

of 400 underground man-made caves, which were once teeming with life.

0:31:440:31:50

Evidence has been found to suggest that people used the caves

0:31:500:31:54

to dwell in up to 1,000 years ago and since then,

0:31:540:31:58

they have been used as a place to live, a place to hide,

0:31:580:32:01

to store goods in and even as business premises.

0:32:010:32:04

Extraordinary.

0:32:040:32:06

This place, back in Anglo-Saxon England,

0:32:070:32:11

was known as Tiggun Cobaucc,

0:32:110:32:13

which literally meant "place of cavey dwellings".

0:32:130:32:16

-What was the beginning of all this?

-Well, the earliest reference

0:32:160:32:19

to the caves were... was back in 900 AD.

0:32:190:32:22

People would simply burrow out the sandstone.

0:32:220:32:25

And then, hey presto, they would have a place to live.

0:32:250:32:28

Very basic tools that they used to scrape away at the caves.

0:32:280:32:31

You can see some of the tool marks that are still evident.

0:32:310:32:34

Some people would build dwelling places,

0:32:350:32:38

obviously, on the street level

0:32:380:32:40

and then in order to make themselves a bigger space, more space,

0:32:400:32:44

they would burrow down and give themselves a basement,

0:32:440:32:47

a cellar, where they would probably store their food.

0:32:470:32:50

And often, a lot of the time, they used to sink wells, as well.

0:32:500:32:53

But it wasn't uncommon for somebody to sink a cesspit

0:32:530:32:57

adjacent to a well.

0:32:570:32:59

So, obviously, the cesspits would be used to throw all the waste

0:32:590:33:02

and the horrible bits down there.

0:33:020:33:05

And this cesspit could be right next to a well

0:33:050:33:09

-where families would be drawing up water to drink.

-Healthy.

0:33:090:33:12

Suffice to say, Gary, it's very rarely I have to duck.

0:33:170:33:20

Well, here we are in the Horseshoe Cave.

0:33:220:33:25

This was one of the cellar areas from a public house

0:33:250:33:28

that stood above here, which was the Three Horseshoes pub.

0:33:280:33:31

Now, apart from being a place to store beer,

0:33:310:33:34

this had one or two other sinister uses, as well.

0:33:340:33:38

These are the kind of places where people would come and plot.

0:33:380:33:42

They would force a hole from this cave

0:33:420:33:44

all the way up to street level

0:33:440:33:46

and at the top of that hole,

0:33:460:33:48

there would be a small child with a pebble.

0:33:480:33:50

And he would be a lookout for the King's soldiers.

0:33:500:33:52

And if he saw any approaching, he would throw the pebble,

0:33:520:33:55

that would hit the floor, the people who were plotting

0:33:550:33:58

their schemes would be able to disperse safely

0:33:580:34:01

without being arrested.

0:34:010:34:02

Do you think Robin Hood was down here with his Merry Men?

0:34:020:34:05

Absolutely.

0:34:050:34:07

I mean, this was great sort of cover from the Sheriff and his men.

0:34:070:34:10

And also, there is a whole section of caves that go off

0:34:100:34:12

in that direction towards the castle.

0:34:120:34:15

There was actually passageways right underneath the city.

0:34:150:34:18

At the turn of the last century, more caves were created

0:34:190:34:23

by people living up top, keen to capitalise on what lies beneath.

0:34:230:34:28

Some of the poorest families in Nottingham would dwell

0:34:280:34:31

in the caves during the Victorian period.

0:34:310:34:34

And a lot of the people that owned properties upstairs

0:34:340:34:36

would basically dig a hole in the caves

0:34:360:34:38

and say to a family, "Here you are, you can rent this room off me."

0:34:380:34:42

The caves also proved incredibly useful during the Second World War.

0:34:420:34:47

Because of Nottingham's geographic proximity

0:34:470:34:51

to an important ammunition filling factory,

0:34:510:34:54

it was bombed heavily. Thousands of people

0:34:540:34:56

sheltered here, in the caves.

0:34:560:34:58

Was the city heavily bombed?

0:34:580:35:02

There was one particular day, May 8, 1941,

0:35:020:35:06

when the Germans dropped well over 400 bombs on the city.

0:35:060:35:10

What were they aiming for? What were the main targets?

0:35:100:35:12

They were after the Royal Ordinance Depot,

0:35:120:35:14

which is over to the south of the city.

0:35:140:35:16

So, David, your experiences in the war.

0:35:160:35:18

Obviously, being a babe in arms in the Second World War,

0:35:180:35:21

were you called up later on for national service?

0:35:210:35:25

-You are digging a hole here.

-I am digging a hole.

