Episode 6 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 6

Jon Culshaw and Debra Stephenson take to the road with antiques experts Thomas Plant and Mark Stacey to find the best antique deals in Edinburgh for auction in Essex.


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-Some of the nation's favourite celebrities.

-Can we just have 1.50 for the two,

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-then you've got yourself a deal?

-One antiques expert each.

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See what I've got in store for you.

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Da, da, da, da, da!

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And one big challenge,

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who can seek out and buy

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the best antiques at the best prices...

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To see you... Nice.

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LAUGHTER

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..and auction for a big profit further down the road?

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GAVEL BANGS

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Who will spot the good investment?

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Who will listen to advice?

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What you just come out with, I cannot believe that.

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And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?"

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to Edinburgh.

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Setting for a road trip to remember,

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and not just for the witty banter,

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sparkling repartee and eye-catching antiques.

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It might be wet.

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It might be windy,

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but it's still going to be a fight to the finish,

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to see which of our celebrity teams

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can make the most of their £400 spending money.

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Can you recognise who it is?

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Haven't a clue?

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Let's get in the car.

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It's Jon Culshaw and Debra Stephenson.

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-Impressionist extraordinaire...

-LAUGHTER

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..Jon possesses an uncanny ability to become other people

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and has poked gentle fun at virtually every personality on the planet.

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You're useless, the lot of you, and for that reason, you're all fired.

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But when he relaxes,

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he still enjoys nothing more than

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gazing at the stars.

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I've got my new telescope and ridiculously big binoculars.

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They're a beefy pair of binoculars.

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And sitting pretty next to Jon is actress and comedienne

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Debra Stephenson.

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Definitely game for a challenge.

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If I could win this heat, that would mean a lot to me,

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that would really make my day.

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And well known for her roles on TV's Bad Girls and Coronation Street,

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she is no slouch in the mimicry department either.

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Co-starring with Jon on the Impression Show.

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Hey, Dannii, come in here and check out my bum.

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I reckon it's got even smaller.

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No way, Kyles. That thing's already as tight as a kookaburra's mimsy.

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SHE GASPS

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I don't know anything about antiques.

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My mother-in-law does,

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she's a whiz, and she lives in Scotland.

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I don't think I'll be allowed

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to go in and ask for her help,

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I don't suppose I'll need to really.

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Because we've got our own experts,

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-haven't we?

-We do have experts.

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Er... That's debatable.

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Smile, Thomas. Smile for the camera.

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What are you doing?

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I'm trying to get the windscreen wiper working.

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They don't work.

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You've done it, you've done it!

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They just needed my touch.

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Behaving like excitable schoolboys at the prospect of meeting

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their celebrities...

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LAUGHTER

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I know that laugh, it's Mark Stacey,

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who, despite a hefty 25 years in the antiques trade,

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specialising in porcelain, silver and retro, has never

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lost his boundless, boyish enthusiasm when it comes to collecting.

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LAUGHTER

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Good teeth too.

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And at the wheel of the dinky 1960s Morris Minor,

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and often mistaken for a jolly literary character...

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You're like Billy Bunter.

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..it's Thomas Plant, who started out as a lowly porter

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and rose through the ranks to become chief in-house valuer,

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with an impressive knowledge of silver, jewellery

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and collectable toys. Gosh!

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-I'm quite excited.

-I'm very excited.

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Do you think they're going to do impressions of us?

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I doubt they'll do one of you, Thomas.

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I think they can do me because of my distinctive voice.

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You have got a unique voice.

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You're sort of just...

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-What am I, just...boring?

-Yeah.

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Oh, that's just so unkind.

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Our teams will kick off in Scotland's capital city, then head

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southwards, finally ending up at

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an auction showdown

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in Loughton, Essex.

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As Jonathan struggles to make his escape from the tartan,

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red, late-1960s Triumph Spitfire...

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It's like the car's giving birth to you.

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..everyone rallies round to help deliver him from its clutches.

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It's a boy!

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Nice to meet you.

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Hello, I'm Thomas.

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Let me just get me bearings!

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It didn't want to let you go.

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Clearly, that's the car for you.

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Aye, aye, I think Debra has a car strategy here.

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When I was a teenager, and 17 and learning to drive,

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this would have been my absolute ideal car.

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I wanted a Morris Minor convertible.

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Debra is after the Morris Minor

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and Mark seems to have a problem with the Triumph.

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I find getting in and out of those low cars difficult.

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Is it your age?

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So, the teams are decided.

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I'll be DCI Gene Hunt, and you can be Sam Tyler.

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Off they head in convoy to their first shop.

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Debra is with Mark and Jon is with Thomas in the Spitfire.

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And they sound worried already.

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I am concerned about this other duo behind us.

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What should we be watching out for?

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I don't know, I think there's going to be stiff competition.

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Well, we're about to find out, aren't we?

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-We've landed. Well done.

-Good old Bessie.

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We're getting there first.

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First up is Courtyard Antiques, run by Lewis Rosa.

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My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius.

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I think we'll get in, shall we? Yeah.

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Can't have them grabbing the bargains.

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Can you hear me?

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I can hear you.

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I'm speaking from many centuries ago.

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-Should we leave the boys downstairs?

-Yes.

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Let's go up and see what's up here.

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We can have a good rummage before they get a chance.

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Sounds like a plan.

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And with both teams itching to spend their £400, there's no time to lose.

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Nothing's leaping out.

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It's not flashy, is it?

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No.

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I wonder, are the boys having better luck downstairs?

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A couple of things I've spotted.

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One of them could be this little banker's lamp.

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Somebody might think, that might look nice in my house

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and they might sort of buy it.

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Art Deco began in Paris in the 1920s

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and the lamp is a fine example of the style.

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You can't go wrong with a lamp.

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You can't go wrong with it, and I like the original glass shade.

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That's really good.

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A fine lamp indeed, but also a blinding price.

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-It's 180 quid.

-It's all right, we can work at that.

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-We'll work at that, OK.

-We will.

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Has the spotlight shone on anything for Debra?

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-Actually, this is quite nice.

-It's a set for 12.

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-That's a really good tea set.

-They look quite old, don't they?

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-Yeah, what do you think though?

-But I don't think they are.

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The pattern is called Gainsborough. Yeah.

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Then it's...Queen Anne China.

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-Do you think 1950s?

-Do you know, you're absolutely right.

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So, although styled to look older, it's actually mid-20th-century,

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making it more vintage than antique.

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-Do you like it?

-I do.

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A lot of the ladies I know, a lot of my friends,

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are really into having coffee mornings.

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I think it's something that even if it's not old and valuable,

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it's definitely something that people would like and enjoy using.

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It's not a useless item.

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I don't think it's Mark's cup of tea.

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-Moving on.

-Moving on, shall we?

-Yeah.

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-Do you think they've bought lots of stuff downstairs?

-I doubt it!

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-I doubt it.

-I know Thomas too well.

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Thomas, you might know, but you've not reckoned with the impetuous nature of Jon Culshaw.

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The other thing I spotted was this.

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Oh, yeah, the Voigtlander.

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The Voigtlander camera, with the viewfinder in there. On its tripod.

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That's quite decorative.

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That would have a certain charm to it.

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Voigtlander is one of the oldest names in photographic equipment,

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originally established in Vienna in the 18th century.

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This model, the Brillant, dates from the 1930s.

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-Another thing I've spotted.

-Oh, yeah, here we go.

-On a roll here.

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Jon is definitely getting the hang of this antiques buying lark,

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whilst upstairs, Mark is forced to look to the heavens for inspiration.

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You know, sometimes, it's almost worth looking above your head

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-in places like this as well.

-Oh, yeah.

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-Oh, look at that chair.

-Oh, it's got a little face.

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-It's got loads of face people on it, hasn't it?

-Oh, yeah.

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I think that's rather funky, don't you?

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-I don't like it.

-It's not about that.

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It's about what might appeal to somebody else, you see, as well.

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I mean, it's kind of ugly because the faces of these gargoyley things

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are so ugly, and then they've got breasts and protruding stomachs

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and taily things.

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Urgh! It's freaking me out, actually.

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I think we need to take you into a darkened room, dear.

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-You're getting all excited.

-It's horrible!

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I think it's got something about it.

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Seriously...

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Doo, doo, doo doo! Doo, doo, doo doo!

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-No, I think it has, you know.

