Episode 8 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


Episode 8

Presenters of Homes Under the Hammer, Lucy Alexander and Martin Roberts, trade homes for antiques as they scour the shops of Hampshire in search of a bargain.


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Transcript


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'Some of the nation's favourite celebrities.' Why have I got such expensive taste?

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'One antiques expert each.' THEY LAUGH

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Now, that is what I call a good shopping experience.

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'One big challenge. Who can seek out and buy the best antiques at the very best prices?'

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Answers on a postcard. HAMMER BANGS

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Ohh! 'And auction for a big profit further down the road?'

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I like to try on the wares.

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'Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?'

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Do you like it? No, I think it's horrible.

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'And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?"'

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Well done, us. 'Time to put your peddle to the metal.

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'This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip!

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'Yeah!

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'Today's fight for the antique crown begins in the ceremonial county of Hampshire.

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'A new pair of TV faves sporting ?400 each

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'enter the sphere of oddities and curiosity.

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'They're no strangers to an auction.

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'It's telly presenters Lucy Alexander and Martin Roberts.'

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Wow. I am so excited! That is a beautiful baby!

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This is my dream car. Really? Yeah, it's an MG TF,

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probably from about 1950s... Can we stop the showing off already? I'm not showing off.

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Can you drive it? You know what? I've got the key!

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I hope you've got the picnic rug and lashings of ginger ale in the boot.

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Strapped on the back, darling. Love it! Right, tally-ho!

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'Martin's right, they're off in this 1954 MG TF.

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'It's pre-seat-belt era, which is why they're not wearing any.

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'And isn't it a British beauty, eh? Hip-hip!'

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So what is the oldest thing you've got in your house? A dinosaur fossil.

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Lots of old-fashioned scientific equipment, some art.

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The oldest thing I've got in my house is the photograph of you hanging on my wall.

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That's really sweet. Thanks, darling. SHE LAUGHS

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'This double act began their on-screen relationship

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'a decade ago on the BBC's hugely successful Homes Under The Hammer.'

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There are peaches but there are also rotten apples. Absolutely.

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'But for Lucy, it all began by studying drama and dance in her youth.

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'A stint at Nickelodeon as a children's presenter

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'was just the thing to set her up for a long and prosperous career working with Martin Roberts.'

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Even I couldn't fit all my shoes and handbags in there.

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I am rather nervous because you know I have got to win.

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I promised my kids. That is very sad, cos even for your children, I'm not going to let you win.

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'Ready for the clash is Martin Roberts.

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'His career began on BBC Merseyside radio in the 80s

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'before hitting our screens as a travel presenter.'

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# If I had a hammer

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Looks like the front is about to fall off the house to me.

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'For the last ten years, he's been an expert in all things property

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'alongside Lucy in Homes Under The Hammer.'

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Mirror, mirror, on the table,

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tell me what this will fetch at auction if you are able.

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I wonder what the experts are going to be like. If there's somebody with facial hair, I'll have him.

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Why? I don't know, I quite like facial hair.

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A good antique expert should have facial hair. That's what I think.

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'Well, one of them does.'

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Antiques Roadshow! Oh, Thursday! We've missed it!

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'And expert number one is the spruce James Lewis.'

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I was thinking around 45, 50 quid.

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That's very cheeky. I know. That's very cheeky. I know.

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'This cheeky chappy's been antique crazy, man and boy,

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'buying and bidding from the age of six, no less.'

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Do you know how you know it's summer? How?

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Because the people of Portsmouth are half-naked, look.

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Excellent! Get in there! Half-naked people!

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'Highly qualified for the job of admiring the view

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'is surveyor James Braxton.'

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How much have you got on this fellow? 15 or something?

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You haven't come for a deal, you've come to have a row!

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'A sophisticated bon viveur,

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'he loves fine wine and fine food just as much as fine art and furniture.'

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Have you got any ideas of who you'd like to go with?

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Why don't I go for the girl? You normally go with the guys.

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I normally go with the guys. Why don't we do a swap?

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'I think James Braxton's been doing his homework.

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'Cutting a fine path to the rendezvous, the experts are in a 1980s model Mercedes SL

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'and they're still admiring the birds.' Lots of fabulous birds.

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So many woodpeckers. Oh, lovely!

