Episode 7 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

Pam St Clement and Rudolph Walker take to the road with antiques experts Thomas Charles Hanson and James Braxton to find the best antique deals in Sussex, Kent and Essex.


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-Some of the nation's favourite celebrities...

-What if we were to say 150 for the two?

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You've got a deal.

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..one antiques expert each...

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I'll just turn my back!

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Da, da, da, da, da, da, da!

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..and one big challenge - who can seek out

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and buy the best antiques at the very best prices...

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Wait for me, wait for me, wait for me!

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..and auction for a big profit further down the road?

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Keep going.

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Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

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What you've just come out with there, I cannot believe that!

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And who will be the first to say "Don't you know who I am?!"

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Time to put your pedal to the metal -

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Buckled up and raring to go on this Road Trip,

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we have two characters sure to make a drama out of a crisis.

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It's the King and Queen of Soapland -

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Pam St Clement and Rudolph Walker.

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Today's antiques hunters are best known for residing

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in one of the liveliest addresses in the country.

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Having been through more husbands...

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"You are now man and wife together."

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..earth-shattering news...

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It's all gone wrong, love.

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..and explosions than most,

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and as one of the longest-serving cast members

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on Britain's favourite soap,

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Pam St Clement has secured a place in the nation's heart

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as the formidable Pat Butcher from EastEnders.

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Oh! Temper, temper!

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I'm very apprehensive about this, Rudi.

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I don't know anything about antiques.

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Don't tell anybody. Well, I know what I like.

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-Do you enjoy shopping?

-I do.

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Unfortunately, when I'm feeling miserable and depressed,

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-that's when I spend the most money.

-That's very feminine!

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RUDI LAUGHS

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MUSIC: "Smooth Operator" by Sade

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From classics like Othello to controversial sitcoms

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like Love Thy Neighbour, Rudi's career spans over 45 years,

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and this smooth operator is showing no signs of slowing down.

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You've got a lot to learn, boy!

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The fellow EastEnders veteran who is still walking the walk

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as loveable gent Patrick Trueman famously had a fling with our Pat.

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Why don't you get back to your wife, eh?

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Ouch!

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He's even been decorated by Her Majesty the Queen,

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so you can call him Rudolph Walker OBE, no less.

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But the great British summer has got them off to a rather damp start.

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Oh, Rudi, look at this, for goodness' sakes.

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Gosh, Pam's quite posh, isn't she?

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Seaside on a summer's day...

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And they're sailing towards their challenge

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in a rather splendid 1973 Rolls Royce Corniche - cor, I say.

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-Beautiful movement, isn't it?

-It is...

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Oh, we're talking about the car now, aren't we(?)

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RUDI LAUGHS

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Never likely to let something as trivial as a spot of rain

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dampen their spirits, and ensuring that everyone sticks to the script,

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we have two more cast members.

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If I was to quickly waft...

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In a supporting role, we have someone who,

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if you mention the Queen Vic to, he might blush.

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Yes, it's the man who famously auctioned off

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a pair of Queen Victoria's knickers -

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it's the ever-dapper, ever-dashing Charles Hanson.

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Charles, there's no time, you can't look at waistcoats.

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You're antiqueing, for God's sake, man, come on.

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I am six foot - ooh!

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And completing this dazzling line-up, we have the elder statesman

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with more auction experience than you can shake a gavel at -

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over 20 years, you know - it's the local legend James Braxton.

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I think you've got an advantage,

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because you know this area quite well, don't you?

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-I'm on home ground.

-This is your home patch.

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I'm the away team taking on the might of Braxton and his companion.

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And whilst our luvvies cruise in their Rolls,

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our experts are careering towards their curtain call

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in this quintessentially English 1960 Morris Minor.

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-And so we are going east.

-No, west.

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-Oh, yeah, west.

-We're going west.

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That way. Watch out, Charles.

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You're making me nervous, Charles.

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Oh, boy, we could be in for a bumpy ride here.

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I've got to be careful, because I'm going to keep saying,

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AS FRANK BUTCHER: "Pat, look at this!"

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I imagine she's quite a tough lady,

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-do you think she'll be tough in her bargaining?

-I think she will be.

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-RUDI:

-At the end of the day, they know their stuff.

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Well, hopefully!

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RUDI LAUGHS

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Let the antique-hunting masterclass begin.

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Learning to navigate negotiations with £400 each,

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Pam and Rudolph have two days of intense shopping,

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one crucial auction and no time to spare.

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The ever-alluring East Sussex coast endeavours to dazzle

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at the starting point for this three-county road trip,

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taking in Kent and winding up at auction

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in the market town of Rayleigh in Essex.

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The rather posh, bracing Bexhill-on-Sea

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poses as the backdrop for our cast's first encounter.

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Here we are! Come on, ram it up now!

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What an amazing building.

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It's the old train station, and a fabulous antiques shop.

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Oh, here they are, James.

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-Best behaviour, look smart, ready for action.

-Hello.

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-James.

-James.

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Great to see you.

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-Do you collect antiques?

-No, I don't.

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Well, I will guide you through the vast variety of antiques there are.

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Have you any great flair for a certain aspect of antiques?

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No, I have no flair at all. I mean, forget that.

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No, get out of here! But you're full of colour, you're vibrant...

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Having established their novice status, it's an even match,

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though there is one imbalance which needs to be addressed -

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who gets the Rolls?

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Rudolph, we'd better make sure we hang onto this car,

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and Charles and Pat can get in the Morris.

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I think this is more us, isn't it?

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-I mean, it's more me.

-It is more you.

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-You're in the Morris, by the way.

-Sorry?

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You'd better go in the Minor.

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Charles is the most appalling driver, Pam,

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-but you're in safe hands in that car.

-What are you saying?

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Rudi has relinquished this lovely car to me.

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-Well, I am having second thoughts.

-It's him! He's the troublemaker!

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Come on, let's get in there. First mover advantage, I think.

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Has he got those car keys anywhere hidden on that dashboard?

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Nip round there and see if they're in the ignition.

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-No, they've gone.

-Oh, darn.

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Oh, no, they're here! I've got the keys!

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Let's go inside.

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The first dastardly deed of the day done - let's hope that doesn't end up costing them.

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Let's find all these goodies.

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This fabulous old train station houses

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a vast collection of quirky and classic items.

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James, what about... No?

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Pair of glasses. But do you see the difference in height?

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There's chunks been taken out of that and they've ground it down.

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-OK.

-So that's why it's a different height.

-Wow.

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-So... Lesson number one.

-Lesson number one.

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A lot to take in.

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Luckily, owner Andrew Towle is on hand to help.

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Don't worry, that's not him.

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Don't do all the work yourself. This is the owner.

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Yeah, but he's also selling.

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I know, I know. We'll trust him.

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-All right.

-He has a kindly look about him, doesn't he, Rudi?

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Yes.

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With underhand tactics already at play with these two,

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I can do nothing but wish them good luck - or should I say break a leg?

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Did you ever have any antiques on EastEnders at all?

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-Nope.

-Nothing at all?

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No, no. Only the actors.

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Come on, Pam, that's no way to speak about Barbara Windsor.

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What's your taste? Is it furniture, is it silver, is it jewellery?

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-I like glassware.

-Yes, yeah.

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-I like china, I like jewels.

-Yes.

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I always like anything that glitters.

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-The market is good for things like small silver.

-Right.

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-For things like small bits of porcelain, for collectibles.

-Yes.

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Where the market is suffering, for no apparent reason,

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is this sort of market furniture.

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This chest is 1810. You're talking Waterloo, you're talking George III.

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It's real history, but at the moment, at auction,

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they're barely making £150.

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Top tips there, then, Charles.

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And don't forget, we're going from this grand antiques centre

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to try and make money, so we've got to really dig deep.

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-Got a task, haven't we?

-We have got a task, exactly.

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No pressure, then(!)

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But taking it in their stride,

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James and Rudolph are finding all sorts of weird and wonderful things.

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That's a pretty little rosewood box.

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Yeah, very unusual. Good quality, the rosewood.

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-Goodness.

-Inlaid with mother of pearl. Feel the weight of it.

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Jeez!

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-I think it was off a ship, to stop the movement.

-Wow.

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But I mean, how many of these would be around, do you think?

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Have you come across something like this?

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-Never. It's a novelty. Anything unusual sells.

-Right.

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So that would be off one of these fabulous Victorian yachts,

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-wouldn't it?

-Absolutely.

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Probably an engineer or something,

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his wife said, "Right, darling, we're going on board ship."

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It's so heavy, this.

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What some clever person has done is, they've lined beneath the base here.

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It's a big piece of lead, but it's fabulous, isn't it?

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What could that be, Andy?

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I could do it for 45 for you, James, just to give you a chance.

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Rudi, if you weren't here, I would be ripping that man's hand off.

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Well, rip it off - I'll just turn my back.

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Thank you. First one done. That is fabulous, Rudi.

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You did say you could go ahead then, didn't you?

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Yeah, yeah!

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-Give the man a shake.

