Episode 3 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Arlene Phillips and Anton du Beke compete to buy great antiques and turn a big profit. Experts James Braxton and Charles Hanson lend a hand as the road trip visits West Yorkshire.


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Transcript


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-TIM WONNACOTT:

-Some of the nation's favourite celebrities...

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What if we said 150 for the two? Then you've got yourself a deal.

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..one antiques expert each...

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Thank you, baby!

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Da da da-da da-da da-da da!

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..and one big challenge - who can seek out

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and buy the best antiques at the very best prices...

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I can feel something.

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THEY LAUGH

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..and auction for a big profit further down the road?

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Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

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What you've just come out with there, I cannot believe that!

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And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?!"

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Time to put your pedal to the metal -

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to West Yorkshire -

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2,029 square kilometres of gorgeous Britain.

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Whee...!

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And now a haven for two light-footed celebrities

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with £400 each and antiques in their sights.

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That's not their back view, by the way. Ha!

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From the world of dance, we have both sides of the judging arena.

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Mirror, signal, manoeuvre.

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Watch that man!

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All right. Oh, my God!

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Oh, my God!

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She is the girl who changed choreography

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and who outraged the censors with Hot Gossip

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and helped a nation to dance better.

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Now here for your viewing pleasure, it's Arlene Phillips.

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And Arlene's glamorous partner is this fine young specimen.

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A stalwart of the ballroom, a veteran of Strictly

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and a man who faces adversity with grace and poise.

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He's the outgoing rear of the year - he's Anton du Beke.

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Are you looking forward to two days of this?

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I'm very much looking forward to two days of this.

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I can't think of anything I'd rather do.

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And while our celebrities savour their affable 1969 Ford Cortina,

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they simply cannot find auction prospects all on their lonesome.

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-Do you know who the experts are?

-No, not a clue.

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-I hope he's a good expert.

-Yeah, I hope he's an expert!

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-I hope he's knowledgeable. An expert expert.

-An expert expert.

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-I'd like an expert.

-Not just any old expert.

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-Not any old jobby.

-God, no.

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Oh, no! In an ideal world,

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the finest expert minds would be at Arlene and Anton's disposal.

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But today...

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There you go. Very good for the buttocks.

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If we build up a sweat for you,

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Arlene will see your real credentials for dancing.

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HE LAUGHS

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Oh. Right, take it away. Take it away.

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Hmm.

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A surveyor and auctioneer,

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he's done 25 years' hard antiques labour.

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He loves fine furniture and great British design.

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Don't do it, madam. Don't do it.

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He's James Braxton.

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What should I do, James?

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And I know what you're thinking -

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school's out early, and that chap needs a haircut.

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However, he's a successful auctioneer,

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he's a shrewd businessman, he's a bit of a charmer.

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He's Charles Hanson. And he's cool. Well, he thinks so.

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Following in their almost reliable 1982 Citroen 2CV,

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our experts are dressed to impress.

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I always wanted to be a dancer.

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Did you? Really? You've got the figure for it, Charles.

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I'm often told I'm a very good dancer.

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I am the total opposite of you, Charles.

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HE LAUGHS

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When the music starts, I think

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I can cut some shapes on the dancefloor,

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but everybody around me tells me I can't.

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-My old singing teacher went to see you in Oh! Calcutta!

-Oh, my gosh!

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-Where you were dancing with your kit off.

-Yeah, I was.

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-I tried to get Ann Widdecombe to do that but she wasn't having it.

-Yay!

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I know, you said we'd never make it!

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-I used to be called Twinkletoes.

-Did you?

-Twinkletoes Hanson.

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Well, he may be light on his feet, but he's also late.

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Hello!

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-Hello!

-Perfect, perfect.

-Well done, Charles.

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Take it easy, take it easy.

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Dancing feet.

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Exactly, exactly.

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Come on, give us a shuffle!

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THEY LAUGH

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I am the most wooden man ever!

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-Look at this!

-How are you?

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Good to see you.

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-I'm James, how are you?

-I'm Arlene.

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-Nice to see you, Arlene, good to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

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-How are you?

-I'm good, I'm really good. So, what happens now?

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Antiques.

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-And you're an expert?

-I'm an expert.

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-And you're an expert.

-Absolutely.

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And I'm a bit more of a mover. This man needs some practice.

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Give me your hand.

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THEY LAUGH

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Very good.

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Good moves, good moves. Come on, Eileen. Arlene.

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-Come on, Arlene.

-Arlene!

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Come on, Arlene.

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It's Arlene, by the way!

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Nice one, James, get the name right(!)

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So our celebrities now have a sort of expert and £400 each.

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Bring on the rummaging.

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They will take in the best of the west of Yorkshire

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before hopping over borders to Lancashire and Merseyside

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for an imminent, decisive Liverpudlian auction

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in just two days' time.

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First, glorious Cullingworth opens its doors,

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and the local antiques fair here on the third Sunday of every month

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will need to give everyone a good start.

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-Anton, this is it.

-Ah!

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-This is it, this is what you call antiques.

-Is it?

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Are you a collector?

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I do like old sort of...um...things.

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Well, that sounds... sort of like antiques.

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Maybe Arlene can throw herself in more sort of wholeheartedly, maybe.

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"The Yorkshire Stone Castle". Ruined castle, 1860s, watercolour.

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Someone's framed them in rather ugly frames.

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Don't say that, it's probably the lady here!

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It's a matter of opinion, isn't it?

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-Quite.

-Yeah, I suppose so.

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I was just about to say how beautifully framed they were.

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Anton, I'll test you. What is an antique?

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Something aged, would it be?

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Yeah. Aged, it must be 100 years old. 100.

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So think pre-Titanic, think Edwardian and earlier,

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and all these objects here, they're collectable.

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We have £400 to spend.

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I think we can get lunch out of that, don't you?

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Not really the spirit!

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If Anton can't offer Charles enthusiasm, then, well,

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what can he offer?

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I want to walk round the antiques fair today with a swagger,

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almost to follow your lead,

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and to see how I can evolve myself as a dancer.

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-Really?

-Yeah, I do, yeah.

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Well, it will start from the floor up.

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Oh, look, it's a stalking party. 1895.

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So when Queen Victoria made the Highlands so fashionable

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with the purchase of Balmoral

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and society moved for the 12th of August

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up to the Highlands for grouse shooting and then stalking.

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-This is the beautiful 12th, or whatever it was called.

-Yeah.

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-Glorious twelfth.

-Glorious 12th.

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If it wasn't antiques, it'd be dancing. I really mean it.

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Yes, yes. I think you have a natural talent.

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You have something in there that we can work on.

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You're going to walk properly. So stand tall,

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and you're going to walk naturally,

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because if you can't walk, as Josephine Bradley said -

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-you would have liked her - you can't possibly dance.

-OK, OK.

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So I'm going to walk, see? My feet, natural swinging leg action here.

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Natural, natural, natural. I do a little turn and I walk back.

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Don't turn on your heels, dear. Keep walking.

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This doesn't look much like shopping, does it?

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-Do a turn. On your toes.

-Oh!

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Whilst Charles works on his new career,

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Arlene is expanding her horizons in the field of antiques appraisal.

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What could you do this for?

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-45.

-45. I think that's a great price

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and I think it would be churlish...

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-So, £45...

-£45.

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..is on our very, very, very first purchase.

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-Well done. That's great.

-Well done!

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Arlene's got straight down to some serious antiques business already.

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This girl certainly knows what she wants,

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and I'm sure the boys are busy shopping too. Right?

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-Now walk.

-Maybe not.

-Yes?

-Yeah, walk. Keep the body up.

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Roll through your feet. Don't go up and down.

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-Turn. Good turn!

-Really good turn.

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Grip. You must grip both buttocks.

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Never mind about buttocks, how about gripping some shopping?

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I love this.

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She is glam, isn't she? Very glam.

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I love this.

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Marilyn Monroe.

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Oh, my God, look at the bathing belle and her ball.

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Now, which one do you like out of the both or do you like them both?

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Well, OK. I love the Marilyn because of the pose,

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because of the look, I love the colours,

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but this one feels to me that if you put her up in auction,

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people would be going bump, bump, bump.

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I'd like to take it off your hands.

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What do you really think I could get this bathing belle for?

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It's 75, and that's it.

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Could we do it for 70?

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-No.

-75.

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-Lovely, thank you very much.

-Should we leave here?

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Let's move on out of here, let's go!

