Episode 8 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 8

Goalkeepers Peter Shilton and Peter Schmeichel compete off the pitch to find the best antique deals in a road trip around Cheshire, with experts Paul Laidlaw and Mark Stacey.


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Some of the nation's favourite celebrities...

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What if we said 150 for the two? Then you've got yourself a deal.

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..one antiques expert each...

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Oh, that's cheating!

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# Da, da, da, da, da, da, da! #

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..and one big challenge - who can seek out

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and buy the best antiques at the very best prices...

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And with a lot of sincerity and honesty, that...

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..and auction for a big profit further down the road?

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Potential for disaster.

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Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

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What you've just come out with there, I cannot believe that!

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And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?!"

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Time to put your pedal to the metal!

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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The road trip arrives in Cheshire for England versus Denmark,

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with a pair of footballing legends in a 1964 Triumph hybrid.

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We're going on an antiques road trip, not a rally!

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-Well, we're in the first...

-You have done a bit a driving, obviously.

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No, this is my first time. I don't have a licence!

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From the world of international goalkeeping,

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we have two pairs of very safe hands.

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I'll tell you one thing I did admire about you,

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was that you was that you had your own style, your way,

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and I think that's what goalkeeping's about, I think.

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It's going to be like this on this antique road trip.

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-Do you want me to indicate?

-Yeah, yeah!

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He's 1978's Player of the Year for Nottingham Forest.

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He's England's most capped player, ever - 125 games -

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but suffered terribly from an ambidextrous Argentinean.

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He's taken his gloves off to get antiques-rummaging today.

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He's Peter Shilton.

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Something for a large cocktail!

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And stepping off his line,

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the man twice voted World's Best Goalkeeper.

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He's the hero of Manchester United's 1999 treble win.

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He's the "Great Dane",

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with an amazing 129 caps for the Danish team.

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But how can that be 40 quid?

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He's Peter Schmeichel!

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I won't be able to say, "Oh, that's worth anything, or that's valuable."

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You're going to go by your instinct?

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Well...no. What I'm going to go by - we've got to get help!

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We've got to get expert help!

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And help you gentlemen shall receive, with the keenest,

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finest experts you can fit into this bijou 1972 Fiat Gamini,

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which we've borrowed off Noddy. Now, which one's Big Ears?

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Oh, it's going to be a bumpy ride, as Bette Davis said!

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Hold on. So you sit..?

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-On my word!

-Oh, hello!

-You like that?!

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ENGINE REVS

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-Oh, hello!

-Onward!

-Whoa!

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He's a dashing, Caledonian auctioneer,

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who knows the world of antiques like he knows himself.

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This is where the nice young man thing turns into a...

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-Oh, not so nice!

-..hideous monster.

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Ha-ha! He's a militaria expert, he's a snappy dresser...

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Hand over your money, sir!

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..he's Paul Laidlaw.

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I think that's quite sexy!

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And I know what you're thinking. "Him?! An expert?! In what?!"

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It's an...erm...antiques centre.

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He's a shrewd antiques valuer, he's a natural-born Welshman,

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and a bouncing Brighton boy.

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He's Mark Stacey!

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# He's football crazy He's football mad... #

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New road trip, the world's best goalkeepers,

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and our keenest antiques centre-forwards.

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Stand by!

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I've never been to a football match.

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I don't think I've ever been to a football match.

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# Duh, duh, duhhh! #

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Oh, dear, oh, dear!

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Waiting to see the guys that are going to guide us through this

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and then...as you say, just go by...just go by our instincts.

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I mean, I remember this much from school - I end up in goals,

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if I was lucky enough to be the last guy to be picked,

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-when there was no-one else to choose!

-Yeah, me too.

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Go left, go right. The goalkeeper's pose!

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Time of our superstars to meet our sensitive wallflowers.

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I could do with the loo and a cup of tea.

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-This is so olde worlde. Gentlemen!

-Hello!

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Just been the scenic route!

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-Hello. How nice to meet you.

-Very nice to meet you. I'm Paul.

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You see, I've got a head start. I've brought two antiques.

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I've got the car and Peter!

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I like your style! I like your style!

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Which teams do you support?

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PAUL: Oh... Scotland!

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You can go with Peter, then!

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Peter Schmeichel should go with the dealer and Peter Shilton with the auctioneer, yes?

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- An entente cordiale! - I'm happy with that!

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Welcome to the winning team!

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And they're off!

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It's going to be an interesting away match,

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so let's check the fixture list.

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Cheshire's glorious antiques shops will play host for this trip,

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before our teams hit an all-action auction in Runcorn.

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First, up our footie celebrities

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will get their first taste of serious browsing,

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in Sandbach.

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In 2008, Sandbach became an official Fair Trade Town.

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Shops must be packed with locally sourced, sustainable goods.

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So where to begin?

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-You start by following your nose.

-Really?

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And then grab... I always give the same advice.

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If it grabs your attention, for good or bad reasons -

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you might go, "Oh, my word, that's hideous!"

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-That's a strong reaction. Strong reactions are good.

-Right.

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And we need items that are going to stand out.

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It's a bit like goalkeeping - it's being individual, isn't it?

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Something that's going to be a bit special, take the imagination.

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Yes. I mean no. It's really nothing like goalkeeping.

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Saxon Cross Antiques is waiting to sell its wares,

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with owner, and lone defender John, here to help.

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-So we...what? We have £400?

-Yeah, we've got £400.

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-In total?

-In total.

-Right.

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-Plenty of choice in here.

-Ah, all'n'sundry is what I like.

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Those are quite fun, those dragon candlesticks, with the inkwell.

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-They're very decorative.

-Yeah.

-They're very interior design.

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What would be a good price for us here?

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If I was putting that into auction,

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I would probably put maybe £100 to £150 on it.

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-It's £95.

-No!

-Yeah.

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Well, that's got someone interested!

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This fancy dragon three-piece is very "Mark",

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and comprises an ornate inkwell and two candlesticks.

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£95 isn't a bad price for an early 20th century desk garniture.

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If we could get that for much lower there might be a profit there.

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And I think somebody would quite like that as...

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A gentleman would like that on his desk, in his study.

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-But if we could get it for, say, 50...

-We'd buy it.

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We would buy it, wouldn't we?

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Meanwhile, upstairs, Paul Laidlaw is...talking!

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Some dealers specialise and others have a broad outlook,

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and John's one of them.

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I love broad outlooks, because, frankly, dealing with a specialist,

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they're at the top of their game.

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I'm going to make a suggestion.

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-Yeah?

-Could we do, eh, we just have a slow walk round...

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-Mm-hm?

-..we don't say anything.

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I can have...just...just get a first impressions thing.

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-Would that be all right?

-Let's do it, Peter. I'll go in the opposite direction.

-All right.

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Maybe Peter needs a break from the chat.

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Or he's taking this business pretty seriously.

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I just want to get a feel of how I feel about certain objects.

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Something...to put in the bathroom.

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I've got a completely open mind at the moment.

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You're doing a big dinner or something,

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you want something to put something on, in the middle of a table.

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I suppose it's called china, isn't it?

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Well, that's what I'd call it!

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Um...

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Any luck with the inkwell set?

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Yes. I've checked the price.

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45.

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£45! For the candlestick. The candlesticks and the inkwell.

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-I like round figures.

-Right.

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So fives are difficult for me. Peter doesn't do antiques.

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He was thinking of about 30.

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But will "thinking" get the price down, to £30?

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Haggling is tricky for the strong, silent type!

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Couldn't do 30. £40.

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-£40?

-All right.

-OK. We've got a deal.

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-Let's shake on hands on 40.

-OK.

-All right?

-OK.

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Well done, chaps.

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Although these are possibly more Stacey than Schmeichel.

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What's next?

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-That's for, em...

-It's for ham and things, isn't it?

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-Yeah, isn't it?

-For meat.

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-It's quite a neat object, actually.

-That actually, looks really nice.

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But a lot of people want those sort of retro kitchens now.

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-Yeah.

-That actually is quite a decorative object,

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-as well as a very practical object.

-Yeah.

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-Do you like it?

-Yeah. It's the kind of thing I would go for.

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You know, big sort of heavy piece of wood that sits there, and...

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-Quite masculine.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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Quite chunky. You know...strength.

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-I kind of like it, the more I...

-Yeah. I agree, actually.

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Something meaty for Petey here. Ha!

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A chunky Victorian chopping board,

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updated in the 1930s with a metal steak stand and now priced at £65.

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-John, we're being completely mad here...

-Right.

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..and Peter really likes this, but it's missing a chain and a loop.

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Well, the price I had on it was 65.

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-Oh!

-Oh, no!

-No, no, no, no, no, no.

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No, we weren't thinking that at all.

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-No, no, no.