0:35:250:35:28

I was among the last people to do national service.

0:35:280:35:32

I had two years in the RAF.

0:35:320:35:35

But it I was very lucky, I got posted to Cologne,

0:35:350:35:38

which was the home of the British Forces radio station,

0:35:380:35:40

and that is where he began as a rock 'n' roll disc jockey.

0:35:400:35:44

It was a very exciting time in Germany

0:35:440:35:46

because Elvis Presley was there at the same time with the US Army.

0:35:460:35:49

So, I played all his records because it was the time of rock 'n' roll.

0:35:490:35:53

Brilliant.

0:35:530:35:54

If only the people taking shelter here could have tuned in.

0:35:540:35:57

And with that, our intrepid explorers are off again.

0:35:590:36:02

MOTOR GROANS

0:36:020:36:04

Whoa!

0:36:040:36:05

I knew these hardhats would come in useful.

0:36:050:36:07

I don't think they were supposed to keep them.

0:36:070:36:10

A hop, skip and a jump to Derby for Kate

0:36:140:36:16

and Charles to their last shop of the day.

0:36:160:36:20

Are you enjoying yourself?

0:36:210:36:23

-I am having such a lovely time.

-Are you sure?

0:36:230:36:25

I wanted to find you something gilt-edged,

0:36:250:36:27

but it hasn't quite happened yet, so I'm sorry.

0:36:270:36:30

I always find, though, Kate,

0:36:300:36:31

when the weather comes in, I seem to get better.

0:36:310:36:33

I don't know why it is.

0:36:330:36:35

When the chips are down.

0:36:350:36:36

HONKING Hello. Oh!

0:36:360:36:39

Charles, is that your driving causing upset on the roads again?

0:36:400:36:44

Derby was built on the wealth created here from its pioneering use

0:36:460:36:50

of water to power firstly its silk and then its cotton mills

0:36:500:36:53

in the early 1700s.

0:36:530:36:55

And it was another stroke of ingenuity which helped

0:36:550:36:59

to preserve Derby's grandeur during the Second World War bombing raids.

0:36:590:37:03

The south of the town had a German radio jamming site,

0:37:030:37:08

allowing the city's splendour to be spared.

0:37:080:37:10

Here we are.

0:37:100:37:11

Oh, my goodness me.

0:37:110:37:13

-You take me to all the best places.

-I know, I'm sorry.

0:37:160:37:18

That is the benefit of Charles being a local lad.

0:37:180:37:21

-Talk about singing in the rain.

-Absolutely.

0:37:210:37:23

-Hello.

-Hi.

0:37:230:37:25

-Hello, I'm Kate.

-Miss Kate, welcome.

0:37:250:37:27

You are looking as dapper as always.

0:37:270:37:29

Proprietor Dennis is standing by with a warm welcome.

0:37:290:37:34

If you can have a think about what you think is quite quirky...

0:37:340:37:37

Eclectic.

0:37:370:37:39

Because we are on a really tight roll now.

0:37:390:37:42

You yourself are a very knowledgeable man, Charles.

0:37:420:37:44

-Do you think so?

-I know so.

-Yeah, thanks.

-I know so.

0:37:440:37:48

I think a lot of people underestimate you.

0:37:480:37:50

-I know you are very good.

-You are a good man, Dennis.

0:37:500:37:53

I don't think I need to point much out to you.

0:37:530:37:55

But you need to point it out to me.

0:37:550:37:57

Dennis, this beautiful lady is learning, OK?

0:37:570:38:00

And you are a man, Dennis, I know, who can entertain.

0:38:000:38:03

Dennis certainly can entertain.

0:38:070:38:10

Tea, music... no biscuit, mind, but...

0:38:100:38:14

# Lately I've been staring in the mirror

0:38:140:38:18

# With, you say No special place to go. #

0:38:180:38:21

While Kate makes beautiful music with Dennis,

0:38:230:38:26

Charles has more pressing matters on his mind.

0:38:260:38:30

Cut to the chase, Hanson.

0:38:300:38:31

I can't find any antiques in this emporium

0:38:310:38:34

and I'm really quite concerned because our armoury of items

0:38:340:38:37

is nothing yet.

0:38:370:38:39

And we are almost over.

0:38:390:38:41

However, Charles has seen something in a looking glass,

0:38:420:38:45

which might just shine.

0:38:450:38:47

Dennis, the mirror over there, little beaded, octagonal...

0:38:470:38:52

-I like it.

-I think it's earlier than '30s.

0:38:520:38:53

You think it is '20s then? Yeah, OK.

0:38:530:38:56

It is quite nice and heavy.

0:38:560:38:58

I personally like that, I don't know what you think.