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Yeah, let's go to another antiques shop. Come on.

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That's two in the bag for Team Arlene.

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Feels like Anton and Charles are just...

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dragging their feet, frankly.

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There's a plethora of history on this table.

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Of an antique history.

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And where are you swaying to?

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Well, a nice scent bottle over there I saw earlier. Look at that.

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-It's blue enamelled on top.

-Yeah. What do we think about that?

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It says made by Adie Brothers of Birmingham, 1902.

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So this was made, let's say, 10 years before Titanic sank.

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Is it collectable?

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Oh, absolutely. Silver hallmark, look, that's all-important...

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-that lion there confirms it's solid silver.

-Keep going.

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That's nostalgia, OK?

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And then you sort of throw your arms out, can't you,

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and you can believe in it.

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Oh. Hey, can you feel it?

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I think Anton's beginning to feel something. Oh, Lord.

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Could a £90 perfume bottle awake his senses?

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-Anton, you know, I'm here to serve you.

-Are you?

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-I'm here to...

-Advise me.

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..advise you and I would like to buy

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a good scent bottle for about £60.

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What do you think, £70?

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-£70.

-What do you think?

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We'll give you 70 of our best pounds for it.

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OK. For you. Just for you.

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Should have said 65. I told you!

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Let's hope we've awoken Anton's inner antique shopping sense

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with that long-awaited purchase.

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Right. Well, I'm very happy with that.

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One down.

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However, the competition are hot-footing it and are on the move.

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When I actually go looking for antique bargains,

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I'm up at 5am and I'm hitting the markets with the traders

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and I'm getting worried that it's getting a little bit late.

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-We're a bit casual about this, aren't we?

-Yeah.

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So you are an early bird?

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I am an early bird when I decide to go hunting.

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And now the Road Trip leads Arlene and James due north

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by a whopping nine miles to Keighley on the outskirts of Bradford.

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Keighley has been home to the greats.

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Former residents include Mollie Sugden,

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aka Mrs Slocombe of Are You Being Served?,

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and actor Peter Mayhew,

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better known as Chewbacca from the once-popular Star Wars films.

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Were you ever in Hot Gossip?

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No, I wasn't IN Hot Gossip - I created Hot Gossip.

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You created it. So have you always been sort of more choreographer?

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I fell into choreography by accident.

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I was babysitting for Ridley Scott.

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Really?!

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HE LAUGHS

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No, I know. This is a true story.

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And he was offered the job of creating a commercial

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for Lyons Maid ice cream with a dancing cow and a milk maid,

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and he said to me, "Could you do a few steps?"

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And it went on from there.

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So that was...Ridley Scott?

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That was my start.

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That is quite a start.

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A very good start.

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Right, Arlene, here we are.

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Fabulous.

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A lady of your calibre, to the front door, I think, with you.

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Thank you.

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Arlene and James have begun well,

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and Keighley's tantalising Heathcoat Antiques

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could help them stay ahead of the game. Owner Michael is here to help

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and has a selection of silver items to tempt them with.

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Now, what is this? What are they?

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So that looks like...

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Are they studs or buttons?

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Yeah, a dress set. 14-carat fronts.

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And these are 14 quid, are they?

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No, they're 14 carat.

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14 c... Sorry.

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-TIM LAUGHS

-Keep up, James!

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But clearly, Team Arlene has set their sights on buying

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a number of quality items.

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Keen searching unearthed a gold, dress stud set,

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a silver-topped jar,

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a Georgian silver tablespoon,

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a pair of napkin rings, all for a bargain £20.

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That's a gift. Oh, and an enamel box, priced at 68.

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What's your best price on that?

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-40.

-40.

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I think you'll make a profit on that.

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You know what, Michael, I'm trusting you.

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HE LAUGHS

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Don't let me down, because I'll be back. OK.

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So we're going to have that?

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I think we should have this. I definitely think we should have...

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Those for 20?

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-Yes. That's a no-brainer.

-Well done. We've bought four lots.

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So that's a cool £40 for the enamel box

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and £20 for the silver and gold collection. Great!

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-Money, James.

-There you are.

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Thank you, baby.

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Talking of infants,

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the day's shopping triumphs are feeling a little one-sided.

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As a young boy, when did you realise you had...

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twinkletoes?

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When I looked down and I had princess slippers on!

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THEY LAUGH

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I started dancing when I was about 13 or 14.

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And pretty soon after that, I thought,

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"This is something I'd really like to do."

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Doubling back from Keighley,

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Anton and Charles are heading for an indulgence.

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Four miles southwest lies the very pretty village of Haworth,

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world-famous birthplace of the literary Bronte sisters

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and, interestingly, twinned with

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the ancient Inca city of Machu Picchu in Peru.

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That's bonkers.

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But I feel as though

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we are making chemistry together, aren't we?

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The dancing and the antiques are coming together.

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-I can take that lady...

-..who's a powerhouse...

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I would use other words than powerhouse.

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-Perhaps I'll give you the terminology.

-Yes, please.

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Beautiful, words like that. They appreciate that, words like that.

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-Magnificent, they love that word.

-All the dancers?

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Heavyweight, not so keen.

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Charles may have a lot to learn about ballroom etiquette,

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but he does know how to show a celebrity a good time.

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Local artisan Robin is waiting to meet our boys and show them

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his rather unique business, run from his back garden workshop.

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-Hello, sir.

-Good to meet you. I'm Robin.

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-Hi, Robin.

-Have you come to do some clog-making?

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The exact origin of clogs is obscure,

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but they are possibly the oldest form of footwear in the world.

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These are not the familiar hollowed-out Dutch clog

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but a wooden-soled leather-uppered shoe.

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Traditionally associated with Yorkshire and Lancashire,

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the Industrial Revolution saw clogs worn all over Britain,

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from northern textile mills to London fish docks.

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During the Victorian period,

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clogs were worn mainly by the working class,

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and a pair could've set you back between two and three shillings.

0:16:160:16:20

Robin bought Greenwood Clogs in 2005

0:16:200:16:23

to preserve the local craft

0:16:230:16:26

and continue supplying local farmers. Oo-arr!

0:16:260:16:29

This is the workshop.

0:16:290:16:31

Let's see if we can all fit in.

0:16:310:16:34

I've seen lots of workshops but never a workshop full of clogs.

0:16:340:16:38

This is a farmer's clog.

0:16:380:16:39

It's got a leather upper, chrome leather,

0:16:390:16:42

which is quite hard-wearing.

0:16:420:16:43

It's machine-stitched, this type of upper, on a treadle sewing machine.

0:16:430:16:48

-Unbelievable.

-Then it's nailed to the sole.

0:16:480:16:52

I think that's one advantage for farmers,

0:16:520:16:54

because walking in all that manure and fertiliser,

0:16:540:16:57

the stitching can rot,

0:16:570:16:58

whereas nails are pretty hard-wearing.

0:16:580:17:00

When making a pair of clogs,

0:17:000:17:01

the first thing you start with is a drawing of the person's foot.

0:17:010:17:05

We make some measurements across the foot, just to check the size.

0:17:050:17:09

Some people have higher arches than others.

0:17:090:17:12

Any sensitive areas, like bunions or bony bits...

0:17:120:17:16

-What size feet are you?

-I am about eight and a half. What are you?

0:17:160:17:19

-Any bunions?

-No bunions. No ingrown toenails or anything unpleasant.

0:17:190:17:24

-Any bony bits?

-No, only the bits which should be bony.

0:17:240:17:26

I suppose being a dancer... I have flat arches. Are yours quite high?

0:17:260:17:30

Have you got dropped arches?

0:17:300:17:31

-I'm afraid I have.

-You will never make a dancer.

0:17:310:17:33

You can slip that in

0:17:330:17:36

and just ease the leather out, like that.

0:17:360:17:39

Every street had one at one time.

0:17:390:17:41

-So you just push the leather out?

-Yes. I love these old tools.

0:17:410:17:45

There are so many different tools with different purposes.

0:17:450:17:48

That looks a bit alarming at first sight, doesn't it?

0:17:480:17:51

It looks like a torture instrument.

0:17:510:17:53

How many people today are carrying on this tradition of clog-making?

0:17:530:17:56

-Maybe a dozen...

-Really?

-..I can think of.

0:17:560:17:58

In some areas, clog-making is a lost art.

0:17:580:18:01

But the small group who carry on the tradition are passionate

0:18:010:18:05

about the product and the skills involved in their construction.