-OK, I'll trust you on that.

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Oh, no, I hate those words!

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-Be it on your head.

-Oh, no!

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Then it all goes wrong, it all goes wrong when you say that.

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Oh, Mark, surely not?

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-The other thing I've spotted...

-You're on a bit of a roll.

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Yeah, you've just got to let things filter to you, haven't you?

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I like copper.

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Polished up, it always looks very impressive.

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This copper mirror here, I could just imagine somebody buying that.

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I could just imagine people going for it.

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Jon, you definitely have an eye for this, but an expensive one.

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That mirror is a hefty £160.

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We've spotted a couple of things. Jon has...

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The Voigtlander camera on the tripod and then the lamp.

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What were you thinking? I'm scared to ask what you were thinking.

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This is where the Dominic Littlewood personality comes in.

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OK, beautiful lamp, £180. We'd like to do a little bit better than that.

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What if we were to say... What if we were to take the one off?

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What if we were to say 80, and you've got a deal right there and now?

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I think it would be easier if I just said the very best price.

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Which would be 120.

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And the Voigtlander?

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£40.

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Watch out, Lewis, here comes Dominic Littlewood again.

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That would make a total of 160.

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OK, you're a nice man, running a wonderful shop here.

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What if we were to say 150 for the two, then you've got yourself a deal?

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-Hang on a minute. Calm down.

-Right.

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I think you're doing very well.

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This is why I need to be advised.

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I am a young Jedi in this craft.

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You have forgotten the figure I set. It is gone from your mind.

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I don't blame you, Lewis, I've forgotten it too!

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I'd like to give you 120 for both.

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Oh, boys!

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No.

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You'll need more than a Jedi mind trick to win Lewis over,

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who appears to have a trick of his own involving a copper mirror.

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If we could come to a price on this mirror that you're happy with,

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and then I could reflect on what you said about those things.

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Three items, £200, the lot.

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Wow! £200, that's half your budget!

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No.

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Could we not talk about 80 for this? That's another tenner.

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Oh, Lordy!

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I'm going to walk over there for a moment and then come back.

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Are you, do you want to do that on your own?

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-I've got a curve ball coming in.

-Off you go.

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Jon has spotted a different but more ornate Art-Deco lamp

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and it's given him an idea.

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Stand by.

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Is just a bit more silvery and onyxy.

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It might make it more distinctive, a bit more collectable.

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This may help us because this is obviously a more decorative base,

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which would make it more expensive.

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But if we were to go for the same price as we were doing the package with the not-so-elaborate lamp,

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then that might make you happier?

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-And you were saying 230?

-Yes.

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There's no way you'll do 220 for me?

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There's no shifting Lewis, who drives a hard bargain.

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If they want a vintage camera, copper mirror

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and more decorative Art-Deco lamp, it's £230.

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Shall we do it? Do you want to go for it?

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I think we should, yeah.

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-DAVID ATTENBOROUGH VOICE:

-Here we see two rutting dealers

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at their most illustrious.

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A bit impulsive, I think.

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It might have been a lot worse, had it not been for your guidance and expertise.

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It could have been a lot worse! You could have been paired up with "Maverick" Mark.

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Poor Debra, she really doesn't like that chair,

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but our rogue expert won't listen.

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We've got a real split opinion here.

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Debra hates it and I think it's quite fun,

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if the price is right, of course.

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I could do that for 130 for you.

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For that kind of money, you need a closer inspection.

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It would appear to be a Renaissance-style hall chair.

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It's sort of growing on me. I think I'm being gently persuaded.

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-I'd be able to persuade you a lot if we got it at a better price, wouldn't I?

-I think so.

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As you say, it is on my head.

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I can't decide whether it's really ugly or really attractive.

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I think they would put £60 to £80 on it.

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What do you think? It's in your court now.

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-I liked £80.

-£80 is better.

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Would you consider 70?

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Was there something else you wanted to buy?

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Funny you should ask, Lewis.

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Debra has her heart set on the tea service, but will Mark be persuaded?

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Debra, I don't know why, likes the tea set,

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but there's no price on that,

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so we don't know how much that is.

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If you were to take the chair and the tea set together,

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we could call it...70 and 50

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-is 120.

-120.

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Would you let us have that for 40?

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OK, that would be fine.

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I was going to try and get the both of them for 100. It's only...

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You really can't do them for 100 for the two?

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Why don't we split the difference and call it 105?

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-Shall we do that?

-I think we should.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah.

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-Why don't we shake his hand?

-Thank you very much.

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Thank you very much, Lewis, that's really nice of you.

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Well done, Debra, you've got the tea service,

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but you're stuck with that chair at £70.

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Sorry!

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Oh, my gosh, the rain has come again, Debra.

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-Let's get in the warm.

-At least we've got two items in the bag.

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-I'm quite happy, are you?

-I'm very happy, well done.

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With three purchases under their belts,

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it's time for our boys to ponder on their place in the universe

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at Edinburgh's prestigious Royal Observatory. Don't you know?

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Luckily, Jon and Thomas haven't come to peer through telescopes,

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as it's clearly not the day for it.

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Instead, they're in for a celestial treat, right up Jon's street.

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One of the finest collections of ancient astrological

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and astronomy manuscripts in the world.

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On a scale of one to ten, Jon, this is excitement level...?

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Oh, it's...

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11, 12, more.

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Hi, there...

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The boys are met by senior astronomer John Davies.

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-Welcome to the Royal Observatory.

-Thanks for having us.

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The Royal Observatory was founded back in 1888, at the behest

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of the 26th Earl Of Crawford,

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who was a keen amateur astronomer.

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He offered his library of rare ancient scientific books

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and instruments to the City Of Edinburgh

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on the proviso that they built an observatory to house them.

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This is Karen, our librarian.

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Karen, nice to see you.

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Karen Moran is on hand to point out the highlights of the collection.

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It must be so special to have these!

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It's a privilege to look after this collection.

0:16:550:16:58

It's one of five like it in the world,

0:16:580:17:00

but ours has been deemed the best in the world.

0:17:000:17:03

-This is the best in the world?

-Of this type of collection.

0:17:030:17:06

And what a collection it is, including first editions

0:17:070:17:11

by iconic names such as Copernicus, Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton,

0:17:110:17:16

and together, they tell the incredible story

0:17:160:17:19

of human understanding of our place in the universe over two centuries.

0:17:190:17:23

One of the earliest manuscripts is by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy

0:17:250:17:29

who, in AD140, set down Plato's theory

0:17:290:17:33

that the Earth was placed

0:17:330:17:35

at the centre of the universe, with everything else revolving around it.

0:17:350:17:39

These decorative images I see front of me don't look like they have

0:17:390:17:44

-much to do with astronomy.

-You're correct and incorrect,

0:17:440:17:48

-because they are to do with astrology rather than astronomy.

-Sorry.

0:17:480:17:51

But in mediaeval times, they were both seen as one and the same thing.

0:17:510:17:54

In those days, astronomy was used by doctors to cure illnesses

0:17:540:17:58

and they would carry medical bibles with them

0:17:580:18:01

to help with diagnosis and treatment.

0:18:010:18:03

And you can have a quick glance at this one. You can see, it's the zodiac man.

0:18:030:18:06

Each house of the zodiac relates to a different part of the human body.

0:18:060:18:12

-He's got an interesting expression on his face, hasn't he?

-Exactly.

0:18:120:18:15

A bit like Gene Wilder.

0:18:150:18:16

What are these? These look fascinating.

0:18:160:18:18

Yes, they are portable versions, if you like, of the bigger text.

0:18:180:18:23

Physicians would carry these around on their belts.

0:18:230:18:28

They look wonderfully fragile and delicate, don't they?

0:18:280:18:31

They are.

0:18:310:18:33

It took another one-and-a-half centuries for this accepted wisdom to change,

0:18:330:18:37

following the groundbreaking observations of Copernicus and Galileo,

0:18:370:18:42

finally acknowledging the Sun's rightful place at the centre of the solar system.

0:18:420:18:46

Tell us about this one in the corner here.

0:18:460:18:49

Is this showing the moment when the Earth was no longer

0:18:490:18:53

-the centre of the solar system, but that passed over to the Sun?

-The sun, exactly.

0:18:530:18:57

This is our first-edition Copernicus from 1543.