-Wow. I'm quite happy.

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Rudi, I hate to sound boastful,

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-but I think we've just slipped into the lead here.

-Yep.

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Boast away, James. At £45, the box is a bargain.

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I quite like the chairs. Do you like them?

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No. Don't do anything for me at all.

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-I love these chairs, aren't they great?

-Oh, my lord.

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I love those chairs. They're heavy, they're rich, they're carved.

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But in today's market, has anybody got a home

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that would accommodate four of those enormously space-taking-up chairs?

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I love them.

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At least Pam was paying attention to what Charles was saying earlier,

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even if he wasn't.

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These chairs, again, early 18th century.

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They're good chairs, aren't they?

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They are, but I don't see them going. I really...

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Meanwhile, Rudolph has been captivated by something

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altogether more delicate.

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-That's interesting.

-Hey, hello.

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-Oh, they're nice, aren't they?

-That's not what caught my eye(!)

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We're all men of the world.

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Oh, of course! It's more these that caught my eye.

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Who is Yvonne Macfie?

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So Roaring Thirties, wasn't it?

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So we'd all recovered a bit after the Great War

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and then the Wall Street Crash of '29.

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There's a look, isn't there?

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And quite austere, look at that.

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-Look at that with the fur.

-Yeah.

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Rudi, I can see you're itching

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to take on Andy in a bit of haggling there.

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Personally, if I was buying something like that,

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-I really wouldn't go above £20.

-Really?

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Well, I think that would be a great buy if we got them for 20.

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OK, let's see!

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Here we go - Rudolph's first haggling test.

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Can you throw these in with the thing we're buying?

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No. I can do a deal on these, though. 20 quid, I can do these for.

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No, I'd give you that for 10.

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What can we... I mean, it's not someone that's well-known.

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Oh, it is. Well-known to me.

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Well-known to you, yeah!

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£20 is a giveaway, really. If you don't do well on that...

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In fact - go on, come clean, Rudi.

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You said, "If he says about..."

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Yeah, I mean, if you...

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"If he says about 20, I'll buy them."

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Wait a minute, James, whose side are you on?

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You're on the same wavelength, you two!

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He's our man, he's our man! He's reading you.

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I'm trying to do me best.

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He drives a hard bargain, our Rudi.

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Shaking on £20 for the bevy of beauties,

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and they paid £45 for the rosewood box - not a bad start, chaps.

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Andy, have they bought anything yet, the other team?

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They have bought two items, Charles.

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Have they bought well?

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I think they've bought well, I think you've got to start working, Charles.

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Do I detect a whiff of desperation in the air?

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Right, let's have a look and see what else you've got.

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Is there anything you haven't put out yet?

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Nice try, though.

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How much is the canteen, out of interest?

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I can do that for 65.

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What is it?

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-Fish forks, aren't they?

-They're fish forks, yes.

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Did you ever serve with fish forks and knives

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in the old pub on EastEnders?

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No, don't be foolish. Don't do that in pubs.

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And that's him told!

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-Mental note. Thank you, Andy, we'll think on it.

-Yeah, sure.

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Nothing is doing it for me here.

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And you know, I want to give you a wow factor.

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I want to give you a real, "Look at this, Pam, this is really great."

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No, no, I'm...

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I'm walking round a bit aimlessly and I want to impress you, Pam.

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I think whilst they're negotiating and they bought two items,

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why don't we hop in their car and hop off?

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What a good idea. OK.

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So far, grabbing the Rolls first is the only thing

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this mischievous pair have agreed on.

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-They're coming out very shortly, OK?

-Quickly, quickly!

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Ha-ha!

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ENGINE FAILS TO START

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Oh, no, start!

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Oh, dear.

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-Oh, it's as dead as a doornail.

-It's dead.

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Right. Put it in neutral.

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Yeah, I'm in neutral.

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Mind you, looks like Pam's done this before.

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Have you got the brake on? Yes?

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-Hold on, the brake's off now. OK.

-OK?

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Yeah, OK, try now. Keep going!

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-That's it, that's it.

-Keep going!

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Such a gent, Charles - allowing the lady to push.

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Wait for me, wait for me!

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-Hop in, quick!

-And there you have it -

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Pam St Clement and Charles Hanson in Grand Theft Auto.

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Oh! The rotters.

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DRAMATIC DRUMBEAT FROM EASTENDERS

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The scrabble for their first antique is taking our rogues

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five miles east along the coast to historic Hastings.

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Hastings has an incredible history of maritime adventures,

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smugglers and, of course, the first castle

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to be built in England by William the Conqueror.

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Today, it has a cosmopolitan vibe, and luckily for us,

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some fabulous antique shops.

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Pam, are you a Pamela or just Pam?

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I quite like Pamela. Pamela rolls off the tongue quite nicely.

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-Might I call you Pamela?

-Please do.

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-Do you like my waistcoat? I love your waistcoat.

-Really?

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Men should be cavaliers, they should be dressy and peacocks.

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I'm a bit puny really, Pamela, I'm...

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Some people look better in clothes,

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some people look better out of clothes.

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Yeah, it's a good point, thanks.

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With nothing bought, these two players need a plan.

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I'm determined to spend all our money,

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because look what we're driving, hey?

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Let's reflect our motor.

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Eat your heart out, Rudi!

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Their second stop of the day, Nelson House Antiques.

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How's that? Oops! How's that?

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"Worn relics part exchanged".

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Don't get any ideas, cos you're not part-exing me, thank you!

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Proprietor Sue Bower's standing by.

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-Hello, there!

-Hi, hello, hello. Nice to see you.

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-Look at this.

-That is...

0:15:350:15:38

-Look at this for the mother of all chandeliers, here.

-Splendid.

0:15:380:15:42

Not dissimilar to one of Pat's famous earrings!

0:15:420:15:46

You're a lady who likes a good glint. What's it worth?

0:15:460:15:48

-850.

-850?

0:15:480:15:50

It could be yours for £3,200.

0:15:500:15:54

Go home!

0:15:540:15:56

Exactly, Charles.

0:15:560:15:57

I mean, unless there's a pair, there's no way Pam's going to be interested!

0:15:570:16:00

That's a good old screen, isn't it?

0:16:000:16:02

Look at that.

0:16:020:16:04

"In a dream, I saw them stand

0:16:040:16:06

"Hope and memory, hand in hand

0:16:060:16:08

"Hope's sweet face was bid from view,

0:16:080:16:11

"But I knew it, pure and true."

0:16:110:16:14

Could you stand by this screen for the next month

0:16:140:16:16

and sell it for me, Pam?

0:16:160:16:17

You'd be wonderful!

0:16:170:16:19

Come on, you two - the day is wearing on and you're still antique-less!

0:16:190:16:23

-We need to get buying.

-I know we do.

0:16:230:16:26

We are a lady and gent on the run.

0:16:260:16:28

We're in the Rolls, but we need now some objects to go in the boot,

0:16:280:16:32

-don't we?

-We do.

0:16:320:16:33

-We do, don't we?

-We do, indeed.

0:16:330:16:35

I'm sorry about this, Pam. I'm not a bad expert.

0:16:360:16:39

It's just...it's not...you know, I'm not seeing it yet.

0:16:390:16:41

It's never over until that big lady sings.

0:16:410:16:45

I know, I know.

0:16:450:16:47

How frustrating! You two aren't having any luck at all.

0:16:470:16:50

Or could this be what I believe is referred to as "bad karma"?

0:16:500:16:53

Excuse me, sir.

0:16:540:16:56

There's no other antique centre around here, is there?

0:16:560:16:58

Big antique centre?

0:16:580:16:59

Well, the only other antique shop is down in George Street.

0:16:590:17:03

Oh, yes! Oh, Pam, look at this.

0:17:060:17:08

Great. I'm feeling more antique inspired now.

0:17:080:17:11

Glad to hear it, Charles.

0:17:110:17:13

Shop manager David Hunt wants to show our day-trippers

0:17:130:17:17

something which might just fit the bill.

0:17:170:17:19

This only came in on Friday.

0:17:190:17:20

Pam, you know what I said - we like market fresh.

0:17:200:17:22

We like new things in, untouched.

0:17:220:17:26

Pam, would you take a glass of white wine out of that?

0:17:260:17:31

If I was feeling strong enough... Feel that.

0:17:310:17:32

A really heavy... Oh, yeah, that's great, isn't it?

0:17:320:17:35

Bohemian. 1880 or thereabouts.

0:17:350:17:37

-Exactly.

-So the way this was made, Pam,

0:17:370:17:39

you would have had this almost cameo of glass, a sandwich of glass,

0:17:390:17:43

and the engraver would have engraved through the yellows,

0:17:430:17:47

rub it all out, to reveal the sandwich of clear glass underneath.

0:17:470:17:51

And look at the deer in the landscape.

0:17:510:17:53

That's quite nice. Look at that detail.

0:17:530:17:56

You don't have to sell it to me, Charles!

0:17:560:17:58

It's whether, you know, it would sit happily in our auction.

