Episode 4 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


Episode 4

Stars of stage and screen Simon Williams and Duncan Preston take a buying trip around Essex with £400 to invest in antiques with experts James Lewis and Philip Serrell.


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Transcript


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Some of the nation's favourite celebrities.

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Why have I got such expensive taste?

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One antiques expert each.

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Speak, oh wise one.

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And one big challenge.

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Who can seek out and buy the best antiques at the very best prices?

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Answers on a postcard!

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An auction for a big profit further down the road.

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# When I'm cleaning windows! #

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Who will spot the good investment? Who will listen to advice?

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-Do you like it?

-No, I think it's horrible!

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And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?!"

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Well done, us.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Doing battle today in the Roman playground of Essex

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are two gladiators of stage and screen.

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Simon Williams and Duncan Preston.

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And check out their chariot, eh?

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The magnificent E-type Jag.

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That is just so beautiful!

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The E-type has always turned heads and made the headlines.

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Enzo Ferrari himself called this the most beautiful car in the world

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when it was released in 1961.

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Oh, that's just beautiful.

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Treat her like a lady, Simon. Gently does it!

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We're in for two very fine days.

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We're in for some fine country weather.

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And Simon's on the hunt with Duncan, whose career has spanned Hamlet to Emmerdale.

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As Victoria Wood's leading man,

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he's starred on stage and screen in Acorn Antiques,

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and wasn't he Stan the janitor in Dinner Ladies?

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Oh, yes!

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The element of competition is alive and well.

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It certainly is!

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At the other end of the social spectrum,

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Simon is famed for his aristocratic roles from '70s drama Upstairs Downstairs

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to joining Duncan in Dinner Ladies.

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What's that?

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It's a shepherd's pie, Ma'am. Your Royal Highness.

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-Not made with real shepherds, I hope?

-Ha, ha, ha!

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So, with decades of playing the cream of the upper classes behind him,

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Simon should have no trouble getting to grips with the precision engineering

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of this classy little motor.

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-How many gears has it got?

-Who cares how many gears? Four.

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-Right.

-The backwards one you can't find.

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I get my people to park for me!

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Of course he does!

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And looking every inch the gentleman,

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will surely be a boon when it comes to getting a good price for his antiques.

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I'd be looking so cool. And when the antique dealers saw me arrive,

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they'd add a zero to everything they've got in store!

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Ah, well. Maybe not, then.

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The cars match the men. From sleek and sexy to muscular and manly!

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Ha-ha! Pairing up with our celebs are two Road Trip veterans,

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Philip Serrell and James Lewis.

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This is the very first car there ever was.

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It's a punchy three-litre V8 Triumph Stag for them.

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If you read the Bible, it says, "Moses came down the hill in his triumph."

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And this is it!

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In that case, just like our experts, it's aging beautifully.

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Derbyshire auctioneer James Lewis started his career at the tender age of six

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when he bought a bird cage for his budgie at auction.

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It was going "cheep"!

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Made for you!

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When in Rome, James...

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Oh, no!

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And there's the silver fox himself, auctioneer Phil Serrell

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who has a lot of bottle when it comes to taking a risk on some hair-raising purchases!

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But when it's sewing up the competition, he's all business.

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A table-top sewing machine.

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No, I don't mind. It's all about taking part, isn't it? Is it hell!

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Our teams have two days of antiques shopping ahead,

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with £400 in their back pockets.

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Their aim? To strike the kind of deals that make them lots of dosh at auction.

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So, to battle, at Finchingfield in Essex.

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Then it's a quick stop in Suffolk

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before Road Tripping the 300 miles

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to that all-important auction on the English Riviera at Torquay.

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Starting off in Finchingfield, there's just time for a cuppa

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before our experts meet our sophisticated celebrities.

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You've got the drinks in, then?

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-How are you? Good to see you.

-Pleased to meet you.

-How are you?

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Choosing partners takes careful deliberation.

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Heads.

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You've got Phil.

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Good. There we are. We're in business.

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-Shall we let them race off, and we'll sit down and have a coffee.

-That would be nice. Lovely.

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Whilst Simon and James make a dash to the first shop,

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Phil reveals his strategy to Duncan.

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Duncan, I think the plan is a hare and tortoise job, here.

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-Yeah, go on.

-Well, there's a pub there

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and I think we should equally spend our time between the antiques centre and the pub. What do you reckon?

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Well, I've got to be honest. I saw the pub before the antiques centre!

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Listen, it's Antiques Road Trip, not Antiques Pub Crawl!

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Nice to see one team, though, taking it seriously.

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-I'm Simon Williams.

-Hello, sir.

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-Hello, there.

-Hello! Hi, there.

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Peter and Mary Curry have owned Finchingfield Antiques Centre for 25 years,

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although for the first seven years, they ran it as a restaurant.

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Whilst Duncan and Phil check out the retail opportunities in the pub,

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Simon is honing his haggling skills.

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-Have you got a lot to spend?

-Poor as church mice. Take no notice of the E-type Jaguar!

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Not sure you'll get away with that one, Simon!

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In fact, the boys have £400 to spend.

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But is there anything on the menu that will serve up a healthy profit?

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-I'm not moved here yet. Are you?

-No, not yet.

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Somebody actually made that, you know!

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Is Simon casting a spell? Well, it's worth a try!

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Interesting stuff. I'm enjoying myself. Are you?

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Yeah, it's... I always feel the pressure, you know,

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until I find the first object.

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-That's the sort of thing I love to find.

-Big iron brackets and things.

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These cast iron Victorian architectural brackets

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date to about 1860 and were often used in conservatories.

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The whole discipline is about not what you want to have in your house,

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-it's what we can make money on.

-That's it.

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That's why I'm a pauper.

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Exactly, Simon.

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Seems like he's really getting the hang of this Road Tripping business.

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He's got a good eye and he's keen.

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What do you like? What do you collect?

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I like a bit of a painting.

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Simon's spotted a 1984 pastel by Jon Antony Atkinson,

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entitled Joanie, Early Morning, priced at £38.

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Is it a boy or is it a woman?

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Poor old Joanie!

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-I think it's a woman. I'm seeing woman.

-I see woman now.

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See a woman who's had a disappointing time of it, I think!

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Yeah. She's not happy, is she?

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But there's a mood there, and nice tones.

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-I think at 38, I think it's...

-Hmm.

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1984. It's not early.

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-No, it's not early.

-She's not happy, she's not pretty, she's not early.

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-There's something possibly a little bit French.

-Yeah. I agree with you.

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Could we make a buck on that?

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Let's put it somewhere else, and stand back.

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Good plan.

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Well, as they say, she's no oil painting!

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But will Joanie's frail charm attract a potential bidder?

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Speak, oh wise one!

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I think it's nicely done.

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I think you're right.

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-Damning with faint praise?

-No.

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I think she's either in her sick bed or...

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-She didn't quite get there.

-Yes.

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So, to buy or not to buy is the question being pondered by Team Simon.

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Meanwhile, next door, it seems Phil has found the answer to his problems.

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And no, it's not the wine!

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"Not a drop is sold till it's seven years old."

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It's John Jameson's whiskey. Irish scotch. Are you a scotch man?

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No, I'm afraid not.

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-You might be now!

-I might be changing!

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Well, we all might be!

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-Can I take the bottles out?

-Please do.

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Has Phil found unexpected treasure?

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So is this an old one, or a brand new one?

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That was bought a couple of years ago from a lady called Heather,

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who has a vintage shop here in the area.

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-I think that's a fun thing.

-Yes, it is.

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Someone's taken a whiskey box, attached a handle, and hey presto!

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-That's quite a clever idea, I think.

-Yes, it is.

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It's a trick, isn't it? It's worked. That's just what it is.

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But I think it's fun.

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What you need to look at is who's going to buy it at the auction.

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-There's going to be a few drinkers there.

-A few?!

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-Well, there's going to be us, for a start!

-Absolutely right.

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-But it's going to go to another pub, isn't it?

-Yeah. Yeah.

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I'd have that at home.

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But there's only room for six bottles of booze in it.

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We're going to be really mean here,

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but if that goes for auction, I think that'll make between 15 and 30 quid.

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Which means we've got to try and buy it for between five and ten pounds. Is that any good?

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-He's crying!

-I would be crying!

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I would be crying, I would. Realistically, we would...

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£20.

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-Do you like it?

-Split the difference. 15 quid.

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£15.

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Sold for £15. And their slow and steady strategy bags them the first deal of the Road Trip.

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Well done, chaps.