-Best I could do, 20.

-£20.

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This football leg-end next to me is, you know,

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is really interested in that.

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It's nice and masculine, isn't it?

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Yeah. That's... I like that.

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But we have to make a profit on it.

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-Yeah.

-And I'm not sure that there'd be many like me out there.

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Looks like Peter Schmeichel's finding his inner haggler!

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-On behalf of Peter, I've got to be honest with you...

-Right.

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I'm sure he would be delighted to shake your hand at a tenner.

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-Wouldn't you?

-I was thinking just that.

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-Let's shake hands on a tenner. Yes?

-I'll go for that. £10.

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Ten quid. Wonderful.

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-Well done.

-John, you're an angel, thank you very much!

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-We're happy with that, aren't we?

-I think we are, yeah.

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But I'm not sure John's so happy.

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Could he find more pleasure by helping the other Peter, and Paul?

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-Don't mind me just kicking this ball past you...

-Right.

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-..and striking.

-Yes?

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You've not got any pieces of furniture

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that are a pain in the neck, been sitting about for a while,

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that you could...you'd be glad to see the back of?

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-Yep.

-That'd be great.

-I'll have a look for you. Yeah, sure.

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Excellent.

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Well, if you don't ask, you don't get.

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But what can John realistically let you have?

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-I've got this mirror....

-That's delightful. Isn't that sweet?

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The painting on that is absolutely fantastic.

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Lovely - and five years ago, might have sold well.

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But maybe not today.

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So if we got it for a tenner, that would be all right?

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Love the way your mind works, Peter! I'm loving working with you!

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-You wish, you wish!

-There are two of us!

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What would that...? Sort of...what, 30, 40 quid?

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I would let you have it for 20, to help you beat the other Peter.

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That sounds good to me. Does it you?

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-I don't think he'd go any further.

-That was said with a lot of sincerity and honesty!

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An English goalkeeper has got to beat the other Peter!

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Well, John's much happier here with Team GB...

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Lovely.

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..and proudly helping a Scotsman to help an English legend.

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-We're in agreement.

-Yes, we are.

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An Englishman and a Scotsman are in agreement!

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Drop dial clock, rosewood, mother of pearl and pewter inlaid.

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Pewter inlaid?

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You've got pewter inlaid and mother of pearl.

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At this stage we are up against the clock.

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Just realised what I did there!

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Just coming thick and fast! Sorry about that!

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We're ready for a penalty shoot out!

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Um...tell me the price.

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I'd do it for £60.

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But would somebody want it, in this day and age?

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Right now, it's old-fashioned. Could it be 30 quid?

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And I know that's obscene money, but that's the market at the moment.

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-Mm. 35?

-Yeah.

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Right. Well done. Well done. Thanks very much, John.

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And the end of this half, it's 2-2.

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No sign of a yellow card...not yet!

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But someone has to get the tiny red car!

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Thar she blows! Chocks away! Hey-hey!

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Hey-hey! We're on our way! Off we go!

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Time for this celebrity road trip to hit the road.

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Ridiculous motor!

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Well, I think for what the asking prices were

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and what we got them for...

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There's a chance, isn't there?

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Yeah. I'm quite optimistic about that.

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Well, this is definitely a first, Paul.

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This is something I've never experienced before in my whole life!

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-A Noddy car for real!

-This is a Noddy car!

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I'm surprised nobody's looking at us!

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I'm not!

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Sandbach is ticked off the fixtures list,

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as we head 15 miles for an away match in Sandiway.

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I went behind the school playing field

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and he put a couple of cones down.

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First game of football ever, in my life.

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And he said, "Who wants to go in goal?"

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-And I put my hand up.

-Right!

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That's what goalkeepers are all about,

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it's just one of those positions

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that you either want to play or you don't.

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And that was the start of my goalkeeping career, really,

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and I must have been eight years old at that time.

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That's how it all worked out.

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I was playing for England against Scotland at Hampden Park.

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I said, "Get the change goalkeeper's shirt out of the skip.

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He came back and says, "We haven't put one in."

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So the only jersey he could find was to borrow

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a Scottish goalkeeper's shirt.

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-So I played for England...

-In a Scotland shirt!

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Out in front, Team Schmeichel are away to Peggoty's Attic,

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with seasoned professional Gordon just waiting to get stuck in.

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-We're going to have a whizz round.

-Yes.

-We're on a mission. Ah!

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Looks like our chaps have hit this new shop meaning business.

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That's a World Cup programme there.

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-Is that a real...? That sounds very cheap for that.

-Exactly. 20 quid.

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Let's have a look at that, just see what it is.

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This is... Actually, this is quite interesting.

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-I quite like this, this is quite...

-Do you?

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Well, what you have here is a record of the 1966 World Cup.

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And somebody has actually written all this in.

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All the teams. All the games. The scorers.

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This authentic 1966 World Cup tournament programme has been much loved and thoroughly used.

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It's £20 here, but could it be more valuable

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if a footballing legend sells it, or even signs it?

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Do you think you could give me a discount on that?

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Er...a small one. I can definitely do it for £18.

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-18.

-Yeah.

-I've got to ask Gordon, because we are in the presence

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of one of football's greatest goalkeepers.

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Yeah. Eh, well...

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Could we go... Can we go to 15, do you think?

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We will buy it at 15.

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Go on, then.

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Congratulations, Peter!

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A good price for an item dear to your heart,

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but can anything here tickle Mark's fancy?

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There is one thing in this cabinet which is very interesting actually.

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Ohhhh!

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It's a small collapsible pen by Sampson Mordan.

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Oh, that's so sweet, isn't it? Oh, that's lovely, isn't it?

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The first thing to talk about is

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the fact that it's what we call a propelling pen.

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They're normally pencils, and this would have gone on a little chain

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on a lady's chatelaine,

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which would have hung in late Victorian/Edwardian times

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-on a lady's belt.

-Right.

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Ordinarily, these are fairly common, and it's just chased in silver,

0:16:470:16:53

but the thing that really gives it a little bit of added provenance,

0:16:530:16:58

or added collectability, is that name - "S Mordan & Co."

0:16:580:17:02

-Samson Mordan. Some of their pieces...

-Can I have a look?

0:17:020:17:06

Please do.

0:17:060:17:08

Some of their pieces, they can make £3,000 or £4,000.

0:17:080:17:11

This is not going to make that sort of money.

0:17:110:17:14

-No.

-I mean, I don't even want to look at the price, Gordon.

0:17:140:17:17

I think they would estimate that at something like £40-80 at auction.

0:17:170:17:22

I mean, I'd love to get it for £30.

0:17:220:17:24

30? I'd like to be able to sell it you for 30.

0:17:240:17:28

-Well, there's nothing stopping you!

-Uh, there is.

0:17:280:17:32

-No, there's not, come on!

-There is, I have to buy some baked beans for tea.

0:17:320:17:35

I need to eat. I need to eat, I'm afraid!

0:17:350:17:37

I can do it you for 40.

0:17:370:17:39

Oh, but that's right on my low end estimate.

0:17:390:17:42

Oh! Sounds painful.

0:17:420:17:43

Well, why don't we split the difference and say 32?

0:17:430:17:47

You must have gone to a different school than I did!

0:17:500:17:52

Well, a Welsh school!

0:17:520:17:54

We'll do it for 35.

0:17:540:17:57

35?

0:17:570:17:59

-Well, I let you have your programme.

-Yeah!

0:17:590:18:03

Well done, gentlemen.

0:18:030:18:04

Now the Schmeichel auction arsenal

0:18:040:18:07

is looking a little more threatening.

0:18:070:18:11

ENGINE STALLS

0:18:130:18:16

BOTH: Oh, no!

0:18:160:18:18

And they're off! Again.

0:18:180:18:21

Meanwhile, Peter and Paul have gone on ahead,

0:18:230:18:27

slipping past sweet Sandiway

0:18:270:18:29

and bombing it 12 miles north to Warrington.

0:18:290:18:32

What's with penalties then? What's your philosophy?

0:18:320:18:36

There's different ways, you got the Bruce Grobbelaar,

0:18:360:18:39

where you fling your arms around,

0:18:390:18:40

I mean, those things are great when you actually,

0:18:400:18:43

when the striker misses the goal or you save one,

0:18:430:18:45

but if they stick it in the net you feel a bit silly, really, you know.

0:18:450:18:49

I played the percentage game really, unless I was really sure, 100%,

0:18:490:18:53

I knew which way he was putting it, and sometimes you can sense that.

0:18:530:18:57

But generally, you need a bit of luck.

0:18:570:19:00

Right.

0:19:040:19:05

That lucky chap Peter Shilton

0:19:050:19:08

is being taken for a little sporting treat.