0:38:580:39:01

Follow me, between here.

0:39:010:39:03

I quite like that wardrobe.

0:39:030:39:05

It is mahogany and it is satinwood crossbanded.

0:39:050:39:08

You have got some minor wear and tear.

0:39:080:39:11

I'm checking for any splits.

0:39:110:39:12

Open that door. And also, it is really well lined.

0:39:120:39:17

-That's solid.

-It is solid.

0:39:170:39:20

Dennis, what would be the best price you could let it go at?

0:39:200:39:23

-It has got 199 on it.

-Yeah.

0:39:230:39:26

150.

0:39:260:39:27

I am looking at this sort of thing.

0:39:290:39:31

And I...there's that.

0:39:320:39:35

-If we did look to buy some other items, that might help.

-Yeah.

0:39:350:39:39

-We'll have a walk round.

-Yeah.

-OK, Dennis.

0:39:390:39:41

A sturdy price for a sturdy piece.

0:39:410:39:45

They're going to have to get negotiating.

0:39:450:39:47

Over here, I like this plate, despite the damage.

0:39:470:39:50

-Do like this?

-Yes.

-This is Wedgwood.

0:39:500:39:53

This is hand-painted. It is worth, in great order, £150.

0:39:530:39:58

It is powder blue ground. It has had some damage.

0:39:580:40:01

It has been cracked round here. This would date to around 1920,

0:40:010:40:04

and I love this plate because it could be quite cheap.

0:40:040:40:07

Dennis, come over here, eh? I like your mirror.

0:40:070:40:09

I do, Dennis, love that wardrobe.

0:40:090:40:12

I'll do the three things, the three items, for £150 to you.

0:40:120:40:17

-Kate.

-Time's up.

-Yeah, our time is almost up.

0:40:180:40:21

I would love to pay probably...

0:40:210:40:25

£100 for the whole lot.

0:40:250:40:27

-I'm trying my best.

-Look at the lady.

0:40:270:40:29

-Dennis, look at those eyes.

-I don't like all this bartering.

0:40:290:40:33

Look at that smile, Dennis.

0:40:330:40:35

Now, I'm going to cut the deal for you.

0:40:370:40:41

You said 100, I said 150.

0:40:410:40:43

£125, Mr Hanson.

0:40:430:40:46

I know, we can toss a coin.

0:40:460:40:48

-If it comes in as a head, it's £100.

-Yes.

0:40:480:40:51

If it's a tail, it's 110, OK?

0:40:510:40:54

-Lady luck.

-OK.

-Tails.

-Oh, Dennis!

0:40:540:40:58

As the official adjudicator of the day,

0:40:580:41:00

I do declare the deal is done for £110.

0:41:000:41:03

£110, yes.

0:41:030:41:04

And the £2 goes back to Charles.

0:41:040:41:07

-Thanks, Dennis, you're a good man. 110.

-Thank you.

0:41:070:41:11

Having clambered out of the caves, though, David and Thomas are darting

0:41:120:41:16

half an hour west to also pay Dennis a visit in delightful Derby.

0:41:160:41:20

Hiya.

0:41:200:41:21

Hello. Nice to meet ya.

0:41:210:41:23

All right, Dennis, let's browse.

0:41:230:41:26

This is a little... It's quite nice.

0:41:260:41:28

-Oops!

-Whoa!

0:41:280:41:30

Butter fingers.

0:41:300:41:31

-All breakages have to be paid for.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:41:310:41:34

We haven't broken anything, I promise!

0:41:340:41:37

There is still time, Thomas.

0:41:370:41:39

David is just letting me get on with it, which is marvellous.

0:41:400:41:44

And I'm just looking.

0:41:440:41:46

I've only let you get on with it because I know you're the top man.

0:41:460:41:49

And I know that because you told me.

0:41:490:41:53

It's hard work, eh, Tom?

0:41:530:41:55

# When you're sitting at home and relaxing

0:41:550:41:57

# And you're working in a noisy factory

0:41:570:41:59

# Da-da-dee-dee-dee When the clock strikes three

0:41:590:42:02

# Everything stops for tea. #

0:42:020:42:04

Eh!

0:42:040:42:05

That's beautiful.

0:42:100:42:12

I think there's a bromance brewing.

0:42:120:42:14

Just you carry on, Thomas.

0:42:140:42:16

I quite like those.

0:42:160:42:18

-They're nice, yeah.

-They're lovely.

0:42:180:42:19

-I wonder how old they are, Thomas.

-1930s.

-Yeah, what do you think?

0:42:190:42:23

What does the writing say on them? SM and BP. What is SM?

0:42:230:42:27

I don't know. Sado-masochism.