0:18:050:18:08

Robin uses the soft wood alder to fashion the soles,

0:18:110:18:14

as the timber is water-resistant.

0:18:140:18:17

So you hold this in your right hand

0:18:170:18:18

and wedge the wood in place like that.

0:18:180:18:20

-Then you can just shave off little bits like that.

-Oh, wow.

0:18:200:18:24

So you do a lot of curling?

0:18:240:18:25

It is the leverage that makes it easier to carve the wood.

0:18:250:18:28

It's like slicing through butter. Would you like to have a go?

0:18:300:18:33

Could I have a go? Would you mind terribly?

0:18:330:18:35

Yeah. Hold that in your left hand.

0:18:350:18:36

-Shall I hold it for you?

-No, don't get involved.

0:18:360:18:39

Just... The main thing to remember...

0:18:390:18:42

-Look at that. How's that?

-Great. A natural, I think.

0:18:440:18:48

-It's a nice feeling, actually, isn't it?

-It is. It is quite therapeutic.

0:18:480:18:53

-Oh, it's a little...

-Fantastic.

-I like that word. Fantastic.

0:18:530:18:57

He's bitten off a little more than he can chew there.

0:19:000:19:03

-He is fairly hacking at it now.

-This is pretty much hacking.

0:19:030:19:07

-An old hack.

-He's an old hack.

0:19:070:19:09

When you see people like us coming in here, or him to be specific,

0:19:090:19:13

hacking away at your traditional skill,

0:19:130:19:16

does it make your heart sink very slightly?

0:19:160:19:18

Does a little bit of your soul die away?

0:19:180:19:20

No, it's nice to see people interested and having a go.

0:19:200:19:23

Whilst there are many skills and much care involved in constructing

0:19:230:19:27

a pair of clogs, it is their simplicity that makes them

0:19:270:19:30

so durable and, so some say, very comfortable shoes.

0:19:300:19:34

With Charles and Anton wearing a brand-new pair each,

0:19:340:19:37

what's the next best thing to do?

0:19:370:19:39

Have a dance, I suppose.

0:19:390:19:41

-How do they feel?

-They feel very comfortable, actually,

0:19:410:19:43

in a sort of cloggy kind of way.

0:19:430:19:46

This is my friend, Harry. He's going to show you how to dance.

0:19:460:19:49

Hello, Harry.

0:19:490:19:50

-Good luck with him.

-Hi, Harry.

0:19:500:19:53

I'm going to show you what we use them for.

0:19:530:19:56

Show us a basic move, just the first sort of start off move.

0:19:560:19:59

The first step is step, shuffle, step, shuffle.

0:19:590:20:02

Step, shuffle, step, shuffle, step, step, step.

0:20:020:20:05

Obviously a lot faster than that.

0:20:050:20:07

-So have a go. Good luck.

-Yes, thank you.

0:20:070:20:10

After four. Three, four. Step, shuffle, step, shuffle...

0:20:100:20:13

Gosh! Harry is a skilled dancer and musician,

0:20:130:20:16

performing with the clog-wearing Lancashire Wallopers.

0:20:160:20:20

Harry's outfit is authentic to a 19th-century bargeman.

0:20:200:20:24

But the more contemporarily clad Charles

0:20:240:20:29

is simply trying his best.

0:20:290:20:32

I'm sorry about her at the end there. I do apologise.

0:20:320:20:35

The next one is really, really easy.

0:20:350:20:37

Step, drop, step, drop, step.

0:20:370:20:40

For some reason, they call this the Wurzel step. I've no idea why.

0:20:400:20:43

Now, here's a thing.

0:20:430:20:45

If you want a pair of dancing clogs,

0:20:450:20:47

then the wood ash is used,

0:20:470:20:49

as, apparently, it produces a better tone.

0:20:490:20:52

ACCORDION MUSIC

0:20:520:20:54

-Go!

-Now.

0:21:010:21:02

All together.

0:21:050:21:07

-Look up.

-I'm trying!

0:21:090:21:11

-Oh, bravo!

-Well done.

0:21:110:21:13

That was very good. Charles, brilliant!

0:21:130:21:16

-Was that quite good?

-No. Good effort.

0:21:160:21:20

-Thank you very much indeed. Great to see you.

-You're welcome.

0:21:200:21:23

What a wonderful day. Our fortunate celebrity dancer

0:21:230:21:26

has a new pair of dandy clogs and has learned a fantastic new dance.

0:21:260:21:30

And our expert did...

0:21:300:21:32

well, really very well too.

0:21:320:21:35

One, two, three, four.

0:21:350:21:37

ACCORDION MUSIC

0:21:370:21:39

Time to hang up those dancing clogs and bed down now for the night.

0:21:420:21:46

There's a full day's shopping ahead,

0:21:460:21:49

and everyone will need to feel fresh and happy.

0:21:490:21:52

Night-night!

0:21:540:21:56

The sun's up, and West Yorkshire is ready for us.

0:22:030:22:07

But is everyone ready for the day?

0:22:070:22:10

-This car...

-It's a beauty, isn't it?

-It's a beauty.

0:22:100:22:13

-It's like if you turn the wheel...

-It goes eventually.

0:22:130:22:16

It has a mind of its own. I like that.

0:22:160:22:20

That reminds me of some of the women I've danced with.

0:22:200:22:23

Yeah, minds of their own. Trying to lead instead of follow.

0:22:230:22:28

-Sorry, Jim. I can't find reverse. Can you give me a push?

-Come on.

0:22:280:22:31

The Citroen has a mind of its own too.

0:22:310:22:34

More buttock work.

0:22:340:22:36

Jim, it's good to stretch. You know what they say about dancing.

0:22:360:22:40

-Always keep straight hands.

-Is it straight hands?

0:22:400:22:43

-It's all of this.

-Is it?

-Yes.

0:22:430:22:45

So far, Arlene Phillips and her suave companion

0:22:450:22:48

have spent £180 on four auction hopefuls.

0:22:480:22:53

The 1895 watercolour,

0:22:530:22:56

the 1920s figurine with beachball,

0:22:560:22:59

the silver and gold job lot,

0:22:590:23:01

and the pretty enamel box.

0:23:010:23:03

Arlene and James have £220 left to tango with.

0:23:030:23:07

-I don't think you would do very well with that, I'm afraid.

-OK, fine.

0:23:070:23:12

Well, you know. You're the expert.

0:23:120:23:14

Don't keep saying that. The pressure's on.

0:23:140:23:16

Meanwhile, Anton Du Beck and his willing accomplice

0:23:160:23:21

have spent just £70 on one solitary item.

0:23:210:23:23

They've done a lot of dancing about.

0:23:230:23:25

The silver and enamel perfume bottle.

0:23:250:23:28

With great resolve, new shoes and £330,

0:23:280:23:31

Anton and Charles must launch themselves

0:23:310:23:34

into a solid day's rummaging.

0:23:340:23:36

-They call it...

-A bygone?

0:23:360:23:38

-No.

-A '70s object?

0:23:380:23:41

No, shut your face! You're not helping at all.

0:23:410:23:43

Shops are open, and the teams are back together

0:23:450:23:48

to go their separate ways.

0:23:480:23:49

-'80s has now become vintage.

-That's my era.

-That's your era.

0:23:490:23:54

I was doing the early days

0:23:540:23:56

of the creation of videos for MTV.

0:23:560:23:59

Go on, name some names.

0:23:590:24:01

Well, I was in New York with Whitney Houston,

0:24:010:24:04

in Detroit with Aretha Franklin,

0:24:040:24:07

I worked with Diana Ross, I worked with Elton John, The Bee Gees...

0:24:070:24:11

It wasn't like working with a Michael Jackson or a Madonna.

0:24:110:24:14

Well, just be glad you not working with Charles.

0:24:140:24:18

Anton, one of my great hobbies is metal-detecting.

0:24:180:24:21

Have you heard of it?

0:24:210:24:23

And your wife, how does she feel about you doing that?

0:24:230:24:26

Well, she understands my needs.

0:24:260:24:28

Well, I'm glad somebody does, Charles.

0:24:280:24:30

Our treasure hunters are off now

0:24:300:24:33

to pastures new.

0:24:330:24:34

Leaving Haworth behind,

0:24:340:24:36

the Road Trip heads 10 miles south

0:24:360:24:38

to the handsome village of Mytholmroyd.

0:24:380:24:41

-Ready to go?