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That tortoise and hare have gone rushing off into there.

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We can enjoy our drink, can't we?

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Is a round of drinks cheaper than the basket?

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-I'll have to buy you one as well, now!

-Good point!

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Strictly orange juice, boys. You're driving!

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Next door, Joanie has been left to languish on the couch

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as Peter is summoned.

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-Can we borrow you for a minute?

-Yes, right.

-Thank you.

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How long has this been in your premises, I wonder?

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It's been here a long time, hasn't it?

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The wallpaper was faded around it!

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Oh, stop it!

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Luckily, we can't afford wallpaper, because of people like you!

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It's got a bit of something about it, hasn't it?

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She looks dead!

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-She's just resting!

-No, we weren't seeking a fiver!

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That's just as well!

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Are we talking here, or are we actually negotiating?

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I'm not sure at the moment!

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I think if we could get it for 20, we'd be in some kind of business. Do you?

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That was exactly the level. And we haven't pre-planned that, either.

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It's a classic pincer movement.

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I'll just confer. Won't be a minute.

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So it's 38. Right.

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Peter's consulting with the real boss, his wife, Mary.

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So, 20 quid. I was looking at 38.

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25.

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You've got it at 25.

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I think it might sell for 25.

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22?

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-He's as hard as flint, isn't he?

-He's a tough man.

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A henchman, here.

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Um, 22.50, then.

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22.50. I said 22.50. I think that's a fabulous bargain!

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-Thank you very much.

-It's not even mine!

-Well done.

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There we are. Well done. Well found.

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What do you think? You like? You like?

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Too late for second thoughts, old bean!

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With Joanie in the bag, the boys are in a buying mood.

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Not coming back for your brackets?

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Oh, the Victorian brackets.

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Those brackets, I think, are very good at that price.

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They're interesting.

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49 quid the lot.

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He'll probably do... They're not mine. He'll probably do them for...

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I should imagine you'd get them for about 35.

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I think with the damage to them, we could get that price tidied up a little further.

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I can ring him up and ask him.

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Good. Let's just wait and see what we get back on the phone here.

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Seems Simon's definitely getting the hang of this!

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Time for Peter to call the dealer.

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Alan, I've got Simon Williams and James Lewis here,

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looking at your cast iron brackets.

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-What were you...

-We wanted to offer 15 for the two.

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-Or 25 for the lot.

-25 for the lot or 15 the two.

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-The good ones. Is that about right, do you think?

-Yes.

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-So no joy on that.

-How about 35, then? What do you think?

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They're taking up a lot of space here.

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Exactly. You're doing them a favour!

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You're going to do that?

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You're on, then? OK.

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35.

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-We are done.

-Go on.

-Good. Thank you.

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Wow! A nail-biting end, and a sterling ovation for our leading man.

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-Great! Well done!

-I've had a fantastic hour!

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So that's a 20th-century pastel for £22.50,

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and four cast iron brackets for £35.

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£57.50, altogether.

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There's 60.

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-58. £60.

-Lovely. Thank you very much.

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-Good doing business with you.

-Pleasure.

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Time to hit the road. No sign of Team Duncan.

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The opposition gets the pick of the cars.

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Which one will they choose, I wonder?

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I'm having the best day!

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It is lovely.

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-Wonderful.

-England with a blue sky. Open-top car.

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E-type, you, and the good thing is, we've got cameras turning and I don't have to learn any lines!

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One thing about antiques, I absolutely love them.

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But if they're rubbish antiques, I don't like them.

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If they're very good antiques, I get worried about the grandchildren knocking them over or breaking them.

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-So they're a kind of two-edged sword!

-They are.

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Simon isn't the only one reflecting on the joys of the antiques trade.

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Duncan is reminiscing about his time on Victoria Wood's masterpiece, Acorn Antiques.

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'We had a great time doing that.'

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'We didn't know how funny it was'

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when we first started doing it.

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You look at one of Victoria Wood's scripts,

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but we didn't know that the back cloth was swinging from side to side

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or half of what was going on.

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She has a vision like nobody's ever seen.

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Hang on. Looks like Phil is having a visionary moment of his own!

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Look at all that in there!

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What's the old dog up to?

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There's all sorts of axles, and all sorts.

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Yes. It's resting in peace, actually.

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-Guard dogs and all sorts of things!

-I don't want to buy a guard dog, but is there anything else?

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Oh, dear!

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Looks like the old remains of a trailer over there.

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I think we need to look at places like this.

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Well, we're certainly looking at it! Onward down the road.

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Onwards, indeed.

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Meanwhile, Simon and James are forging on ten miles to Gosfield,

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and the talk turns to this acting lark.

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Have you always been acting? Or is it in later life, or..?

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No. When I was a kid, my father was an actor.

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He took me to see My Fair Lady with Stanley Holloway.

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Stanley Holloway took me by the hand, took me out onto the stage of the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane

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and there was a great big empty auditorium. And he said, "What do you think of that?"

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And I said... Oh, I just knew then that these were the buildings

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I wanted to be in all my life. I love them!

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Next stop is on the outskirts of Gosfield,

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said to be where geese were resting on their march from Norwich to the markets of London.

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Fantastic!

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Simon and James have big boots to fill.

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I was guest of honour at the Gosfield Shopping Village opening ceremony

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back in 2006.

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The village has two main barns,

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housing items from some 130 dealers. Wow!

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And keeping an eye on proceedings is Betha. She's Polish, by the way.

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SPEAKS POLISH

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SHE CORRECTS HIM

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Well done! Well done!

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I didn't know you nearly spoke Polish, James!

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Good tactic, though. Get her on your side.

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Woo-hoo-hoo!

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Guess!

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-65.

-295!

-What?!

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-Yes.

-Oh, that's incredible.

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I can carry my own luggage, sir!

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Yes!

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Talk me through these.

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They have a crown on the back, hallmarked Sheffield.

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A lion, which means it's English silver.

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And an S. From about 1900, 1910.

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-A set of six of those are worth 30 to £40.

-Yes.

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Ah, a wry smile. But that's half the ticket price.

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-We'd have to get half price to get our money back, I think.

-I think we would.

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Moving to the next barn, they now have 12 shop units and an art gallery to peruse.

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Good tactics to split up. Cover more ground, that way.

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So many things to feast the eye on.

0:17:110:17:13

James has sniffed out something close to his heart.

0:17:140:17:17

A snuff box. This one dates to 1730.

0:17:170:17:20

It's mother-of-pearl in tortoise shell.

0:17:200:17:24

Snuff used to be so popular

0:17:240:17:26

that George III's wife, Queen Charlotte,

0:17:260:17:28

dedicated a whole room to it

0:17:280:17:30

and was known as "Snuffy Charlotte"!

0:17:300:17:32

I think that's a possibility.

0:17:320:17:35

-Shall I move this ticket?

-OK.

0:17:350:17:38

And he's not finished yet.

0:17:380:17:39

He's going box mad.

0:17:390:17:42

It's unusual because of its shape, more than anything.

0:17:430:17:46

-What is it made of?

-Battersea enamel.

-Battersea enamel?

-Yeah.

0:17:460:17:50

Battersea enamel was a factory which used a transfer printing process

0:17:500:17:54

back in the 1750s.

0:17:540:17:56

That's a terribly special green.

0:17:560:17:58

It's, um, about 1820.

0:18:000:18:02

They often had a mirror in the top.

0:18:020:18:05

And it was when you would have a spot or blemish on your skin

0:18:050:18:08

and you would cover it with a beauty spot.

0:18:080:18:10

And then within ten or 15 years, it became fashionable to have the beauty spot anyway.

0:18:100:18:16

Yes.

0:18:160:18:17

So you would literally lick, tap, and with the mirror, apply.

0:18:170:18:23

Lovely.

0:18:230:18:24

So with two boxes in hand, can they broker a deal with Betha?

0:18:240:18:27

Over to you, Simon!

0:18:270:18:29

-If we were to propose a job lot of this and the...

-And that.

-..that.

0:18:290:18:36

-Are they 35 each?

-35 each, yes.

-So that's 70.

0:18:360:18:39

£70 altogether.

0:18:390:18:40

-I'd like to make an offer of £60 for the pair.

-OK.

0:18:410:18:45

You are tough!

0:18:450:18:48

But I don't see how else we can pull it off.

0:18:480:18:52

-Would you go with that?

-I think special for both of you. You are so nice!

0:18:520:18:55

It pays to have a class act on your team! Good work, old fruit.

0:18:570:19:00

Just really makes it right.