0:42:270:42:30

Try and keep the show clean if you can.

0:42:300:42:33

Before we commit ourselves to these three cans,

0:42:330:42:37

I want to ask you this, who will buy them and where will they keep them?

0:42:370:42:41

Well, first of all, maybe car enthusiasts,

0:42:410:42:43

people who own a classic car.

0:42:430:42:45

They might be kept in the garage.

0:42:450:42:47

Or they get made into very sexy table lamps.

0:42:470:42:50

So, if we can agree a good price,

0:42:500:42:52

you're confident that these are going to do well. Cos I'm...

0:42:520:42:55

I'm putting my reputation on the line here with you.

0:42:550:42:59

So much pressure!

0:42:590:43:01

-So, you've got 25 on them each.

-That's right, sir.

0:43:010:43:05

Nice!

0:43:060:43:07

Take a smell of that. Petrol and stuff.

0:43:070:43:10

Old petrol. And the price of petrol now, you realise, is very expensive,

0:43:100:43:15

-so I'm going to have to put these up.

-No, you're not.

0:43:150:43:18

Right, what would you do for the...?

0:43:180:43:21

Well, £25...

0:43:210:43:24

When I went to school, that calculation tells me that's 75.

0:43:240:43:28

It does. What would you do?

0:43:280:43:29

Well, how does...

0:43:290:43:31

..buy two, get one free sound?

0:43:320:43:35

Buy two, get one free.

0:43:350:43:37

So, with my brilliant mathematics, I think that's £50.

0:43:370:43:41

It's all right. I mean, I'd like to...

0:43:410:43:43

Little bit better.

0:43:430:43:45

How does 45 sound?

0:43:450:43:46

-40 and you've got a deal.

-Done.

0:43:460:43:49

Brilliant man. That's awesome.

0:43:490:43:50

Let's hope we have a few petrol heads at the auction,

0:43:500:43:53

or at least someone with a little imagination.

0:43:530:43:57

And here, in the ecclesiastical setting of Derby's grand cathedral,

0:44:010:44:06

our road trippers will reveal all.

0:44:060:44:08

I noticed, Thomas, that our pile is bigger than their pile.

0:44:080:44:12

It is a big pile.

0:44:120:44:13

But, course, we have to remember that size doesn't matter.

0:44:130:44:16

OK, good luck.

0:44:160:44:19

Oh!

0:44:190:44:20

Hello, hello.

0:44:200:44:21

This is amazing.

0:44:230:44:25

When I was a boy, I had a wind-up gramophone.

0:44:250:44:28

But not back in the '30s, surely.

0:44:280:44:30

Stop being flattering.

0:44:300:44:33

Dead man. Even in a cathedral, he's a dead man.

0:44:330:44:38

What is it worth, Kate? Would you pay for this?

0:44:380:44:40

-I would...200.

-If we get 200, we'd be pleased.

0:44:400:44:44

-It was £80.

-Really?

0:44:440:44:45

Yeah, great objects.

0:44:450:44:47

Of course, what we like is great style.

0:44:470:44:49

Tom, the table lamp. Do you like it?

0:44:490:44:51

You know, I'm not a lover of Art Deco,

0:44:510:44:53

so I have to be honest and say that's not me.

0:44:530:44:55

Her, on her own, she's worth £25.

0:44:550:44:58

With that lamp on top, David, she could fly away.

0:44:580:45:00

It is so rare.

0:45:000:45:01

I'm already nervous, well done.

0:45:010:45:03

OK, so this is a regimental sergeant major's cane.

0:45:030:45:07

Colonial silver.

0:45:070:45:08

It is a good stick.

0:45:080:45:10

Oh, I love that.

0:45:100:45:11

-Kate, you will like that with your military connections.

-Yeah.

0:45:110:45:14

Are we allowed to bid on your things?

0:45:140:45:16

Don't say that.

0:45:160:45:18

-By all means, make sure you're there.

-Well done.

0:45:180:45:20

-Kate, please unveil our wares.

-OK.

0:45:200:45:22

Oh, look at this.

0:45:220:45:24

Well, actually, they look really nice, don't they?

0:45:240:45:27

But, Charles, it's got a crack on it.

0:45:270:45:28

We were a little bit on the edge of desperate.

0:45:280:45:31

It's signed, it's Wedgwood. Wonderful, rich powder blue ground,

0:45:310:45:34

and it wasn't expensive.

0:45:340:45:36

- No, £25? - It cost us ten pounds.

0:45:360:45:38

-So we are happy with that.

-Look at that reaction.

0:45:380:45:41

We are on the run now. OK, we're catching up.

0:45:410:45:43

-We were the underdogs. A good reaction, great.