-Ready to go.

0:24:410:24:43

Are you in that antique-focused mood today?

0:24:430:24:46

-I feel very focused on antiques today.

-What are you after?

0:24:460:24:49

I'm after a bargain that we can sell on for a profit.

0:24:490:24:52

Come on.

0:24:520:24:55

I know exactly what I'm doing!

0:24:550:24:57

Mytholmroyd is more famous as the birthplace

0:25:000:25:03

of Sylvia Plath's husband, the poet laureate Ted Hughes.

0:25:030:25:07

But today, it is the Caldene Antiques Centre

0:25:070:25:11

which brings our shoppers to town.

0:25:110:25:14

Owner Paul is on hand for kindly advice.

0:25:140:25:17

Aren't you feeling at home here? Look above you. A glitterball.

0:25:170:25:22

-Glitterball!

-I could feel something.

0:25:220:25:25

I wasn't quite sure what it was. I thought it was the damp in my knees.

0:25:250:25:29

-But it's a glitterball, it's calling.

-Exactly.

0:25:290:25:31

Do you think they sell the glitterball?

0:25:310:25:34

Yes. Everything is for sale.

0:25:340:25:36

-Tell me how much it is.

-A mere £38, Anton.

0:25:360:25:40

We as sellers, and with your pedigree,

0:25:400:25:42

maybe that would be associated with you in the auction room.

0:25:420:25:46

-Do you think?

-It might generate a public interest in it.

0:25:460:25:48

Have you got a plinth I could put it on?

0:25:480:25:51

I could turn it into a trophy and present it to myself.

0:25:510:25:54

-Did you not win it three years ago?

-No, let's not talk about it.

0:25:540:25:57

-Four years ago?

-It was no years ago. I don't want to talk about it.

0:25:570:26:00

Just leave it, Charles!

0:26:000:26:04

Whilst Anton licks his wounds,

0:26:040:26:06

Arlene and James are hot-footing it to Hebden Bridge

0:26:060:26:09

for more antiques. Hebden Bridge is a small market town.

0:26:090:26:13

It was an ideal location for water-powered weaving mills.

0:26:130:26:15

During the 19th and 20th centuries,

0:26:150:26:18

it became a centre for the clothing industry.

0:26:180:26:21

So much so that it became known as Trouser Town.

0:26:210:26:25

Let's hope James has got his on

0:26:250:26:27

as they head for Hebden Bridge Antiques.

0:26:270:26:30

After all, we don't want him being debagged.

0:26:300:26:32

-What's our strategy here?

-Market fresh.

0:26:320:26:37

Market fresh?

0:26:370:26:39

Oh, I like the sound of that.

0:26:390:26:42

Our experts and celebrities want those special items,

0:26:420:26:44

literally just in the door.

0:26:440:26:48

Here at Hebden Bridge Antiques,

0:26:480:26:51

could Jude be the girl to help? Hey, Jude!

0:26:510:26:53

I'm looking round here,

0:26:530:26:55

and you've got masses of the most glorious stuff.

0:26:550:27:00

But what we need is something we can make money on, and I wonder

0:27:000:27:03

if you have anything hidden away in that back room that's market fresh.

0:27:030:27:06

Something special.

0:27:060:27:07

Here's something we only put out yesterday,

0:27:070:27:10

which I particularly like.

0:27:100:27:11

-It's that pink vase.

-That pink Vasart?

0:27:110:27:14

-Yes, the Scotland glass.

-Oh, it's beautiful.

0:27:140:27:16

I don't really know a lot about this Vasart vase,

0:27:160:27:20

but I know it was only new in on Sunday.

0:27:200:27:23

Sunday, eh? Well, that sounds market fresh to me. Yum-yum!

0:27:230:27:27

The nutty problem, the price.

0:27:270:27:30

It's a very reasonable price of £40.

0:27:300:27:33

What would that be to us?

0:27:330:27:36

Don't say 50!

0:27:360:27:39

You're challenging me.

0:27:390:27:41

-Think low, think low.

-Your lowest price so we don't have to keep bidding.

0:27:410:27:46

-OK, 30, I think is quite...

-Have we got 30?

0:27:460:27:50

-We're quite close to the edge now, aren't we?

-We are close to the edge.

0:27:500:27:53

-You want to pay 25, don't you?

-Yeah.

0:27:530:27:56

Of course, Arlene and James have plenty of money.

0:27:560:27:59

But it's a good tactic, although the acting was a bit wooden.

0:27:590:28:03

-Hello!

-Look at this. Do you like it?

0:28:030:28:07

It's an antique Black Forest desk tidy inkwell.

0:28:070:28:11

And inkwell?

0:28:110:28:12

It was made in the Black Forest in around 1890.

0:28:120:28:16

It's got this purpose of being a practical object on a desk

0:28:160:28:21

and is also very decorative.

0:28:210:28:23

It has a certain Hungarian feel, because it's German.

0:28:230:28:27

-Is Hungary near Germany?

-I think it probably might be.

0:28:270:28:31

-It's missing the ink bottle.

-It is.

-That could be a bit of a blow.

0:28:310:28:36

What's the best price, out of interest?

0:28:380:28:41

-That would be £40.

-But no less?

0:28:410:28:44

-I think...we'd have to stick at that, yeah.

-OK.

0:28:440:28:47

-Food for thought, mental note.

-Mental note.

0:28:470:28:50

In fact, Charles is playing the long game here.

0:28:500:28:53

And Anton, well, he doesn't seem to be playing any sort of game.

0:28:530:28:57

I mean, who's making the decisions here?

0:28:570:28:59

He's very funny, Charles. He makes me laugh. He's very enthusiastic.

0:28:590:29:02

I don't think we have the same tastes, but when we do

0:29:020:29:06

come together on something, it's obviously going to be a winner.

0:29:060:29:10

It's just coming together on something,

0:29:100:29:12

that's the problem at the moment.

0:29:120:29:13

Have you ever flown Concorde?

0:29:130:29:17

No, I have not. Have you?

0:29:170:29:19

-Look at that, a silver Concorde frame. Isn't that wonderful?

-Lovely.

0:29:190:29:23

Solid silver and only £55.

0:29:230:29:25

-Do you like it?

-Well, I like it.

0:29:250:29:27

It just says silver frame.

0:29:270:29:29

Well, it IS a silver frame

0:29:290:29:31

but one that you would have bought onboard Concorde as a souvenir.

0:29:310:29:35

So it is a bit special.

0:29:350:29:36

It's a modern collectable.

0:29:360:29:38

A collectable is all about the theme.

0:29:380:29:41

And this Concorde theme is like the Titanic.

0:29:410:29:45

It's something we will remember with great nostalgia,

0:29:450:29:49

because it was such a queen of the sky, wasn't it?

0:29:490:29:52

It really was the ultimate in that flying machine.

0:29:520:29:55

So it's the ultimate in-flight souvenir,

0:29:550:29:59

the ultimate disco accessory,

0:29:590:30:01

and the ultimate meeting of German and Hungarian culture...possibly.

0:30:010:30:07

But does Anton really like any of them?

0:30:070:30:09

-Sometimes you buy tactically with your mate in mind.

-OK.

0:30:090:30:14

-I'm thinking of you.

-You take full responsibility for that disaster?

0:30:140:30:18

-I will take full responsibility. Would you take 90 for all three?

-We will.

0:30:180:30:23

You've bought...

0:30:230:30:25

..a - no disrespect, lads - rotten glitterball.

0:30:270:30:31

You've bought a broken table thing and a silver frame.

0:30:310:30:36

Yes.

0:30:360:30:38

-Because I'm determined... to make us money.

-All right.

0:30:380:30:43

And with that, we're going to say, "Going..." - look at me -

0:30:430:30:47

"Going, going...

0:30:470:30:50

"Gone." We'll take them, sir. Thank you very, very much.

0:30:500:30:53

Charles has done it and dragged poor Anton kicking and screaming towards a rather uncertain fate.

0:30:530:30:58

20, 40, 60, 80, 90.

0:30:590:31:01

-Keep the faith in me, OK?

-I've got the faith.

0:31:010:31:03

-I need coffee.

-Let's have coffee.

-And a lie down!

0:31:030:31:06

And whilst Anton loses control,

0:31:090:31:11

Arlene has fallen under the spell of three Scottish witches.

0:31:110:31:15

Sorry, vases.

0:31:150:31:17

Two made by Vasart and one by Strathearn,

0:31:170:31:19

but all 20th-century Scottish studio glass.