0:17:580:18:01

It says £95. The absolute best on that would be...?

0:18:050:18:08

80, it would be - that's it.

0:18:080:18:10

Hm. I would offer you £70, for cash.

0:18:100:18:13

And I would have to say no.

0:18:130:18:15

Can't just come down a little bit? 75?

0:18:150:18:18

I've come down £5 more than I should anyway...

0:18:180:18:20

Sure. Sure.

0:18:200:18:21

So I...you know...

0:18:210:18:23

Oh, dear! Three shops down and nothing bought.

0:18:230:18:26

This is turning into a tragedy.

0:18:260:18:28

-I can't believe we're still empty-handed.

-I know.

0:18:280:18:30

-Are you really concerned?

-Yes.

0:18:300:18:33

-Really? Live in hope, OK?

-OK.

0:18:330:18:35

I'm sorry!

0:18:350:18:36

Yes, live in hope - things can't get any worse.

0:18:370:18:41

-We're going in the wrong direction, aren't we?

-We are.

0:18:410:18:43

I lied.

0:18:430:18:44

Never mind.

0:18:440:18:45

Meanwhile, James and Rudolph are clearly enjoying the Morris' charm.

0:18:460:18:51

Rudi, do you like cars substantial?

0:18:510:18:53

I like the solid, substantial cars -

0:18:530:18:56

the ones that really sit on the road and they're heavy.

0:18:560:18:59

Yeah. How did we end up in this, then?

0:18:590:19:01

How did we...?

0:19:020:19:03

OK, maybe not!

0:19:030:19:05

With the wind in their hair - well, you know what I mean -

0:19:050:19:09

James and Rudolph are making their way 20 miles north-east

0:19:090:19:13

to idyllic Rolvenden, to a rather special motor museum.

0:19:130:19:18

With some of the earliest examples of everything

0:19:180:19:21

from goods vehicles, family cars,

0:19:210:19:23

caravans and an array of motoring memorabilia,

0:19:230:19:25

this museum is one of the best private collections of its kind in the country.

0:19:250:19:29

Hey, look at this!

0:19:290:19:31

-Isn't this superb?!

-Wow!

0:19:310:19:33

-Hey-hey-hey! Look at these!

-Isn't it lovely?

0:19:340:19:38

Passionate petrolhead Chris Booth's 52-year love affair

0:19:380:19:42

with everything automotive started when he was a child,

0:19:420:19:45

initially collecting toy cars and pin badges.

0:19:450:19:48

This is one here which I have, which happens to be a Morgan,

0:19:480:19:52

which I had when I was four years old.

0:19:520:19:54

So did this spark your interest in the...?

0:19:540:19:56

I suppose it did. It was the three-wheelers, for something different.

0:19:560:20:00

In 1960, Chris bought his first Morgan three-wheeler -

0:20:000:20:03

the vehicle which brought motoring to the masses.

0:20:030:20:06

This Morgan was the one I had in 1960.

0:20:060:20:10

What a great car. Is this made in 1960 or is it older?

0:20:100:20:14

It's 1934.

0:20:140:20:15

The main reason I started with a three-wheeler

0:20:150:20:18

was because you could drive it on a bike licence when you were 16.

0:20:180:20:21

The stars of this collection have to be

0:20:220:20:25

the 20 pristine Morgan three-wheelers,

0:20:250:20:29

commonly known as the cycle car.

0:20:290:20:30

And the man behind this motoring revolution was Henry Morgan.

0:20:300:20:35

In 1910, he launched his motoring marvel,

0:20:350:20:37

which quickly gained huge respect.

0:20:370:20:41

Soundly built and incredibly fast, it won hundreds of awards

0:20:410:20:43

and smashed speed records in every class of motorsport.

0:20:430:20:49

Although the last Morgan three-wheeler left the factory

0:20:490:20:51

in 1953, thanks to people like Chris, its legacy lives on.

0:20:510:20:55

When I came to England in 1960, when I saw a three-wheeler,

0:20:550:20:58

I thought, "What's happening to England?

0:20:580:21:01

"We're used to four-wheelers in Trinidad.

0:21:010:21:03

"Suddenly, I'm faced with a three-wheeler!

0:21:030:21:05

"Have they gone backward over here?"

0:21:050:21:07

-Is there a little fellow we could sit in?

-Yes, you can, yes.

0:21:070:21:10

James, I thought you'd never ask!

0:21:100:21:12

-Look at this fella!

-Hey-hey!

0:21:140:21:16

This model of classic 1920s Morgan was another champ.

0:21:160:21:19

Able to reach speeds of 70mph, it won more medals and trophies

0:21:210:21:24

than any other comparable machine.

0:21:240:21:27

Turn the petrol on. Flood the carburettor,

0:21:270:21:30

we turn on the battery,

0:21:300:21:31

turn on the ignition switch, turn on the oil...

0:21:310:21:34

OK, someone's going to have to write all this lot down!

0:21:340:21:36

It's like a jet fighter, this!

0:21:360:21:38

Ignition... A little bit of throttle, and press the starter.

0:21:380:21:42

Well, I tell you what, I'm not going to steer it,

0:21:470:21:50

because I wouldn't want to come back!

0:21:500:21:52

I'm going to get into this and take it all the way to Trinidad!

0:21:540:21:58

It's all right, I'll give you the privilege. You sit...

0:21:580:22:02

Bit of a squeeze, eh, James? Must have been that big breakfast.

0:22:020:22:05

-Oh... Oh! Oh!

-And he's off.

0:22:050:22:10

No, you don't - just tap the brake there. OK, that's as far as you go.

0:22:100:22:13

All right, all right, all right, all right, all right!

0:22:130:22:16

Or he would be, given half a chance!

0:22:160:22:19

That is fabulous. Thank you, Chris.

0:22:190:22:22

-Shall we get back to the Morris?

-Can you walk properly?

-No, you lead on, you lead on.

0:22:220:22:26

Charles and Pam are scampering to their last shop of the day,

0:22:280:22:32

20 miles north to the charming town of Tenterden.

0:22:320:22:35

When you, uh, first appeared in EastEnders,

0:22:380:22:42

did you ever foresee the longevity of your quarter of a century?

0:22:420:22:47

I was an actor who always refused long runs.

0:22:470:22:50

I said "Oh, I don't want to tie myself down for a year!"

0:22:500:22:52

But to develop a character and to play the breadth of scripts

0:22:520:22:57

that I've been allowed to over that 25 and a half years,

0:22:570:23:01

is something that you probably wouldn't get in an entire career.

0:23:010:23:05

So far, Pam and Charles have bought precisely nothing.

0:23:070:23:09

Let's hope they find something here.

0:23:090:23:11

-Lovely!

-OK, Pamela.

-Let's go and see what they've got.

0:23:110:23:16

That magical thing might be there to be unearthed.

0:23:160:23:19

For both your sakes, I do hope so!

0:23:190:23:21

-Hi, Terry. I'm Pam.

-Hello.

0:23:210:23:24

-Nice to meet you.

-And you.

0:23:240:23:25

Let's hope you're going to do great things for us.

0:23:250:23:27

Shop owner Terry Smith is primed and ready to assist.

0:23:270:23:32

I think we probably want to go for the novelty, for the more peculiar.

0:23:320:23:36

Yes, I agree. Absolutely.

0:23:360:23:37

I've seen something very amusing.

0:23:370:23:39

That's quite neat. Is it a little pillbox?

0:23:390:23:42

Is that a regent...? Oh, no. Viagra.

0:23:420:23:44

-I think that's the person who made it!

-Yeah.

0:23:440:23:48

I mean, do you see many Viagra boxes?

0:23:480:23:50

-I wouldn't know.

-No.

0:23:500:23:52

That's quite a nice box, isn't it? Probably made in France, in Limoges.

0:23:520:23:56

Sometimes novelty sells, and, you know, maybe...you know,

0:23:560:23:58

maybe the market's growing for Viagra pillboxes.

0:23:580:24:01

-Who knows?

-You know?

0:24:010:24:02

-I think it's delightful.

-I like it.

0:24:020:24:05

-It would warm the auction room.

-Yeah. Yeah. OK.

0:24:050:24:08

It's a lovely shop, isn't it?

0:24:080:24:11

An unexpected find, but, hey, they said they wanted novelty.

0:24:110:24:14

However, they need more, and time is not on their side.

0:24:140:24:17

Time is ticking. Look at this.

0:24:190:24:20

You know, Pamela...

0:24:220:24:23

You know, you could have a picture of you and me, hey?

0:24:230:24:27

A match made in heaven.

0:24:270:24:30

Actually, no, I tell you, that is a fabulous wedding present.

0:24:300:24:33

Because you can have a picture of the bride and groom.

0:24:330:24:37

Yeah. Look, could have your initials there, my initials there.

0:24:370:24:40

-I don't think your wife would be very happy about it.

-No, no.

0:24:400:24:42

But that is substantial, it's got a good gauge of silver

0:24:420:24:47

and, OK, it's not antique, but it's of an intrinsic value

0:24:470:24:51

because it's silver.