-We love that.

0:45:430:45:46

And then the caddy.

0:45:460:45:47

That, I'm afraid, was my emotional purchase.

0:45:470:45:49

-We both had tears, didn't we?

-We did, actually.

0:45:490:45:52

In all seriousness, it reduced me to tears because of the inscription,

0:45:520:45:56

which is, "To Toddles, from Daddy."

0:45:560:45:59

I wish you the best of luck.

0:45:590:46:01

- Really? - I really do.

0:46:010:46:03

I'll have to take that on the chin.

0:46:030:46:04

I think it's lovely, but the problem is,

0:46:040:46:07

it's got this later engraving on it, hasn't it? It has just killed it.

0:46:070:46:10

It tells a story of love and romance.

0:46:100:46:13

I know, I know, but you know what the purists are like,

0:46:130:46:16

and they go, "Oh, it's got a name engraved."

0:46:160:46:18

But it is still 1905.

0:46:180:46:19

OK, is that a vesta or a sovereign vesta?

0:46:190:46:23

- It's both. - Is it by Sampson and Mordan?

0:46:230:46:24

- It is. - Is it what, 1906?

0:46:240:46:26

- Have you seen it before? - No, I've never seen it before.

0:46:260:46:28

- It is 1906. -Is it 1906?

0:46:280:46:30

-Yeah, I don't believe that.

-Look at that!

0:46:300:46:31

There's more. Now, look at that.

0:46:310:46:33

-I saw that!

-It's a wardrobe.

0:46:330:46:34

It is an Edwardian Sheraton and Revivalist wardrobe. There we are.

0:46:340:46:37

We believe the market is so down for furniture,

0:46:370:46:41

we had to buy it and show it off to an audience.

0:46:410:46:44

- How much was it? - Well, we rate it highly.

0:46:440:46:46

- How much was it? - We really like it.

0:46:460:46:49

Hang on a minute, did you spend £80 on that?

0:46:490:46:52

Is that all?

0:46:520:46:53

That is all it cost.

0:46:530:46:54

Is that all it cost?

0:46:540:46:55

We started off thinking that we had big things

0:46:550:46:58

and you only had little things.

0:46:580:47:00

And here you come at the end with something bigger than anything

0:47:000:47:02

we have got at all.

0:47:020:47:03

You know what they say, size does matter.

0:47:030:47:05

Good luck. Size matters.

0:47:050:47:07

- Good luck, boys. - Good luck.

0:47:070:47:10

Let's get the real story on what

0:47:100:47:13

they thought about their opposite team's lots.

0:47:130:47:16

I do like our big, masculine, macho...

0:47:160:47:19

What is so funny?

0:47:190:47:21

Our big... Thank you very much.

0:47:210:47:23

Furniture, why did they buy furniture?

0:47:230:47:25

I don't know. We didn't even think about furniture.

0:47:250:47:28

I don't rate that old lamp.

0:47:280:47:29

To me, it is jagged, press moulded...knicky-knacky?

0:47:290:47:32

I don't rate at all...

0:47:320:47:33

Is it a knobbly knick-knack? Or not quite?

0:47:330:47:35

It wasn't quite.

0:47:350:47:36

-I think they really spent a lot of money on that silver.

-Yes.

0:47:360:47:39

And in a London sale,

0:47:390:47:41

all that sentiment about the spoon is gone out the window.

0:47:410:47:44

You know what they say, I think we've been very, very brave.

0:47:440:47:47

-And what do they say? Fortune favours the brave.

-It does.

0:47:470:47:50

Well, it's time to leave Derby and scarper 130 miles south

0:47:500:47:55

to the charming borough of Chiswick, in Greater London.

0:47:550:47:59

For the last 13 years,

0:48:010:48:02

Chiswick Auctions has run a bustling sale every Tuesday,

0:48:020:48:06

heaving with antiques and art.

0:48:060:48:09

With up to 1,000 lots going under the hammer each week,

0:48:090:48:13

it attracts a lot of attention from dealers and collectors alike.

0:48:130:48:17

Well done.

0:48:210:48:23

Well, finally, we have made it.

0:48:230:48:25

Bid at £20. 22. 25. 28. 30.

0:48:250:48:28

And the man in the know who will be running the show

0:48:280:48:31

is auctioneer Tom Keane. Good man.

0:48:310:48:34

117.

0:48:340:48:35

Oh, the Wedgwood cabinet plate.

0:48:350:48:38

I had to superglue it. Now, that won't help the price, will it?

0:48:380:48:40

What is it going to make, 25, 35 quid?

0:48:400:48:42

If I can roust 'em along.

0:48:420:48:44

The military presentation came.