0:19:080:19:10

In the Old Coach House is a collection and testament

0:19:100:19:13

to the history of bicycles.

0:19:130:19:15

Owner and curator Paul Adams is waiting to enthuse

0:19:150:19:18

to our national sporting treasure.

0:19:180:19:20

-Hello there.

-Good afternoon, chaps.

0:19:200:19:24

-I'm Peter.

-I'm Paul.

-Hello sir.

0:19:240:19:27

-Hi, I'm another Paul!

-Oh, are you! Right.

0:19:270:19:30

Paul's collected more than 100 antique bicycles over four decades,

0:19:300:19:36

and in 1980 turned his bursting coach house

0:19:360:19:38

into a wonderful cycling museum.

0:19:380:19:40

Exact origins are a topic of much debate,

0:19:400:19:45

but Scottish blacksmith Kirkpatrick MacMillan

0:19:450:19:49

is thought to have created

0:19:490:19:51

the first mechanically propelled model in 1839.

0:19:510:19:53

From early designs to the modern, medal-winning racing bike,

0:19:530:19:57

small innovations have come and gone.

0:19:570:20:00

-How did this all begin for you?

-Well, coincidentally,

0:20:020:20:05

we're standing next to the first bicycle I ever bought.

0:20:050:20:08

It's called a child's treadle bike.

0:20:080:20:11

The pedals don't go round, they go up and down.

0:20:110:20:16

-Unbelievable.

-And it's about 1920.

0:20:160:20:19

It's easy to forget that these simple standard mechanics

0:20:190:20:23

were not always uniform.

0:20:230:20:25

In their development, British bicycles have played a leading role.

0:20:250:20:29

This home grown velocipede dates from around 1869,

0:20:290:20:33

before the more famous Penny Farthings arrived.

0:20:330:20:35

Designers Ernest and Pierre Micheaux had a great idea called pedals.

0:20:350:20:41

This configuration here, this crucifix here,

0:20:410:20:45

serves a purpose, in so much as if you're going downhill, fast,

0:20:450:20:50

and the pedals are flying round,

0:20:500:20:52

you would put your hocks on here - it's called a hock rest.

0:20:520:20:55

Just to get your legs out the way?

0:20:550:20:57

Yes, quite. Because that's careering round at a rate of knots.

0:20:570:21:00

Yeah.

0:21:000:21:02

And if it bangs your ankle, you'll know about it.

0:21:020:21:04

You'll know about it, yeah.

0:21:040:21:06

For a braking system, these handlebars, they turn.

0:21:060:21:12

This cord activates the brake on the back wheel,

0:21:120:21:17

-which is only a block of wood.

-Right.

0:21:170:21:19

So the more tension you put on here,

0:21:190:21:21

the more of a braking action you get.

0:21:210:21:25

The saddle spring is simply a cart spring.

0:21:250:21:29

It's a piece of tempered steel.

0:21:290:21:31

If you're riding an iron-tyred machine on cobbles such as this,

0:21:310:21:36

it's going to shake your bones.

0:21:360:21:39

Ah yes, no good for sensitive derrieres then.

0:21:390:21:42

Bicycles have always been an enduring and much-loved

0:21:420:21:46

mode of transportation, respected today as both a great form

0:21:460:21:51

of exercise and an environmentally benign method of getting about.

0:21:510:21:55

But Paul just loves how they look,

0:21:550:21:57

in all their wacky historical incarnations.

0:21:570:22:00

I mean, it's so unusual, so unusual, isn't it?

0:22:000:22:02

-Oh, it's brilliant.

-I mean, this is incredible.

0:22:020:22:05

I mean, most of what we've seen today have got the leather seats.

0:22:050:22:08

Yes.

0:22:080:22:09

That must have been so much more comfortable just to sit on.

0:22:090:22:13

So intricate, and known as a hammock seat.

0:22:130:22:15

-Yeah.

-As you ride, it rocks.

0:22:150:22:18

Mm.

0:22:180:22:19

So it is extremely comfortable.

0:22:190:22:21

And this little gizmo here, this is called a bundle carrier,

0:22:210:22:26

and the idea is that the springs open up,

0:22:260:22:30

and in there you can put a newspaper or a cape in case it rains.

0:22:300:22:35

Fantastic, yeah, brilliant.

0:22:350:22:37

And again, it's a novelty to this machine.

0:22:370:22:40

-And what's the bike called, Paul?

-It's called a Dursley Pedersen.

0:22:400:22:43

Dursley Pedersen.

0:22:430:22:44

It was made and designed by a man called Mikhail Pedersen.

0:22:440:22:49

And what nationality was he?

0:22:490:22:51

He's a Dane.

0:22:510:22:52

-A Dane?

-A Dane.

0:22:520:22:53

We should have Peter Schmeichel here, not me!

0:22:530:22:56

-What am I doing here?!

-Oh, no, we got the best guy.

0:22:560:22:58

All right, that's good enough, you're saying all the right things!

0:22:580:23:00

Peter, I think we've talked about this enough.

0:23:020:23:05

I want to see you at speed.

0:23:050:23:08

Come on.

0:23:080:23:10

I don't know if speed's the right word, judging by these cycles!

0:23:100:23:13

But you want to see me have a go on something?

0:23:130:23:15

Yeah, is that a possibility, Paul?

0:23:150:23:17

Paul is a passionate advocate of two-wheeled,

0:23:170:23:20

clean-air road tripping, but also likes to have fun,

0:23:200:23:22

and, today, that's at Peter Shilton's expense.

0:23:220:23:26

This is quite special, Peter.

0:23:260:23:28

It's an American machine, wooden wheels, no brakes, because it's...

0:23:280:23:34

-No brakes?!

-No, no.

0:23:340:23:36

You've really sorted me out here, haven't you?

0:23:360:23:38

Well, this is going to be a test for you,

0:23:380:23:40

because it's a shaft drive bicycle, so the drive is constant.

0:23:400:23:46

That means absolutely nothing to me.

0:23:460:23:49

Well, in a moment or two, you'll fully understand!

0:23:490:23:52

This is Evel Knievel rides again here, look.

0:23:520:23:56

-It suits you, sir.

-Thank you very much.

0:23:560:23:59

There you go.

0:23:590:24:01

Like that.

0:24:010:24:03

Way-hey! That was all right.

0:24:030:24:05

I've got to try and turn now.

0:24:050:24:08

I tell you what, for its age this machine is absolutely incredible.

0:24:090:24:14

And for your age, you are.

0:24:140:24:16

Thank you very much, Paul, thank you.

0:24:160:24:19

It's good to have a novice riding a bike, as it should be!

0:24:190:24:23

And all credit to you.

0:24:240:24:26

Thank you very much, Paul, very nice to meet you.

0:24:260:24:28

Thank you, sir.

0:24:280:24:29

With some good, solid shopping

0:24:290:24:31

and a couple of lightly bruised cheeks behind them - ha! -

0:24:310:24:34

we've successfully made it through injury time with no

0:24:340:24:38

substitutions so far.

0:24:380:24:40

What was Peter like shopping though? Did he have an eye?

0:24:400:24:43

Well, yeah, for anything on the top shelf!

0:24:430:24:46

And I don't mean that the way it sounds!

0:24:460:24:49

But he's very tall.

0:24:490:24:50

It's still getting used to it, really, buying...

0:24:500:24:53

What to ignore, what people might not want.

0:24:530:24:58

-You know, to be honest, I have no concept of that.

-No.

0:24:580:25:01

I honestly do not know,

0:25:010:25:02

so I'm sort of, I'm listening to what Mark's saying.

0:25:020:25:05

I mean, he played the game, if you can say it.

0:25:050:25:07

It wasn't the beautiful game, but he played the game.

0:25:070:25:11

Let's hope someone's learned something today.

0:25:110:25:14

Time for an early bath.

0:25:140:25:16

Night, night!

0:25:160:25:17

The sun rises on the Peters'

0:25:180:25:20

last day of shopping before selling their wares in Runcorn tomorrow.

0:25:200:25:23

I was going to say, you do look a bit tired today.

0:25:230:25:26

I mean, I've got to say that.

0:25:260:25:28

-I was a bit tired.

-I'll look like you do tomorrow then, will I?

0:25:280:25:31

So far, Peter Shilton

0:25:330:25:34

and Paul Laidlaw have landed a pair of bargains,

0:25:340:25:37

spending just £55 on an Arts and Crafts mirror

0:25:370:25:41

and a Victorian wall clock.

0:25:410:25:43

Mr Shilton launches into day two with £345 still to spend.

0:25:440:25:49

There's no room in the back, is there?

0:25:510:25:53

Honey, I shrunk the car!

0:25:530:25:55

Schmeichel and Stacey, meanwhile,

0:25:550:25:58

got stuck in and spent £100 on four items.