0:24:510:24:52

And you know, I just think it's been a tough day today,

0:24:520:24:55

and, you know, this could be our match.

0:24:550:24:57

Potentially the second item they're all agreed on. I'm thrilled!

0:24:570:25:01

It's modern but if it was new, I don't think you could buy that for £300.

0:25:010:25:05

This photo frame, I would guide at auction between 100 and 150,

0:25:050:25:09

so we'd really want it for about 120.

0:25:090:25:12

Best we could do, 135. That's somewhere between your estimate.

0:25:120:25:16

And I would probably want to buy it for about £110.

0:25:160:25:19

115 and we have a deal - we'll shake on it.

0:25:190:25:23

Well, do you want to chuck in the little Viagra pot as well?

0:25:230:25:27

For fun, yes. We'll put the Viagra pot in as well.

0:25:270:25:29

-Cometh the hour...

-Cometh the man!

0:25:290:25:32

In the 90th minute, for £115,

0:25:320:25:35

I think we've bought our first two items!

0:25:350:25:38

-It's been...

-Relieved, relieved!

-..a day, hasn't it? A day and a half.

0:25:380:25:41

Terry, thanks ever so much.

0:25:410:25:43

Oh, no, no, no! No, wait!

0:25:430:25:45

That's lovely.

0:25:450:25:46

A Victorian... Look at the lovely acorn leaf handle.

0:25:460:25:49

Silver-plated meat dish.

0:25:490:25:50

And the nice thing is also, look, there's a crest on there.

0:25:500:25:53

I think you'll find it's called a cloche, actually!

0:25:530:25:56

It must be, what? 1860? 1870?

0:25:560:25:59

Something like that. It's certainly Victorian.

0:25:590:26:01

What we could almost do is buy this

0:26:010:26:03

and put it with the Viagra pot and say "Wife, look, look at this.

0:26:030:26:07

"Voila!" Hey? What do you think?

0:26:070:26:10

-I love your foreplay!

-Oh, Pam, you are awful!

0:26:100:26:12

-What's the best price on this?

-It should be £50.

0:26:120:26:15

But seeing as you've bought the silver frame already,

0:26:150:26:18

I'll do it for £40 for you.

0:26:180:26:19

-Shall we do it?

-Yes.

0:26:190:26:21

Terry, you're a good man.

0:26:210:26:22

There we go again, another handshake.

0:26:220:26:24

-That's great.

-Cheers.

0:26:240:26:25

Maybe good things do come in threes.

0:26:250:26:27

This surprise last-minute find, a stunning Victorian silver-plated

0:26:290:26:32

meat cover, brings their total spend for the day to £155.

0:26:320:26:35

So get some rest, m'darlings,

0:26:390:26:41

because tomorrow, you've all got some serious shopping to do!

0:26:410:26:44

Night-night!

0:26:440:26:45

Cue sunshine, cue Rolls Royce, cue our ever-eager roadtrippers,

0:26:480:26:52

ready for another day of antique-shopping heaven.

0:26:520:26:56

Good morning, young man.

0:26:560:26:57

Oh, that is a compliment, "young man".

0:26:570:26:59

Oh, I like the sound of that!

0:26:590:27:00

-Pamela, you know, she's ever so keen to get it right.

-Yeah.

0:27:000:27:04

She's high on energy, and, James, I have to deliver.

0:27:040:27:08

Charles has been saying to me you have to buy with your heart

0:27:080:27:14

but you also have to, on top of it,

0:27:140:27:16

make a judgement about whether it's of the moment.

0:27:160:27:18

You know, what are people looking for?

0:27:180:27:21

Rudi was funny with the haggling. I could see he wanted to do it,

0:27:210:27:24

and he totally changed, like an actor.

0:27:240:27:27

He put on a very stern persona.

0:27:270:27:29

Let's have a smooth ride, please.

0:27:320:27:33

Sorry. THUDDING

0:27:330:27:35

James...

0:27:350:27:36

Yesterday very nearly ended in disaster for Pam and Charles

0:27:430:27:46

as they couldn't find or agree on anything to buy.

0:27:460:27:50

I'm sorry about this, Pam, I'm not seeing it yet.

0:27:500:27:52

Until, of course, they struck gold!

0:27:520:27:54

Well - silver, actually.

0:27:540:27:56

They spent £155 on a twin silver frame,

0:27:560:28:00

a silver-plated meat cover and a cheeky Viagra pot,

0:28:000:28:03

leaving them £245 to pick up some more priceless props.

0:28:030:28:09

We're all men of the world.

0:28:090:28:11

Meanwhile, the ever-ready Rudi and James

0:28:120:28:15

strode their way through several scenes,

0:28:150:28:18

picking up a weighty, lead-lined rosewood box

0:28:180:28:20

and some sultry sketches for a modest £65.

0:28:200:28:25

With a whopping £335 still to spend,

0:28:250:28:28

Messrs Walker and Braxton have some serious business to do today.

0:28:280:28:32

If you weren't here, I'd be ripping that man's hand off.

0:28:320:28:35

Well, rip it off.

0:28:350:28:37

-Morning, team.

-You look perfect in there.

0:28:380:28:40

I feel absolutely right, it's my home.

0:28:400:28:42

OK, bye. See you later.

0:28:420:28:44

-Have a lovely day.

-Bye.

0:28:440:28:46

-It's completely dead, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:28:500:28:53

It's completely Popeyed.

0:28:530:28:54

-I think we'll have to leave the car here, actually.

-Yes.

0:28:540:28:56

-And we'll walk up.

-Have you got Securicor on hand?

0:28:560:29:00

Bye-bye, sweetheart, behave.

0:29:010:29:03

The indignity! Imagine - having to walk!

0:29:040:29:07

This morning, James and Rudi are headed to the last shop

0:29:070:29:11

Pam and James went to yesterday - well, you never know,

0:29:110:29:14

they might have missed something!

0:29:140:29:16

-Rudi, this is my manor, so I know...

-So you know it, all right. OK.

0:29:160:29:20

-Home territory.

-Home territory.

0:29:200:29:22

-Morning, morning. This looks very promising.

-This looks very nice.

0:29:220:29:26

Yeah, Pam and Charles dealt with Terry yesterday.

0:29:260:29:29

Today, his wife Pam is helping the boys.

0:29:290:29:31

I bet Charles said this to you yesterday -

0:29:310:29:34

have you got anything market fresh? Did he?

0:29:340:29:37

-I don't know, my husband dealt with them yesterday.

-All right.

0:29:370:29:40

-Shall we spend five, ten minutes looking round the shop?

-Yeah.

0:29:400:29:44

-You shout out if anything grabs you.

-All right.

0:29:440:29:47

This is difficult.

0:29:500:29:51

I just wouldn't know where to start as far as

0:29:510:29:54

what the people going to auction, what they want to buy.

0:29:550:29:59

Come on, Rudi, haven't you learned anything?

0:29:590:30:02

What's this? Walnut case.

0:30:020:30:05

It's a metronome, so it keeps your time.

0:30:050:30:07

OK.

0:30:070:30:09

# Old man river

0:30:090:30:12

# That old man river...

0:30:120:30:16

All right.

0:30:160:30:17

Then you slide it up to go fast.

0:30:170:30:19

# Pack up all my cares...

0:30:190:30:21

Too slow!

0:30:210:30:23

And here's good old Terry,

0:30:250:30:28

who's produced something rather interesting for the boys.

0:30:280:30:30

Oh, look at that.

0:30:300:30:32

Bought yesterday.

0:30:320:30:33

Bought yesterday. That is market fresh. What a lovely barometer.

0:30:330:30:37

I think that's rather interesting.

0:30:370:30:39

That's 1850 to 1870.

0:30:390:30:42

Yeah, so a trusty Victorian one.

0:30:420:30:44

Beneath that is a reservoir of mercury

0:30:440:30:47

and these are ivory -

0:30:470:30:49

-Vernier scales, they call these.

-Ah, right, OK.

0:30:490:30:52

And these are so accurate, aren't they?

0:30:520:30:54

Indeed they are, but it's worth bearing in mind

0:30:540:30:57

that only ivory products which pre-date 1947 can be legally bought.

0:30:570:31:02

Thankfully, this one dates from a much earlier period.

0:31:050:31:07

I think that's rather unusual. It's a nice bit of mahogany.

0:31:070:31:11

How much?

0:31:110:31:12

150 quid.

0:31:120:31:14

-Rudi, I think we should buy that.

-I think so too.

0:31:140:31:16

150.

0:31:160:31:18

Er, can I have a word with your...

0:31:180:31:20

-PAM:

-That's the first I've seen!

0:31:220:31:23

I know, I know...

0:31:230:31:25

Can you go back inside, please? Let me have a chat with...

0:31:250:31:27

I tell you, I tell you - watch this man.

0:31:270:31:30

Ladies tend to swoon, don't they?

0:31:300:31:32

Not, not, not Pam, I don't think!

0:31:320:31:34

I think it's a lovely item and I think we should buy it.