0:18:570:19:00

Yes, you are exactly right, Jon, he's put the Sun in the centre

0:19:000:19:03

and the planets moving in these beautiful circular orbits around the Sun.

0:19:030:19:09

In the 17th century, Englishman Sir Isaac Newton

0:19:090:19:12

was to solidify these ideas through mathematical theory.

0:19:120:19:16

Laws that continued to form the basis of all scientific thought

0:19:160:19:20

until the early 20th century.

0:19:200:19:22

Look at this, the mask of Isaac Newton himself.

0:19:220:19:26

Yes, it's a death mask of Isaac Newton.

0:19:260:19:30

Ours was once owned by Professor Wallace,

0:19:300:19:33

who was a professor of mathematics and astronomy

0:19:330:19:35

at Edinburgh University. It's numbered 44 of about 500

0:19:350:19:38

of these masks that were produced.

0:19:380:19:40

-He looks rather at peace, doesn't he?

-He does.

0:19:400:19:42

His principles are still being observed, even now.

0:19:420:19:45

Isn't that right, Mr Newton?

0:19:450:19:48

Newton's great friend, astronomer Edmond Halley,

0:19:480:19:51

further reinforced these theories of the universe when, in 1707,

0:19:510:19:55

he successfully predicted the return of the famous comet named after him.

0:19:550:20:00

It's a wonderful, wonderful collection

0:20:000:20:02

and it's a privilege to see it and I'm only sorry we can't stay for longer

0:20:020:20:05

and take it in quite a lot more.

0:20:050:20:09

I agree. Wonderful!

0:20:090:20:11

-DAVID DICKINSON VOICE:

-So let's see what it goes for at the auction.

0:20:110:20:14

-JON:

-Sorry, I blaspheme.

0:20:140:20:16

You did blaspheme.

0:20:160:20:17

Yes, and what an auction that would be. Come along, Thomas,

0:20:170:20:21

drag him back to Earth, there's shopping to be done.

0:20:210:20:24

No time for the telescope. Sorry.

0:20:240:20:27

-Jon, we'd better buy some antiques.

-We had, I suppose so, we mustn't be distracted.

0:20:270:20:31

-You are very distracted.

-I'm clearly distracted.

0:20:310:20:34

Back on planet Earth, Debra and Mark are leaving Edinburgh

0:20:340:20:38

and heading south to West Linton.

0:20:380:20:42

Nestling in the Borders,

0:20:420:20:43

this ancient village dates back to Iron Age times.

0:20:430:20:47

Its name comes from the Celtic for lake or pool, rather apt today.

0:20:470:20:53

Debra, I'm dying to know, how did you get into all this impressionism?

0:20:530:20:58

Oh, well, erm...

0:20:580:21:00

Ever since I can remember, my dad used to do impressions to make me laugh.

0:21:010:21:05

-Oh, did he?

-When I was really little, and I used to copy him.

0:21:050:21:08

He used to basically teach me to do them.

0:21:080:21:11

The first one I ever remember doing was Margaret Thatcher saying,

0:21:110:21:15

"When I become Prime Minister..."

0:21:150:21:19

Ha-ha!

0:21:190:21:20

West Linton is home to Mr MacDonald's Saleroom Emporium,

0:21:200:21:25

whose proprietor is Ryan, the Mr of the aforementioned edifice.

0:21:250:21:29

-Oh, gosh.

-Look at that!

0:21:290:21:32

Oh, my God!

0:21:320:21:34

I've been waiting for this all day, Debra.

0:21:340:21:36

This place is brilliant.

0:21:360:21:38

This is going to be an Aladdin's cave, I can see it now.

0:21:380:21:41

-That's 1950s, isn't it?

-It's got to be.

0:21:450:21:49

It's rather fun.

0:21:490:21:52

HE MUTTERS

0:21:520:21:54

What's this?

0:21:540:21:57

Well it's a pulpit, I think, isn't it?

0:21:570:22:00

Do you like it?

0:22:000:22:01

Yeah, I can't think what use it would be.

0:22:010:22:04

I mean, why would you have this?

0:22:040:22:06

I don't know, so many people these days are looking for interesting

0:22:060:22:10

interior design features.

0:22:100:22:14

Do you know, I don't think Debra likes it. Sorry, Mark.

0:22:140:22:18

-Shall we carry on?

-Yeah, I think so.

0:22:180:22:21

Those are quite pretty, Debra, aren't they?

0:22:210:22:23

-They're really pretty, and do they have silver tops?

-They do have silver tops.

0:22:230:22:27

If you look inside this one, it's Mappin & Webb, 1899, apparently.

0:22:270:22:32

Quite right!

0:22:320:22:34

Mappin & Webb were renowned as the quality suppliers

0:22:340:22:37

of luxury goods at the end of the Victorian period.

0:22:370:22:41

89 for the pair.

0:22:410:22:43

I'm really disturbed by the fact that

0:22:440:22:47

one's slightly bigger than the other.

0:22:470:22:48

Shall we take these over as a consideration?

0:22:480:22:51

Despite Debra's concerns, Mark takes the lead,

0:22:510:22:55

but before bargaining can start, he's distracted by more silverware.

0:22:550:22:58

Don't you think those would look elegant on your table?

0:22:580:23:01

Really nice, absolutely. I like things that you can still use.

0:23:010:23:05

-That are quite practical?

-Yeah.

0:23:050:23:07

There's a case set here as well.

0:23:070:23:09

-A little silver...

-It needs a wee polish.

0:23:100:23:13

-..salt and pepper.

-A wee polish.

-A wee polish.

0:23:130:23:16

Rub-a-dub, eh? You'd better polish off the deal quickly

0:23:160:23:19

because Jon and Thomas have caught up with you and are just outside.

0:23:190:23:23

Great name, I used to do voiceovers for places like that,

0:23:230:23:26

it'd be, "Go to Mr MacDonald's Saleroom Emporium now!

0:23:260:23:30

"Antiques, collectables and curios, bought and sold. Call now!"

0:23:300:23:34

Would that have been for local radio? How exciting.

0:23:340:23:37

This time, I won't be so reckless as I was before.

0:23:370:23:40

I can hear their dulcet tones.

0:23:400:23:43

Mysterious sort of place.

0:23:430:23:46

I think we should explore further. Who knows what we might find here!

0:23:460:23:51

You'll find the opposition!

0:23:510:23:54

-Ah!

-What do you want? Oh, go away.

0:23:540:23:57

-It's the Child Catcher.

-What are you doing here?

0:23:570:24:00

We came for our last and final shop.

0:24:000:24:02

We've only just got here, it's not fair that you've arrived so quickly.

0:24:020:24:06

-Have you been having fun?

-Yes.

0:24:060:24:09

Careful, Debra, nattering to Jon will leave Mark free

0:24:100:24:13

to dream of making more and more and more maverick purchases.

0:24:130:24:16

I love that pulpit.

0:24:180:24:20

I think she's right, I don't know what we'd do with it, but...

0:24:200:24:24

-I think it's great fun.

-Over £220, it better had be.

0:24:240:24:28

-BRUCE FORSYTH VOICE:

-See you after the break.

0:24:280:24:31

Finally, back to business.

0:24:310:24:34

Namely, a pair of silver salts with blue glass liners

0:24:340:24:37

and a cased silver cruet set.

0:24:370:24:40

Ticket price £120.

0:24:400:24:42

We were rather hoping, to give us a fighting chance...

0:24:420:24:45

..we might be able to offer you and get those

0:24:470:24:50

for about 60 quid, for the two.

0:24:500:24:53

As the first weekly instalment, yeah.

0:24:530:24:55

While the serious negotiations are going on over there,

0:24:580:25:01

we're reading the Sooty annual over here...

0:25:010:25:04

Nick Robinson, BBC News,

0:25:040:25:06

near the big box of books.

0:25:060:25:08

-LEWIS:

-Give me 70, and then I can feed my daughter.

-Oh.

-Oh.

0:25:100:25:16

We've heard this before.

0:25:160:25:17

What's the decision on these, or do you want us to tell you

0:25:170:25:20

what we would like to get those for?

0:25:200:25:22

Yeah, hit me with this one, yeah.

0:25:220:25:25

Because we're worried about size differential,

0:25:250:25:28

we were rather hoping we'd get those for 40.

0:25:280:25:31

Let's make it 55.