0:25:580:26:01

No crossing your fingers, put it there.

0:26:010:26:04

The dragon desktop set, the Victorian chopping board,

0:26:040:26:08

the 1966 World Cup programme and the Samson Mordan propelling pencil.

0:26:080:26:13

Mr Schmeichel has £300 left to play with.

0:26:130:26:17

I walked straight past it.

0:26:170:26:18

You did.

0:26:180:26:20

But then in fairness,

0:26:200:26:21

-you've walked straight past most of it.

-Yeah, I know!

0:26:210:26:24

I actually played at Barrow.

0:26:240:26:26

-Did you?

-Yeah.

0:26:260:26:28

I played in the third round of the FA Cup for Leicester City at Barrow.

0:26:280:26:33

I remember it because it was such a tough match,

0:26:330:26:35

we won 2-1 but they had a centre forward - I'll never forget him,

0:26:350:26:40

he was a dentist, supposed to be really quite articulate,

0:26:400:26:43

well balanced - and I went for a ball that was running

0:26:430:26:48

out for a corner, and he was chasing it, and I couldn't get to it.

0:26:480:26:52

I just got me hand to it, and as I was laying on the floor,

0:26:520:26:54

he ran and stamped on me hand.

0:26:540:26:56

Eugh! Wow, tough game is football. Bit like antiques!

0:26:560:27:02

A new day and a new journey, leaving Warrington behind

0:27:020:27:05

and dribbling 12 miles southwest to intriguing Frodsham.

0:27:050:27:09

Bizarrely, in 2005 French footballer Djibril Cisse became

0:27:110:27:17

Lord Mayor of Frodsham - huh!

0:27:170:27:19

But as our shoppers arrive in town, it's worth noting,

0:27:190:27:22

prior to the first Norman invasion - around 1065 - the town was

0:27:220:27:26

valued at a bargain £8.

0:27:260:27:30

Hosting this second round shopping derby is

0:27:300:27:33

the Lady Heyes Craft Centre,

0:27:330:27:35

with its many antiques nooks and crannies.

0:27:350:27:38

This is our last chance now Peter. Let's go in positively.

0:27:400:27:44

And let's not panic.

0:27:440:27:45

-Is that silver?

-Because that's quite fun.

-Is it silver?

0:27:520:27:56

No, it's not, I think it's probably silver plate.

0:27:560:27:59

But I just like the way that this is quite elegantly formed with

0:27:590:28:03

this branch, and I like those strong feet on it.

0:28:030:28:06

It's a nice looking object, that.

0:28:060:28:08

-Heavy.

-It's quite substantial.

0:28:080:28:10

-That's the first thing that I do, I look at the price!

-25.

-Yeah.

0:28:100:28:13

-Which is not bad.

-The two stout men of Team Schmeichel

0:28:130:28:17

have made a solidly masculine choice here.

0:28:170:28:20

What's next?

0:28:200:28:21

Well, I did actually pass this earlier on.

0:28:210:28:24

It's a marble figure,

0:28:240:28:26

and it looks like a sort of Russian or Turkish warrior, but I think

0:28:260:28:32

we could probably get that for a really cheap price, because it

0:28:320:28:36

looks incongruous, it doesn't fit in with the other pieces we've got.

0:28:360:28:39

-How interesting.

-See I quite like this, it's quite nicely carved.

0:28:390:28:42

This, I can tell you, this marble is... That's probably from Italy.

0:28:420:28:46

I think so.

0:28:460:28:48

Probably from around Pisa, because near Pisa is the only

0:28:480:28:51

mountain in the world where they've got pure white marble.

0:28:510:28:54

Really?

0:28:540:28:56

Otherwise it looks like bathrooms, you know?

0:28:560:28:58

You have little streaks in it.

0:28:580:29:00

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Marbled. As it were.

0:29:000:29:02

Michelangelo used to get his marble from there.

0:29:020:29:05

It's quite a good subject,

0:29:050:29:06

because people like militarious objects, so if we got

0:29:060:29:10

that for a very cheeky price,

0:29:100:29:12

that would be a sure-fire winner for us.

0:29:120:29:15

Well, currently it's £75, but if any man can get a cheeky

0:29:150:29:19

price on a white marble figurine, then that man is Mark Stacey.

0:29:190:29:23

Time to speak to Rose - stand by. Rose?

0:29:230:29:27

What could you let us have that for?

0:29:270:29:30

What are you offering? £10.

0:29:300:29:32

-Make it 20, you can have it.

-You see, that's not good, is it?

0:29:320:29:37

I'll ask Jill. Jill?

0:29:370:29:38

-Yes?

-Jill, you've been called in here.

-Right.

0:29:380:29:41

Clutching something, I see. What are you clutching?

0:29:410:29:43

That's Victorian glass. A present from Runcorn.

0:29:430:29:46

-A present from Runcorn!

-Quite relevant for the auction...

0:29:460:29:48

For where we're going. "A present from Runcorn."

0:29:480:29:51

Well, I suppose if it's going to sell anywhere, it'll sell in Runcorn, won't it?

0:29:530:29:57

But we did quite like this.

0:29:570:29:59

-Yes.

-And the silver-plated meat platter.

-Right.

0:29:590:30:02

-But we've been very mean, I'm afraid.

-Right.

-You know.

0:30:020:30:06

Actually, YOU have, Mark.

0:30:060:30:09

Peter - well, he's still not enjoying these haggles much.

0:30:090:30:13

So we'd like to get that for ten and that for ten.

0:30:130:30:15

-Yes, go on.

-Go on.

0:30:170:30:18

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-Are you happy with that, Peter?

0:30:180:30:21

I'm happy with that.

0:30:210:30:22

-Thank you.

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you very much.

0:30:220:30:24

Well done, Mark. You've even got that Runcorn jug thrown in for free.

0:30:240:30:30

Will there be any good stuff left for Frodsham's late arrivals?

0:30:310:30:35

Hello, Peter! Hello, Paul!

0:30:360:30:38

There.

0:30:380:30:39

Pine shelves, assorted brass and bric-a-brac.

0:30:400:30:44

Victorian brass candlesticks in brushed steel,

0:30:440:30:48

and there's one Georgian piece there.

0:30:480:30:53

Can you spot them?

0:30:530:30:54

Something like...

0:30:540:30:55

-These look a bit different, but not a lot...

-Don't they just?

0:30:550:30:58

-Well, they look a bit classier than these.

-They do look classier!

0:30:580:31:03

Because there are classical lines to those. Beautifully chosen.

0:31:030:31:08

How old are these?

0:31:080:31:10

I've no idea. Well...

0:31:100:31:11

200.

0:31:110:31:13

These are George III.

0:31:140:31:16

-200 years old?

-Yep.

0:31:170:31:19

-You're joking. No?

-Abso...

0:31:190:31:21

In amongst late Victorian and early 20th century,

0:31:210:31:25

we've got Georgian brass.

0:31:250:31:26

Would these be...

0:31:260:31:28

I mean, 200 years old - are these going to be really expensive, or...?

0:31:280:31:31

At auction...

0:31:310:31:34

Go on, tell me. Surprise me.

0:31:340:31:37

..you might buy them for a fiver.

0:31:370:31:40

-A fiver?

-I kid you not.

0:31:400:31:42

They are utterly undervalued.

0:31:420:31:45

-These don't fit the bill.

-So why are we looking at these?

0:31:450:31:48

-Because they're priced at

-£6. Mm.

0:31:480:31:51

In a catalogued auction,

0:31:520:31:55

described accurately as a pair of George III brass candlesticks...

0:31:550:32:00

-Yeah.

-..circa 1800,

0:32:000:32:03

I think if we are lucky,

0:32:030:32:06

they make ten, 15, 20, five, 30...

0:32:060:32:11

-Who knows?

-Who knows? Yeah, if you get a couple interested...

0:32:110:32:14

There might be a little profit in this.

0:32:140:32:17

True - marketing is key.

0:32:170:32:19

However, the auction is tomorrow - not much time to get the word about.

0:32:190:32:23

Let's hope Louise will let them have it for a song.

0:32:230:32:26

Now, I'm going to disappoint you, because we've been here

0:32:260:32:29

and we've got money to spend

0:32:290:32:31

and I'm hitting you with a pair of sad brass candlesticks

0:32:310:32:36

that no-one loves, and I'm going to add insult to injury by saying,

0:32:360:32:40

-"Well, they're priced at £6..."

-Oh, my God!

0:32:400:32:42

SHE CHUCKLES

0:32:420:32:44

What would you like to pay for them?

0:32:440:32:46

Let me explain my rationale. We're on the way out the...

0:32:460:32:48

We're absolutely beat. We're up against the clock.