0:31:190:31:22

This is the other Vasart one.

0:31:230:31:25

This has got a price tag of 45.

0:31:250:31:28

I'm tempted to bulk up if we go and get the right price.

0:31:280:31:33

Could be get that at a similar price to that one - 25?

0:31:330:31:36

Hmm, go on, then.

0:31:380:31:40

-What about the Strathearn?

-50?

0:31:400:31:43

100 for the three.

0:31:430:31:45

If you're asking me, James, I'm going, "Let's do it."

0:31:450:31:48

Well, let's do it. Come on.

0:31:480:31:50

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:500:31:52

-I'll take two, you take one.

-OK.

-We're off.

-Let go!

0:31:520:31:55

And with that, our happy shoppers depart Hebden Bridge,

0:31:550:32:00

heading for pastures new

0:32:000:32:01

-just as the competition are arriving in town.

-Right on down.

0:32:010:32:06

No harm done.

0:32:060:32:07

With Hebden Bridge Antiques still recovering from its last celebrity encounter,

0:32:070:32:11

the wonderfully "market fresh" Peter clocks in for his shift.

0:32:110:32:14

Let's hope he's ready for action.

0:32:140:32:16

Look, Anton, look at this down here.

0:32:170:32:20

Languishing away. Do you like her?

0:32:200:32:23

She is quite sweet. Yes. Less than she was when she started, I fear.

0:32:230:32:28

-I quite like her.

-Really?

0:32:280:32:31

-Yes, I do.

-She's got a hand missing.

0:32:310:32:34

You know what, she's got a hand missing here

0:32:340:32:38

and a hand missing on the back here.

0:32:380:32:41

-So she has got both hands missing?

-Absolutely.

0:32:410:32:43

-You've made it sound like there were more to come.

-Exactly.

0:32:430:32:46

(But I quite like her.)

0:32:460:32:48

-Really? It's broken.

-It's broken, I know.

0:32:510:32:54

It's broken, it's tired, it's worn out.

0:32:540:32:57

-On the floor down here.

-Kicked about.

-Kicked about.

0:32:570:33:00

Because she's after a Romanian sculptor who was called Dimitri Chiparus.

0:33:000:33:05

I sold an original by him of almost this exact pose,

0:33:050:33:10

which was bronze and ivory, which made about £17,000.

0:33:100:33:15

-Did she have both hands?

-She had one hand missing.

0:33:150:33:19

But this one isn't ivory, it's actually resin.

0:33:190:33:24

(But it's period.)

0:33:240:33:25

Pick it up. Let's take it.

0:33:250:33:27

Well, maybe not "take", but some negotiation with market fresh Peter would be

0:33:270:33:32

the best course of action right now.

0:33:320:33:34

-What's the best price we could have her for?

-Let me have a look.

0:33:340:33:37

It's broken, by the way.

0:33:370:33:38

Got a lovely, you know, Anton feeling about her.

0:33:380:33:43

-How does £50 sound?

-Would you take £30 for her?

0:33:430:33:47

-Go on, then, let's make it 30.

-Anton, what do you think, £30?

-Yes.

0:33:470:33:50

Really? Yes, we'll take her.

0:33:500:33:52

-Yes, we will take her.

-Yes, we'll take her.

0:33:520:33:55

Anton is finally getting the hang of this. Could he be about to take the antiques shopping bull by the horns?

0:33:550:34:02

I quite like this. What do you think of this?

0:34:020:34:05

You'll be pleased with this - it's got a stamp.

0:34:050:34:10

-It's got a stamp! It's got a lion.

-Yes.

0:34:100:34:12

-It's got a lion.

-Which means it's...?

0:34:120:34:15

-Real.

-Silver, yes.

-Genuine silver. K - 1920s?

0:34:150:34:20

And the good thing is there's no monogram or crest,

0:34:200:34:23

it hasn't been personalised, so it's really fresh to the market.

0:34:230:34:27

Well, how about getting fresh with some haggling?

0:34:270:34:30

-We'd like to offer you £100.

-Cash.

-In cash. In cash.

0:34:300:34:34

-We don't have to worry about receipts.

-Cash in hand, cash in hand.

0:34:340:34:37

In your hands. Cold cash.

0:34:370:34:39

-Why don't we say...

-Why don't we say yes?

-..130?

0:34:390:34:42

Honestly, we're putting all our eggs into this silver basket.

0:34:420:34:46

-I like it. No, we are.

-The margin will be very tight.

0:34:460:34:50

But as a special one-off, just for you, let's call it 100.

0:34:500:34:54

-Thank you very much.

-That completes our famous five objects. I'm really confident.

0:34:540:34:59

-Good.

-Thank you, Peter.

-Thank you.

0:34:590:35:00

The dirty dancer has done it.

0:35:000:35:03

Finally, Anton takes the responsibility for his own shot at Road Trip glory.

0:35:030:35:08

Not before time, as the hour of auction showdown draws near.

0:35:080:35:13

Oblivious to recent purchases, Arlene and James are taking

0:35:140:35:18

themselves off for a nostalgic seaside treat.

0:35:180:35:22

Road Trip is taking Arlene back to her adolescence.

0:35:230:35:27

56 miles east from Hebden Bridge,

0:35:290:35:32

way out on the Lancashire coast, sits a very special place.

0:35:320:35:35

Look, there's the North Pier! Blackpool North was posh.

0:35:370:35:42

My auntie lived in Blackpool South which wasn't posh.

0:35:420:35:45

But I thought of this as very grand.

0:35:450:35:48

Women that would sit on deck chairs and have their jewellery on and their best frocks.

0:35:480:35:52

And as a teenager, my sister and I, we used to come here,

0:35:520:35:57

and I would wear my stilettos

0:35:570:35:59

and dress up to go walking down the North Pier.

0:35:590:36:03

What a stunner!

0:36:050:36:07

Blackpool began putting itself on the map in the late 1870s,

0:36:070:36:10

becoming the first town in the world to get electric street lighting.

0:36:100:36:15

In 1889, Blackpool's mayor, John Bickerstaffe,

0:36:150:36:19

attended the Great Exhibition in Paris and fell in love with a big iron tower.

0:36:190:36:24

British seaside history would never be the same again.

0:36:250:36:29

-Does this bring back memories?

-Yeah, memories of the circus.

0:36:290:36:33

-Really?

-Yes.

-Did you start in this circus?

-No!

0:36:330:36:36

JAMES LAUGHS

0:36:360:36:39

I used to come to Blackpool when I was small, cos we lived in Manchester.

0:36:390:36:43

-And we came to visit the circus.

-Oh, fabulous.

0:36:430:36:47

Amazingly, the entire Tower and ballroom took just three years to complete,

0:36:470:36:53

using 2,500 tonnes of steel and 5 million Accrington bricks.

0:36:530:36:59

On opening day, 14th of May, 1894,

0:36:590:37:03

thousands of people took the inaugural tour.

0:37:030:37:05

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:37:070:37:09

Current general manager Kate Shane is here to give Arlene and James their turn.

0:37:090:37:13

-Nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

0:37:130:37:15

-Welcome to Blackpool Tower.

-Thank you.

0:37:150:37:17

So, our beautiful ballroom.

0:37:180:37:21

-It is absolutely exquisite.

-It is stunning, isn't it?

0:37:210:37:26

It's rather like walking into a German or Austrian church.

0:37:260:37:30

-It's sort of baroque, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

-It's amazing.

0:37:300:37:33

-It must be Grade I listed?

-The whole building is Grade I listed, yes.

0:37:330:37:37

So, yes, we're very proud, very proud of Blackpool Tower,

0:37:370:37:41

but this is the icing on the cake for us, the beautiful ballroom.

0:37:410:37:44

This spring in this floor is incredible.

0:37:440:37:50

To dancers, this is the piece de resistance in terms of dancing,

0:37:500:37:53

the springing in the floor, yeah, they love it.

0:37:530:37:55

-A quick step on this floor means that you really can fly.

-Really?

0:37:550:37:59

Arlene, is this the mecca of dancing, Blackpool?

0:37:590:38:02

Blackpool Tower ballroom is where every ballroom and Latin dancer wants to dance.

0:38:020:38:08

-It's the most desirable ballroom possibly on earth.

-Really?

0:38:080:38:13

Most definitely. I would say that.

0:38:130:38:15

Nowhere else in the world do you ever see the words

0:38:150:38:19

"Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear."