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Have you got green woodpeckers? Green ones. Lots of greens.

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Lots of black and reds. Lots of thrushes, lots of blackbirds. Lovely.

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Robins.

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'Appropriately, the battle for antique excellence

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'starts in Hampshire, the home of the British Army and Royal Navy,

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'but finishes 218 miles away at auction

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'in the Cathedral city of Lincoln.

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'First stop is the historic naval port of Portsmouth.'

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Hey-hey! Whoo-hoo!

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Hi, guys! Hi. James. Nice to meet you. I'm Lucy.

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Very good to meet you. Now, what about antiques? You're big homes people.

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Well, I personally love antiques and I've got a house that's full of

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an eclectic mix of everything I've collected over the years.

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And I don't have any antiques in my house whatsoever. No!

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I'm a modern, contemporary person.

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Lucy, I'm going to have to teach you the way of antiques. Are you?

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James, show me the light. Right, come on. Which car are we taking?

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No choice, guys. I'm keeping the MG. I think you'll find you're not.

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THEY LAUGH

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James! Hurray!

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You're my TV husband. I've got a new one now. You're so fickle!

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Bye! The winners are off! Whoo!

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'Lucy's traded in her old model for a new one already.'

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Every time you step into any of your houses,

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you're going, "Oh, look at the period features, look at the doors, original panelling."

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So does that mean that you're a passionate furniture collector?

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Erm, not so much. I mean, I love old furniture.

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Whether I'll be able to spot a Chipperfield... Chippendale? Chippendale.

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'Well, you wouldn't want to get those two mixed up.'

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As much as I love Lucy, we've got to beat her. We have!

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'Fierce competition between our celebs, then. This is going to be a lot of fun.

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'The chaps' treasure hunt begins in a historic naval store house.

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'Martin's already inside, but James, keen to find a fresh bargain,

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'is chatting to a dealer who's just dropped off a ship's lamp in the shop.'

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How much is that? Er, here and now, 120. It's a big one.

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Lovely. OK. We'll have a wander. But thank you very much. Thank you.

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'Now he's got the scoop, it's time to jump aboard the good ship rummage for plunder! And lee ho!'

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Where do we start, then? It's just a matter of looking at almost everything

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and just finding the one thing that is priced lower than it's worth.

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'He's like a Zen master.

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'Ready to splice the mainbrace is Andrew.'

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Look at this. I love this clock. Why isn't this for sale? Because it's a fake.

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Oh, it's a fake, is it? I just leave it there to remind myself

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to be a bit more cautious next time.

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Really? That's why it's not for sale. I only sell originals.

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'Ha-ha! So stick that in your pipe and smoke it!'

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What about this? 'Martin's beady eye has alighted on a signed menu

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'from a dinner that would've had the paparazzi in a frenzy back in their day.'

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Look at this. This is the sort of thing I really love.

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This is the Lady Taverners, a celebratory Italian evening, but look at the people who were there.

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Robert Powell, Bill Tidy, Willie Rushton,

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Frazer Hines, Nicholas Parsons...

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'Ooh! Frenzy was perhaps an exaggeration.'

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That's got to be worth something. Let's have a look. How do you price that?

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You get the right person in the room who's a Willie Rushton fan...

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Nicholas Parsons signed it. 'All the greats, eh?'

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25 quid. 1988.

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I think we've got a chance with that. They're fairly modern signatures.

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The autograph is far more sought-after when the person dies.

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I once had somebody ask me, their father said,

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"Go and get his autograph, it'll be worth something when he's dead." That's what they said to me!

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'Yeah, a bit drastic. But this is for charity.

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'They're searching on, taking the menu with them.

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'Shopkeeper Andrew, keen to help, has something to show the boys.

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'He recently bought a collection of maritime artist

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'William Wyllie's sketches and watercolours at Christie's.' What's the appeal of Wyllie?

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Well, he's got a strong Portsmouth connection.

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He lived here for about the last 30 years of his life.

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And I've just ingrained on him, basically.

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'Wyllie is best known for his maritime-themed paintings and etchings

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'which sometimes fetch thousands.

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'These aren't classic Wyllie and the auction is in Lincoln,

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'where maritime is unlikely to be as popular, so they could be taking a risk here.'