0:31:370:31:39

OK, you're the expert and I have to agree with you.

0:31:390:31:41

I love this, really love this. Thank you.

0:31:410:31:43

-TERRY:

-Saves me doing it up!

0:31:430:31:45

Once again, James and Rudi are not leaving empty-handed

0:31:460:31:49

and clearly not saving anything for a rainy day.

0:31:490:31:52

They've paid the asking price of £150 for this stick barometer.

0:31:520:31:57

Let's hope it stays fair!

0:31:580:32:00

Charles is yet to shine on this antiques drama

0:32:030:32:05

and so he's brought the Queen of Soaps to the house once owned

0:32:050:32:09

by the woman hailed as the Queen of the Stage, Dame Ellen Terry.

0:32:090:32:13

Maybe here he'll find his motivation!

0:32:130:32:17

Look at that! Roses painted to order.

0:32:170:32:21

Is that 16th century?

0:32:210:32:23

You're quite right. Henry VIII, early 1500s.

0:32:230:32:26

You know, I'm impressed.

0:32:260:32:28

I defy any building that's built modern to last this long.

0:32:280:32:32

Smallhythe Place is a Tudor gem nestled in the Kent countryside

0:32:330:32:38

and was bought by Dame Ellen in 1899 for the princely sum of £900,

0:32:380:32:44

and was her home for the last 30 years of her life.

0:32:440:32:48

It is now run by the National Trust.

0:32:480:32:49

-Good morning. May we come in?

-You can indeed.

0:32:490:32:52

-Paul, meet Pamela.

-Hello, Paul. How do you do?

0:32:520:32:56

Welcome to Ellen Terry's residence.

0:32:560:32:58

-Lovely.

-Fantastic.

0:32:580:33:00

Tour guide Paul Meredith will help illuminate this captivating lady

0:33:000:33:04

who really was the Liz Taylor of her day.

0:33:040:33:06

Hailing from a dynasty of actors,

0:33:060:33:08

Ellen Terry began acting as a child in Shakespeare's plays,

0:33:080:33:12

before going on to be regarded as the leading Shakespearean

0:33:120:33:15

and comic actor in Britain, with a career spanning seven decades.

0:33:150:33:19

Though having had three husbands and two illegitimate children,

0:33:190:33:23

her life was anything but conventional.

0:33:230:33:25

Was she a real beauty, Paul?

0:33:250:33:27

Very, very beautiful and admired by men sort of throughout the country.

0:33:270:33:31

Yeah.

0:33:310:33:32

And, apparently, a lot of young men proposed to their brides by saying,

0:33:320:33:36

"As Ellen Terry won't have me, will you marry me?"

0:33:360:33:40

Really? Is it a lady you look up to, Pam?

0:33:400:33:43

Oh, very much.

0:33:430:33:45

How did she become such a name?

0:33:450:33:47

Well, strangely enough, she was one of the first to actually

0:33:470:33:50

use the media quite a lot.

0:33:500:33:52

We have a letter that she wrote to her third husband

0:33:520:33:55

which says how she was chased down the platform of a railway station

0:33:550:33:58

by the equivalent of the paparazzi of the day.

0:33:580:34:01

Rushed into the carriage and pulled the blind down

0:34:010:34:04

to stop them pestering her at the time.

0:34:040:34:06

Isn't it interesting that that was the press of the day as well?

0:34:060:34:09

'Twas ever thus.

0:34:090:34:11

Perhaps you would like to go upstairs now

0:34:110:34:13

and have a look at one of Dame Ellen Terry's most famous costumes.

0:34:130:34:16

-The original?

-Indeed.

0:34:160:34:18

-Ah. Heavens.

-Can't wait. Can't wait.

0:34:180:34:20

Wonderful.

0:34:200:34:21

The pinnacle of her career, of course, was playing Lady Macbeth.

0:34:220:34:26

The famous beetle-wing dress for Dame Ellen's performance

0:34:260:34:30

as Lady Macbeth at the Lyceum theatre in London was made in 1888.

0:34:300:34:35

This magnificent costume adorned with real beetle wings

0:34:370:34:40

is now over 120 years old -

0:34:400:34:42

and has recently undergone a painstaking reconstruction

0:34:420:34:45

and restoration which took a whopping 1,300 hours to complete.

0:34:450:34:49

Yes. The beetle dress.

0:34:510:34:53

And what's it made of, Paul?

0:34:530:34:55

Well, there's a silk underskirt that's sort of dyed

0:34:550:34:58

to the right colour and then there's a crocheted over-dress,

0:34:580:35:03

and then on each corner of all the crocheted bits

0:35:030:35:07

was sewn a beetle wing.

0:35:070:35:08

That must be quite heavy.

0:35:080:35:11

It's a heavy costume.

0:35:110:35:12

It went with a cloak as well which was also quite heavy.

0:35:120:35:15

That's a nightmare on stage, I have to say, to be...

0:35:150:35:18

You know, to have a heavy costume.

0:35:180:35:21

It's an added stress, if you like.

0:35:210:35:24

This is the actual book that she used,

0:35:240:35:26

the prompt copy of Macbeth which is fully annotated

0:35:260:35:30

with all sorts of little scribbles on how she's going to play the part.

0:35:300:35:35

Look at this - "Slight break in voice."

0:35:350:35:37

'Lady M, consider it not so deeply.'

0:35:370:35:42

After Dame Ellen's death in 1928,

0:35:440:35:47

everything passed to her daughter Edith,

0:35:470:35:49

who turned one of the outbuildings into a theatre

0:35:490:35:53

which, to this day, regularly hosts plays.

0:35:530:35:56

And clearly, Pam just can't resist.

0:35:560:35:58

But Charles, really, perhaps you should sit this one out.

0:35:580:36:02

-So am I acting as though you're my lover?

-I'm your wife.

0:36:020:36:05

Sorry, wife. That's it.

0:36:050:36:06

So wife. OK, Mrs.

0:36:060:36:09

Hardly a packed house, but I'm sure Paul will give them

0:36:090:36:12

his undivided attention.

0:36:120:36:13

-All right?

-Got it, got it.

0:36:130:36:15

How now? What news?

0:36:150:36:17

He has almost supp'd. Why have you left the chamber?

0:36:170:36:20

Hath he ask'd for me?

0:36:200:36:21

Know you not he has?

0:36:210:36:23

I have given suck, and know how tender 'tis

0:36:230:36:25

to love the babe that milks me, and would,

0:36:250:36:29

while it was smiling in my face,

0:36:290:36:32

have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,

0:36:320:36:35

and dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you have done to this.

0:36:350:36:41

Gosh. The raw emotion.

0:36:410:36:45

It is so difficult to read that with all her notes.

0:36:450:36:47

There's scribbles all over it. It's wonderful, look.

0:36:470:36:50

-If we should fail?

-We fail?

0:36:500:36:52

But screw your courage to the sticking place, and we'll not fail.

0:36:540:37:01

PAUL CLAPS

0:37:040:37:06

Thank you. Thank you very much.

0:37:060:37:08

Well, that was quite a performance!

0:37:090:37:11

I think as productions go on the stage at Smallhythe,

0:37:110:37:14

that's got to be one of the most unique I've ever seen.

0:37:140:37:17

-Follow me.

-Yes, please.

0:37:170:37:19

Never leave me, Lady Macbeth, and I promise you, the future is ours.

0:37:190:37:23

He really has the gift of the gab.

0:37:230:37:26

I say - Charles had gone all method!

0:37:270:37:30

Let's get this show back on the road!

0:37:300:37:33

Our antiques tale is taking us 25 miles cross-country

0:37:330:37:37

to the stunning spa town of Royal Tunbridge Wells.

0:37:370:37:41

In its Georgian heyday, this was a booming tourist resort.

0:37:410:37:45

Visitors flocked here to take the waters -

0:37:450:37:47

thought to have healing properties.

0:37:470:37:49

Much of the stunning architecture from that period remains,

0:37:490:37:53

and within lie some fabulous antique shops.

0:37:530:37:57

-Where are we going now?

-Tunbridge Wells.

0:37:570:37:59

Royal Tunbridge Wells, please!

0:37:590:38:01

-Well, we are both royalists, aren't we?

-We are.

0:38:010:38:03

Pam, cometh the man, cometh the hour, hey?

0:38:030:38:06

You got the right man, I promise you.

0:38:060:38:08

Let's do it for Queen and country.

0:38:100:38:12

Let's go and find that missing,

0:38:120:38:15

missing object that is waiting for you and I.

0:38:150:38:18

On, on! You noblest English.

0:38:180:38:21

-Thank you, Henry V.

-Yes.

0:38:230:38:25

I say, that was rather rousing!

0:38:250:38:27

Your famous role in Love Thy Neighbour...

0:38:300:38:33

Wow, that's going back a bit.

0:38:330:38:35

That started in 1970.

0:38:350:38:38

After the first few episodes,

0:38:380:38:40

we had a kind of inkling that this was something special.

0:38:400:38:43

It was ground-breaking, it was a tremendous success.