0:38:190:38:22

Yes, a Shakespearean quote from Venus And Adonis,

0:38:220:38:25

and yes, it is the only place that you can dance under that.

0:38:250:38:28

People use the phrase, "if walls could talk," but if a floor could talk...

0:38:280:38:34

-Oh, yeah.

-Can you imagine how many people met the love of their life here and married?

0:38:340:38:41

Blackpool, the resort, was formed as somewhere for the working classes

0:38:410:38:45

to go and enjoy themselves.

0:38:450:38:47

And there is a quote that when they created this beautiful opulent ballroom,

0:38:470:38:51

that a factory girl could be a duchess for a day.

0:38:510:38:54

And that just makes you feel warm inside that something like that happened.

0:38:540:38:57

You're quite right. The ballroom was created by designer Frank Matcham,

0:38:590:39:03

one of the most successful of his time.

0:39:030:39:07

Blackpool was the first place to offer such opulence to ordinary working people.

0:39:070:39:12

Our dancing legend, Arlene Phillips, spent formative summers here

0:39:120:39:17

and finds another bright emblem of her past.

0:39:170:39:20

-So our beautiful Wurlitzer organ.

-Aww. It's fantastic!

0:39:200:39:25

Can I be Reginald Dixon?

0:39:250:39:28

The beloved, world-famous Reginald Dixon, the man who popularised

0:39:280:39:34

I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside, had this amazing organ

0:39:340:39:38

built for himself, and the Tower ballroom, way back in 1935.

0:39:380:39:44

He drew enormous daily crowds here for 40 years

0:39:440:39:47

and was knighted for his services to music in 1968.

0:39:470:39:51

Very, very, very complicated to play,

0:39:530:39:55

but the most exciting thing was standing waiting.

0:39:550:39:59

And I'm going to show you what happens.

0:39:590:40:03

ORGAN PLAYS

0:40:030:40:05

-It's great, isn't it?

-It is.

0:40:100:40:13

-I think it deserves a round of applause, do you not think?

-Yeah.

0:40:190:40:23

Absolutely. Yeah!

0:40:230:40:26

Blackpool Tower is a triumph of ambition and design,

0:40:270:40:31

conceived with good heart, and built with a love of ordinary people.

0:40:310:40:36

Now, if you didn't think THAT was enough to get you on your feet,

0:40:380:40:42

how about this?

0:40:420:40:44

Beneath the Tower, Frank Matcham created another stunning arena

0:40:440:40:48

also dear to Arlene's heart.

0:40:480:40:51

It feels so tiny, but it felt so enormous,

0:40:510:40:53

-and there were elephants in here!

-Yeah.

0:40:530:40:56

And one feature that is worth pointing out... you can see the archways?

0:40:560:40:59

Those are the archways of the Tower and the four corners of the legs.

0:40:590:41:03

So the embellished plasterwork is actually on the steel structure.

0:41:030:41:06

So when you're in the middle of the ring,

0:41:060:41:08

you're actually stood right underneath the centre of the Tower.

0:41:080:41:11

It's a complete circus arena,

0:41:130:41:16

with traditional circus big-top features,

0:41:160:41:19

and as a part of the routines...there's this.

0:41:190:41:22

-Oh, look! Dancing waters.

-Yeah, dancing waters.

0:41:240:41:28

All the waters are choreographed to the music.

0:41:280:41:32

-It is stunning, isn't it?

-Stunning.

0:41:320:41:34

-Have you done any water acts like this?

-No, I haven't.

0:41:340:41:38

This must be magical.

0:41:380:41:39

It's magical for me, and I'm a stately age, but as a child...

0:41:390:41:43

It's magical.

0:41:430:41:45

What inspired Arlene's childhood dreams,

0:41:480:41:51

and many young people before her,

0:41:510:41:53

will inspire future generations for many, many years to come.

0:41:530:41:58

Leaving nostalgia behind, it's time to head for the show and tell,

0:41:580:42:03

and find out what they really think of each other's items. And look - more water!

0:42:030:42:08

-Oh, hello!

-Oh...!

0:42:080:42:11

This is more you, Anton.

0:42:110:42:14

-A man of style, a man of dapper attire.

-Oh!

0:42:140:42:18

-A little dress stud set.

-Darling set!

0:42:180:42:20

-14-carat gold.

-Are they 14 carat?

0:42:200:42:23

They're for an elegant gentleman,

0:42:230:42:25

but if you think you're only getting that, you're not.

0:42:250:42:30

That's one big lot, Anton, and I'm trembling a bit, because it's a really good lot.

0:42:300:42:33

-How much is it worth?

-I reckon...about £65.

0:42:330:42:38

-I'm going to say more.

-Really?

-I don't know about those studs.

0:42:380:42:42

If they are 14-carat gold, that lot is worth £150-plus.

0:42:420:42:46

We paid 20.

0:42:460:42:49

What, for each piece?

0:42:490:42:50

No - Arlene and James

0:42:500:42:52

actually got the whole BUNDLE for just £20. Scary, isn't it?

0:42:520:42:57

-These are our piece de resistance.

-They are?

-Yeah, they are.

0:42:570:43:01

Are they Scottish?

0:43:010:43:03

-Do you know that they are?

-I thought they might be Scottish.

0:43:030:43:06

-Look at the colour, Anton. They are alive, aren't they?

-They are.

0:43:060:43:09

-I can't stand 'em.

-All right, Anton!

0:43:090:43:13

The Road Trip is a competition, but it's usually a friendly one.

0:43:130:43:16

-No, they're revolting.

-Why?

-Cos we didn't pick 'em.

0:43:160:43:19

Well, perhaps we should move on.

0:43:190:43:21

Three, two, one...

0:43:210:43:23

Oh...!

0:43:240:43:26

Disco ball!

0:43:260:43:27

Look at this, Arlene.

0:43:270:43:30

That... I love this, this is my favourite lot.

0:43:300:43:33

-Look at that bear.

-Oh, I'm not attracted to this at all.

0:43:330:43:38

I didn't like it either.

0:43:380:43:40

Don't tell me you paid more than £20 for that?

0:43:400:43:44

-It's not attractive.

-Anton, sell it.

0:43:440:43:45

"How does your bear smell?" "Terrible! It's got no nose."

0:43:450:43:49

-I think it's novel and quirky, and it cost...?

-£30.

-Good.

0:43:490:43:53

I think you'll find some man that will come along

0:43:530:43:56

and think, "That would be attractive on my desk." I hope you do.

0:43:560:43:59

Me too - poor Bavarian/Hungarian snoutless fellow.

0:43:590:44:04

We began with a fine sniff of a scent bottle. And it's here.

0:44:040:44:07

-JAMES:

-I like that.

0:44:070:44:09

Art deco, blue enamel...

0:44:090:44:10

Blue and silver. Solid silver.

0:44:100:44:14

-It has a wonderful whiff...

-£128.

0:44:140:44:17

-What did you pay for it?

-What do you think?

0:44:170:44:20

I probably think that you got it down to somewhere like 70?

0:44:200:44:24

60?

0:44:250:44:27

£27.

0:44:270:44:28

-£27. Is this label false?

-Plus 43 - it cost us £70.

0:44:280:44:33

-And didn't I just say £70?

-You were spot-on.

0:44:330:44:37

I hate it when you're right.

0:44:370:44:39

It's beautiful, and I would not have paid more than £70,

0:44:390:44:43

because if you HAD paid more, forget it.

0:44:430:44:46

Great. But what do they really think?

0:44:460:44:49

I think it's not bad.

0:44:490:44:51

I think they paid pretty good prices.

0:44:510:44:54

But it just depends on what people like.

0:44:540:44:56

I hate the bear, and he could go for a fortune.

0:44:560:44:59

-They've got one really good star lot, you know.

-The picture?

0:44:590:45:01

No, it's those dress studs. And the bits of silver they bought.

0:45:010:45:05

-I think our items, they're looking good.

-They're looking good!

0:45:050:45:09

I had a real burst of confidence about our items,

0:45:090:45:14

and I'm so glad we got the three vases.

0:45:140:45:17

Because Charles likes the vases.

0:45:170:45:19

So it's going to be a real helter-skelter, hurdy-gurdy,

0:45:190:45:22

rollercoaster ride for you and me tomorrow, but keep the faith.

0:45:220:45:25

I think we've bought well together.

0:45:250:45:28

Let's keep the faith!