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They'd maybe do theatrical studies at the beginning, so you've got a lot of bizarre creatures and so forth,

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which you wouldn't see in his normal work. Like this long-nosed...

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That's not a great commercial piece.

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A William Wyllie collector will not go for that.

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Yeah, you want something classical maritime.

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No, but, it still has the interest of it being Wyllie.

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'Andrew's put ?20 on the Wyllie sketch,

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'but Martin's keen to do some negotiating and has an offer in mind for it,

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'plus the celebrity menu, which is priced at ?25.'

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What could that be? I'll do it for 20.

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Would you do the two for 30? Yeah, that's fine. I would've said two for 20.

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No. Would you?

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How about two for 25? Two for 25, go on. Yeah? OK.

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'James's bare-faced cheek has saved them a fiver

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'and they've started their treasure trove for auction. Bravo, chaps.'

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Marvellous. Thank you. Thank you very much. You're welcome.

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'With so much to choose from, the browsing continues.

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'James is still hoping to find the ship's lamp

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'dropped off by the dealer he met outside.'

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I'm desperate to sort of buy something vaguely maritime.

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Look at that! A lighthouse binnacle.

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The guy outside... Yes? 120 quid he said he could do that for.

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Who? Just outside here there was a guy with a bundle of weapons.

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What? Yeah. He was leaving.

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Did you call the police? No. Antique weapons. OK.

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And I said, "What are you doing?" He said, "I've just done a big deal

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"but I've just put something in there that you might like. It's a great big steel binnacle."

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He said 120 quid, but that's 380. It's different.

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Do you like it, though? It's a bit rusty. Bit of Hammerite on there.

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So is somebody really going to buy that?

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Cos it's 120 quid, it's a big slice of our budget. It is.

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'Time to get the mystery weapon-wielding man on the phone

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'and straighten out the price.'

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I've spoken to the owner, he says fine.

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'Nicely done! It's decision time.'

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A little bit of, erm, what's that word, serendipity.

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You genuinely happened to bump into that bloke who you accosted cos he had a load of weapons

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and then you happened, in this maze of a place, to have found the exact bit. Go on, shake his hand.

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Thank you very much. Deal. Thank you. I love the whole story.

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'A serendipitous deal done at 120 indeed! Down from 380.'

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You can roll it home. You can. 'They've collected three trophies for their trunk.

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'The Wyllie sketch, a signed menu and the ship's lamp thingamajig,

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'spending ?145 of their ?400 budget. Time to get rolling!'

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Cheerio. Bye. Bye.

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'James and Lucy are motoring to the beach at Southsea

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'and Lucy's still smirking about half-inching the MG.'

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I am so pleased that we got that car

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because Martin was just loving it too much!

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I've got to say, I do feel a little bit guilty

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about trading in my telly husband for you. Telly husband!

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Well, ten years is a long time! We are close.

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But he does go mad and buy everything, so I know he's going to get over-excited. Excellent.

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I'm very good with bartering. I like to get a good deal. Good.

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But I need you to guide me. Shoes and handbags, Martin was joking,

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but I do love a bit of trying on, I have to say!

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That's where your expertise lies, does it? Shoes and handbags.

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'That's a different shopping trip altogether, Lucy.

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'James and Lucy are dropping anchor at Roberts of Southsea.

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'And the man himself is ready and waiting to deal.

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'Once more into the breach!'

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Now, Robbie, how long have you been here for? Ten years in this shop.

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Ten years? In the trade, 30 years.

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30 years? Yep, as a boy. You must have started early. Yes.

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Dad in this, as well? And grandfather. That's dad. Hello, dad. Hi.

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'Crikey! Three generations of Roberts' in the trade.

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'He's not going to be a pushover.'

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What do you think you've got here...

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Everything. No, come on. What is your favourite piece in this whole shop?

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What do you love in here that you think... Whatever someone buys and goes out of that door with.

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'Told you!' We'll have a good look round. 'Chocks away!

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'Lucy's interest has been captured by some tin trunks.'

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These are fantastic trunks. Look at these. Both of them.

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Lieutenant Colonel Buckland.

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I see a lovely hat box. Lovely.

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It's quite a nice, stylish item. I would use that in my home

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to put bits and pieces in. Yeah. That's fantastic. Yeah.