0:19:000:19:02

Lovely. Thank you. Gives us a chance.

0:19:020:19:05

So, that's £60 for an enamel patch box and a snuff box.

0:19:050:19:09

Just the thing James collects.

0:19:090:19:12

If it had been my money for my collection, I'd have happily paid ticket price for that. It's lovely.

0:19:120:19:16

There you are. If only we could get that message to the auctioneer!

0:19:160:19:19

-Yeah.

-I wonder what Preston and Philip are getting up to?

0:19:190:19:24

-Probably been in the pub all day!

-Probably have!

0:19:240:19:26

That's slanderous! In fact, Duncan and Phil have left Finchingfield

0:19:260:19:31

and driven the 15 miles east to Sudbury.

0:19:310:19:34

They're visiting a place where an old aged tradition thrives

0:19:340:19:37

and without which, many of Britain's historic buildings simply wouldn't survive.

0:19:370:19:42

-Am I looking at Peter?

-You are, indeed. Nice to meet you. Lovely day.

-And you.

0:19:420:19:47

Nice to meet you.

0:19:470:19:49

Peter Minter's family business is one of the country's foremost brick makers

0:19:490:19:53

and produces over 300,000 a year, using age-old techniques.

0:19:530:19:57

The bricks are used to renovate our most important buildings,

0:19:570:20:00

like Hampton Court Palace.

0:20:000:20:02

-This is the end product of all this? All this huge concern?

-Yes.

0:20:020:20:07

"Mark Nicholson, Victoria Cottage, Halstead", a local town.

0:20:070:20:10

But it could be anywhere. These are going to Hampton Court. So there's a variety.

0:20:100:20:14

They're all different. I never knew there were so many different bricks.

0:20:140:20:18

In fact, as every historic building is unique,

0:20:180:20:20

there are more than 25,000 different types.

0:20:200:20:23

Most of them are moulded. Ordinary bricks are moulded, and most of the specials are moulded.

0:20:230:20:27

It depends entirely on where they're going as to the specification,

0:20:270:20:30

the clay we blend for it and how we do it.

0:20:300:20:33

Can you take us through how you start? Right from the beginning?

0:20:330:20:38

Yes. Go to the pit. That's where it all starts with the geology and the clay.

0:20:380:20:41

We'll see that and you'll understand the process as it evolves from there.

0:20:410:20:44

I'm looking forward to this.

0:20:440:20:46

The Minters have been on-site since 1936,

0:20:460:20:49

but the tile kiln dates back to 1450.

0:20:490:20:52

The industry is even older.

0:20:520:20:55

The whole of the brick industry in this area goes back to Roman times

0:20:550:21:00

and into the Saxon period as well.

0:21:000:21:01

It almost seems continuous.

0:21:010:21:03

This is the pit, where we actually dig the clay.

0:21:030:21:06

Crikey Moses!

0:21:070:21:09

I can see there's a hole there.

0:21:100:21:13

You don't put explosives in there?

0:21:130:21:16

No, we dig it all in the autumn.

0:21:160:21:19

And we dig when it's the best conditions down here

0:21:190:21:23

and then we actually stockpile it and use it the following year.

0:21:230:21:28

And what you're looking at is the estuary, from the Thames estuary,

0:21:280:21:32

about 40 million years ago.

0:21:320:21:34

-This was water?

-Water. 40 million years ago.

0:21:340:21:37

The clay is the source of the material, and the key to the whole thing.

0:21:370:21:41

Turning that 40-million-year-old clay into bricks like these

0:21:410:21:45

starts back in the workshop.

0:21:450:21:47

-What's that goo?

-That's the clay.

0:21:470:21:51

That's the clay. We were down in the pit.

0:21:510:21:53

It's been processed through there with just water added

0:21:530:21:56

and it comes out as a paste like that.

0:21:560:21:58

Kenny here has brick making in the blood.

0:21:590:22:02

It's important to our heritage buildings that these skills are passed down.

0:22:020:22:06

His father works here. He makes the moulds.

0:22:060:22:09

-Right.

-And his mother worked here.

0:22:090:22:13

It's all part of the family.

0:22:130:22:14

It's all family, isn't it?

0:22:140:22:16

This method he's using, would it have been the same 100 years ago?

0:22:160:22:21

Yes. This building was here then.

0:22:210:22:24

This technique would have been used in this area,

0:22:240:22:26

it's called stock moulding because the block underneath is known as the stock.

0:22:260:22:29

-Right.

-The frame goes over it.

0:22:290:22:31

You can raise and lower your frame to get different thicknesses of the same size.

0:22:310:22:35

We've got over 150 different frame sizes.

0:22:350:22:39

There are about 25,000 different-sized bricks you could make

0:22:390:22:42

if you wanted to compute it all.

0:22:420:22:44

Fascinating.

0:22:440:22:45

-Can I have a go?

-You can certainly have a go.

-Can I?

-We'll dress you properly.

0:22:450:22:49

Good idea. This could get messy!

0:22:490:22:51

-Kenny, will you show me how to do it?

-Yeah, sure.

0:22:510:22:54

A bit of sand in there. Get your hand round in the middle.

0:22:540:22:57

So far, so good.

0:22:570:22:59

-And then in there?

-Yeah.

0:22:590:23:01

Like that?

0:23:030:23:04

Oh.

0:23:040:23:06

That settles out.

0:23:060:23:07

-Is that right?

-Now you want to roll it as you...

0:23:070:23:10

-Roll it over.

-It's pouring out, Kenny!

0:23:100:23:13

Steady!

0:23:130:23:14

-Bit of a shake.

-Yeah.

-Bit of a bang.

0:23:140:23:17

CLATTERS TO FLOOR

0:23:180:23:20

That's called dropping a brick!

0:23:200:23:21

-How was that?

-To be honest, not very good!

0:23:210:23:25

I didn't mean that honest!

0:23:250:23:27

Don't hold back, Kenny. You tell him, son! Let him have it.

0:23:270:23:30

Oh, dear.

0:23:300:23:32

It just makes you look good, this, doesn't it?

0:23:320:23:34

Fabulous.

0:23:350:23:36

Maybe stick to acting, then, Duncan.

0:23:360:23:37

I think we should move on.

0:23:370:23:39

Good idea! But Phil's determined not to leave the brickyard empty-handed

0:23:390:23:43

and he's spotted a decorative finial.

0:23:430:23:45

This looks to me like it's what, 1860, 1870?

0:23:450:23:49

It was copied originally from a much earlier 16th-century building.

0:23:490:23:53

-So this is from 1870?

-It was down on the Thames somewhere. We did a series of pinnacles.

0:23:530:24:00

Then we were asked to make some more up. So that's copying something from the 16th century.

0:24:000:24:05

-So you made these?

-Yes, we made those.

0:24:050:24:07

Exactly, Phil. So unless Peter's ageing well, it's not 150 years old.

0:24:070:24:11

-Is it for sale?

-I suppose anything's for sale, yes.

0:24:110:24:15

Here we go!

0:24:150:24:16

Now, in auction that's going to make 40 to 60. That sort of region.

0:24:170:24:22

Which means we've got to try and buy it for a bit less than that.

0:24:220:24:25

If we were selling them per item, each of those pieces...

0:24:250:24:28

-Oh, no, we don't want to do that.

-Not that?

-We want to buy the whole lot, Peter,

0:24:280:24:32

-and we want to give you...

-40 or 50 quid.

0:24:320:24:34

-No. 30 quid.

-30 quid?!

0:24:340:24:36

-20 or 30 quid.

-20 or 30?

-I didn't think you'd like to hear the 20 bit!

0:24:360:24:39

-No, I don't like 20 quid.

-But the 30 quid might do, might it?

0:24:390:24:42

30 quid? Well, it's... Just as it's you. Just because it's you.

0:24:420:24:46

Oh, get in there! Get in there!

0:24:460:24:48

Brilliant, Peter!

0:24:480:24:50

Crikey. So he's either bagged a bargain or...

0:24:500:24:54

We just bought a pile of bricks for 30 quid!

0:24:540:24:56

-Come on.

-Shall we get on?

0:24:590:25:01

We'll go and open the boot.

0:25:010:25:04

So, the end of an unconventional first day.

0:25:040:25:07

Duncan and Phil have stuck to their plan of taking things at a steady pace.

0:25:070:25:12

And Simon and James have been haring ahead doing deals left, right and centre.

0:25:120:25:16

No sign yet who's going to win this race!

0:25:160:25:19

So, nighty-night, boys!