0:25:310:25:32

So adding the mismatched silver vases to the other items selected

0:25:320:25:37

gives a total price of £125.

0:25:370:25:40

It would be lovely to have got those for a round figure, wouldn't it?

0:25:420:25:46

You know I like round figures.

0:25:460:25:48

What are you offering, 110?

0:25:480:25:50

No, 100, for the lot!

0:25:500:25:52

What do you think, Debra?

0:25:530:25:55

105?

0:25:560:25:58

-Deal.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:580:26:01

I'm so impressed.

0:26:010:26:03

Once again, Debra decisively clinches the deal.

0:26:030:26:06

Meanwhile, Jon's fascination with vintage continues,

0:26:060:26:09

as he's drawn to a 1950s radio.

0:26:090:26:12

That'd be a great thing if it works.

0:26:120:26:13

You like the sort of Britishness, don't you?

0:26:150:26:20

This wonderful British, sort of 1950s...

0:26:200:26:23

It's just the design of it, it's really cool.

0:26:250:26:28

I'm not sure Thomas agrees with you there, Jon.

0:26:280:26:31

On the other side of the room,

0:26:310:26:33

Mark is obviously up to something with young Mr MacDonald.

0:26:330:26:36

Right, Debra's off browsing somewhere else... I love this.

0:26:360:26:40

I don't know why, I just love it.

0:26:400:26:42

Debra doesn't see what I see in it

0:26:420:26:45

and I know she's going to kill me, but I really want to buy it.

0:26:450:26:48

I don't want her to let me go without having it.

0:26:480:26:50

In a perfect world, I'd love to try and get it as near £100 as possible

0:26:500:26:55

to give me a chance. Can you come anywhere near that?

0:26:550:26:58

-120.

-Right, I'm having it. I'm having it, are you sure?

0:27:000:27:05

-I'm happy with that.

-Really? Then I'm having it. I'm having it.

0:27:050:27:09

Debra's going to kill me, but I'm having it.

0:27:090:27:11

-As long as she doesn't kill you till you've paid.

-I'll pay you now.

0:27:110:27:14

Shame the confessional wasn't for sale.

0:27:140:27:17

Time to own up, Mark.

0:27:170:27:18

I've bought the pulpit.

0:27:200:27:22

ANNE ROBINSON VOICE: So, think you're clever, do you?

0:27:220:27:26

-Buying a pulpit. See what I've got in store for you!

-Oh, no!

0:27:260:27:30

I don't think she's taken it too badly.

0:27:300:27:33

I just hope now there's a profit in it.

0:27:330:27:36

So do I, Mark!

0:27:360:27:38

The boys are still tuned into that radio.

0:27:380:27:41

-It works, you get Radio Scotland, that's it. Well, up here.

-Yes.

0:27:410:27:47

Can I lift it down and have a look?

0:27:470:27:50

That's in really good shape.

0:27:500:27:52

-What's that got to be?

-Make me an offer.

0:27:520:27:56

I don't like this bit. I get scared. I don't like it!

0:27:560:28:01

I would like to offer you £15.

0:28:010:28:04

-Make it 18.

-18 and it's a deal.

0:28:090:28:11

-Deal.

-Yeah?

-Done.

-Wonderful.

0:28:110:28:15

AMERICAN ACCENT: How about that? I'm glad it worked out so easy.

0:28:150:28:18

You're a gentleman, sir.

0:28:190:28:20

The headlines, the radio has just been purchased at the Emporium.

0:28:200:28:24

A report coming next...

0:28:240:28:26

Jon is so excited over the sale

0:28:260:28:29

that he gives young Mr MacDonald's daughter the £2 in change,

0:28:290:28:33

thus Road Trip rules mean that the price of the radio is £20.

0:28:330:28:37

Debra's team have bagged a pair of silver-topped vases,

0:28:370:28:41

two silver salts, a boxed cruet set and a pulpit.

0:28:410:28:44

Total spend - £225. What a mixture!

0:28:440:28:49

End of day one, and a very satisfied Jon and Debra compare notes.

0:28:490:28:54

That was a very enjoyable day.

0:28:540:28:58

One of those days where you feel like you've learned quite a lot,

0:28:580:29:01

gone into a new field and learned all about it.

0:29:010:29:04

Yeah, I know, I love exploring new territory.

0:29:040:29:07

-THOMAS:

-Jon is wonderful to work with.

0:29:070:29:11

He's very funny, and all these wonderful voices.

0:29:110:29:14

-MARK:

-I know, I'm the same with Debra, she is so sweet.

0:29:140:29:18

We've just got on like a house on fire,

0:29:180:29:21

but more than that, she realises she's got the better expert.

0:29:210:29:24

Naturally, obviously, you can only big yourself up that much, Mark.

0:29:240:29:29

Yes, I quite agree, Thomas, but right now, chaps,

0:29:290:29:32

it's time for some well-earned shuteye.

0:29:320:29:35

Night-night!

0:29:350:29:36

-JON:

-I reckon, you've just got the knack for this.

0:29:410:29:44

DEBRA LAUGHS

0:29:440:29:45

-I worry I was a bit too impulsive yesterday.

-Oh, really?

-I think so.

0:29:450:29:51

You know what, I think you've got to trust your instincts, Jon.

0:29:510:29:56

So we've got a really relaxed day today.

0:29:560:29:59

Debra and Mark had a great first day...

0:29:590:30:01

-Debra...

-Thank you very much.

-..I'm so impressed

0:30:010:30:04

..spending £330 on a 1950s Queen Anne china set,

0:30:040:30:07

a Renaissance-style hall chair...

0:30:070:30:09

Oh, look at that chair!

0:30:090:30:12

It's horrible!

0:30:120:30:15

..a pair of silver-topped vases,

0:30:150:30:17

two silver salts, a silver cruet set and a pulpit -

0:30:170:30:20

apparently used as a theatrical prop

0:30:200:30:23

at the Edinburgh Lyceum.

0:30:230:30:25

-I think it's strange...

-Well, I'm strange!

0:30:250:30:28

Haven't you realised that yet?

0:30:280:30:31

That leaves them with just £70 to spend today.

0:30:310:30:35

-Jon and Thomas did equally well...

-You're on a bit of a roll.

-Yeah,

0:30:350:30:39

you've got to let things filter to you, haven't you?

0:30:390:30:41

..buying an Art-Deco lamp,

0:30:410:30:44

an Arts and Crafts copper-framed mirror,

0:30:440:30:46

a Voigtlander Brillant camera,

0:30:460:30:49

and a walnut-veneer Pye radio, as you do.

0:30:490:30:52

-AS JIM BOWEN:

-Super, great. We'll count it in the break. Can't beat a bit of Bully!

0:30:520:30:56

Total spent £250,

0:30:560:30:58

leaving them with £150 for today's hunt.

0:30:580:31:02

-AS NOEL EDMONDS:

-The Banker says he respects you

0:31:020:31:04

and he would like to offer you... £4,000.

0:31:040:31:07

One couple who are not off

0:31:070:31:09

antiques-hunting this morning

0:31:090:31:11

are Debra and Mark. They're travelling

0:31:110:31:13

from West Linton to Blantyre

0:31:130:31:15

to visit the birthplace

0:31:150:31:16

of Dr David Livingstone.

0:31:160:31:18

The celebrated explorer and medical missionary,

0:31:180:31:21

known for his work in central and southern Africa.

0:31:210:31:25

The David Livingstone Centre,

0:31:250:31:26

established to commemorate his life

0:31:260:31:28

and work, is set in the tenement where he was born

0:31:280:31:32

and adjoins the site of the cotton mill where he started work.

0:31:320:31:36

The building houses many of Livingstone's possessions,

0:31:360:31:38

from his time spent in Africa, unsuccessfully searching

0:31:380:31:42

for the source of the Nile.

0:31:420:31:44

Debra and Mark will discover more

0:31:440:31:46

about one of our national heroes from the late-19th century

0:31:460:31:49

with tour guide Karen Carruthers.

0:31:490:31:53

Welcome to David Livingstone's little house.

0:31:530:31:55

David Livingstone was born in this room

0:31:550:31:58

on 19th March 1813

0:31:580:32:00

and lived here with his parents and four siblings.

0:32:000:32:03

It is quite difficult to understand

0:32:030:32:06

how seven people could live in this one room. God!

0:32:060:32:09

So, he had a very humble background. How did he get from this start

0:32:090:32:13

to being Dr David Livingstone?