0:38:430:38:48

This is our dynamic duo's last chance

0:38:480:38:51

to bag a bargain for the auction.

0:38:510:38:52

And where better than at Ian Relf Antiques?

0:38:520:38:56

Let's go!

0:38:580:39:00

Oh, and there's the man himself!

0:39:000:39:02

-Hi, how are you doing?

-Not too bad. Rudolph Walker.

0:39:020:39:04

I'm pleased to meet you.

0:39:040:39:06

I recognise you straight away and I remember listening

0:39:060:39:09

to your play on Radio 4 when you played Basil D'Oliveira, that was...

0:39:090:39:12

Whoa. You're joking.

0:39:120:39:15

Most people, when they meet you, say "Oh, Love Thy Neighbour" or "EastEnders".

0:39:150:39:19

You made my day.

0:39:190:39:20

I hope you make my day now by spending some money!

0:39:200:39:23

Ah, flattery, works every time. Now get shopping.

0:39:260:39:30

What about your trombone there?

0:39:300:39:32

I mean, will this appeal to someone

0:39:320:39:35

who is collecting this sort of thing or is it for...

0:39:350:39:37

Musical instruments are always sought after

0:39:370:39:40

and especially of a certain manufacture.

0:39:400:39:43

Who's it made by?

0:39:430:39:45

-Boosey &...

-Boosey & Hawkes?

0:39:450:39:46

Oh, fabulous, great maker.

0:39:460:39:49

You can see I'm obviously a jazz musician

0:39:490:39:52

by the way I'm approaching this!

0:39:520:39:54

Oh, hello! Another one.

0:39:560:39:57

That's another fiver knocked off.

0:39:570:40:00

Isn't it something like...

0:40:010:40:03

HE PLAYS RASPILY

0:40:040:40:07

Oh, no, James, please don't. Stick to the day job!

0:40:070:40:09

Sweet music, sweet music.

0:40:090:40:11

I mean, is that natural or is that...

0:40:110:40:14

-We call those honourable scars.

-Honourable scars.

0:40:140:40:18

OK, OK, I have a few of those, yes.

0:40:180:40:20

Somebody threw a glass at the man in Ronnie Scott's!

0:40:200:40:26

-What could that be to us?

-Let's see... Erm...

0:40:260:40:30

how about 65?

0:40:300:40:33

-65. God, that seems good.

-James, what's happened to haggling, then?

0:40:330:40:39

It's a speculative thing, and it might play in our favour.

0:40:390:40:42

-So about 60 would be all right for this.

-Yeah, go on, we'll go to 60.

0:40:420:40:46

-60. Well, I think we should do that.

-OK.

-Good work, Rudi.

0:40:460:40:51

Sneaky little haggle there - managed to knock a fiver off. So £60 it is!

0:40:510:40:56

-What are we looking at?

-The cricket ball.

0:40:560:40:58

And, you know, you do the off break and the leg break

0:40:580:41:02

-and if they allow me to demonstrate it in front of the crowd...

-Exactly.

0:41:020:41:06

..it might make a few more pounds. You never know.

0:41:060:41:09

Handled by Rudolph Walker, who also touched Gary Sobers' hand,

0:41:090:41:13

who also touched Viv Richards!

0:41:130:41:15

-That's a few extra quid, isn't it?

-Yeah!

0:41:150:41:17

I'll put that in with the trombone.

0:41:170:41:21

You never know, even if it made one or two pounds, it's profit.

0:41:210:41:23

-True.

-That's really kind.

0:41:230:41:25

Well, clearly bowled over by Mr Walker's charm,

0:41:250:41:29

Ian has kindly thrown in the cricket ball for free.

0:41:290:41:32

-What a good sport!

-Let's hit the road.

0:41:320:41:34

-OK. Bless you. Thanks a lot.

-Thank you, Ian.

0:41:340:41:37

Here we are.

0:41:370:41:39

Ah, Aaron Antiques. Fingers crossed they have more luck in here.

0:41:390:41:43

Oh, I've knocked something over already.

0:41:430:41:45

-That's a cockerel. He's still crowing.

-Not thanks to you two!

0:41:450:41:50

Pam, I'm feeling really pumped up now. I'm feeling really pumped up.

0:41:500:41:53

Really, Charles?!

0:41:530:41:55

Probably just too much orange squash, old boy. It'll pass.

0:41:550:41:59

Fortunately, it looks as if this little treasure trove may well have

0:41:590:42:03

some unusual fruits to bear.

0:42:030:42:04

-He's quite neat, isn't he? Quite like him?

-No.

-Look at him.

0:42:040:42:08

Eh? He's smiling at us, isn't he?

0:42:080:42:11

And, you know, he's a bit flaky, but over the years we all get flaky.

0:42:110:42:15

-Put him down, I want to have a look round.

-Do you like him?

-No.

-No, OK.

0:42:150:42:19

Unless you two can agree. I can't see this ending well.

0:42:190:42:23

Or, Pamela, do we go for a big statement piece, or, dare I say it,

0:42:230:42:27

even a statesman, because up there is that great man, Disraeli.

0:42:270:42:32

I think personally we stand more chance with your gnome

0:42:320:42:36

than we do with Disraeli.

0:42:360:42:37

I just don't think that the auction house we're going to

0:42:370:42:40

-is going to actually have a Disraeli fan there.

-No.

0:42:400:42:44

That's an interesting observation.

0:42:440:42:46

There's something else there I like the look of.

0:42:460:42:49

It's a little watering can.

0:42:490:42:51

That, I suspect, is Staffordshire 1890-ish

0:42:510:42:56

and it's quite novel because it's in pot.

0:42:560:42:59

It's a lead-glazed earthenware.

0:42:590:43:01

It's hand tinted with this... Ah, look - bees and honey.

0:43:010:43:05

-It means money, maybe.

-He knows what that means!

-Bees and money.

0:43:050:43:08

-I'm learning EastEnder rhymes, OK.

-Bear that in mind.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:43:080:43:13

Well, would you Adam and Eve it? After a little butcher's hook,

0:43:130:43:17

they've finally found "summing" they both like.

0:43:170:43:20

Just nip up them apples and pears

0:43:200:43:23

and see what else you can bump and grind - find.

0:43:230:43:26

-There's something else there I like the look of.

-Oh, that's nice.

0:43:260:43:30

That's a really, really nice clock, Pam.

0:43:300:43:32

Shop owner Ronald Goodman is able and ready to assist.

0:43:320:43:36

-Just come in, that one.

-Just come in, has it?

-Oh, right.

0:43:360:43:39

Hong Kong retail. Is that right, do you think?

0:43:390:43:42

Yeah, I think it's probably a French movement.

0:43:420:43:45

-It's probably 1880s, I should think.

-Made to order for...

0:43:450:43:47

It could have been for a big maritime company, in Hong Kong.

0:43:470:43:51

But you've got the anchor and the ship's wheel

0:43:510:43:53

and you've got the cannons.

0:43:530:43:55

Anyone who's interesting in maritime history would want to buy that.

0:43:550:43:59

-How much?

-I'm asking 220. It's a lovely thing.

0:43:590:44:02

If you really want it, you can have it for 180.

0:44:020:44:05

-We saw down below, sir, a nice watering can, didn't we?

-Mm-hm.

0:44:070:44:11

-Try... Try and sweet talk him.

-What are you asking?

0:44:110:44:16

Well, it's a rare object, I've never seen one quite like that before.

0:44:160:44:20

It can be as little as £160.

0:44:200:44:23

-I think that's way above us.

-Yes.

-We do do the brass model for £20.

0:44:230:44:29

-Ah, well!

-Yes.

0:44:290:44:32

These two items together would take them to £340.

0:44:320:44:36

But they've only got £245 left from their £400 budget.

0:44:360:44:40

Some serious negotiations required here, or a radical re-think.

0:44:400:44:44

What would be the best on the clock and the watering can?

0:44:440:44:47

245 quid the two, and you've got a deal.

0:44:470:44:50

That's got to be the deal of a lifetime.

0:44:500:44:53

But is there one more thing we could put in our armoury

0:44:530:44:56

to take on the might of James Braxton and Rudi?

0:44:560:45:00

-What other item?

-A little piece.

-How about a magnifying glass?

0:45:000:45:04

The magnifying glass is a 25-quid magnifying glass all day long.

0:45:040:45:07

To give us a fighting chance, with your blessing, dealer, that at 15,

0:45:070:45:11

the clock at 170,

0:45:110:45:13

which takes us up to 185, and then the money left over,

0:45:130:45:18

60 on the kettle, which comes to 245...

0:45:180:45:23

I think, Pam, we have a deal.

0:45:230:45:26

£245 in cash.

0:45:260:45:29

-And that's it, our entire budget gone.

-That's it.

0:45:290:45:33

This is the way I like to see people leave the shop -

0:45:330:45:36

with no money in their pocket.

0:45:360:45:38

Well, it was a close call

0:45:380:45:40

but Pam and Charles managed to pull it out of the bag and spend all their money!