0:25:190:25:21

It's the dawn of a new day.

0:25:240:25:26

Will Phil finally take Duncan to an antiques shop?

0:25:260:25:29

And can Simon keep schmoozing those deals?

0:25:290:25:32

He's already feeling wickedly competitive

0:25:320:25:35

and he's barely had breakfast.

0:25:350:25:37

I'm quietly confident. We've still got money to burn today.

0:25:370:25:40

We bought some stuff yesterday, masterpieces of art,

0:25:400:25:44

artefacts, oh yes.

0:25:440:25:45

-Art?

-I'm not saying any more.

0:25:450:25:49

No, best not to.

0:25:490:25:50

My goal is just to keep away from antiques shops. That's the way forward.

0:25:510:25:55

-I know what you've done.

-What?

0:25:570:25:59

You've picked something up off the side of the road, knowing you!

0:25:590:26:02

Well, you're not too far wrong.

0:26:020:26:05

So far, Simon and James have spent £117.50 on four items.

0:26:050:26:10

The pastel painting, four cast iron brackets,

0:26:100:26:13

the mother-of-pearl snuff box and the enamel patch box.

0:26:130:26:17

Duncan and Phil, however, have forked out a miserly £45 on two items.

0:26:170:26:20

A wooden box and a pile of bricks!

0:26:200:26:22

So, time for out teams to turn their chariots south-east to Colchester,

0:26:240:26:27

for the next part of this Road Trip.

0:26:270:26:29

And there's fighting talk in the air!

0:26:290:26:32

-Right, here we are, Day Two.

-Morning, girls!

0:26:320:26:35

-Morning!

-How are you?

0:26:350:26:37

It's a fine day.

0:26:370:26:39

Good, so you're going to continue your losing streak, basically, the way the strategy's going.

0:26:390:26:45

Straight in for the kill!

0:26:450:26:46

We're going to go... We've got money to spend and we're going to spend it more subtly than yesterday.

0:26:460:26:52

Like a good drama, Simon, we're accelerating towards a brilliant conclusion.

0:26:520:26:58

No over-acting, thank you!

0:26:580:27:00

In the first century AD,

0:27:010:27:03

the Romans established a legionary fortress in Colchester

0:27:030:27:08

and anointed the town as the provincial capital of Britain.

0:27:080:27:11

There's something about the way they spell "bitz", B-I-T-Z, that worries me here!

0:27:110:27:16

Right. Clever use of the language!

0:27:160:27:19

That's not the half of it!

0:27:190:27:21

-What's your name?

-Bob.

-Hi, Bob.

0:27:210:27:22

-Oh, "bitz and bobs"!

-Bitz and Bob's.

0:27:220:27:24

Bob Kavanagh and his wife have owned this shop for seven years.

0:27:270:27:31

Their collection covers everything, from Victorian jewellery to stuffed warthogs!

0:27:310:27:36

-We've got work to do here.

-Looking promising.

-Good.

0:27:370:27:40

If you want to catch a big fish, look at that!

0:27:400:27:44

We could get Preston on that!

0:27:440:27:46

There's Pierce Brosnan there. Get a shot of me.

0:27:470:27:51

A striking resemblance!

0:27:510:27:52

You're quite Bond-like, actually!

0:27:540:27:56

It's amazing how the role escaped me.

0:27:560:27:58

He's a bit of a "bore"!

0:27:580:28:00

Aw!

0:28:000:28:02

James has spotted something from his home county of Derbyshire.

0:28:020:28:06

TAPS VASE

0:28:060:28:08

It's pastelware, 1930s.

0:28:080:28:11

And made by Denby in Derbyshire.

0:28:130:28:15

-Is it hand-painted?

-Mm. Hand-moulded. It's a moulded piece.

0:28:150:28:20

But they're hand-decorated.

0:28:200:28:22

It's part of their range called Danesby Ware.

0:28:220:28:26

What will that fetch?

0:28:280:28:30

What will that make us?

0:28:300:28:32

It should make 30 to 35 quid.

0:28:320:28:34

That would be a decent profit. Ticket price is a tenner.

0:28:340:28:38

Oh, no! Not another brick!

0:28:390:28:42

If only James knew!

0:28:430:28:45

Even Philip Serrell would find that interesting!

0:28:450:28:48

James, you have no idea!

0:28:480:28:50

It's a royal wedding brick!

0:28:500:28:52

Commemorating the union of Charles and Diana,

0:28:520:28:55

made by the London Brick Company in 1981.

0:28:550:28:58

We could sell that to Phil!

0:28:590:29:01

No need, James. He's got that one covered!

0:29:010:29:04

Mahjong set.

0:29:040:29:06

Really?

0:29:060:29:07

-1920s.

-Yes?

0:29:070:29:09

A complete set. If you lift it out, I'll show you.

0:29:090:29:12

Although it looks like dominoes,

0:29:120:29:14

this ancient Chinese game of skill and strategy is more closely related to rummy.

0:29:140:29:18

I think that would make about 75, 80 quid at auction.

0:29:180:29:21

This will make about 195 at auction.

0:29:210:29:24

James is not convinced.

0:29:240:29:27

Anything else, Bob?

0:29:270:29:29

What about the Royal Worcester coffee set? That will sell quite well.

0:29:290:29:34

Tell me about this.

0:29:350:29:37

It's Royal Worcester, who were one of the best porcelain manufacturers in England.

0:29:370:29:44

If they'd been painted with fruit,

0:29:440:29:46

then they'd be £100, £150 a cup and saucer.

0:29:460:29:50

But the plain powder blue is very difficult to sell at the moment.

0:29:500:29:55

So...

0:29:550:29:56

-But still very pretty.

-It is pretty.

0:29:560:29:59

What's the best on the mahjong set?

0:29:590:30:02

95.

0:30:030:30:05

-Hmm.

-What do you want to pay for it?

0:30:050:30:07

-80.

-You've got a deal.

0:30:070:30:09

Before you shake hands...

0:30:090:30:11

He bit his hand off! Quick, make the most of it!

0:30:110:30:14

-He's the expert.

-Will you throw that in with it?

0:30:140:30:16

-Yes.

-Shake the man's hand. You've done a deal.

0:30:160:30:19

That's a 1930s English Denby vase and a Chinese mahjong set for £80.

0:30:200:30:25

Well done, boys.

0:30:250:30:27

Exit stage right.

0:30:270:30:29

Entering stage left are Duncan and Phil,

0:30:290:30:31

who are heading ten miles south to Britain's most easterly inhabited island

0:30:310:30:35

and its small town, West Mersea.

0:30:350:30:38

This is really nice. I'm glad we came down here.

0:30:380:30:41

-I've never even heard of Mersea!

-I haven't, either.

0:30:420:30:45

Since Roman times, it's been famous for oysters.

0:30:450:30:48

So can our pair find a magic pearl to bring them riches at auction?

0:30:480:30:52

But let's not get ahead of ourselves.

0:30:520:30:54

First things first.

0:30:540:30:56

Work out where you are!

0:30:560:30:58

Is it "Mer-sey" or Mersea?

0:30:580:31:00

They call it Mersea.

0:31:000:31:02

Mersea. And is that an island, do you think?

0:31:020:31:04

Oh, crikey. Mersea Island, chaps! The clue's in the name!

0:31:040:31:08

This is lovely.

0:31:080:31:10

Wonders will never cease.

0:31:100:31:12

Duncan and Phil are finally heading to an antiques shop.

0:31:120:31:15

One with a nautical feel.

0:31:150:31:17

Why? Because Phil is a man with a plan.

0:31:170:31:20

Those are quite nice, look.

0:31:200:31:22

We've got to think here, haven't we?

0:31:220:31:25

-We're going to Torquay.

-Yeah.

-Which is on the coast.

-Yeah.

0:31:250:31:28

-Unless somebody's moved it.

-Something nautical.

0:31:280:31:30

Sounds like a winner.

0:31:300:31:32

You know, I think we might have set ourselves too big a task here

0:31:410:31:44

by trying to buy stupid things.

0:31:440:31:46

We've got our eyes shut to shops like this, really.

0:31:460:31:49

Really, Phil?

0:31:490:31:51

-I like that.

-What about that, yeah?

0:31:510:31:53

These bronze fittings were screwed to ships' decks next to the cleats

0:31:530:31:58

around which the mooring ropes were tied.

0:31:580:32:00

-They're for ropes on a ship.

-Yeah.

0:32:000:32:02

-And there's the rope.

-Yeah.