0:32:130:32:15

It's an incredible story, really.

0:32:150:32:17

He started working as a piecer in the mill.

0:32:170:32:19

He seems to have decided early on that he was not going to stay there,

0:32:190:32:22

he had a real desperate thirst for education.

0:32:220:32:26

That thirst for knowledge was quite incredible,

0:32:260:32:29

even though working a 14-hour day in the mill

0:32:290:32:31

from the age of ten, he would study every night before going to bed.

0:32:310:32:35

That thirst to learn,

0:32:350:32:37

combined with Livingstone's very strong Christian faith,

0:32:370:32:40

just pushed him forward.

0:32:400:32:41

By 1836, aged 33,

0:32:410:32:44

he was studying Medicine and Theology

0:32:440:32:46

in Glasgow, having determined to become a medical missionary.

0:32:460:32:50

And what else have you got that's directly related to that time

0:32:500:32:55

that he spent in Africa?

0:32:550:32:57

We've got an amazing collection, directly related.

0:32:570:32:59

-Can we have a look at some of those pieces?

-Absolutely.

0:32:590:33:02

Some are the objects from our collection,

0:33:020:33:04

some journals, some navigation equipment,

0:33:040:33:07

-some rather gory medical equipment.

-Oh!

-Oh!

0:33:070:33:09

-Oh, that's medical equipment?!

-Yes!

0:33:090:33:11

-It looks like more like a joiner's toolbox, doesn't it?

-And what about this?

0:33:110:33:15

That's his medical bag. We've all seen bags like that,

0:33:150:33:18

-it's amazing to think that was with Livingstone...

-In Africa.

0:33:180:33:22

Livingstone won the trust of local tribes with his skills

0:33:220:33:26

as a medicine man, and even invented a treatment

0:33:260:33:29

for malaria called Livingstone's Rousers.

0:33:290:33:32

A mixture of quinine and rhubarb

0:33:320:33:34

that was used until the 1920s.

0:33:340:33:36

I love the way they've called it tabloid,

0:33:360:33:39

rather than tablet.

0:33:390:33:40

But his work in Africa took him far beyond medicine.

0:33:400:33:45

Livingstone was a committed anti-slavery advocate

0:33:450:33:48

who hoped that his explorations would help put an end

0:33:480:33:51

to the dreadful trafficking of the indigenous population,

0:33:510:33:55

a goal he worked tirelessly towards for many years.

0:33:550:33:59

During his final expedition,

0:33:590:34:00

and with nothing having been heard from him for months,

0:34:000:34:04

the explorer and journalist Henry Morton Stanley

0:34:040:34:07

was sent to find him, resulting in the famous phrase,

0:34:070:34:10

"Dr Livingstone, I presume!"

0:34:100:34:12

when they finally met, near Lake Tanganyika in 1871.

0:34:120:34:16

The two men spent four or five months together

0:34:160:34:18

and when Stanley was leaving Livingstone,

0:34:180:34:21

Livingstone gave Stanley vast numbers of letters and journals

0:34:210:34:24

-and so on to take home, and this is the little bag that...

-God!

0:34:240:34:28

Did he actually write that - "Positively not to be opened"?

0:34:280:34:31

-I think it's actually been stitched.

-Oh, it's been stitched on, has it?

0:34:310:34:35

Yeah. We believe that "positively"

0:34:350:34:37

was stitched by Stanley,

0:34:370:34:39

-but this was by Livingstone.

-Gosh!

0:34:390:34:43

-You can hardly see that that's embroidery.

-No!

0:34:430:34:46

One of the things that he'd written about

0:34:460:34:48

was a terrible massacre of over 400 people

0:34:480:34:51

by Arab slave traders at a little place.

0:34:510:34:55

The British public was shocked,

0:34:550:34:57

putting pressure onto the government to act.

0:34:570:35:00

A naval blockade was threatened

0:35:000:35:02

and finally, the ruling Sultan acquiesced

0:35:020:35:05

and closed the slave market in Zanzibar.

0:35:050:35:08

He genuinely had a respect for them, I think, by the sounds of it,

0:35:080:35:12

because he didn't go there... we know he went as a missionary

0:35:120:35:15

to preach the Word of God, but he tried to understand them.

0:35:150:35:17

He was on their side, really, wasn't he?

0:35:170:35:19

Yeah, he was a great humanitarian.

0:35:190:35:21

I think he was very different to many folk who went afterwards.

0:35:210:35:24

Livingstone had suffered from bad health for many years

0:35:240:35:27

and he died in May 1873.

0:35:270:35:30

His companions buried his heart in his beloved Africa,

0:35:300:35:34

but returned his mummified body back to Britain,

0:35:340:35:36

along with many of his belongings, now on display at the centre.

0:35:360:35:41

His burial at Westminster Abbey

0:35:410:35:43

is a testament to the Victorian public's esteem.

0:35:430:35:47

-Thank you.

-Thank you for having us.

-It's a fascinating story. Thank you for coming.

0:35:470:35:51

And it's time to track down

0:35:510:35:54

our other pair of intrepid explorers, who are 30 miles away,

0:35:540:35:57

heading into the village of Wiston, near beautiful Tinto Hill.

0:35:570:36:00

Jon and Thomas have an appointment

0:36:000:36:03

to shop at Sunnyside Antiques.

0:36:030:36:05

What a charming spot!

0:36:050:36:08

Owned by Mark Attwood,

0:36:080:36:10

perhaps he can help them select some profitable purch-ases!

0:36:100:36:15

Sorry, I couldn't resist that.

0:36:150:36:17

Impulsive Jon has his eye on something already.

0:36:180:36:21

What's that copper tank up there?

0:36:210:36:23

I believe it's a big water urn

0:36:230:36:26

and, as you rightly point out, it's copper, big brass tap,

0:36:260:36:29

tin lined. Date-wise, probably late-19th century.

0:36:290:36:34

I can certainly get it down, if you want to have a look.

0:36:340:36:37

Luckily, Mark's son Ben is on hand

0:36:370:36:39

and delivers the tank to a doubting Thomas.

0:36:390:36:42

What's it going to be?

0:36:420:36:44

-£160.

-Really?

-Mm-hmm.

0:36:440:36:46

I think that's got some room in it.

0:36:480:36:51

-So you wouldn't take 100?

-Not at the moment, no.

-Not at the moment?

0:36:510:36:54

I suggest we just have a quick... We carry on looking as well.

0:36:540:36:58

I quite like things like this, but that's me.

0:37:030:37:06

A bushel.

0:37:060:37:07

Well, let's move on.

0:37:080:37:11

-UPPER-CLASS VOICE:

-So we're not even into the main part of the shop yet

0:37:110:37:14

-and we're seeing contending things.

-That's good.

-This bodes very well.

0:37:140:37:18

This is what you sort of tend to think of antiques as being,

0:37:180:37:21

sort of like dogs like that.

0:37:210:37:24

That's antiques, innit, there?

0:37:240:37:26

Look at them, like little porcelain Jedwards perched there.

0:37:260:37:29

He's quite jolly, isn't he?

0:37:290:37:30

May I have a look?

0:37:300:37:32

-AS BRUCE FORSYTH:

-"It's nice to see you, to see you, nice!

0:37:340:37:39

"Haven't they carved me out well?"

0:37:390:37:42

Very good.

0:37:420:37:43

I feel like Paul Bettany and Russell Crowe.

0:37:470:37:50

-As Captain Jack Aubrey!

-Jack Aubrey, yeah.

0:37:500:37:53

Not taken with porcelain dogs, masks or telescopes,

0:37:530:37:56

Thomas seems to have unearthed something else.

0:37:560:38:01

This Scalextric is completely out of context here.

0:38:010:38:05

What's very nice about it is that it's all in mint condition and boxed

0:38:050:38:09

so it makes it more desirable.

0:38:090:38:12

There's a full Scalextric set,

0:38:140:38:16

as well as separate boxes of accessories.

0:38:160:38:18

It's toy heaven for Thomas.

0:38:180:38:21

And, oh, dear! I think it's catching.

0:38:210:38:24

It's got a sort of Richard Wilson quality, as if to say,

0:38:240:38:27

"He's never going to get round there at that speed!"