0:32:480:32:51

Those guys are... chomping at our heels. Er...

0:32:510:32:54

(You cannae sell them.)

0:32:540:32:56

Gimme them for a couple of quid or something daft.

0:32:560:32:59

I'll half it. £3.

0:32:590:33:00

-It's a deal!

-OK.

0:33:000:33:02

-Thanks very much.

-You're welcome.

0:33:020:33:04

-Well done. Thank you very much.

-You're very welcome.

0:33:040:33:06

-Thank you very much.

-£3 I have.

-Do you want them wrapping, as well?

0:33:060:33:10

Now, that would just be taking the mickey!

0:33:100:33:12

-"£3 - would you wrap them?!"

-THEY CHUCKLE

0:33:120:33:15

A very good deal, although Shilton took a bit of a back seat.

0:33:150:33:19

What could get this former goalkeeper excited?

0:33:190:33:23

Is that the FIFA World Cup?

0:33:230:33:25

Mind you, I don't think it's original.

0:33:250:33:27

THE original!

0:33:270:33:29

I don't think so, somehow! No, no. It looks...

0:33:290:33:32

It looks a bit... A bit worn.

0:33:320:33:34

I'm surprised you recognised that World Cup -

0:33:340:33:36

you haven't actually qualified for quite a long time, have yous?!

0:33:360:33:40

Ooh! That was awkward! Although, let's face it,

0:33:400:33:44

England hasn't seen a trophy like this for a while either.

0:33:440:33:47

It's a Chianti bottle, is it?

0:33:470:33:49

Right, with a note on it.

0:33:490:33:50

-I presume it's...yeah, red wine.

-And it says...

0:33:500:33:54

"Actual item presented to Paul Gascoigne

0:33:540:33:58

"at the World Cup, after he cried on receiving a yellow card."

0:33:580:34:02

Yeah, I mean, I'm not quite so sure about that.

0:34:020:34:05

If that had Gas... Er, Gazza's autograph on it,

0:34:050:34:08

I'd then be saying, "Oh, my word - do I believe the autograph?

0:34:080:34:11

"And if I do, that's a great thing!"

0:34:110:34:13

Yeah.

0:34:130:34:15

But it's not signed.

0:34:150:34:17

-No.

-If only we knew someone that was in the England squad...

0:34:170:34:21

-Yeah.

-Italia '90...

0:34:210:34:23

Maybe...Lineker?

0:34:230:34:25

Hold on a minute - I was there, wasn't I?!

0:34:250:34:28

That, with your autograph on it...

0:34:280:34:30

-Yeah.

-..is a good thing.

0:34:300:34:32

They're asking £55 for that, which I think...

0:34:320:34:36

is probably optimistic.

0:34:360:34:37

I think it very optimistic, yeah.

0:34:370:34:39

Sounds like it's time to bring on that English rose.

0:34:390:34:44

We're just looking at this...

0:34:440:34:46

This...obviously, bottle of wine -

0:34:460:34:48

World Cup bottle of wine, Italia '90.

0:34:480:34:50

There's no way we'd be looking at £55.

0:34:500:34:53

But...I mean, we're talking five or ten pounds for a bottle of wine,

0:34:530:34:56

-you know, so...

-And it might be off.

0:34:560:34:58

And it might be off, and we don't know - is the wine still in there?

0:34:580:35:01

-Oh, yes, it's in there. Yes, yes.

-Yeah.

0:35:010:35:03

Well, we could settle on a tenner, I think, if that's any good.

0:35:030:35:06

-A tenner?

-Yeah.

-Yeah, I think we'll accept that. That'd be great, yeah.

0:35:060:35:10

Peter Shilton got his hand on that fine purchase

0:35:100:35:14

as those precious shopping moments draw to a close.

0:35:140:35:18

Did you always want to be a goalkeeper, Peter?

0:35:180:35:21

Er, I was always a goalkeeper, cos, er...

0:35:210:35:24

But is it something you wanted to do from a young age?

0:35:240:35:27

-It was just something that happened.

-Really?

0:35:270:35:30

The first time I ever played, I was put in goal, and then...

0:35:300:35:33

You know, I was... I was fairly good at it and I just stayed.

0:35:330:35:37

So I never... I never thought about it.

0:35:370:35:39

The road trip is moving us forward, yet back in time for Peter and Mark,

0:35:410:35:46

as they head 33 miles east by north-east

0:35:460:35:49

to the city of Manchester.

0:35:490:35:51

-I always wanted to make football my living.

-Yeah?

0:35:550:35:59

Always. It was always in the back of my head.

0:35:590:36:02

I always wanted to come to England.

0:36:020:36:04

-I always wanted to be playing for Manchester United.

-Really?

0:36:040:36:07

When I was a kid - small kid - that was my dream every night.

0:36:070:36:11

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:36:110:36:12

Manchester's achievements span through industry, politics,

0:36:120:36:15

music and popular culture but football remains at its heart -

0:36:150:36:19

a city where Peter Schmeichel is a bit of a hero.

0:36:190:36:23

He's bypassing Old Trafford to go back to football's roots.

0:36:250:36:28

'They think it's all over. Well, it is now.'

0:36:280:36:31

The brand-new museum of football is not quite finished,

0:36:310:36:34

but our returning hero gets the red-carpet treatment...

0:36:340:36:38

We should go through the turnstiles here.

0:36:380:36:40

..even as opening night preparations take place.

0:36:400:36:43

Sorry about the mess, lads!

0:36:430:36:45

Director Kevin Moore can meet a goalkeeping legend

0:36:450:36:48

and also, you know, our Mark!

0:36:480:36:51

As you can see, we're getting ready for our opening event,

0:36:510:36:53

but what you've come into is the Hall Of Fame,

0:36:530:36:56

which is dedicated to the greatest-ever players and managers in English football.

0:36:560:37:00

And Peter is one of those all-time greats.

0:37:000:37:03

-How do you feel about that?

-I feel very good about that.

0:37:030:37:06

If you'd like to come upstairs...

0:37:060:37:07

The exact origins of football go back centuries,

0:37:070:37:10

mentioned in medieval scripts and in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

0:37:100:37:15

But the modern game developed during the Industrial Revolution,

0:37:150:37:18

as men used their Saturday afternoons,

0:37:180:37:21

after the factories closed early, to have fun on the pitch.

0:37:210:37:25

The original rules were organic and shifting.

0:37:250:37:29

What we're looking at is the handwritten laws

0:37:290:37:31

of Association Football, written down for the first time in 1863.

0:37:310:37:37

-As early as that?

-Absolutely. It's the year that the FA is founded

0:37:370:37:40

and they have to come up with combined rules

0:37:400:37:44

that everyone agrees on.

0:37:440:37:46

But from this - a group of Victorian gentlemen in England -

0:37:460:37:49

they're creating a game which has spread around the world

0:37:490:37:52

to more than 200 countries.

0:37:520:37:54

These new rules established what seems obvious to modern football fans -

0:37:540:37:59

the duration of the game, the size of the pitch,

0:37:590:38:01

the number of players in each team and how the game is structured.

0:38:010:38:06

I like the handwriting.

0:38:060:38:07

It's beautiful, isn't it? Oh, it's very 19th century, this.

0:38:070:38:10

But in founding the FA,

0:38:100:38:12

the point was there needed to be one set of rules...

0:38:120:38:15

-Consistent.

-..that everyone could agree on.

0:38:150:38:17

Of course, some of the clubs and individuals couldn't agree,

0:38:170:38:20

and they broke away to set up rugby.

0:38:200:38:24

That is absolutely fantastic.

0:38:240:38:26

That's another thing that, er... That I'm interested in.

0:38:260:38:28

That's... You know, being a foreign player and a goalkeeper myself,

0:38:280:38:32

Bert Trautmann is something... Someone that I kind of, in my...

0:38:320:38:35

I think he broke his neck in an FA Cup final, didn't he?

0:38:350:38:38

-1956 FA Cup final.

-Yeah.

-Gosh!

0:38:380:38:40

But he was also, sort of, like the first foreign player to embrace

0:38:400:38:44

the English game, and I wonder if... I've seen he's in the Hall of Fame.

0:38:440:38:48

-I wonder if you got any artefacts from his time.

-Yes, we do.

0:38:480:38:52

We've got an amazing artefact connected from Bert Trautmann.

0:38:520:38:55

-and if you'd like to come through...

-Absolutely.

-..I'll show it to you.

-Please do, lead the way.

0:38:550:38:59

Bert Trautmann inadvertently helped begin a modern phenomenon

0:38:590:39:03

in the world of British football - the foreign player.

0:39:030:39:06

1956.

0:39:060:39:07

Bert Trautmann, he was... He was a German prisoner of war

0:39:070:39:10

and he chose to stay in England,

0:39:100:39:13

and he basically became the first foreign player.