0:45:400:45:44

That flurry of haggling concludes the shopping expedition.

0:45:440:45:47

Well played, everyone.

0:45:470:45:48

But now, here in the rather splendid town of Tunbridge Wells,

0:45:480:45:53

it's time to compare notes and reveal what they bought.

0:45:530:45:57

-Ohhh!

-That's interesting!

-Interesting!

0:45:580:46:01

Pick up the jewellery box, have a look at that.

0:46:010:46:04

-OK. Is it heavy?

-Oh, Lord above! What's in there?

0:46:040:46:06

-That's heavy, isn't it?

-That is incredibly heavy.

0:46:060:46:09

Is it lead lined? < It's lead. How much did it cost you?

0:46:090:46:12

< £40. Yeah, bargain.

0:46:120:46:14

I would guide it between £70 and £100.

0:46:140:46:17

Maritime interest, we're not far from the coast, I like it. The ball.

0:46:170:46:20

Tell me, has it any pedigree? What's its provenance?

0:46:200:46:23

Rudolph Walker's holding it.

0:46:230:46:25

-We probably wouldn't get anything for this, but I'm sure we will.

-Why?

0:46:260:46:31

-I just saw these and I thought...it's unusual.

-Yeah.

0:46:310:46:35

Very Wallace Simpson, '30s.

0:46:350:46:38

Oh, they're good. Framed, they would be worth individually a fair sum.

0:46:380:46:42

-What are they worth as a collection?

-I would say probably about 60.

0:46:420:46:47

How much?

0:46:470:46:49

-Go on, Rudi.

-20.

-No!

0:46:490:46:51

See, it's who you know, and this man knows all these people.

0:46:510:46:55

He's on the ropes!

0:46:550:46:57

-Well, we spent every last...

-Every last penny, we went to the wire.

0:46:570:47:00

Rudi, give me your initial impression.

0:47:000:47:03

Look at that for an array of items! < What's this?

0:47:030:47:06

Well, James, this was actually spotted by Pamela, she unearthed it.

0:47:060:47:12

< Very good. It's our star buy

0:47:120:47:14

because it was the most expensive but it has that maritime flavour.

0:47:140:47:17

-Marble base.

-I like the Hong Kong... Wow!

0:47:170:47:21

It wasn't cheap, though. < 200?

0:47:210:47:24

-Yeah, he's spot on, isn't he? But it cost us.

-170.

-170.

0:47:240:47:27

Then, James, we felt we were a match made in heaven,

0:47:270:47:29

so we bought a twin photo frame.

0:47:290:47:32

Lovely.

0:47:320:47:33

-Rudi, it's solid silver.

-What?!

-Absolutely solid.

-SOLID silver.

0:47:330:47:37

Rudi, we bought something just for you. You're a man.

0:47:370:47:42

Very rare.

0:47:420:47:43

Yeah, it's cheeky. >

0:47:460:47:48

The sweetest little Limoges pill box.

0:47:480:47:51

Rudi, we know you're young at heart, OK.

0:47:510:47:54

I haven't blushed like this all day!

0:47:570:47:59

I'm speechless.

0:47:590:48:01

Here we come tomorrow, here we come tomorrow. Mwah!

0:48:020:48:06

Now it's time to find out what they really thought

0:48:060:48:09

about what each other bought.

0:48:090:48:11

When the cloth came off their objects, I thought "Not a patch on ours."

0:48:110:48:15

I have to tell you, I thought ours were classier.

0:48:150:48:17

-We have got them on the ropes here!

-Yep, yep, yep, yep, yep.

0:48:170:48:21

James seemed to find that box very interesting

0:48:210:48:24

but I can't see who'll purchase it, to be honest with you.

0:48:240:48:27

-Yeah, yeah.

-They'll just think, "Why have they got a heavy box?"

0:48:270:48:30

-To introduce the Viagra, that was kind of...

-That was a low blow.

0:48:300:48:34

It was, it was. Below the belt! Literally.

0:48:340:48:37

I am quite nervous.

0:48:370:48:40

They've bought an explosive lot

0:48:400:48:42

which could be that folio of watercolours.

0:48:420:48:44

To me, that was a real bargain.

0:48:440:48:46

Between us, I think it's been a good two days.

0:48:460:48:49

I think it's been a great two days. Thank you very much indeed.

0:48:490:48:51

-Good luck.

-It's been a pleasure.

-Yeah.

0:48:510:48:54

Time for the grand finale. The all-important auction lies

0:48:550:48:58

an hour north in the market town of Rayleigh.

0:48:580:49:03

It'll be daunting, it'll be epic,

0:49:030:49:05

it'll be like a rollercoaster, James.

0:49:050:49:07

I just hope that we don't make a vast loss

0:49:070:49:11

-because that would be so embarrassing, it really would.

-Yes.

0:49:110:49:14

Their final scene is set in an auction house of suitable vintage!

0:49:140:49:19

Stacey Auctions, purveyors of fine antiques and collectables

0:49:190:49:22

since 1947.

0:49:220:49:24

-Pull in here, boss.

-In there?

-Yeah, perfect.

0:49:240:49:27

330, new bidder. 340.

0:49:270:49:30

Auctioneer extraordinaire Paul Stacey

0:49:300:49:33

has the inside scoop on what he thinks will perform well here.

0:49:330:49:37

Without any question, the best lot is going to be the desk clock.

0:49:370:49:41

Charles and Pam spotted a sleeper, and I think it'll make £200 or £300.

0:49:410:49:44

Rudolph and James bought the trombone. I hope they haven't paid too much for it.

0:49:440:49:49

-The Victorian meat dish...

-Nice and shiny, isn't it?

0:49:490:49:51

Generally, these go into auction and don't make much. I don't know why they bought it, quite frankly.

0:49:510:49:56

The Viagra pot, what do you say about that?!

0:49:560:50:00

It might make £10, it might make 100.

0:50:000:50:02

This is going to be something that's quite different.

0:50:020:50:05

Both teams started with £400 each.

0:50:050:50:08

Pam and Charles spent the lot

0:50:080:50:10

and ended up with six shiny, pretty objects,

0:50:100:50:13

now organised into six auction lots.

0:50:130:50:16

-It's never over until that big lady sings, OK?

-I know, I know.

0:50:160:50:20

However, Rudi and James only spent £275,

0:50:220:50:25

a real mixed bag across their five auction lots.

0:50:250:50:28

I'm getting nervous, actually.

0:50:280:50:30

Well, may the best man win.

0:50:300:50:32

This is when we separate the men from the boys.

0:50:320:50:35

-Well, I don't know...

-HE CHUCKLES

0:50:350:50:38

Ladies and gentlemen,

0:50:380:50:39

take your seats! The auction is about to begin.

0:50:390:50:43

Do well, but not too, OK?

0:50:430:50:46

First up, it's Pam and Charles' silver twin picture frame.

0:50:460:50:50

Must start the bidding at £70.

0:50:500:50:52

-The bid's here with me at £70.

-Come on!

0:50:520:50:54

70, 75, now 80 against you, 85.

0:50:540:50:58

90, 95. 100 back with me on the commission.

0:50:580:51:01

Last chances, please.

0:51:010:51:02

At 100.

0:51:020:51:04

Oh, no.

0:51:050:51:07

Let's hope that loss doesn't put them out of the picture.

0:51:070:51:11

I'm sorry, Pamela, I'm sorry. It's warming us up, warming us up.

0:51:110:51:13

Rudi and James' lead-lined rosewood box,

0:51:140:51:18

thought to be from a Victorian ship, is next to appear.

0:51:180:51:21

Nervous?

0:51:210:51:24

Let's start the bidding at £20 to start.

0:51:240:51:26

-£20 straight in.

-Hey, we've got a bid.

0:51:260:51:28

£20 is bid, thank you, sir.

0:51:280:51:30

Well, now. 20.

0:51:300:51:31

22, 25, 28,

0:51:310:51:34

30, 32, 35, 38,

0:51:340:51:36

40, 42.

0:51:360:51:39

Go on, sir.

0:51:390:51:40

45, 45 I have on the internet, against you in the room.

0:51:400:51:43

It's on the internet at £45. Are you all done?

0:51:430:51:46

Selling to the internet for £45.

0:51:460:51:49

That's taken the wind out of their sails!

0:51:520:51:54

We come now, ladies and gentlemen, to the erotic interest.

0:51:550:51:59

We have the Viagra pill box.

0:51:590:52:02

Come on!

0:52:020:52:04

-£20 to start, £20 straight in. Are you bidding, sir?

-Come on!

0:52:040:52:08

No, no, sorry! No, no, I'm sorry.

0:52:080:52:11

JAMES: He's a young man!

0:52:110:52:12

22 now, 25, 28 on the internet.

0:52:120:52:16

-Bit of stiff competition now!

-LAUGHTER

0:52:160:52:19

He just had to go there, didn't he?

0:52:190:52:21

A bid of £38 now, £38. Are you all done?

0:52:210:52:24

-This hammer is going down.

-Yes!