0:38:270:38:34

Produced by Triang in the 1960s,

0:38:370:38:39

this CM33 set is the motor racing competition series,

0:38:390:38:44

featuring models of Porsche and a D-type Jag.

0:38:440:38:47

The price for everything is 350.

0:38:490:38:51

Right, come on, we can't afford this and I'd want the whole lot.

0:38:510:38:56

-Had I not been so reckless yesterday...

-Don't say that,

0:38:560:38:59

don't regret, never regret, that's the thing, never regret.

0:38:590:39:02

Will Jon and Thomas stay on track? It's decision time.

0:39:020:39:06

Well, the bushel's great.

0:39:070:39:10

-The bushel is great.

-The copper tank.

-The tank is fun.

0:39:100:39:14

(I would have loved that Scalextric. I would have loved it!)

0:39:140:39:18

We could still just buy the set, but...

0:39:190:39:22

Thomas just can't quite lose his enthusiasm for boys' toys,

0:39:220:39:26

so the Scalextric has to be,

0:39:260:39:29

but will he be able to persuade Mark to split the bundle?

0:39:290:39:33

Where are we?

0:39:330:39:34

We're back at Scalextric, back at Scalextric,

0:39:340:39:39

and would you mind splitting it up?

0:39:390:39:42

Um, what part...

0:39:430:39:45

What components were you after?

0:39:450:39:49

-I was just after the box set.

-Just the box set on its own?

0:39:490:39:52

Just the box set on its own.

0:39:520:39:54

I don't think I can afford the whole lot,

0:39:540:39:57

to be honest with you, unless you want to lose money.

0:39:570:40:00

I'd like to give you £60 for it.

0:40:000:40:03

Right. Honestly, I couldn't.

0:40:030:40:06

-I could quite easily get £100 for it.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:40:060:40:11

But we could meet somewhere...

0:40:110:40:15

-90.

-80.

0:40:150:40:17

-No, sorry.

-Go on!

-No!

0:40:170:40:20

85.

0:40:200:40:21

-All right, then. 85, it is.

-Thank you.

0:40:210:40:23

I've got no hands to shake.

0:40:260:40:28

And with the Scalextric safely in their possession,

0:40:280:40:31

the boys decide to call a halt on their shopping,

0:40:310:40:34

leaving the field clear for arrivals Debra and Mark.

0:40:340:40:38

We could pull up there.

0:40:380:40:40

-Yeah, I think if we pull up here...

-Yeah.

0:40:400:40:42

-Oh.

-Ooh! This is nice!

0:40:460:40:48

-So we've got £70 left.

-Yeah.

0:40:490:40:53

We've bought five items, so we don't really need to get another one,

0:40:540:40:57

but it would be nice to spend all the money, wouldn't it?

0:40:570:41:00

-That's unusual, isn't it?

-Yes, it's a carved shell.

0:41:000:41:03

It's probably a light of some sort, but...

0:41:030:41:06

It's very decorative.

0:41:070:41:09

That looks quite pretty, doesn't it?

0:41:100:41:13

There's a pair of them, actually.

0:41:130:41:15

Aren't those patterns lovely?

0:41:150:41:16

-Those little roundels.

-Absolutely beautiful!

0:41:160:41:22

You can see, these are my colours.

0:41:220:41:23

-Oh, yes!

-If you look at my scarf, and you look at that vase...

0:41:230:41:27

Well, that's why I picked them up.

0:41:270:41:29

Oh, you silver-tongued charmer!

0:41:290:41:32

Cloisonne is a French term for an oriental technique

0:41:320:41:36

for decorating metal objects using vitreous enamel.

0:41:360:41:39

The decoration is formed by attaching metal wires or strips

0:41:390:41:43

to make compartments or "clois" on the surface of the vessel,

0:41:430:41:47

which remain visible on the finished piece,

0:41:470:41:49

separating the different-coloured enamels.

0:41:490:41:52

They may complement Debra's colours,

0:41:520:41:54

but will the price match their budget?

0:41:540:41:56

-Are they expensive?

-They're 120, the pair.

0:41:560:41:59

Ooh. That's over our budget, I'm afraid, isn't it?

0:41:590:42:02

They're a nice pair as well.

0:42:020:42:04

Luckily, there is a smaller pair.

0:42:040:42:06

But this is a completely different material.

0:42:060:42:10

No, no. It's absolutely the same technique.

0:42:100:42:13

I like those because they're faceted.

0:42:130:42:15

They've got that octagonal look,

0:42:150:42:17

but this is much smoother, so it's all gone over.

0:42:170:42:20

-The colours are still working for me.

-They're still working for you.

0:42:200:42:23

They still fit in with your overall colour scheme.

0:42:230:42:26

Still thumbs-up to the colours, but will it be thumbs-down to the price?

0:42:260:42:30

The best on those would be 50 for the pair.

0:42:300:42:33

Are we happy to go for these for £50?

0:42:330:42:37

Yes, I think so.

0:42:370:42:39

-But it leaves us £20...

-I know.

0:42:390:42:42

-..which is a funny little amount to...

-It's a funny little amount.

0:42:420:42:45

A funny amount, hardly worth holding onto.

0:42:450:42:48

Let's take a peek in the silver cabinet.

0:42:480:42:51

I like that spoon, but I know that's going to be more, isn't it?

0:42:510:42:54

An early-20th century hallmarked copy

0:42:540:42:57

of a royal anointing spoon.

0:42:570:43:00

-I can do that for 20.

-Really?

0:43:000:43:02

-Really?

-Could we have a look?

-We could put it in with the silver.

0:43:020:43:05

We could do, I suppose.

0:43:050:43:06

That's a copy, definitely, of the silver anointer,

0:43:060:43:09

-but it's beautifully made.

-It's beautiful.

0:43:090:43:12

-Should we do that?

-Yeah.

-Let's shake hands, all right?

0:43:120:43:14

The vases and this for 70 quid.

0:43:140:43:16

-That's great.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:43:160:43:18

-You're welcome.

-Perfect.

0:43:180:43:20

You're driving.

0:43:200:43:21

Deal done, money spent, time to reunite with Jon and Thomas.

0:43:210:43:25

Just delicately take it off.

0:43:250:43:27

Only polite to... Ladies first, really.

0:43:270:43:29

-And one more.

-Oh!

0:43:300:43:33

Oh, Mark! We need to go over and have a look.

0:43:330:43:36

We need to examine... That's a delightful hall chair.

0:43:360:43:41

Well, there's a surprise - Thomas likes the chair.

0:43:410:43:44

The one Debra hated.

0:43:440:43:46

-But it's her pride and joy, the tea service, up next.

-Yes, I must say,

0:43:460:43:50

it was a bit of a personal choice

0:43:500:43:52

and it was my choice, wasn't it?

0:43:520:43:55

-You humoured me.

-How much was it?

0:43:550:43:56

-35.

-Yes.

-35 for a six-place setting?

0:43:560:44:00

-12.

-12?

-There are 12 cups and saucers.

-That's a bargain!

0:44:000:44:03

Is it dishwasher proof?

0:44:030:44:04

Very much doubt it, Jon!

0:44:060:44:08

What do you make of the silver-topped vases, then?

0:44:080:44:11

-Very good quality.

-Good quality.

-They were actually £35 for the two.

0:44:110:44:15

-Oh, my God, that's such a good price.

-That's a result.

0:44:150:44:18

No-one's commented on the size difference.

0:44:180:44:20

-And the cloisonne?

-The cloisonne,

0:44:200:44:23

these were one of our final purchases.

0:44:230:44:26

-They're lovely.

-They're lovely.

-Sort of early-20th century.

-£80?

0:44:260:44:29

-No, we paid, actually, £50 for them.

-Oh! Bargain.

0:44:290:44:31

This one was 20. It's a little silver anointing spoon.

0:44:310:44:34

Some items are just too big to pop in the back of a car,

0:44:340:44:38

so Mark has to improvise, using the medium of mime.

0:44:380:44:40

-We've got a very big pulpit, haven't we?

-Oh, yes, huge.

0:44:400:44:46

-Yeah, we spent every penny of our money.

-Let's look at your lots.

0:44:460:44:49

Next up, Jon and Thomas reveal their haul to Debra and Mark.

0:44:490:44:52

Let's do a magician's reveal with the thing.

0:44:520:44:55

Oh, Jon! This is so you!

0:44:560:44:59

Gosh. Mark - actually lost for words for once!