0:39:130:39:16

-Really?

-Really high-profile foreign player.

0:39:160:39:19

And in this final, he broke his neck.

0:39:200:39:23

And he's 2mm from dying.

0:39:230:39:25

He didn't realise it, but they have pictures where he's like this,

0:39:250:39:28

and he played on, he carried on,

0:39:280:39:30

and he had to play with that... neck brace ever since.

0:39:300:39:34

Gosh! Amazing story!

0:39:340:39:37

And it gives a fantastic picture of what English football is all about.

0:39:370:39:41

Obviously people who are born in this country are sort of used to it,

0:39:410:39:45

but people like me, that comes from the outside,

0:39:450:39:47

this is what attracts us, is the history, the traditions

0:39:470:39:52

and also the incidents that are so well documented.

0:39:520:39:55

The free movement of players has come to characterise

0:39:550:39:59

the modern game of football, especially in Britain.

0:39:590:40:02

And there's something uniquely British and rather wonderful

0:40:020:40:06

hanging on the walls here, all about going to the match!

0:40:060:40:10

Oh, well, Laurence Stephen Lowry.

0:40:100:40:15

Probably one of the most... famous, important,

0:40:150:40:18

British artists of the 20th century.

0:40:180:40:20

A Manchester artist, of course,

0:40:200:40:22

and he painted lots of industrial scenes like this.

0:40:220:40:27

What stadium is that?

0:40:270:40:28

This is Burnden Park, Bolton Wanderers.

0:40:280:40:30

-Bolton, yeah. I've actually played in that stadium!

-Have you?

0:40:300:40:33

Yeah!

0:40:330:40:34

I could see that was Manchester, because, you know, it looks windy.

0:40:340:40:37

-Yes.

-People are sort of walking into the wind.

-What's the value of that painting?

0:40:370:40:41

It was bought by the Professional Footballers' Association

0:40:410:40:44

some years ago, for just under £2 million.

0:40:440:40:46

-£2 million?

-Yes.

0:40:460:40:48

Lowry had a fascination for ordinary people,

0:40:480:40:51

and was a kind of football fan.

0:40:510:40:53

Rarely has a sport generated such loyalty,

0:40:530:40:57

culture and community from its spectators.

0:40:570:40:59

Most people, well, men in Britain, have a team and probably watch

0:40:590:41:04

at least a match or two, but many live for Saturday afternoons.

0:41:040:41:09

So I know these are all fans' memorabilia,

0:41:090:41:11

and it ties in with something that Mark and me,

0:41:110:41:14

we bought yesterday, that we're going to put into auction,

0:41:140:41:17

and it is a official souvenir programme for the 1966 World Cup.

0:41:170:41:22

He's actually journaled everything.

0:41:220:41:25

Ah, so it's handwritten and annotated...

0:41:250:41:27

Handwritten, with all the results, all the goal-scorers.

0:41:270:41:30

-You can have a look through that and maybe...

-Fantastic.

0:41:300:41:33

I mean, maybe you'd be interested in putting a bid in for...

0:41:330:41:36

Tell you what, Peter Schmeichel might struggle with buying

0:41:360:41:40

but he's a dab hand at selling!

0:41:400:41:42

It's fantastic. This is what the museum's all about.

0:41:420:41:44

And also for sale in Runcorn tomorrow - hint, hint!

0:41:440:41:48

But for now, our football legend

0:41:480:41:51

and his trusty sidekick have had the time of their lives.

0:41:510:41:54

Just in time to check out the opposing team's new signings.

0:41:540:41:58

Very sadly, Peter Shilton and our Paul spent £5 - Ha!

0:42:000:42:06

On a pretty Carlton Ware vase,

0:42:060:42:08

which did not last its journey in the little red car.

0:42:080:42:12

-That's a shame, isn't it?

-We've rumbled it to death.

-That's a real shame.

0:42:120:42:16

Yeah, but let's take a look at all the wonderful things that didn't break, eh?

0:42:160:42:20

-Shall we go for it?

-Gingerly.

0:42:200:42:22

-We have to do this nice and slowly.

-Cos we've had a casualty already.

0:42:220:42:25

Wow!

0:42:250:42:27

Oh!

0:42:270:42:28

Wow!

0:42:280:42:30

-Gosh, what?

-Who is it signed by?

0:42:300:42:32

It's em...what's that say on there?

0:42:320:42:34

Oh, that's cheating!

0:42:340:42:36

Oh, I can't believe that!

0:42:360:42:38

Yeah, and if that's not bad enough, Peter and Paul got a sneaky

0:42:380:42:42

last minute purchase, buying two snuffboxes right under our...noses.

0:42:420:42:46

-I'm intrigued with this. Can I look at this?

-Yeah, do.

0:42:460:42:49

This handsome silver joby for £85

0:42:490:42:52

and this pretty little papier-mache fellow for 25.

0:42:520:42:56

Cute!

0:42:560:42:58

That really is rather... rather nice, continental.

0:42:580:43:02

I think it's lovely. My hunch, I might be wrong, would be Dutch.

0:43:020:43:05

-Yeah.

-Late 19th century, it's not 18th century.

0:43:050:43:08

Yeah, that's where we've gone.

0:43:080:43:10

He just picks it up and, "I think it's Dutch..."

0:43:100:43:12

Well, that's being an expert.

0:43:120:43:14

-That's being an expert.

-Which is something that we're not.

0:43:140:43:17

But you've given the whole world many years of other pleasure.

0:43:170:43:21

Well, that's reasonable enough, that's reasonable enough. We can't argue with that, well done.

0:43:210:43:25

Thank you very much.

0:43:270:43:28

Well done, can't argue with that. Are you ready for ours?

0:43:280:43:31

We're dying, do it.

0:43:310:43:33

-Oh.

-Oh. Well.

0:43:350:43:38

Well. We've all gone for candlesticks.

0:43:380:43:40

-Indeed.

-We've both gone for something football related.

0:43:400:43:43

This is... Peter will tell you because he found it.

0:43:430:43:45

What it is, it's an official souvenir

0:43:450:43:47

programme from the 1966 world cup,

0:43:470:43:51

that was the one that England won.

0:43:510:43:54

Remember? They won a trophy once.

0:43:540:43:56

Just about remember it, yeah. Just about remember it.

0:43:560:43:59

We're really quite pleased with ours, we've got a nice little cross section there,

0:43:590:44:03

but the nice thing is... Where are we selling?

0:44:030:44:05

I saw it, yep.

0:44:050:44:07

We're selling it at auction in Runcorn.

0:44:070:44:10

Absolutely horrible things

0:44:100:44:12

but appropriate I think for the sale we're going to.

0:44:120:44:14

I don't know if Paul would agree with me, but I think this one is too close to call.

0:44:140:44:19

PAUL LAUGHS

0:44:190:44:21

Well, I'm sure you'd all agree to each others' faces,

0:44:210:44:24

but what do you really think?

0:44:240:44:26

Well, it was OK, I wasn't blown away when they took the drape away.

0:44:260:44:32

I think they've got some good items.

0:44:320:44:36

My overriding impression is,

0:44:360:44:37

I'm well impressed at the prices they paid.

0:44:370:44:41

I think the World Cup thing might be quite fun because he signed it.

0:44:410:44:45

He signed it so, yeah... That makes a difference,

0:44:450:44:48

same thing with our programme.

0:44:480:44:49

I think, was it the Runcorn jug?

0:44:490:44:52

That might be a novel thing on the day but we'll have to wait and see.

0:44:520:44:55

This time tomorrow it's all over, man.

0:44:550:44:57

You know, it is very, very difficult to predict.

0:44:570:45:00

I've never been to an auction like this so I'm quite excited about it.

0:45:000:45:03

So am I. Let's get there!

0:45:030:45:06

Let's get to the auction!

0:45:060:45:08

There's no more we can do now, Paul. That's it.

0:45:080:45:11

No, we're now bystanders!

0:45:110:45:15

I'm really looking forward to today, it should be very exciting.

0:45:150:45:18

After a couple of days hard work.

0:45:180:45:20

And it has been quite hard work.

0:45:200:45:23

Hard work? Hardly 90 minutes of footie, is it?

0:45:230:45:27

But as an exciting journey nears its end,

0:45:270:45:30

Manchester shrinks steadily in the review mirror as this road trip

0:45:300:45:35

heads for the final destination,

0:45:350:45:37

29 miles west sits the town of Runcorn.

0:45:370:45:41

Former spa town and meeting point of the meandering River Mersey

0:45:420:45:46

and the mighty Manchester Ship Canal,

0:45:460:45:49

four Runcorn chemical companies coalesced in 1926

0:45:490:45:54

to form Imperial Chemical Industries.