0:52:240:52:26

JAMES: Well done. CHARLES: Thank you very much.

0:52:260:52:28

That's proved a valuable little lot,

0:52:280:52:31

after their loss on the picture frame - every penny counts.

0:52:310:52:34

Rudi's lovely ladies pose an interesting proposition next.

0:52:350:52:40

30 is bid, 32, 35, 38.

0:52:400:52:43

40 now, 42,

0:52:430:52:44

45, 48 against you, 50 bid.

0:52:440:52:47

Five, 60, five.

0:52:470:52:48

At £65, I shall sell.

0:52:480:52:51

Well done. That's awesome.

0:52:520:52:55

Stunning work there, Rudi.

0:52:550:52:57

I rarely make a profit, I can tell you, Rudi.

0:52:570:52:59

Oh, now he tells us!

0:52:590:53:01

Reassuring, isn't it?!

0:53:010:53:04

Serving up Pam and Charles' third lot of the day,

0:53:040:53:06

it's the silver plated meat dish cover.

0:53:060:53:09

Must start the bidding at £20, 20 is bid.

0:53:090:53:12

Get bidding - 22, 25, 28.

0:53:120:53:14

30, 32, 35, 38 against you.

0:53:140:53:17

Internet bid's at 42.

0:53:170:53:18

-Keep going.

-42 on the internet against you.

0:53:180:53:20

Going to sell to the internet then for £42.

0:53:200:53:24

Ow.

0:53:240:53:26

The auctioneer was right about the cover not fetching much.

0:53:260:53:29

Well, people just don't entertain the same way these days!

0:53:290:53:33

Now, Rudi and James are looking for top brass here

0:53:330:53:36

for their trombone.

0:53:360:53:37

50 I've got, at £50, £50 now in the back of the room.

0:53:370:53:39

JAMES: Well done. CHARLES: Well done.

0:53:390:53:41

55 on the internet.

0:53:410:53:43

£60 against you, at 60 now. It's in the room at 60.

0:53:430:53:46

-Go on.

-65 on the internet.

0:53:460:53:48

70, I've got in the room now.

0:53:480:53:49

At 75 now, at 75.

0:53:490:53:51

-85 now, jump in bid.

-Yes! Go on, go on.

0:53:510:53:54

£85, any advances now? Are we all done at £85?

0:53:540:53:58

Steady one, steady one.

0:53:580:54:00

CHARLES: Well done, brilliant.

0:54:000:54:02

It's all about the bees and honey -

0:54:020:54:04

money - with Pam and Charles' Staffordshire watering can.

0:54:040:54:08

Shall we say about £50 to start?

0:54:080:54:10

Come on, please. Please!

0:54:100:54:11

50 anywhere? Nice thing for £50. 40 if you like.

0:54:110:54:14

Thank you, sir. Straight in at £40.

0:54:140:54:16

JAMES: Well, that's good. CHARLES: Keep going.

0:54:160:54:18

-At 45 now. Any advances at 45?

-Keep going.

0:54:180:54:21

Seems cheap to me at £45.

0:54:210:54:23

48, fresh bidder, thank you.

0:54:230:54:25

£50, 50 bid, at 50 now. Are we all done, then?

0:54:250:54:27

-Last opportunity, then.

-One more.

-At £50.

0:54:270:54:31

-PAM:

-I always thought it was too expensive, but never mind.

0:54:310:54:34

Next up is Rudi's cricket ball...

0:54:340:54:37

..which he got with pure charm for free.

0:54:390:54:42

Please note, ladies and gentlemen,

0:54:420:54:44

this has been specially signed by Rudolph Walker as well,

0:54:440:54:47

so there we are. Where shall we be for this?

0:54:470:54:49

Straight in at, shall we say, £20 to start?

0:54:490:54:52

22 on the internet, at £22.

0:54:520:54:55

25, I have. Thank you, sir.

0:54:550:54:57

-In the room at 25.

-Well done, sir.

0:54:570:54:58

At 25 in the room now.

0:54:580:55:00

-28 against you, sir. £30.

-CHARLES: It's all pure profit.

0:55:000:55:03

At 30 with you, sir. 32 back on the internet at 32.

0:55:030:55:07

The signed ball we sell. The hammer's up at £32.

0:55:070:55:11

-Wow!

-Well done.

-Well done.

0:55:110:55:13

-CHARLES: Well done, Rudi.

-Oh, wow!

0:55:130:55:15

Fantastic.

0:55:150:55:17

Very smooth, Rudi, very smooth!

0:55:170:55:20

Charles and Pam's magnifying glass needs to make something here.

0:55:200:55:24

Shall we say about £20 a start?

0:55:240:55:26

20 I have, 22 straight in.

0:55:260:55:28

22 online, 25.

0:55:280:55:30

It's all on the internet at the moment, at £25 bid.

0:55:300:55:33

At £25, last opportunity, ladies and gentlemen.

0:55:330:55:36

The hammer's up at £25.

0:55:360:55:38

-Well done.

-Thank you very much.

0:55:400:55:41

That's helped us a little bit.

0:55:410:55:43

It's James and Rudi's last lot of the day -

0:55:430:55:46

their rather pricey stick barometer.

0:55:460:55:49

Good luck, Rudi. This is your big moment, OK.

0:55:490:55:51

Shall we say about 120 to start?

0:55:510:55:53

120 I'm bid, 130 on the internet straight in.

0:55:530:55:57

140 coming in at the back there, 140.

0:55:570:55:59

-Well done.

-Goes to online 150.

0:55:590:56:01

160.

0:56:010:56:02

170 on the internet.

0:56:020:56:04

Any advances at 170?

0:56:040:56:06

-180, 180 I've got.

-Yes! Yes!

0:56:060:56:08

190, back on the internet at 190.

0:56:080:56:11

£190, are we all done now?

0:56:110:56:14

Last opportunity then, and I'm selling at £190.

0:56:140:56:17

-Well done, well done.

-It's a profit. It's a profit.

0:56:170:56:22

Oh, it's turned out nice!

0:56:220:56:25

James' hunch on the barometer was spot on!

0:56:250:56:28

-Well done. Well done.

-Well done, Rudi.

0:56:280:56:31

The clock was Charles and Pam's biggest buy.

0:56:320:56:35

The auctioneer loves it

0:56:350:56:36

and if the room does too, they could still come out on top.

0:56:360:56:39

Just believe in it.

0:56:390:56:42

Shall we say about 150 to start?

0:56:420:56:44

150 I've got, 160 straight in.

0:56:440:56:46

160, 170 back of the room.

0:56:460:56:48

-At 170, 180 now, at £180.

-Keep going. Keep going.

0:56:480:56:53

Last opportunity at... 190, just coming in against you online.

0:56:530:56:56

At 190 now. 200 back online.

0:56:560:56:58

At £200, the bid's online at 200.

0:56:580:57:01

I shall sell now then. Last opportunity at £200.

0:57:010:57:05

-Internet bid at £200.

-Oh, you've done it.

0:57:050:57:08

Unlucky! Despite a valiant effort there from Pam and Charles,

0:57:080:57:12

today's winners are Rudi and James.

0:57:120:57:14

Well done. Well done.

0:57:140:57:16

After paying auction costs,

0:57:180:57:20

selective shoppers Pam and Charles made a loss of £26.90,

0:57:200:57:23

so end their road trip with a total of £373.10.

0:57:230:57:28

Rudi and James, meanwhile, did rather better.

0:57:280:57:32

After auction costs, they made a profit of £66.94.

0:57:320:57:36

Yes, the silver-tongued Rudi, together with the local lad James,

0:57:360:57:40

finish their road trip with 466.94.

0:57:400:57:44

What a team, eh!

0:57:440:57:46

All the money generated by our teams will go to Children in Need.

0:57:460:57:50

Well done. We congratulate you.

0:57:500:57:53

What am I going to get for this?

0:57:530:57:55

I'm the loser, I'll just go away and sulk!

0:57:560:57:59

-Give me some love.

-You deserve it, you really do.

0:57:590:58:02

Well done, sir, you did very, very well. All the best.

0:58:020:58:06

Well, it's been emotional,

0:58:060:58:08

but all good things must come to an end.

0:58:080:58:10

-Go through here, James.

-Wait, just a moment...

0:58:100:58:12

Thank you, sir. Bye bye.

0:58:120:58:14

Bye!

0:58:140:58:15

Steady, ladies, steady, ladies.

0:58:170:58:19

-RUDI:

-When you're doing the driving,

0:58:190:58:21

do I have to hold on to anything at all?

0:58:210:58:23

-PAM:

-Just be a navigator, please.

0:58:230:58:25

-I can lead you astray, then.

-Twas ever thus.

0:58:250:58:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:540:58:58

EastEnder veterans Pam St Clement and Rudolph Walker create gripping drama with the help of their antiques experts Charles Hanson and James Braxton, seeking out antiques which will turn a profit. Their three-county road trip takes in Hastings in East Sussex and Tunbridge Wells in Kent before leading them to auction at Rayleigh in Essex.