0:48:440:48:46

A pity it's only '32 and not during the war.

0:48:460:48:49

Wartime issue makes it more valuable.

0:48:490:48:52

But that's solid. The tabletop gramophone is beech wood.

0:48:520:48:54

It's not mahogany, not oak.

0:48:540:48:56

It is a poor man's timber.

0:48:560:48:58

Geisha is not a good make.

0:48:580:49:00

£40 to £60 if they are lucky.

0:49:000:49:01

I predict today, and I am a gambling man,

0:49:010:49:04

that Kate and Charles are odds-on favourites.

0:49:040:49:07

If it was a horse race, they'd win by ten lengths.

0:49:070:49:09

Both teams started with £400 each.

0:49:110:49:13

Kate and Charles, after some impressive haggling,

0:49:130:49:16

spent a mere £296 on six auction lots.

0:49:160:49:20

And with David happy to follow Thomas's expert nose,

0:49:220:49:26

this double act bought just five lots,

0:49:260:49:28

but spent more, bringing their total to £335.

0:49:280:49:33

Ladies and gentlemen, the auction is about to begin.

0:49:360:49:40

First up, it is David and Thomas's 1930 painted petrol cans.

0:49:400:49:47

Taking a bid at £12. 12, thank you.

0:49:470:49:50

You took your time.

0:49:500:49:51

They're moving now.

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They're moving.

0:49:520:49:54

15 and a cup of tea after.

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15. 16. 17.

0:49:550:49:58

-And I'll throw in a bag of crisps.

-No.

-No? At 16.

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At £16. Only £16. Sold at £16.

0:50:000:50:03

Thomas, this is not very good start.

0:50:030:50:06

Well, at £16, they didn't quite set the room on fire.

0:50:060:50:10

I think the great thing is that after this,

0:50:100:50:12

Kate will still be reading the news, I will still be playing records,

0:50:120:50:15

but you two, your reputations are on the line here.

0:50:150:50:18

It might be the end of your careers.

0:50:180:50:20

I like your way of thinking.

0:50:200:50:22

Next, we have Kate and Charles' not so peachy, cracked Wedgwood plate.

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There is a little crack in it.

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-There is a good painting in the middle.

-That is the kiss of death.

0:50:290:50:32

It's only a little one. It's still very beautiful.

0:50:320:50:35

It is not as cracked as we are!

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True.

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Ten pounds for it.

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-Ten, who will give me 12?

-Come on. Keep going.

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12. 15. 18.

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-20. 22.

-Yes!

-25. 28.

0:50:440:50:47

-30. 32. 35. 38.

-Keep going!

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-Come on!

-Keep going!

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-45. 48.

-Get in.

0:50:500:50:52

That is a wonderful thing.

0:50:520:50:54

Bidder at 42.

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-£42.

-He's going.

-42, gone.

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-This is so exciting, like a horse race. Yes!

-Fantastic.

0:50:580:51:01

-Thank you very much.

-Brilliant.

0:51:010:51:03

Amazingly, their cracked plate served them well.

0:51:030:51:06

I'm really proud of you.

0:51:060:51:08

David and Thomas's Victorian umbrella stand is next to appear.

0:51:080:51:14

It's not.

0:51:140:51:16

I think it might.

0:51:160:51:17

£20 for it.

0:51:190:51:21

Bid of £20. Bid three. 22.

0:51:210:51:22

25. 28.

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-He's going.

-30. 32.

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35. 38. 38. 40. 42.

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42. 45. New bid at 48.

0:51:290:51:31

48. 50.

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52. 55.

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Front row bid at 55 and gone.

0:51:350:51:36

You've got it.

0:51:360:51:37

We have lost one, we have drawn one, the next one we win.

0:51:370:51:41

They paid £55 and that is what it brought.

0:51:410:51:45

But with auction costs, they actually made a loss.

0:51:450:51:49

Now, Kate and Charles' 20th century Jacobean-style oak mirror.

0:51:490:51:54

It's a beautiful mirror, don't you think?

0:51:540:51:56

Very reasonable.

0:51:560:51:58

Ten I'm bid. Who will give me 12? Ten pound bidder.

0:51:580:52:00

-Oh, no.

-12, thank you. 14?

0:52:000:52:03

14. 15? Thank you.

0:52:030:52:05

Over here.

0:52:050:52:07

-I'll come back to the important ones in a minute. 16.

-Sorry.

-17 then.

0:52:070:52:10

At £17 then.

0:52:100:52:12

-One more.

-Oh, that is a steal.

-At £17, going at £17.

0:52:120:52:15

And gone.

0:52:150:52:17

Thank you, sir. That is such a steal!