0:44:590:45:04

Look at the Scalextric!

0:45:040:45:06

But moving on,

0:45:060:45:07

I have to tell you what my favourite item is, if I may...

0:45:070:45:10

-Of course.

-..be so bold. It's the mirror.

0:45:100:45:14

Was that expensive, Jon?

0:45:140:45:17

No, it wasn't too bad, was it?

0:45:170:45:18

No, it wasn't. We bought three items as a group.

0:45:180:45:21

-Oh, yes?

-Was this in our first shop?

0:45:210:45:24

-It was. We were a bit impulsive.

-So the Art-Deco desk lamp...

0:45:240:45:27

-That's beautiful as well.

-..the camera and the mirror

0:45:270:45:31

was all one bundle at £230.

0:45:310:45:36

So it comes in at 80, 30, 120.

0:45:360:45:39

And what about the BBC radio?

0:45:390:45:42

It's in such good condition,

0:45:420:45:44

walnut-veneered, but really...

0:45:440:45:47

-It works as well.

-I think it's lovely.

-Expensive?

0:45:470:45:50

-£20.

-It was nothing for £20, was it?

0:45:500:45:52

-Oh, you've got a really good lot.

-You've got a good selection.

-Yeah.

0:45:520:45:56

And you know what I like most?

0:45:560:45:57

-They're completely different to ours.

-Yeah, it's really funny how

0:45:570:46:02

-it's really brought out the character in us...

-Completely different.

0:46:020:46:07

And you two have helped to do that.

0:46:070:46:10

OK, what do our team really think?

0:46:100:46:13

I think they'll be very popular on the day.

0:46:130:46:16

People will, I think, want to own the delicate crockery

0:46:170:46:21

and the salt and pepper set.

0:46:210:46:23

They reflect, you know, Debra's personality very much.

0:46:250:46:28

I love what they have, but I don't feel envious of what they have,

0:46:280:46:32

you know, I'm really in admiration of what they've chosen.

0:46:320:46:36

I think the really shiny china is really delightful.

0:46:360:46:41

and going to do jolly well - for a setting of 12, £35 is nothing.

0:46:410:46:46

-Dealers, yeah.

-I mean, I love their Art-Deco lamp,

0:46:460:46:48

but they did pay £100-odd for it, which is quite a lot.

0:46:480:46:52

Right, gentle admiration for each other's items.

0:46:520:46:55

However, the auction will decide the outcome of this contest.

0:46:550:46:58

Time to get the show on the road and set off south to Essex. Innit?!

0:46:580:47:02

-Is this it?

-This is it!

0:47:050:47:07

The experts are first to arrive

0:47:070:47:09

at Boningtons auction house in Loughton.

0:47:090:47:13

Both teams started with £400 each.

0:47:130:47:15

Debra and Mark spent every last penny

0:47:150:47:19

and ended up with seven items organised into six auction lots.

0:47:190:47:22

But Jon and Thomas only spent £335...

0:47:240:47:28

Hang on a minute!

0:47:280:47:30

..giving them five scorching auction lots.

0:47:300:47:32

However, Shaban, who will be assisting at today's sale,

0:47:320:47:37

has some unwelcome news regarding one of Debra and Mark's lots.

0:47:370:47:41

The tea set, if someone brought that into us on the front desk,

0:47:410:47:45

I'd value that at £80-£120...

0:47:450:47:47

Well, I'd be thrilled with that.

0:47:470:47:49

But unfortunately, your tea set

0:47:490:47:51

apparently has been damaged in transit.

0:47:510:47:53

-So we're slightly concerned...

-Oh, well, that is very concerning.

0:47:530:47:57

That is a blow.

0:47:580:48:00

Without the damage, it was valued at between £80 and £120.

0:48:000:48:03

Unlikely to realise that now.

0:48:030:48:06

How will Debra take the news?!

0:48:060:48:10

Speaking of Debra, what's delayed her and Jon?

0:48:100:48:14

Thomas, I don't know about you, I'm getting a bit nervous.

0:48:140:48:17

Why, because of your lots?

0:48:170:48:18

No, because there's two empty seats here.

0:48:180:48:21

-We're missing somebody.

-We are missing our friends.

-Debra.

-And Jon.

0:48:210:48:25

I agree. With the auction already under way,

0:48:250:48:28

they're cutting it a bit fine.

0:48:280:48:30

Perhaps they're panicking about what they bought!

0:48:300:48:33

But staying away won't postpone the pain.

0:48:330:48:35

-You need to tell her about your tea set.

-Yeah, but I'm going to...

0:48:350:48:39

-No, don't mention it.

-I won't mention it.

0:48:390:48:41

Because I'm going to mention it just before the lot comes up,

0:48:410:48:45

so she doesn't worry about it.

0:48:450:48:46

Ah! Here they are at last. Quick!

0:48:460:48:50

-Sit down, the auction is about to begin.

-Just in time!

0:48:500:48:53

First up, the silver salts, cased silver cruet set

0:48:530:48:57

and silver anointing spoon as a job lot.

0:48:570:49:00

Look at her face.

0:49:000:49:02

£100. 100, I'm bid.

0:49:020:49:04

-Oh, we've got 100.

-110, 120.

0:49:040:49:08

I shall sell it at £110.

0:49:080:49:10

-Are you all out at 110, then?

-Come on, a bit more.

0:49:100:49:13

Not the start they were hoping for,

0:49:130:49:16

but at least a profit after commission.

0:49:160:49:18

Oh, the meanies!

0:49:180:49:20

The meanies! Will Jon's copper mirror excite the buyers instead?

0:49:200:49:24

Start with £60 for it.

0:49:240:49:26

60, surely?!

0:49:260:49:28

40, if you like.

0:49:280:49:31

30, I'm bid. Looking for two. 30's the bid, 32,

0:49:310:49:34

34, 36, 38, 40 - 5.

0:49:340:49:38

50 - 5. 50's the bid

0:49:380:49:40

and I'm selling at £50. Are you all out now at 50?

0:49:400:49:44

I'm selling at 50...5, good man, good man. 55.

0:49:440:49:48

-Oh, rock and roll.

-Yeah.

0:49:480:49:50

60 - 5. 70.

0:49:500:49:52

Are you sure, sir? One more. 65 there. 70?

0:49:520:49:57

70 - 5. One more?

0:49:570:50:00

70's the bid at the back,

0:50:000:50:01

and I'm selling at £70. Are you all done at 70, then?

0:50:010:50:07

Stalled at 70 - a loss.

0:50:070:50:10

-That'll do.

-Got themselves a very nice mirror.

-Yes.

0:50:100:50:13

Indeed, they did. Now, Deb and Mark's oddly mismatched vases.

0:50:130:50:18

Let's hope the size difference doesn't affect the price.

0:50:180:50:21

Start me at £30. I'm trying to build it up there, bro.

0:50:210:50:23

£30, £30!

0:50:230:50:26

£30? 20, if you like.

0:50:260:50:29

20, 22, 24,

0:50:290:50:31

26, 28. 30. - 32. Go on, one more...

0:50:310:50:35

Come on!

0:50:350:50:36

32. 34! 34. 36?

0:50:360:50:40

34's the bid. 36, anywhere else?

0:50:400:50:44

36. 38? 36 is there. Looking for 38.

0:50:440:50:49

I'm selling at £36. Are you all done?

0:50:490:50:52

Oh, that's disappointing.

0:50:520:50:54

This is beginning to look bleak for both teams.

0:50:540:50:57

Somebody's got a bargain.

0:50:570:50:59

Jon and Thomas's Art-Deco lamp. They've got high hopes for this.

0:50:590:51:04

-That looks lovely on the screen.

-It does look lovely.

0:51:040:51:06

Start me £100 for that one.

0:51:060:51:09

-Silence.

-80, if you like.

0:51:090:51:12

Is there £60 anywhere?

0:51:140:51:16

Oh, come on!

0:51:160:51:18

-Put it in at 40, then. £40, I'm looking for.

-I'll start at 30.

0:51:180:51:22

30, I'm bid. Looking for two.

0:51:220:51:24

32, 34, 36, 38, 40. 40?

0:51:240:51:29

38's there. 40?

0:51:290:51:31

38 and selling. 40 - new bidder. 42.

0:51:310:51:35

44, 46, 48, 50. 48's the bid there. 50?