0:32:020:32:04

So as a pair, that's a possibility.

0:32:040:32:07

30 quid apiece. We'd need to have a tickle with the girls on price.

0:32:070:32:11

-30 quid a pair, isn't it?

-Get out of here. It's less than that!

0:32:110:32:15

Time to turn the charm on Lynne and Heather,

0:32:150:32:17

with an offer that will hopefully be music to their ears.

0:32:170:32:20

-Is it for sale?

-It is for sale.

0:32:220:32:23

What made you choose that?

0:32:230:32:26

I just like the look of it.

0:32:260:32:28

Hold on. I thought the plan was to go nautical?

0:32:280:32:30

Do you know what? I wouldn't have a clue what that was worth.

0:32:300:32:33

Give us a tune, Duncan.

0:32:340:32:36

# When I'm cleaning windows! #

0:32:360:32:38

Oh, dawdy.

0:32:390:32:41

Can I have a look at the bows, please?

0:32:410:32:43

Oh, dear. Phil's on the fiddle!

0:32:430:32:45

What are you learning now?

0:32:450:32:47

Very often, you can find a lousy violin

0:32:470:32:51

that might be worth, I don't know, 30 quid.

0:32:510:32:55

And everybody forgets the bow.

0:32:550:32:57

-And the bow could be worth a lot more than the fiddle.

-Wow.

0:32:570:33:01

A lot more than the fiddle. But this is fairly modern.

0:33:010:33:04

-There's a Tommy Cooper joke about that, you know.

-What's that?

0:33:040:33:09

I was left a Rembrandt and a Stradivarius.

0:33:090:33:14

Unfortunately, Rembrandt was a terrible violinist,

0:33:140:33:19

and Stradivarius could never paint!

0:33:190:33:23

Seems the musical instruments haven't struck the right note.

0:33:240:33:27

Time to re-group.

0:33:270:33:29

The only thing I think we might have a chance for

0:33:310:33:34

is those ships' rope tie things.

0:33:340:33:38

But I think we've got to be quite firm in our price.

0:33:380:33:41

Yeah, let's be firm.

0:33:410:33:43

So, with a ticket price of £30, can the boys tie up a bargain?

0:33:430:33:47

I really, really like them. I do like them.

0:33:480:33:50

And it's just down on price.

0:33:500:33:52

Where I'm coming from, I think if you put them into auction,

0:33:520:33:56

you'd perhaps estimate them at, I don't know, 30 to 40 quid.

0:33:560:34:00

25, 45, that sort of area.

0:34:000:34:03

If we bought them for 20 quid the two,

0:34:030:34:06

then if they sell for 30 quid, they're going to make £5 for us.

0:34:060:34:10

But I'd understand if you say no.

0:34:100:34:12

I think there's more in it for you.

0:34:120:34:14

25.

0:34:140:34:15

I honestly think 20 is going to be our best shot. Honestly.

0:34:150:34:20

-All right.

-Sure? Thank you.

0:34:200:34:21

The old sea dog has done it again!

0:34:210:34:23

Thank you very much indeed.

0:34:230:34:26

Thanks ever so much, girls.

0:34:260:34:29

And the deal is sealed with a kiss. How nice!

0:34:290:34:31

Back in Colchester, Simon and James are all spent up.

0:34:310:34:35

But their hunt for antiques isn't over.

0:34:350:34:37

They've come to the home of Gerald Gurney, one of the world's foremost collectors of sporting memorabilia.

0:34:370:34:42

-There we are.

-Mr Gurney, sir, how nice to meet you!

0:34:430:34:46

There we are.

0:34:460:34:47

-I love your doves.

-The doves are wonderful.

0:34:470:34:50

As a former tennis coach,

0:34:520:34:53

it's Gerald's love of racquet sports in particular

0:34:530:34:56

that has inspired this collection,

0:34:560:34:58

built up over 60 years.

0:34:580:35:00

And he has some choice items.

0:35:000:35:03

This is the box.

0:35:030:35:05

-Oh, yes.

-From 1875.

0:35:050:35:08

-Oh, look at that.

-Golly!

0:35:080:35:10

This is one of the original racquets.

0:35:100:35:12

I bought this for £25 on Newmarket racecourse.

0:35:140:35:19

One of these racquets, I was there at Christie's,

0:35:190:35:22

-and it sold for £18,500.

-Golly!

0:35:220:35:27

What have you got there?

0:35:270:35:29

-This is the...

-Oh, the net... The net marker.

0:35:290:35:33

Very elegant thing, isn't it?

0:35:330:35:34

Yes. And look at the scene on the top.

0:35:340:35:36

Oh, gosh, yes.

0:35:360:35:38

He's Victorian, and there he is in his cap.

0:35:380:35:41

-This is a reproduction one, though, isn't it?

-No.

0:35:410:35:44

-Are you sure?

-Yes!

-You wouldn't take a tenner for it, then?

0:35:440:35:47

It was worth a go!

0:35:470:35:48

Ha! Cheeky! In fact, it's worth a lot more.

0:35:480:35:51

There are thought to be just two others in the world.

0:35:510:35:54

This net measurer is the only one remaining at the original net height of four foot 11 inches,

0:35:540:36:00

the other two having been cut down to today's net height of three feet,

0:36:000:36:03

making this one unique.

0:36:030:36:05

-Gosh!

-Brilliant.

0:36:050:36:07

I've got to say - I've been pretending I haven't seen it for the last ten minutes!

0:36:070:36:13

-Yes.

-That, that is fantastic!

0:36:130:36:16

It looks like the Ladies' Wimbledon trophy,

0:36:160:36:19

but this particular Rosewater dish has never seen Centre Court.

0:36:190:36:22

A number of them were made in the 1860s

0:36:220:36:24

but only one became the iconic silver trophy we see today.

0:36:240:36:27

And you can tell me. Is this silver on brass, or silver on copper?

0:36:310:36:36

Elkington and Co invented this technique of electroplating

0:36:360:36:42

in the 1850s.

0:36:420:36:44

They have a copper base

0:36:440:36:48

and they attach a current where the silver attracts to the copper.

0:36:480:36:53

This is an example of that,

0:36:530:36:56

the Venus Rosewater.

0:36:560:36:57

And how did Gerald come by this version of the trophy?

0:36:570:37:00

Well, it was pure luck.

0:37:000:37:02

Some years ago, somewhere round Oxford Street, lots of antiques places,

0:37:020:37:06

and I went in and I saw this.

0:37:060:37:10

And it was £60.

0:37:100:37:14

I then said to the dealer, "Have you got any more tennis items?"

0:37:140:37:18

"Tennis?", he said, "What's it got to do with tennis?"

0:37:180:37:21

-You got lucky that day!

-Wonderful.

0:37:230:37:26

Gerald's collection also includes contributions from some unlikely sources.

0:37:260:37:31

You may have heard of the dispute relating to Boris Johnson and the game of Whiff-Waff.

0:37:310:37:37

Just remind us about the dispute.

0:37:370:37:39

In Beijing, he made the statement very firmly

0:37:390:37:43

that the game of table tennis was first called Whiff-Waff.

0:37:430:37:50

-Right.

-And he got it wrong!

0:37:500:37:53

Indeed. Renowned sports manufacturer Jake

0:37:530:37:56

actually released ping-pong a full nine years before Slazenger invented Whiff-Waff.

0:37:560:38:01

Gerald even wrote to Boris to correct him.

0:38:010:38:04

Boris returned the volley.

0:38:040:38:06

"Dear Mr Gurney,

0:38:060:38:08

"Thank you so much for your letter and comments about ping-pong/Whiff-Waff.

0:38:080:38:13

"I know I am right.

0:38:130:38:15

"Best wishes. Yours sincerely, Boris Johnson, Mayor of London."

0:38:160:38:21

How wonderful! That's typical! But he's not right.

0:38:210:38:24

He is not right. He is not right by nine or ten years.

0:38:240:38:29

This is one of Gerald's prize possessions.

0:38:310:38:34

It used to belong to Fred Perry

0:38:340:38:35

and there's an unusual story attached to it.

0:38:350:38:38

-You know that Fred Perry was champion at Wimbledon.

-Yep.

0:38:380:38:44

You might not know that he was world champion at table tennis.

0:38:440:38:47

-Was he?

-He was, indeed.

0:38:470:38:50

He was one of those annoying characters that was good at everything!

0:38:500:38:53

Budapest 1920.

0:38:530:38:55

Is this the actual trophy that he won?

0:38:550:38:57

This is the actual trophy that he won.