0:52:170:52:20

Going for £17, that doesn't even reflect what they paid for it.

0:52:200:52:24

Where are you going to put it?

0:52:240:52:26

In the hall, I think.

0:52:260:52:30

In the hall. It'll look lovely.

0:52:300:52:32

Attention, Thomas and David's colonial sergeant major's

0:52:320:52:36

-parade stick.

-Start me at £30.

0:52:360:52:38

At £30... £20 bid.

0:52:380:52:39

-25. 28.

-Told you.

0:52:390:52:41

30. 32. 35.

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38. 40. 42. 45.

0:52:420:52:44

A long way to go.

0:52:440:52:45

48. 50. 55.

0:52:450:52:47

Thank you. 60. Five.

0:52:470:52:49

Brilliant.

0:52:490:52:50

No, it's not brilliant, I paid 80.

0:52:500:52:53

85. 90. 95. 100.

0:52:530:52:56

110. 120.

0:52:560:52:58

At 110 and going.

0:52:580:53:00

Brilliant!

0:53:000:53:02

Well done.

0:53:020:53:04

Finally, some major profit.

0:53:040:53:07

See, I told you, didn't I?

0:53:070:53:08

Lose one, draw one, win one.

0:53:080:53:10

And now for Kate and Charles' most emotive purchase,

0:53:100:53:14

the inscribed silver spoon for baby.

0:53:140:53:17

-I am now, I'm really...

-I'm nervous.

-..nervous.

0:53:170:53:20

£30 for it. 32.

0:53:200:53:22

32. 35.

0:53:220:53:23

-38.

-It's going.

0:53:230:53:25

38, thank you. 40 here. 42.

0:53:250:53:26

45. 48. 50.

0:53:260:53:28

-52.

-Wonderful.

-55.

-Keep going!

0:53:280:53:31

£52 and going, all done?

0:53:310:53:32

-A bidder at 52?

-One more.

0:53:320:53:34

One more?

0:53:340:53:36

-£52.

-One for the road.

-All done at 52 and going.

0:53:360:53:39

Your last chance, and gone.

0:53:390:53:40

They are very ardent here.

0:53:400:53:42

-Thank you, sir.

-Thank you very much.

0:53:420:53:44

Thank you very much.

0:53:440:53:45

The auction room not going quite as gaga as they did over it.

0:53:450:53:49

Charles, I think I might have let you down.

0:53:490:53:51

Get out of here.

0:53:510:53:53

Thomas and David's Deco lamp now.

0:53:530:53:55

That lady is so attractive.

0:53:550:53:57

Who knows, when she comes on the screen, lots of men here,

0:53:570:53:59

they might take a fancy to her.

0:53:590:54:02

They might.

0:54:020:54:03

£20 for it.

0:54:030:54:04

£20. 22. 25. 25. 28. 30.

0:54:040:54:07

32. 32.

0:54:070:54:08

35. 35. 38.

0:54:080:54:10

38. 40. 42. 45. 48.

0:54:100:54:13

48. 50. 55.

0:54:130:54:15

60.

0:54:150:54:16

It's amazing, isn't it?

0:54:160:54:18

65. Five pounds, at 75. At 75.

0:54:180:54:20

At 75 and gone.

0:54:200:54:22

All done at £75. At 75 and going then...

0:54:220:54:25

So, we're just unlucky.

0:54:250:54:26

Unfortunately, the Deco light failed to dazzle.

0:54:260:54:30

And now, for Kate and Charles' Edwardian

0:54:300:54:33

silver sovereign vesta case.

0:54:330:54:35

-£100 for it.

-Come on.

0:54:350:54:37

-£50 for it.

-Come on.

0:54:370:54:38

Goes on five. 60.

0:54:380:54:39

Thank you. Five. 70 there.

0:54:390:54:41

75. 80.

0:54:410:54:42

85. 90. Five. 95.

0:54:420:54:45

95, new bidder. 100. 110.

0:54:450:54:47

-Come on.

-110?

0:54:470:54:49

£100. Gone?

0:54:490:54:51

So, that is both teams who have broken even on a lot,

0:54:510:54:55

which again means a loss after commission.

0:54:550:54:58

Next up are Kate and Charles'

0:54:580:55:00

delightful Oriental child's slippers.

0:55:000:55:02

Ten pounds. Bid 10. 12. 15.

0:55:020:55:05

15. 18? 18.

0:55:050:55:07

20. 22. 25 there.

0:55:070:55:08

-28.

-Not yet. 28, Now we are.

-30 there.

0:55:080:55:11

32? Are we done at £30?

0:55:110:55:14

All done at £30 and going.

0:55:140:55:16

£30, OK, four pounds.