0:51:350:51:40

I'm selling it at £48. Are you all out now at 48?

0:51:400:51:44

Ouch! That hurt.

0:51:450:51:47

That's for nothing, Jon. I'm so sorry.

0:51:470:51:50

That really should have made a lot...

0:51:500:51:52

Will Debra and Mark's cloisonne vases go the distance?

0:51:540:51:57

20, if you like, for the vases.

0:51:570:51:59

- 20, I'm bid. - Come on!

0:51:590:52:02

20, I'm bid, looking for two. 22, 24,

0:52:020:52:05

26? 24's there. Looking for 26.

0:52:050:52:09

26, 28?

0:52:090:52:11

- 26 is your bid. - No!

0:52:110:52:14

I'm going to buy them myself. No way! You've got to be kidding me.

0:52:140:52:17

Another loss. Time for another Jedi mind trick.

0:52:180:52:22

-Maybe I should incorporate that Jedi trick.

-Ha-ha.

0:52:220:52:25

Can we picture a profit with Jon and Thomas's camera?

0:52:270:52:31

I am bid 25 on commission. I'm looking for 30 in the room.

0:52:310:52:34

30 - 2's with me. 34, 36.

0:52:340:52:38

-It's getting rolling.

-38, 40.

0:52:380:52:42

42, 44?

0:52:420:52:43

44, I've got, and I'm selling at £44.

0:52:440:52:48

Are you all out on the camera at 44, then?

0:52:480:52:51

-At last! Will this rally continue?

-That's high, you've done well!

0:52:510:52:56

We can go with our 'eads 'eld 'igh, no matter what 'appens now!

0:52:560:53:00

"On your head be it," I believe were the words, Mark.

0:53:010:53:05

-This is rather nice.

-It's lovely.

-Start me at £50 for it.

0:53:050:53:08

-Come on.

-It's not very nice.

0:53:080:53:10

40, if you like.

0:53:100:53:12

Is there £30 anywhere?

0:53:120:53:14

30, I'm bid. Looking for two.

0:53:140:53:16

32, 34, 36, 38,

0:53:160:53:19

40 - 5. 50? 45's the bid.

0:53:190:53:22

50, sir? 45 and selling.

0:53:220:53:25

50. New bidder. Five? 50's the bid.

0:53:250:53:29

Are you all done now at £50, then?

0:53:290:53:31

Oh! How's your head, then, Mark?

0:53:330:53:36

£50. £20 loss.

0:53:360:53:37

Time to break the news about the tea service.

0:53:390:53:43

-There's been a bit of an accident.

-What do you mean?

0:53:430:53:46

Has someone dropped a teacup?

0:53:460:53:48

Well, two of the cups have been damaged in transit.

0:53:480:53:50

You've got to be kidding me?! Oh, what?

0:53:500:53:53

-But don't worry, Debra.

-Aw!

0:53:530:53:55

The whole point was that it was 12 pieces of everything.

0:53:550:53:59

We're OK, because the rules state

0:53:590:54:02

that what they said it was worth perfect, which is £80-120,

0:54:020:54:07

we'll be paid the mid-estimate,

0:54:070:54:10

so whatever happens, we're going to get £100 for it.

0:54:100:54:13

Start me at £30 for that.

0:54:130:54:15

-Oh, dear.

-20, if you like.

0:54:150:54:18

No-one at 20. Is there 15 anywhere?

0:54:210:54:23

15, I'm bid. Looking for 18.

0:54:230:54:26

18, I'm bid, looking for 18.

0:54:260:54:28

I've 18, 20. 22.

0:54:280:54:32

24. 22's the bid

0:54:320:54:35

and I'm selling at 22. Are you all done?

0:54:350:54:38

Technically a loss, but in original condition, valued by the auctioneer

0:54:400:54:44

at between £80-120, luckily, thanks to the Road Trip rules,

0:54:440:54:50

this means they'll receive the low valuation of £80

0:54:500:54:53

because of the damage.

0:54:530:54:55

Every cloud has a silver lining!

0:54:570:54:59

Will the Scalextric get the boys back on track to win?

0:54:590:55:02

Bids on the books start with me at £60.

0:55:040:55:07

I'm looking for five in the room.

0:55:070:55:08

I am bid £60 - 5.

0:55:080:55:10

It's with you, sir. Is there 70 anywhere?

0:55:100:55:12

65's there, looking for 70.

0:55:120:55:15

I shall sell it at 65.

0:55:150:55:18

-Are you all out now at 65, then?

-Does he realise he's got a bargain?

0:55:180:55:22

Spun off at the chicane and another £20 down.

0:55:220:55:25

-I don't know anything about it.

-I thought it was really likeable.

0:55:250:55:29

I would have thought it would be very desirable to a lot of people.

0:55:290:55:33

Next up, it's the retro item that Jon couldn't leave behind,

0:55:350:55:39

but will the vintage radio prove a turn-on for the bidders?

0:55:390:55:42

Interest in this one means I've got to come straight in at 35.

0:55:420:55:46

-Ooh.

-45, 55, 65, 75.

0:55:460:55:50

It's with me on commission at £80. I'm looking for five in the room.

0:55:500:55:54

-It's with me on commission at £80.

-You just don't know, do you?

0:55:540:55:58

I shall sell it on commission at 80.

0:55:580:56:00

Are you all done on this one at £80, then?

0:56:000:56:04

Finally! A tiny profit.

0:56:040:56:06

Your instinct paid off handsomely. Well done, Jon.

0:56:060:56:10

-Marvellous.

-Maybe it's because we gave the change away,

0:56:100:56:13

-we got good karma.

-That was it, wasn't it?

0:56:130:56:15

-You know what this means, of course, don't you?

-Yes.

0:56:150:56:18

It's all down to the pulpit.

0:56:180:56:20

Far too late to apologise now, Mark.

0:56:200:56:23

But have the courage of your convictions, man.

0:56:230:56:26

This pulpit could be the making of you!

0:56:260:56:28

I am bid £100 on commission. I am looking for 110 in the room.

0:56:280:56:33

110. I've got 120.

0:56:330:56:36

130. 120's here with me.

0:56:360:56:41

I'm going to buy it back!

0:56:410:56:43

It could be yours. I'm selling it at 120.

0:56:430:56:45

Are you all done at 120, then?

0:56:450:56:47

You're ahead of your time on that one.

0:56:480:56:51

That happens to us so much, Jon.

0:56:510:56:53

As the dust settles, time to lick their wounds

0:56:530:56:57

and reflect on what might have been.

0:56:570:56:59

Our celebrities began with £400 each.

0:57:010:57:03

After auction costs, Jon and Thomas have made a loss of £83.26,

0:57:050:57:10

so end their Road Trip with a total of £316.74.

0:57:100:57:15

Shocking.

0:57:160:57:19

After auction costs, Debra and Mark have made a loss of £53.96

0:57:190:57:24

and end their Road Trip with a total of £346.04,

0:57:240:57:29

giving them the Pyrrhic victory.

0:57:290:57:32

You can get cream for it, if you like a bit of Pyrrhic.

0:57:320:57:35

-Well done, Tom.

-Had our teams generated any profits,

0:57:350:57:38

-they would have gone to Children in Need.

-Well done, Debra.

0:57:380:57:41

Well... That was a bit of a...

0:57:410:57:45

-Rollercoaster!

-Yeah!

0:57:450:57:47

Ups and downs, mainly downs.

0:57:470:57:49

Isn't it funny that

0:57:490:57:51

-the luckiest thing that happened to us was the tea set breaking?

-I know.

0:57:510:57:55

-It's been lovely meeting you.

-It has been wonderful.

0:57:550:57:57

We've had such fun, wonderful fun.

0:57:570:57:59

-Thank you so much for being such a good spirit.

-Thank you.

0:57:590:58:03

Time to say goodbye, but Jon and Debra have certainly

0:58:050:58:09

left a lasting "impression" on Thomas and Mark.

0:58:090:58:13

But then, you'd expect that after all, wouldn't you?

0:58:130:58:17

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:410:58:44

Jon Culshaw and Debra Stephenson (stars of The Impressions show) join experts Thomas Plant and Mark Stacey respectively. Each team has £400 to spend on their hunt for antique bargains in and around Edinburgh for eventual sale at auction in Essex. Whose profit margin will win the day? Hopefully both teams will do well as all profits go to Children in Need.