0:45:280:45:29

-And bring on tomorrow, and let them fight!

-Come on, let's go.

0:45:290:45:34

Yeah. Let's go. Let's get to auction.

0:45:340:45:38

It's been a monumental journey -

0:45:390:45:41

a three-county race-around of heated shopping

0:45:410:45:43

and inspirational encounters.

0:45:430:45:46

Hebden Bridge and Blackpool become a memory,

0:45:480:45:51

as our two teams head 56 miles to the fab city of Liverpool.

0:45:510:45:58

Home to the Albert Docks.

0:45:580:46:00

Birthplace of the Beatles - yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:46:000:46:04

And shameless purveyor of all things Scouse, including the brow.

0:46:040:46:08

Your driving needs no explanation, chief.

0:46:120:46:15

-James?

-He's terribly keen...

0:46:180:46:21

I'm afraid James has gone inside. But good luck.

0:46:210:46:23

-And to you.

-He's very keen!

0:46:230:46:25

Best of luck to you.

0:46:250:46:27

James can't wait to see inside Cato Crane Auctioneers,

0:46:310:46:35

open to keen bidders and careful browsers since 1985.

0:46:350:46:38

28. 30. 32. 34...

0:46:410:46:43

Today's gavel-basher, John Crane,

0:46:430:46:46

has taken a long, hard look at our celebrities' investments.

0:46:460:46:49

The gold stud set is nice. It's in a box, but it's only gold-plated.

0:46:490:46:54

It looks gold, does the trick, no problem whatsoever.

0:46:540:46:57

Don't think it's 14 carat, though.

0:46:570:46:59

The glitterball...

0:46:590:47:01

someone might be opening a dance hall somewhere, who knows? Lovely.

0:47:010:47:04

What's it worth? I don't know, whatever it brings. £10, £20, £30...

0:47:040:47:08

Would I have it in the kitchen? Yes, maybe. Bit of fun.

0:47:080:47:11

Both teams started with £400 each.

0:47:130:47:15

Arlene and James spent £280 on five auction lots.

0:47:150:47:20

Money, James. Thank you, baby.

0:47:200:47:22

It's a vase.

0:47:220:47:24

But Anton and Charles went one better...

0:47:240:47:28

spending £290 on six auction lots.

0:47:280:47:31

Take possession, show it's yours.

0:47:310:47:34

-Really?

-Puff his chest out.

0:47:340:47:36

-Do you want to touch? It's not bad, is it?

-It's not bad. It's not perfect.

0:47:360:47:41

Chests out and nice big smiles - the auction is about to begin.

0:47:410:47:45

First up - Anton's first reluctant purchase,

0:47:450:47:49

the silver and enamel scent bottle.

0:47:490:47:52

£30 if you like, somebody.

0:47:520:47:54

30? £30 is bid.

0:47:540:47:55

35 now. 35, 35.

0:47:550:47:58

40. 45 at the back, 45. 50.

0:47:580:48:01

£45...

0:48:010:48:02

One more. Come on...

0:48:020:48:04

It's enamel. Did he mention that?

0:48:040:48:09

70. 75 now.

0:48:090:48:10

75. 80. One more?

0:48:100:48:13

£80? I'm selling...

0:48:130:48:15

£80, I'm selling at 80 now.

0:48:150:48:16

-It's going...

-It has a smell.

0:48:160:48:18

Quiet, please. £80...

0:48:180:48:20

Not a terrible start, by any means,

0:48:200:48:22

but auction costs will eat into that hard-won tenner profit.

0:48:220:48:26

-You only made £10.

-Oh, yeah, but we're up.

-It all helps.

0:48:260:48:29

Have you seen the room? We're happy with a tenner, let me tell you.

0:48:290:48:33

And facing the music next, Arlene's enamel offering. This round box.

0:48:330:48:39

£20 is bid. £20 is bid.

0:48:390:48:41

Oh...!

0:48:410:48:42

All done at £20, best we can do is 20.

0:48:420:48:44

No!

0:48:440:48:46

25 there. 25, 30.

0:48:460:48:48

35.

0:48:480:48:49

40. 45 with you?

0:48:490:48:51

40 over there, then.

0:48:510:48:53

It's going to be sold. It's got to go...

0:48:530:48:56

£40.

0:48:560:48:58

Ouch! I'm afraid that's a loss in real terms.

0:48:580:49:03

James! This is not fun any more.

0:49:030:49:06

Well, it's fun for us.

0:49:060:49:08

So let's see if Anton and Charles's Concorde silver frame

0:49:080:49:12

can take to the skies.

0:49:120:49:13

£30 is bid. And 35 with you.

0:49:130:49:15

40. 45.

0:49:160:49:19

Come on, it's worth every single penny. 50...

0:49:190:49:21

55. 60. It's very worth it.

0:49:210:49:25

65?

0:49:250:49:27

-Sir, you'll be sorry afterwards...

-One more.

0:49:270:49:30

65. 70, one more from you.

0:49:300:49:32

It's worth more, they fly!

0:49:320:49:34

70.

0:49:340:49:35

£70 is bid.

0:49:350:49:37

Any more anywhere? Come on.

0:49:370:49:40

One more... Come on.

0:49:400:49:42

75 anywhere...

0:49:420:49:44

70 is your bid, sir. All done and finished?

0:49:440:49:47

Sold. £70.

0:49:470:49:49

A supersonic result. Great.

0:49:490:49:51

Perhaps Anton should have shown Charles's choice more respect.

0:49:510:49:56

-Put it there, Arlene.

-You'll make a killing on that.

0:49:560:49:59

Well done, Charles! Although no-one really likes a show-off.

0:49:590:50:03

£70!

0:50:030:50:04

Now...Arlene and James's bargain, the group of silver and gold.

0:50:060:50:11

What will happen?

0:50:110:50:12

-14-carat...France...

-I beg your pardon?

0:50:120:50:16

Allegedly!

0:50:160:50:17

10. 15 at the back.

0:50:170:50:19

20, 25, 30.

0:50:190:50:21

35.

0:50:210:50:22

40, 45.

0:50:220:50:24

£50 is bid. 55?

0:50:240:50:25

Where's John at the back? 52?

0:50:250:50:27

52. 54. 56.

0:50:270:50:29

58. 60, John?

0:50:290:50:32

58, the gentleman in blue here. At £58...

0:50:320:50:35

60, a new bidder down by the rostrum.

0:50:350:50:37

62, sir. 64.

0:50:370:50:40

66, 68...

0:50:400:50:41

70. 72.

0:50:410:50:43

£70 is bid now. OK, all done at 70...

0:50:430:50:48

Sold. At 70. Really?

0:50:480:50:51

£70.

0:50:510:50:53

Hats off to Arlene.

0:50:530:50:55

An excellent profit - although your expert kind of steered you there.

0:50:550:51:00

We can breathe, we can breathe, we can breathe.

0:51:000:51:03

-You've made 50 quid there.

-Yeah. And you've made an old bird very happy!

0:51:030:51:09

Next up, Charles's broken-nosed Bavarian bear.

0:51:090:51:14

Anton failed to love it. But will the saleroom?

0:51:140:51:18

25? 25 right behind you.

0:51:180:51:20

30. 35, sir.

0:51:200:51:22

40. 45.

0:51:220:51:24

One more? 50.

0:51:240:51:25

Someone like you, £50...?

0:51:250:51:26

£50 is bid. 52?

0:51:260:51:28

52, sir. 54.

0:51:280:51:30

It's a beauty. Hand-carved.

0:51:300:51:32

56. 58.

0:51:320:51:34

Come on, one more?

0:51:340:51:36

58. Round it up to 60.

0:51:360:51:37

-Go on!

-Yes?

0:51:370:51:39

One more. 60. 62.

0:51:390:51:42

£60 is bid...

0:51:420:51:44

All done at 60. Done and finished. A nice lot...

0:51:440:51:48

Stanhope's from Stanhope Street. There we go.

0:51:480:51:50

They've done it again! Anton will be sorry he ever doubted Charles.

0:51:500:51:55

And Arlene...she'll just be sorry.

0:51:550:51:58

-Made £30.

-If it's any consolation, I'm shocked and stunned.

0:51:580:52:01

Now a shot at auction glory for Arlene and James.

0:52:020:52:05

Their hunting watercolour prepares to go ballistic.

0:52:050:52:08

30 is bid. 30.

0:52:080:52:10

40... 50 the gent. 60.