0:45:540:45:57

That's ICI to you and I.

0:45:570:45:59

Good morning.

0:46:010:46:02

How are you? >

0:46:020:46:04

Morning Peter. How you feeling?

0:46:040:46:06

I'm feeling great, excited.

0:46:060:46:08

I've got absolutely no expectations.

0:46:080:46:10

It's got to be down a little bit to luck, hasn't it?

0:46:100:46:13

Always is, auction's a lottery.

0:46:130:46:15

So when we get to... Will they know which items are ours?

0:46:150:46:19

Not necessarily, it depends how much fuss we make.

0:46:190:46:22

ALL LAUGH

0:46:220:46:24

Good luck.

0:46:240:46:26

Good luck. Let the best man win.

0:46:260:46:29

Good luck everyone.

0:46:290:46:30

Today's sale at the Runcorn Auction Centre

0:46:300:46:34

will be presided over by local legend Michael C Bain

0:46:340:46:37

and he's taken a cursory glance at our Peters' purchases.

0:46:370:46:42

I think the propelling pen, which is by Mordan Sampson

0:46:420:46:46

is a good purchase, they always do well here.

0:46:460:46:49

Price? I don't know - £20 to £40.

0:46:490:46:52

Mirrors tend not to do well at this auction house,

0:46:520:46:55

I think that's a little bit risky, we'll be struggling to get a profit on that one.

0:46:550:46:59

Italia '90 - it's a nice souvenir,

0:46:590:47:03

the condition is letting it down a little bit

0:47:030:47:05

and the bonus is of course, it's got Peter Shilton's signature on it.

0:47:050:47:09

The item I have least confidence in

0:47:090:47:12

has got to be the Victorian cream jug.

0:47:120:47:14

If you ask me who's going to be the winner, I'd go for England.

0:47:140:47:17

Both teams started with £400 each.

0:47:170:47:19

Peter Schmeichel and Mark Stacey spent £120 on six auction lots,

0:47:210:47:26

whilst Messrs Shilton and Laidlaw spent a bold £183 on six lots.

0:47:260:47:33

Thank you.

0:47:330:47:34

An Englishman, a Welshman, a Scotsman

0:47:340:47:37

and a Great Dane walk into an auction house.

0:47:370:47:39

You can make up your own punch line later

0:47:390:47:42

because the sale is about to begin.

0:47:420:47:44

Messrs Schmeichel and Stacey's propelling pencil

0:47:440:47:48

writes the first chapter of this auction saga.

0:47:480:47:51

Actually, there are various commission bids.

0:47:510:47:54

I've got 13, 15, 18.

0:47:540:47:55

18 I've got, 20 comes next.

0:47:550:47:57

22, 25.

0:47:570:48:00

28, 30, 35.

0:48:000:48:03

35, 35 new bidder.

0:48:030:48:05

40, 40 I've got. 42 comes next. We hold on at £40.

0:48:050:48:09

Selling at the back of the room at £40, all done at 40.

0:48:090:48:14

Rather meagre beginnings,

0:48:140:48:16

frankly auction costs will swallow that slim margin, I fear.

0:48:160:48:20

It was a small profit. Very small.

0:48:200:48:23

Yep. It was small, but a profit nevertheless.

0:48:230:48:26

Mr Shilton's painted mirror is up next.

0:48:260:48:29

£20 anywhere, £20 who wants it?

0:48:290:48:31

20 I've got, 20 I've got, 22 is next.

0:48:310:48:35

Main bid at 20, all done at £20? Selling at 20, all done at 20...

0:48:350:48:40

Oh, dear. It's a very slow start.

0:48:400:48:43

These players need the crowd behind them!

0:48:430:48:46

You took a punt, you came out of it clean - yeah, fair enough.

0:48:460:48:49

It's probably...probably the least out of our lots

0:48:490:48:52

that I was confident about, to be fair.

0:48:520:48:55

Time for a classic set-play -

0:48:550:48:56

with the Team Schmeichel freebie glass jug.

0:48:560:48:59

Somebody's seen it because I've got a bid here of £10.

0:48:590:49:02

Oh, my, in at 10. Come on.

0:49:020:49:04

12 up there. 15 still with me.

0:49:040:49:07

18 up there, on the gallery, at £18.

0:49:070:49:09

Come on, a bit more.

0:49:090:49:10

18 in the gallery. 20 is next. £18.

0:49:100:49:14

20 in the room. 22.

0:49:140:49:16

It's getting a bit of interest online - not bad, boys!

0:49:160:49:20

-25 in the room. 28 in the gallery.

-One more.

0:49:200:49:23

We're going to go 30. Look nice today and all done at £28.

0:49:230:49:27

£28, all done...

0:49:270:49:29

A healthy, if not enormous profit. At last!

0:49:290:49:33

And now Team Shilton's candlesticks

0:49:330:49:35

wait to light up the saleroom -

0:49:350:49:37

a snip at just £3.

0:49:370:49:39

£50 anywhere?

0:49:390:49:41

Well, 20 then, for George III brass candlesticks.

0:49:410:49:45

20 I've got in the room. 20 I've got.

0:49:450:49:48

-Oh, my God!

-25 in the room. 28 next.

0:49:480:49:50

-25, the bid is over there.

-Come on!

0:49:500:49:53

28 now. 30? 30 in the room.

0:49:530:49:54

30 in the room. This bid is in the room at 30.

0:49:540:49:57

You are a genius!

0:49:570:49:59

All done at 30, the hammer goes down.

0:49:590:50:01

Another great result - Peter and Paul are back in this game!

0:50:010:50:05

£30!

0:50:050:50:07

Aye, it's no over yet!

0:50:070:50:09

And it won't be for a while.

0:50:090:50:11

Pray silence for Schmeichel and Stacey's '66 Championship programme.

0:50:110:50:17

£20. I can start at 20 here, anyway.

0:50:170:50:19

20 I've got. 20 I've got. 22 is next.

0:50:190:50:21

20 I've got. 22 is next. 20 I've got.

0:50:210:50:24

-Oh, come on, a bit more.

-Yeah.

0:50:240:50:25

25 still with me. 28?

0:50:250:50:27

28? 28 on the phone, then. 28 on the phone.

0:50:270:50:32

Still 30 with me. 32 on the phone?

0:50:320:50:34

32 on the phone.

0:50:340:50:36

32, that takes this out. 32 on the phone.

0:50:360:50:38

35 anywhere else? 32 on the phone.

0:50:380:50:41

Well, we've doubled our money, Peter.

0:50:410:50:42

Anybody else want it? 32 on the phone.

0:50:420:50:45

35 on the net. 38 on the phone.

0:50:450:50:48

A flurry of interest on the phones and internet.

0:50:480:50:50

Who can these mystery bidders be?!

0:50:500:50:53

42 on the phone. The bid is on the phone.

0:50:530:50:55

On the phone at £42. We all done, then?

0:50:550:50:58

Selling to the phone at £42, all done at 42.

0:50:580:51:01

Excellent result,

0:51:010:51:04

putting our Danish/Welsh partnership in the lead.

0:51:040:51:07

And I happen to know the successful phone bidder was none other than...

0:51:070:51:10

Manchester's all-new Museum of Football.

0:51:100:51:12

-How nice is that?!

-That's not bad, is it?

0:51:120:51:14

So, any sniff of a profit for Peter and Paul?

0:51:140:51:17

Their first papier-mache snuffbox awaits a discerning nostril.

0:51:170:51:21

I can start this out at 20 with me.

0:51:210:51:24

20 I've got. 22 comes next. 25 now.

0:51:240:51:26

Still with me at 28. 28 with me.

0:51:260:51:29

The bid is still with me at £28. 30 now on the net.

0:51:290:51:31

-30 on the internet.

-On the net at 30. 32 to my right.

0:51:310:51:35

32 in the room.

0:51:350:51:37

-The bid is to my right at £32.

-Nice. Cheap. Good box.

0:51:370:51:39

This is cheap. Are we all done at 32? Selling at 32, then.

0:51:390:51:43

Not too bad for the home team.

0:51:430:51:46

-It's a profit.

-What did you pay for it?

0:51:460:51:49

-25.

-25?

0:51:490:51:51

Now Peter Schmeichel's favourite lot - the hunky chopping board,

0:51:510:51:56

partnered with the manly, meat dish.

0:51:560:51:59

Cor!

0:51:590:52:00

Right, what should we say for this, then? £40 somewhere? £40 anywhere?

0:52:000:52:03

-£40, who wants it? £40 anywhere?

-No-one wants it.

0:52:030:52:06

Come on, now. Well, I'll take 20 to start us off. It's worth that.

0:52:060:52:10

£20 somewhere? £20.