0:38:570:38:59

Fred Perry's trophy!

0:38:590:39:01

As it's a money-based programme,

0:39:010:39:03

what do you think it would be worth today?

0:39:030:39:05

I'm not... That's for you.

0:39:050:39:07

Oh, no idea!

0:39:070:39:10

This is my most recent find at a boot fair.

0:39:100:39:13

It's a ball cleaner.

0:39:130:39:15

-It says 1897 at the top there.

-Shall we give it a go?

0:39:150:39:18

Oh, dear.

0:39:180:39:19

-Do we push?

-I think you have to press it, actually.

0:39:210:39:23

Careful, James. Even the balls are antiques.

0:39:260:39:28

-It's gone now.

-Where's it gone?

0:39:290:39:31

You've chewed it up into fragments!

0:39:310:39:33

Don't tell me that was Fred Perry's ball!

0:39:330:39:36

It's an amazing collection, and I have to say I've learned a lot.

0:39:380:39:41

And I just wish that Boris Johnson might learn a lot, as well!

0:39:410:39:43

If you're watching, learn, Boris!

0:39:430:39:46

Game, set and match to Gerald.

0:39:480:39:50

Wonderful!

0:39:500:39:52

Meanwhile, Team Duncan have left Mersea Island

0:39:520:39:56

and are heading back to Colchester for more shopping.

0:39:560:39:58

But, back to form, it's not an antiques shop.

0:39:580:40:01

Duncan is certainly having an unusual Road Trip.

0:40:010:40:04

This looks really good, doesn't it?

0:40:040:40:06

Woo-hoo-hoo!

0:40:060:40:08

It's Blackheath Reclamation,

0:40:100:40:11

run by Terry Att.

0:40:110:40:13

Hi, Terry. Duncan.

0:40:130:40:15

I know exactly what we want to buy,

0:40:150:40:17

which is a profit. I don't care what it is, I want to buy a profit.

0:40:170:40:21

Luckily, Terry sells everything here but the kitchen sink!

0:40:210:40:25

What about those?

0:40:260:40:27

OK, everything!

0:40:270:40:29

What are they made of?

0:40:290:40:30

This is Carrara marble from Italy,

0:40:310:40:34

used to make such artistic wonders as Michelangelo's David,

0:40:340:40:38

or in this case basins with no plug holes!

0:40:380:40:40

What's the absolute death on these?

0:40:400:40:41

The pair, 90.

0:40:410:40:43

No. Let's go and have a look round.

0:40:430:40:45

Terry's been in the trade for almost 20 years.

0:40:470:40:49

This family-run business started in demolition in 1989,

0:40:490:40:53

but Terry's love of reclamation has seen the business move into architectural salvage

0:40:530:40:57

with a speciality for Tudor items.

0:40:570:40:59

-You wouldn't believe what we've bought! I promise you.

-No.

0:40:590:41:03

-He's off the wall!

-I've got a warped mind!

0:41:030:41:06

You said it, Phil, not me!

0:41:060:41:08

I don't know what you think. I'm thinking one of those sinks.

0:41:100:41:13

-One of those sinks?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:41:130:41:15

-The marble ones?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:41:170:41:18

Well, there's no doubt who's in charge here.

0:41:180:41:20

So, how's it going with Phil, Duncan? Go on, be honest!

0:41:200:41:24

'I think he's totally barmy!'

0:41:240:41:27

And he's picking up things. My sympathies are with the people at the auction,

0:41:270:41:32

getting these things out!

0:41:320:41:34

What's the absolute finito on those?

0:41:340:41:36

What have we got them at? 290.

0:41:360:41:38

'He has that eye that hones in on things.'

0:41:380:41:41

And I'm glad he's here!

0:41:410:41:44

What do you reckon's the best bet? One of those baths or the sink?

0:41:440:41:48

The sinks.

0:41:480:41:50

I know you'll make money on them.

0:41:500:41:51

But at £45 for one,

0:41:510:41:53

is there an offer Terry can't refuse?

0:41:530:41:56

How does 30 quid sound?

0:41:560:41:58

Oh, get in, there!

0:41:590:42:01

-Well done, Terry.

-Shake his hand as well.

0:42:010:42:03

Well, at £30, let's hope the people of Torquay want a sink without a hole!

0:42:030:42:07

Terry, we need something else.

0:42:070:42:09

Uh-oh! Now, what have they spotted?

0:42:090:42:12

-I love that.

-Do you?

-Yeah.

-This is lunacy, isn't it?

0:42:120:42:15

Seems they just can't escape the pub!

0:42:150:42:17

I love that.

0:42:190:42:21

It's plastic. It's not wood.

0:42:210:42:23

-It's not wood. It's unusual...

-Is it really?

-All plastic.

0:42:230:42:27

Who do you know that has got a garden that they'd put that in?

0:42:270:42:30

See, that at auction, it's 50 to 80 quid's worth, isn't it?

0:42:340:42:38

-Mm.

-Which means we've got to try and buy it for under 50 quid.

0:42:380:42:42

Hmm.

0:42:420:42:43

-What do you think that's going to make at auction? Truthfully.

-Exactly what you said.

0:42:440:42:47

No need for Terry to do the hard sell here.

0:42:470:42:50

He's leaving that to Duncan!

0:42:500:42:51

It's there. You don't need to do anything to it.

0:42:510:42:53

The only thing you like about it is it's a pub!

0:42:530:42:56

Yeah, but it's also got something there.

0:42:560:42:58

-You don't have to do anything to it.

-Do not feed me that flannel!

0:42:580:43:02

It has just one interest for you. It's a pub.

0:43:020:43:04

-No!

-Yes!

0:43:040:43:06

Let's go and see what else we can find.

0:43:060:43:09

I feel a bit guilty cos he's let me do all the choosing so far

0:43:100:43:14

and when it all goes horribly wrong, I'm the one that will be in trouble.

0:43:140:43:18

So maybe Phil's going to let Duncan make a decision.

0:43:180:43:21

I like that pub sign.

0:43:230:43:24

You indicated that you could do a deal for us, didn't you?

0:43:260:43:29

On the pub sign.

0:43:290:43:31

What's the best you can do that for?

0:43:310:43:32

-50.

-50 quid.

0:43:320:43:34

-So that means...

-It's a steal for you.

0:43:350:43:37

-Yeah, it is.

-It looks as though it's a bit weathered, as well.

0:43:370:43:40

-You look like that!

-Thank you(!)

0:43:400:43:42

We'll have the Truman sign. We'll have the sign.

0:43:430:43:45

-OK with that?

-Yep.

-I'm happy with that.

0:43:450:43:48

Job done. So that's £30 for the sink

0:43:500:43:52

and £50 for the pub sign.

0:43:520:43:54

With the shopping ending in a full circle.

0:43:540:43:57

So, what started off in a pub

0:43:570:44:00

has finished off with us buying a pub sign!

0:44:000:44:04

-What a lovely story.

-Absolutely right.

0:44:040:44:08

I wonder whether it's... What's the word I'm looking for? Subconscious?

0:44:080:44:13

Yes. Must be.

0:44:130:44:14

What will their rivals make of their subconscious choices?

0:44:140:44:17

Time to show and tell!

0:44:170:44:19

It's been a fantastic treasure hunt, hasn't it?

0:44:190:44:22

But I'm quietly confident that we've got you licked!

0:44:220:44:25

You haven't seen anything yet!

0:44:250:44:26

-I think...

-You can smell it!

0:44:260:44:29

-Shall we start?

-Look at this, eh.

0:44:300:44:32

Curtain up, then. I mean, off.

0:44:320:44:35

How about that, eh?

0:44:350:44:36

Was she in a lot of pain when that was done?

0:44:360:44:39

-Look at this.

-Ah, Mahjong.

0:44:400:44:42

A bit of Denby.

0:44:420:44:44

Snuff box is a beauty.

0:44:440:44:46

I've seen "e-snuff" of those!

0:44:460:44:47

That's "e-snuff" of that!

0:44:480:44:50

I don't think you've done well, but you haven't done badly.

0:44:500:44:53

-I like these.

-They're very you!

-How much are they?

0:44:530:44:57

-They were 35 quid.

-For the four?

-Yeah.

-That's worth the money.

0:44:570:45:01

-Do you want to see how it's done, now?

-Go on, then!

0:45:010:45:03

Brace yourselves!

0:45:030:45:05

What?

0:45:050:45:06

What?!

0:45:060:45:07

Oddly, James seems at a loss for words.

0:45:070:45:10

Have you raided a tip?