0:55:160:55:17

Well done.

0:55:170:55:19

A tiny profit for the tiny slippers.

0:55:190:55:22

At this stage, Kate and Charles are in the lead

0:55:220:55:26

but everything could change in these last two lots.

0:55:260:55:28

This will now tell us who is the expert, the more expert.

0:55:280:55:33

No pressure, Tom.

0:55:330:55:34

The auctioneer does not have high hopes for the Geisha gramophone,

0:55:340:55:39

Tom and David's last lot.

0:55:390:55:41

£20 for it.

0:55:410:55:43

-20, bid at £20.

-Go on!

-22, thank you.

-Two people bidding.

0:55:430:55:46

25. 28.

0:55:460:55:47

30. 32. 35.

0:55:470:55:48

38.

0:55:480:55:50

40. 42. 45. 48. 50.

0:55:500:55:53

Two. 55.

0:55:530:55:54

58. 60.

0:55:540:55:55

62, new bidder. 65.

0:55:550:55:57

68. 70.

0:55:570:55:58

72. 75.

0:55:580:56:00

78? 75, somebody give me 78.

0:56:000:56:02

-Come on, one more.

-One more!

0:56:020:56:05

-One more!

-One more we're there!

0:56:050:56:06

Go on, make it.

0:56:060:56:08

All done now?

0:56:080:56:09

-80 quid.

-Yes!

-I can hardly talk anymore.

0:56:090:56:11

80, bid 80. 82?

0:56:110:56:13

82. Do I see five?

0:56:130:56:15

88. 90. Two.

0:56:150:56:16

95?

0:56:160:56:18

At 92 again. Gone at 92.

0:56:180:56:20

Eh! Thank you!

0:56:200:56:22

You are in the money. You are in the money, David.

0:56:220:56:24

£92!

0:56:240:56:27

Well, that has to be one kind of record.

0:56:270:56:29

This is tougher than I thought.

0:56:290:56:31

It's the moment of truth for Charles and Kate's last lot -

0:56:320:56:36

the Edwardian mahogany wardrobe.

0:56:360:56:38

- It is an investment. - Charles, it's firewood.

0:56:380:56:41

£100 for it.

0:56:410:56:43

A bid here at 80.

0:56:430:56:44

-Come on.

-I've 85. 90.

0:56:440:56:47

95. My last bid is 100, who will give me 110?

0:56:470:56:50

One more.

0:56:500:56:51

At £100, let's say 105.

0:56:510:56:54

-Yes!

-110.

0:56:540:56:56

105, give me 110.

0:56:560:56:58

105, give me 110. For 105 it's going.

0:56:580:57:00

The pressures is immense.

0:57:000:57:03

Third and last, and we're done.

0:57:030:57:05

-It's happened!

-Thank you.

0:57:050:57:09

Well, Charles' haggling paid off, a solid profit for a solid wardrobe.

0:57:090:57:14

I am absolutely emotionally drained.

0:57:140:57:16

-I'm parched, as well.

-Wrung out.

0:57:160:57:18

Unfortunately, and after all Tom's hard work,

0:57:200:57:23

he and David made a loss of £49.64,

0:57:230:57:27

and so leave the road trip with £350.36.

0:57:270:57:32

Kate and Charles did slightly better.

0:57:340:57:35

They had a small loss of £12.28,

0:57:350:57:38

which means they finish the road trip with £387.72

0:57:380:57:43

and are today's winners.

0:57:430:57:45

A close-run race, but sadly, no profits were made on this trip.

0:57:490:57:53

-Well done, partner.

-Hey, partner.

-Well done.

-Knowing my luck,

0:57:560:57:59

-I get to go home with you.

-No, you don't.

0:57:590:58:01

Let's go!

0:58:030:58:04

Away they go, Tom. That's it.

0:58:050:58:07

And the final task of the experts is...

0:58:070:58:10

traffic control.

0:58:100:58:12

Is there no end to their talents?

0:58:120:58:15

-Over there, Tom.

-Yeah, I've got it. I've got it, I've got it.

0:58:150:58:18

One last time.

0:58:180:58:19

BOTH: Going, going, gone!

0:58:190:58:22

Bye-bye!

0:58:220:58:24

-That was our car.

-Can I drive?

0:58:240:58:26

-You can drive.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:58:260:58:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:310:58:34

TV & Radio legend David 'Diddy' Hamilton and Journalist and Broadcaster Kate Silverton are led by antiques experts Charles Hanson and Thomas Plant as they go in search of antiques which will turn a profit. Starting their road trip in Newark, they take in Ruddington, Nottingham and Derby before winding up at auction in Chiswick, West London.