0:52:100:52:13

£60 is bid.

0:52:130:52:15

65, OK.

0:52:150:52:18

I'm going to sell at £65...

0:52:180:52:21

It's going.

0:52:210:52:22

£65? Your bid.

0:52:220:52:24

Sold!

0:52:240:52:25

£20 in the bag, and this auction tango is looking pretty close.

0:52:250:52:30

That is amazing, that we are neck and neck. That is amazing.

0:52:300:52:35

That is incredible.

0:52:350:52:37

I saw your lots, that IS amazing, I couldn't be any more surprised.

0:52:370:52:40

You're a fine one to talk about quality, Anton.

0:52:400:52:43

Let's see if we can D-I-S-C-O

0:52:430:52:45

at the A-U-C-T... Oh, well, you get the idea.

0:52:450:52:50

10. Can we get 12?

0:52:500:52:51

Thank you. 12.

0:52:510:52:53

14. 16. 18. We're nearly there.

0:52:530:52:56

20. 22.

0:52:560:52:57

Come on, DJ. One more.

0:52:570:53:00

22, thank you.

0:53:000:53:01

You'll be sorry afterwards.

0:53:010:53:04

When you're sitting at home tonight.

0:53:040:53:06

It's your bid, sir. £22...

0:53:060:53:09

Sold.

0:53:090:53:11

Slim. But that's the shiniest £2 made here today.

0:53:110:53:15

Next up, she's 1920s, she's a beauty, she's Arlene's favourite.

0:53:150:53:19

But she's also mass produced. Let's hope she catches the bidders' eyes.

0:53:190:53:24

£20 to start me off. Anybody? ..£20 is bid.

0:53:240:53:28

I'll take 25 now, somebody.

0:53:280:53:30

30. Come on. 30.

0:53:300:53:32

35. 40.

0:53:320:53:33

45. 50, it's against you.

0:53:330:53:36

55, 60.

0:53:360:53:39

60 is one bid.

0:53:390:53:41

-£60. All done at £60...?

-No, no...

0:53:410:53:44

At the back...

0:53:440:53:46

60. I've got to sell, ladies and gentlemen. It's going...

0:53:460:53:50

£60...

0:53:500:53:52

-60.

-Well, maybe you just can't sell 1920s figurines in Liverpool.

0:53:520:53:57

Maybe it's not 1920s.

0:53:570:53:59

The 1930s, however... that remains to be seen.

0:53:590:54:01

Can Anton triumph where Arlene floundered?

0:54:010:54:04

-Quite an oldish one...

-Oldish!

0:54:040:54:08

Onyx. Mention the onyx.

0:54:080:54:10

20 is bid there. 20.

0:54:100:54:12

25 over there now. 30, yes.

0:54:120:54:14

35, the gent.

0:54:140:54:16

40. Don't worry about the hand - you can put a glove on it.

0:54:160:54:19

It's a good thing. It's a nice thing.

0:54:190:54:22

35. 40 with you.

0:54:220:54:24

40 is bid, 42... 42 anywhere?

0:54:240:54:28

-I'm going to sell it at 40...

-Go on, one more.

0:54:280:54:31

£40, last time...

0:54:310:54:34

Anton and Charles are carrying the torch for slim victories today.

0:54:340:54:38

But are those small profits starting to add up?

0:54:380:54:41

Well done. Blimey, you could sell snow to the Eskimos, you.

0:54:410:54:46

Arlene fell in love with these delightful glass vases.

0:54:460:54:48

Can Liverpool be smitten by their charms too?

0:54:480:54:53

30? All done at £30? 35.

0:54:530:54:56

40. £40.

0:54:560:54:59

45 anywhere?

0:54:590:55:01

45, 50. 55.

0:55:010:55:04

All done at £55?

0:55:040:55:07

I'm going to have to sell at £55...

0:55:070:55:11

Is that the best we can do, at £55 now?

0:55:110:55:14

It's going... That all right?

0:55:140:55:16

£55...

0:55:160:55:18

It's your bid over there, £55...

0:55:180:55:20

-Sure you don't want to spend more on it?

-Disaster.

0:55:200:55:22

-Can't get any more on it...?

-Go on.

0:55:220:55:24

Tough crowd.

0:55:250:55:26

Long way from Scotland.

0:55:260:55:28

I'm useless!

0:55:280:55:30

-Oh, no...

-< That's a lovely item.

0:55:300:55:32

-Now, they have got to make a loss of about 35...

-45.

0:55:330:55:39

It's close, but no cigar, for Arlene.

0:55:390:55:42

Thank goodness for Anton's sensitivity.

0:55:420:55:44

I'm sure there's a casino - we'll try and make your money up somewhere.

0:55:440:55:48

(CHUCKLES) Anton and Charles have one last lot to sell.

0:55:480:55:52

So let's hold on the celebrating for a moment or two.

0:55:520:55:55

35 is bid. 40...

0:55:550:55:57

45. 50, 55.

0:55:570:56:00

60.

0:56:000:56:02

55 is bid. 60...

0:56:020:56:04

65. 70, 75.

0:56:040:56:06

80... It's worth a lot of money.

0:56:060:56:09

-85...

-One for the road!

0:56:090:56:10

85. 95...

0:56:100:56:13

-CHARLES:

-Come on. The magical three figures.

0:56:130:56:16

£90. All done at 90?

0:56:160:56:18

95 anywhere?

0:56:180:56:20

95, the gentleman.

0:56:200:56:22

100...?

0:56:220:56:23

£95 is bid. 100 anywhere?

0:56:230:56:26

It's £95...

0:56:260:56:28

£95, then, it's going to be sold at 95...

0:56:280:56:32

Your bid, right through there.

0:56:320:56:36

-£95.

-A sad little loss to end on.

0:56:360:56:38

But, happily, small enough to keep

0:56:380:56:40

our gracious front-runners in the lead.

0:56:400:56:43

-She's giving you the shoulder, she's turned her back on you.

-I am shocked.

0:56:430:56:46

-You've got the real chill, you have.

-I'm shocked.

0:56:460:56:49

Come on. I'm leaving!

0:56:490:56:52

Oh, she's out of the door.

0:56:520:56:55

She'll get over it.

0:56:550:56:56

Our celebrities began with £400 each.

0:56:560:56:59

Despite Arlene's and James's enthusiasm

0:57:000:57:04

and gung-ho approach, they made a wounding loss,

0:57:040:57:07

after auction costs, of £42.20.

0:57:070:57:10

So that means they end their Road Trip with £357.80.

0:57:110:57:17

On the other hand, Anton's blase, carefree

0:57:170:57:21

and, frankly, at all times doubting attitude

0:57:210:57:24

made a small profit of £10.94.

0:57:240:57:26

A profit, nevertheless.

0:57:260:57:28

Our gracious winners end their Road Trip with £410.94.

0:57:280:57:34

All the funds generated by our celebrity teams

0:57:370:57:40

will go to Children in Need.

0:57:400:57:42

Arlene, are you going to forgive me?

0:57:440:57:47

-I shall try, James, I shall try very hard...

-ANTON LAUGHS

0:57:470:57:51

Stop crowing!

0:57:510:57:53

-You didn't make THAT much money.

-Oh, listen, the key is we made SOME.

0:57:530:57:59

This is it. Sweet sorrow, hey? But we took it.

0:57:590:58:01

-Sweet sorrow indeed.

-Well done, Arlene.

0:58:010:58:05

-That's enough, James.

-I forgive you!

0:58:050:58:09

Bye... Where's our honk?

0:58:100:58:12

HORN HONKS

0:58:120:58:14

-My mate...a fellow antique buff.

-Yeah.

0:58:170:58:20

Rather...being pedantic, because Anton's a great guy,

0:58:200:58:24

but in terms of steering him, James, into the antique world...

0:58:240:58:28

it's been hard work.

0:58:280:58:30

ANTON: I was hoping that Charles would have given me a bit more of a steer,

0:58:300:58:34

-but he was very good at getting a bargain.

-Is he?

0:58:340:58:37

-I think he wanted to learn to dance. I think he's a frustrated dancer.

-Oh, he is...

0:58:370:58:41

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:540:58:57

Dancers and rivals Arlene Phillips and Anton du Beke compete to buy great antiques and turn a big profit. Experts James Braxton and Charles Hanson lend a hand as the road trip visits West Yorkshire, a traditional clog-making business and Blackpool Tower, before ending at auction in Liverpool.