0:45:100:45:13

-What?

-You've been to a skip, haven't you?

-What?!

-A skip.

-What?!

0:45:130:45:17

I'm so sad for you.

0:45:170:45:19

I've got to just unwrap this gently.

0:45:190:45:21

Oh!

0:45:210:45:22

What's really funny is I stood there,

0:45:220:45:24

because I'm an expert in this business,

0:45:240:45:27

-and I said, "This is probably about 1870."

-You did.

0:45:270:45:29

-You thought possibly 1865.

-I thought that.

0:45:290:45:32

But I was sure. 1870.

0:45:320:45:34

And then Peter told us he made it six years ago.

0:45:340:45:37

Oh!

0:45:370:45:38

Yes, maybe the less said, the better!

0:45:390:45:41

-Are you ready?

-Look and learn.

0:45:410:45:43

-Please.

-The master.

0:45:430:45:46

-A dead tree?

-No, the master.

0:45:470:45:49

Don't you look at our things like that!

0:45:490:45:50

Not only have they been buying from pubs, they've nicked the sign!

0:45:520:45:56

-That's really rather charming.

-Do you know what the best part is?

0:45:560:45:59

It's all plastic.

0:45:590:46:01

It's not wood at all?

0:46:010:46:02

What was it you said? Go for something big.

0:46:020:46:05

Yeah. We couldn't find anything.

0:46:050:46:07

-We couldn't find anything bigger.

-So you bought a snuff box.

0:46:070:46:10

Ribbing aside, what do they really think?

0:46:100:46:13

That's a piece de resistance.

0:46:130:46:16

-I think that might fly.

-Do you?

0:46:160:46:18

When the auctioneer mentions the sign

0:46:180:46:21

you shout, "It's plastic!"

0:46:210:46:24

-Something subtle like that.

-Nice and subtle and fair play and all.

0:46:240:46:27

How do you think they compare with our stuff?

0:46:270:46:30

I wouldn't swap any of our bits for their bits,

0:46:300:46:32

but that's cos we bought our bits and they bought their bits.

0:46:320:46:34

I'd like to see that at the bottom of my garden.

0:46:340:46:37

-I quite like that and that. The rest you can keep.

-Yeah.

0:46:370:46:40

But I honestly think - this is where I go down in flames - I think we might win this.

0:46:400:46:45

Ooh!

0:46:450:46:47

Well, we're about to find out, Phil.

0:46:470:46:49

Time for our Road Trippers to hit the tarmac again

0:46:490:46:52

and bid farewell to Colchester

0:46:520:46:54

and hello to the English Riviera on the south coast

0:46:540:46:57

for the auction showdown in Torquay.

0:46:570:46:59

So, here we are. We're in Torquay at last!

0:46:590:47:02

The day of reckoning!

0:47:020:47:04

Do you know what, I'm not an excitable person, as you've probably gathered,

0:47:050:47:08

but I've just got a little twittering in my stomach.

0:47:080:47:12

Ooh, that sounds uncomfortable!

0:47:120:47:14

Are you feeling mildly confident, Mr Lewis?

0:47:150:47:18

No!

0:47:180:47:20

-That's good to hear.

-Are you?

0:47:200:47:22

Yeah, no. Confidence is a recipe for disaster in sale rooms.

0:47:220:47:26

Torquay became a fashionable seaside resort in the early 19th century,

0:47:280:47:31

initially with the Navy during the Napoleonic Wars.

0:47:310:47:35

Then with the creme de la creme of Victorian society

0:47:350:47:38

as the town's fame spread.

0:47:380:47:40

-Good morning, gentlemen!

-Good morning!

0:47:400:47:43

-Morning.

-How are you doing?

0:47:440:47:46

-How are you?

-Good to see you, partner.

0:47:460:47:48

How confident are we feeling?

0:47:480:47:51

-I think it's in the bag.

-I'm quietly worried.

-It's in the bag.

0:47:510:47:54

-It's in the bag. Shall we make a move?

-Shall we get in there?

0:47:540:47:57

-I can't wait.

-Are we off?

-Come on, then.

0:47:570:47:59

West of England Auctions is the venue for today's showdown.

0:47:590:48:02

They've been running sales here for over 30 years.

0:48:020:48:05

Warren Hunt is the man with the gavel.

0:48:050:48:07

So, what does he think of the team's buys?

0:48:070:48:10

You've got a large advertising sign here.

0:48:100:48:12

There are still a few publicans around here who buy these type of things.

0:48:120:48:17

The pastel painting is what we would call in the trade not a very interesting picture.

0:48:170:48:23

It's the wrong subject.

0:48:230:48:24

Oh, dear!

0:48:240:48:26

Looking at the items James has bought,

0:48:260:48:28

I would say he's probably more of a gentleman who likes to have a little gamble on items.

0:48:280:48:33

As regards the items Phil has bought,

0:48:330:48:36

he's got some nice interesting collectable items there.

0:48:360:48:39

Out of the two, I would probably go with Phil.

0:48:400:48:45

Because the items he's bought I would say he's used his head more.

0:48:450:48:48

So, Duncan and Phil's shopping tactics might just have worked.

0:48:480:48:51

Both teams started this Road Trip with £400.

0:48:530:48:55

Simon and James spent almost half their budget

0:48:550:48:58

picking up five items for a total price of £197.50.

0:48:580:49:02

Duncan and Phil also bought five items

0:49:020:49:05

but were a little more frugal, managing to splash a mere £145.

0:49:050:49:10

We've just bought a pile of bricks for 30 quid!

0:49:100:49:12

So let's see who'll be facing a standing ovation

0:49:140:49:17

and who will be playing to an empty house.

0:49:170:49:19

First up, Simon and James's pastel of the unhappy girl.

0:49:220:49:26

Start me at £10.

0:49:260:49:27

Ten is bid, thank you. Can I see 15?

0:49:270:49:29

15 is bid. 20.

0:49:290:49:32

25. 30.

0:49:320:49:35

New bidder at 30. 35. 40.

0:49:350:49:38

£35. Can I see 40?

0:49:380:49:41

35.

0:49:420:49:43

All done at 35?

0:49:430:49:45

Well done, boys. That's something to smile about.

0:49:470:49:50

Next up is Duncan and Phil's Jameson Whiskey box from the pub.

0:49:510:49:56

Ten to start me?

0:49:560:49:58

OK. I'll accept a five. Can I see six?

0:49:590:50:02

And we have a £6 bid. Seven?

0:50:020:50:04

Eight. Nine. Ten.

0:50:040:50:06

12, madam? 14?

0:50:060:50:09

16. 18. 18 new bidder.

0:50:090:50:12

20? At £18. Can I see 20?

0:50:120:50:16

At £18. All done at 18?

0:50:160:50:20

Oh, dear. After auction costs,

0:50:210:50:23

that wipes out any hope of a celebratory drink!

0:50:230:50:27

So, can Simon and James's iron brackets do any better?

0:50:280:50:31

Start me at £20.

0:50:330:50:35

Not what James was looking for.

0:50:350:50:37

15 I'll accept. Can I see 16?

0:50:380:50:40

16 is bid. 18.

0:50:400:50:42

22. 24. 26.

0:50:420:50:45

28. 30.

0:50:450:50:47

32. 34. 36?

0:50:470:50:50

38. 40.

0:50:500:50:52

42?

0:50:540:50:55

£40. Are you all done at £40?

0:50:550:50:57

Now, cheer up, James. It was profit, albeit a small one.

0:51:000:51:03

Simon and James sneered at this pile of bricks,

0:51:050:51:08

but will Duncan and Phil build a profit?

0:51:080:51:10

A nice quality item, this is.

0:51:100:51:12

Nice quality.

0:51:120:51:13

£50?

0:51:140:51:16

Start me at 50. It's got to go at £50.

0:51:190:51:21

Don't see these very often. 30, then?

0:51:210:51:23

Uh-oh. It's not looking good.

0:51:230:51:26

£20?

0:51:260:51:28

-I'm going to bid £20 myself cos I think it's great!

-That's not allowed!

0:51:280:51:32

Well, that's unusual. But it is allowed as Warren is buying it for himself.

0:51:320:51:37

I've got a bid of 25.

0:51:370:51:38

-30 with me. 35.

-He's bidding on it!

0:51:380:51:41

40 with me. 45.

0:51:410:51:43

It'll look nice in my garden.

0:51:430:51:45

Do you want a beer sign, as well?

0:51:460:51:48

Don't push it, Phil!