0:52:100:52:12

20 bid. 20 I've got. 22 is next.

0:52:120:52:14

At 25. 28 in the gallery.

0:52:140:52:16

£30 at the back of the room. 30 I've got.

0:52:160:52:18

32? No. 30...£30 still.

0:52:180:52:21

All done at 30?

0:52:210:52:22

Selling at 30, last chance.

0:52:220:52:25

Fantastic auction save! £10 safely in Schmeichel's hands!

0:52:250:52:31

I'm disappointed with that.

0:52:320:52:33

And the trophy goes to... Well, let's wait and see.

0:52:330:52:37

Team Shilton's Italia '90 wine bottle enters the box.

0:52:370:52:41

50 quid?

0:52:410:52:42

I'm...I'm...I'm very sceptical about it - don't know.

0:52:440:52:46

It's modelled as the, eh, the World Cup trophy,

0:52:460:52:50

and it's also been signed by somebody really famous.

0:52:500:52:53

ALL LAUGH

0:52:530:52:56

And not only that,

0:52:560:52:57

Peter Shilton's got his signature on it as well.

0:52:570:53:01

Let's hope Peter can get his hands on a winning profit this time.

0:53:010:53:05

Right, what shall we say for this, then? £30 to start me?

0:53:050:53:07

-It's got to be worth 30.

-More than that.

0:53:070:53:09

Tell you what, I'll bid 30. £30 here. 30 I've got. 32 comes next.

0:53:090:53:13

-They're off and running.

-35 in the front. 38. 38. 40.

0:53:130:53:19

40. 42. 45.

0:53:190:53:22

45. 48. 48. 50.

0:53:220:53:27

50, I'll put the rest towards it for you.

0:53:270:53:29

Going 55, sir? 60?

0:53:320:53:35

Go on, 60. Go 60. I'll help you out.

0:53:350:53:38

60. I'm not going more than this, but if you go 60, I'll help you.

0:53:380:53:43

He'll have to wait a few years before he can drink it!

0:53:430:53:45

65? 65.

0:53:450:53:48

65, the bid is in green. I've done the best I can for you.

0:53:480:53:51

The bid is in green at the back, £65.

0:53:510:53:53

All done at 65. Nothing on the net.

0:53:530:53:57

Nice work, Peter Shilton. Your final stab at wheeler-dealing

0:53:570:54:02

really paid off!

0:54:020:54:04

-That's the power of your name, my man!

-Well done. Well done.

0:54:040:54:07

Time for Schmeichel

0:54:070:54:08

and Stacey to go on the attack with their marble soldier figurine.

0:54:080:54:12

Can they catch Team Shilton on the break?

0:54:120:54:15

If there's a £100 internet bid from Denmark,

0:54:150:54:17

-there's a steward's inquiry!

-Would be suspicious, wouldn't it?

0:54:170:54:20

Well, I've got 20 here. £20 with me.

0:54:200:54:23

20 I've got. 22 is next.

0:54:230:54:24

Come on, somebody bid!

0:54:240:54:26

Still with me at £25. 28 on the gallery.

0:54:260:54:28

£28 on the gallery. £28.

0:54:280:54:30

All done at £28, then. All done at £28.

0:54:300:54:34

-Come on!

-Selling at £28 now. All done at 28.

0:54:340:54:37

Nice, steady profits for Peter and Mark.

0:54:370:54:40

Can Shilton and Laidlaw counterattack

0:54:400:54:42

with their next snuffbox? This time in silver...possibly.

0:54:420:54:45

Snuffbox.

0:54:450:54:48

Right, 30 I've got, 30 I've got.

0:54:480:54:50

-It's a long way to go.

-32. 35. 38. 40. 42.

0:54:500:54:53

Still with me at 42. 45. 45.

0:54:530:54:56

And still with me at 48. 50.

0:54:560:54:59

48, the bid still with me. New bidder at 50. £50 over there.

0:54:590:55:02

50 I've got. 55. Commissions are now out. £50.

0:55:020:55:05

Oh, no, no, no!

0:55:050:55:07

60? £60. 65.

0:55:070:55:10

70. 65 there. Do you want to go 68, sir?

0:55:100:55:13

All done at 65, then.

0:55:130:55:15

Selling at 65. All done at 65, and I sell.

0:55:150:55:19

Bad luck!

0:55:190:55:21

I'm surprised at that!

0:55:210:55:23

And that leaves the field fairly open for Peter and Mark,

0:55:250:55:28

with their ornate inkwell and candelabra,

0:55:280:55:31

looking for a local desk to rest on.

0:55:310:55:33

Start at 20. And 22 is next. 22. 25.

0:55:330:55:36

28. 28 in the room.

0:55:360:55:38

28 I've got over there. 30 comes next.

0:55:380:55:41

We all done at £28, then? Nothing on the net.

0:55:410:55:43

£28. Selling at 28. All done.

0:55:430:55:46

Oh, no!

0:55:460:55:47

Weeping won't help, Mark - just ask Gazza!

0:55:490:55:52

Is this a chance for Peter and Paul to nick it?

0:55:520:55:55

Whoa, whoa - that's the clock, the clock!

0:55:550:55:57

Their Victorian wall clock could be saying "profit o'clock"

0:55:570:56:01

if Michael's predictions are correct.

0:56:010:56:03

Well, I've got 40 with me. 40 I've got.

0:56:030:56:05

40 I've got. 45 here. 45 still with me.

0:56:050:56:08

45 still with me. At 45.

0:56:080:56:09

48 on the net. 50 still here. 50.

0:56:090:56:12

55 on the net.

0:56:120:56:14

Bid is on the net at £55.

0:56:140:56:16

Bid is on the net at 55. 55.

0:56:160:56:19

65 now on the net.

0:56:190:56:21

Looks like we're heading for extra time.

0:56:210:56:24

70 in the room. 70 in the room. 70 I've got.

0:56:240:56:27

75 on the net.

0:56:270:56:28

Do you want to go one more, sir? 80. 80 in the room. 80 in the room.

0:56:280:56:31

80 in the room. 85 on the net. 90.

0:56:310:56:34

Do you want to go 90, sir?

0:56:340:56:36

90 in the room. £90. Gentleman says yes.

0:56:360:56:38

-95 on the net.

-Yes, £100 in the room.

0:56:380:56:42

-100 in the room. 100 in the room.

-110 on the net.

-110 on the net.

0:56:420:56:46

I think we might have narrowly avoided a penalty shoot-out!

0:56:460:56:49

110, the bid is on the net. 110. Are we all done at 110?

0:56:490:56:53

Selling at 110.

0:56:530:56:56

A great profit for Team Shilton!

0:56:570:56:59

To our victor, the spoils, and as for, eh, non-victor...

0:56:590:57:05

-It's disappointing.

-It's very disappointing.

0:57:050:57:07

-I thought we had really good stuff.

-You did all right.

0:57:070:57:09

Stuff that people could use.

0:57:090:57:11

I believe we have a winner!

0:57:110:57:13

Oh, and it's over now!

0:57:130:57:15

It's over now, definitely!

0:57:150:57:17

You think it's all over, Paul, and, well, it is.

0:57:170:57:21

Our celebrities began with £400 each.

0:57:210:57:24

Peter Schmeichel and Mark Stacey bought wisely and well,

0:57:240:57:27

making a thoroughly respectable profit of £40.72.

0:57:270:57:32

The Great Dane and his trusty Welshman end this road trip

0:57:320:57:36

with £440.72.

0:57:360:57:38

Messrs Shilton and Laidlaw, however,

0:57:380:57:41

made a wee bit more - £81.04.

0:57:410:57:45

So, Peter and Paul finish triumphant,

0:57:450:57:47

with £481 and four British pennies.

0:57:470:57:51

All of the funds generated here go to Children In Need.

0:57:510:57:54

So well done, Peter, and well done, Peter.

0:57:540:57:58

-So well done.

-Nice to meet you, Mark, as well.

0:57:580:58:00

-Well done, Peter.

-Well done.

-Great to be with you.

0:58:000:58:03

Yes, likewise.

0:58:030:58:04

-And unfortunately, the best men didn't win on the day.

-No, I know.

0:58:040:58:08

PAUL: Well done!

0:58:110:58:12

I think the worst thing is that when you actually buy something

0:58:120:58:15

and then you realise you've actually lost a load of money on it.

0:58:150:58:19

The nice when you're working with somebody else, like the celebrities,

0:58:190:58:24

you can always blame them!

0:58:240:58:26

Goalkeepers Peter Shilton and Peter Schmeichel compete off the pitch to buy and sell antiques in a road trip around Cheshire, aided by antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and Mark Stacey. The celebrities visit a cycling museum in Warrington and a football museum in Manchester, before ending up at auction in Runcorn.