0:51:480:51:50

45 with me. Can I see 50?

0:51:510:51:53

45. I'm actually buying this at 45.

0:51:540:51:56

And the winning bidder is Warren the auctioneer! Ha!

0:52:010:52:04

Next, the George II mother-of-pearl snuff box.

0:52:060:52:09

Can James and Simon sniff out a profit?

0:52:090:52:11

-Start me at £20.

-What?!

0:52:110:52:13

Because, James, that's what.

0:52:130:52:15

20 is bid. Can I see 22?

0:52:150:52:17

22 to the hand. 24.

0:52:170:52:19

26. 28.

0:52:190:52:22

30. Two?

0:52:220:52:23

34.

0:52:230:52:24

Simon's not looking happy!

0:52:240:52:26

34, new bidder.

0:52:260:52:28

36.

0:52:280:52:30

34 at the back of the room.

0:52:300:52:31

Can I see 36? 38.

0:52:310:52:34

I've got a new bidder at 40.

0:52:340:52:36

£40. If you're all done at £40.

0:52:360:52:39

Crikey, it's a profit. It's nosed ahead. Pull yourself together, James!

0:52:430:52:47

Don't be such a baby!

0:52:470:52:49

I want to go home!

0:52:490:52:51

What gets me is you've got two blokes here with about 52 years of experience in the antiques trade,

0:52:510:52:58

they've had two days eking out bargains from all over the country

0:52:580:53:02

and so far, we're about £1.40 ahead of the game!

0:53:020:53:05

-Not very impressive, is it?

-Not really.

0:53:050:53:08

But be thankful it's still a profit.

0:53:080:53:10

Top brass, next, in the form of these deck fittings.

0:53:100:53:13

An auction on the coast should be the place to shift these.

0:53:130:53:18

Start me at £20.

0:53:180:53:19

20 is bid. Thank you. Can I see 22?

0:53:190:53:22

22 is bid.

0:53:220:53:24

24. 26.

0:53:240:53:26

New bidder at 28. 30.

0:53:260:53:28

32. 32 with the lady.

0:53:300:53:33

-Can I see 34?

-Come on.

-Go on!

0:53:330:53:35

Are you all done at 32?

0:53:350:53:37

With three lots each sold, it's virtually neck and neck

0:53:390:53:42

for our teams.

0:53:420:53:44

So, with the rub o' the green, can the enamel patch box

0:53:440:53:46

put James and Simon into the lead?

0:53:460:53:48

-Nice little box.

-How much was it, James?

0:53:480:53:51

120 quid I think it cost, Phil.

0:53:510:53:54

120, or was it 400?

0:53:540:53:55

Nice try, James.

0:53:550:53:57

-I thought you said 130 pence.

-Start me at £30?

0:53:570:54:00

Silence.

0:54:000:54:01

-Ten pounds.

-What?!

-Can I see 12?

0:54:010:54:04

12 is bid. 14.

0:54:050:54:07

16. 18. 20.

0:54:070:54:10

Two. 24.

0:54:100:54:11

26. 28.

0:54:110:54:13

30. Two.

0:54:130:54:15

£30. Can I see 32?

0:54:150:54:17

-I can't believe this!

-32, new bidder.

0:54:170:54:20

34. 36.

0:54:200:54:21

38.

0:54:210:54:23

40. Two?

0:54:230:54:25

£40. If you're all done at £40.

0:54:260:54:28

James may be grim-faced,

0:54:310:54:32

but they've boxed clever to make another profit.

0:54:320:54:36

Next, it's Duncan and Phil's marble basin.

0:54:380:54:40

Let's hope it doesn't sink their profits!

0:54:400:54:42

Come on. Start me at 20.

0:54:450:54:47

15, then?

0:54:470:54:49

15 is bid. Thank you, sir.

0:54:490:54:51

Can I see 16?

0:54:510:54:53

15 only bid?

0:54:530:54:55

I will sell, if you're all done at 15.

0:54:550:54:57

Looks like they're all washed up.

0:54:570:54:59

Got to be worth more than that.

0:54:590:55:01

A carved basin. £15, then. I will sell if you're all done at 15.

0:55:010:55:05

It's that sinking feeling.

0:55:060:55:07

And the first loss of the day. £15.

0:55:090:55:11

-Disaster!

-Wipe that smile off your face!

0:55:130:55:16

"Is it plastic?"

0:55:160:55:19

Miaow!

0:55:200:55:22

Next, Simon and James's mahjong set,

0:55:220:55:24

which they've put with the Denby vase.

0:55:240:55:27

Interesting mix!

0:55:270:55:29

Oh, that's just gorgeous!

0:55:290:55:31

Louder, Simon! They didn't hear you at the back!

0:55:310:55:33

-Start me at £20.

-What?!

0:55:330:55:35

Nice mahjong set. 20 bid. Can I see 22?

0:55:350:55:39

22 is bid. 24.

0:55:390:55:41

26. 28.

0:55:410:55:43

30.

0:55:430:55:45

Two? 34. 36?

0:55:450:55:47

38. 40.

0:55:470:55:49

Two. 44. 46.

0:55:490:55:53

48. 50.

0:55:530:55:55

Five, sir? 60?

0:55:550:55:57

55. Can I see 60?

0:55:570:55:59

55. Are you all done at £55?

0:56:010:56:04

Uh-oh! It's all gone wrong, mahjong!

0:56:060:56:08

Another loss.

0:56:080:56:10

Last orders, everyone. It's the final lot.

0:56:120:56:14

Is the pub sign going to prove plastic fantastic?

0:56:140:56:17

Start me at £20.

0:56:170:56:19

20 is bid. Thank you, sir. Can I see 22?

0:56:210:56:23

22, Ali? 24.

0:56:230:56:26

26. 28.

0:56:260:56:27

30.

0:56:270:56:29

32. 34.

0:56:290:56:31

36. 38?

0:56:310:56:34

Are you all finished at 36?

0:56:360:56:38

Disaster! But it's a close call.

0:56:400:56:42

Time to phone Road Trip HQ to see who's won.

0:56:420:56:46

-'Hello?'

-Oh, hang on.

0:56:460:56:48

Who's won? Who's won?

0:56:480:56:51

-'It's very close.'

-OK. What's our profit?

0:56:510:56:53

'So, after auction costs, you have lost £25.30.'

0:56:530:56:59

Right. OK.

0:56:590:57:01

'Philip and Duncan,

0:57:010:57:03

'you have made a loss

0:57:030:57:06

'of £25.28.'

0:57:060:57:10

'So Philip and Duncan are the winners by two pence!'

0:57:100:57:14

You're joking!

0:57:160:57:18

So, summing up, after setting off at a roaring pace on this Road Trip,

0:57:180:57:22

Simon and James made a conservative loss of £25.30 after auction costs,

0:57:220:57:27

earning them a total of £374.70.

0:57:270:57:31

While Duncan and Phil took a more leisurely approach,

0:57:310:57:34

preferring reclamation yards to antiques shops.

0:57:340:57:37

That netted them a loss of £25.28 after costs,

0:57:370:57:40

giving them £374.72 at the finishing line.

0:57:400:57:45

And that make Duncan and Phil the winners by 2p!

0:57:450:57:49

Can you believe it?

0:57:490:57:51

Well done. Well done.

0:57:510:57:53

I knew we'd win. I knew we'd win.

0:57:530:57:54

-Two pence?!

-Amazing!

-I think your bricks worked for you!

0:57:540:57:58

-Two pence!

-Don't feel bad about it, will you?

0:57:580:58:01

-Off we go.

-I think they're wrong. Recalculate, please!

0:58:030:58:06

Profits across the series will go to Children in Need.

0:58:060:58:09

Time for our guests to take a bow and face the final curtain.

0:58:090:58:14

Now, would we rather be an antiques dealer or an actor?

0:58:140:58:19

I think they would make better auctioneers than we would make actors!

0:58:190:58:23

I think they can turn their hand to it worryingly easily.

0:58:230:58:27

Mind you, we ARE antiques. Well, you are!

0:58:270:58:29

I don't know what they'll get for me!

0:58:290:58:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:530:58:56

Stars of stage and screen Simon Williams and Duncan Preston team up with antiques experts James Lewis and Philip Serrell for a celebrity buying trip around Essex. Armed with £400 each and two stunning classic cars, their mission - to acquire items to sell for profit at auction in Torquay, Devon. On the way, Duncan tries his hand at an ancient craft and a collector of sporting memorabilia has a tale to tell about London Mayor Boris Johnson.


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