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We should buy lots in here. I think we will. SHE LAUGHS

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'They like the tin trunk and hat case, but they're playing it cool until they've had a look around.

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'Suits you, madam.'

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Lucy, what about pictures? That picture down there has a slightly naive charm to it.

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Is that what you call it? That's The Quadrant in Brighton.

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'The Quadrant is a well-known drinking establishment,

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'serving the thirsty of Brighton for over 150 years.

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'This large oil on canvas is by a Brighton artist and has a ticket price of ?20.'

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It's slightly domestic realism.

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It's sort of ordinary people.

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It's quite unglamorous.

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It's got brightness. That's why I don't really like it. It's got a naive charm.

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Give me the date. Look at those! 70s.

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70s. It is, isn't it? It's all... The denim jacket, the denim jeans.

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I like the fact that it's on a canvas and it's got some nice, bright colours.

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And I like the lady there with the pram and the flowers. Yeah.

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Cos I remember my mother having a pram like that, actually. Yeah.

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I think I even was in a pram like that.

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For eight quid... 'Hello!' For eight quid, you can have it.

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Can we have that for eight quid? Shake the man's hand!

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Robbie, it is lovely doing business with you. That is really lovely.

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You're a very clever lady. Oh, great, yes! Thank you. Ooh, mind that light!

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'Oh! Disaster averted and the first deal done. Lovely.

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'They have one item of booty banked, but look out, Lucy's on a roll.'

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What is that? I think you put it in the water, suck it up,

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then you... Ohh! So it's like a large syringe.

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'It might look like a giant syringe, but it's a brass rose-sprayer with no price attached.'

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That's something that I can see somebody having in their house

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and somebody coming in and saying, "What's that?" and you say, "Ooh, well..." and you have a little story.

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So I think that could be quite a fun object to have.

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And it's quite country up in Lincoln so they might grow roses up there.

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Like it! He's on it.

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'He's a pro.'

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Do you think that we could add much value to something like that?

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Listen, that was ?8, ?15 the two, then you can't lose. All right?

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You can't lose then. Give the man a big kiss. I'm going to do that.

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After we have bought all the purchases.

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I'm not going to kiss him yet. No. He can look forward to that.

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'I'm sure he will, too! So, smackers aside,

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'they've just purchased another piece of precious plunder. And they're not finished yet.

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'Having thoroughly perused the premises, the pair are drawn back to the trunks.

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'But things are afoot. I wouldn't want to be in Robbie's shoes. Watch out.'

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I've just sold that one to a customer.

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When? They came to the door. What, just then? Yeah.

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You took too long! You can't do that! I'm sorry. That's not allowed!

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You can't lose on that one underneath. No, I want that one.

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If we can't have that trunk, what about that trunk?

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I like your style.

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We don't want a Lieutenant Colonel, we want a General! That's what we want!

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What we really, really want! General Burnaby. 'Girl power.'

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Can we shut the door in case anyone comes in and buys it, please?

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'They're inspecting another tin trunk with the higher ranking of General Burnaby.

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'But they're still not convinced.'

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Right, what about this trunk underneath here? That's a lovely one.

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It's got quite a lot of intricate little bits and pieces going on.

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Does it come with all the bits? No. THEY LAUGH

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Go on, best price. No bids. 20 quid. And I'll chuck that one in.

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And you can't lose on that.

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'James and Lucy like the trunk and Robbie's thrown in the hat tin

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'for a knock-down price of ?20.

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'But they're not ready to pack up their troubles just yet.'

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You don't think we should have the general in with this, as well, Lucy?

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Oh, that would be lovely, a stack.

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A stack. Cos they would look nice together, wouldn't they?

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'With a little brute strength from James...' I think it's got gold coins in there.

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'..and artistic flare from Lucy...'

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That actually works with the black on top of the tan.

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It does. It's a sort of lovely tableau

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or a natural window-dresser.

0:18:110:18:13

Come on, Robbie, it is a package. It's a package deal. 30 quid.

0:18:130:18:18

30 quid, come on. Now you're going to get that kiss! Mwah! Mwah!

0:18:180:18:22

'Whether you like it or not.' It's the nicest day today!

0:18:220:18:25

JAMES LAUGHS I'm feeling an ice cream and a Flake coming on. Yeah.

0:18:250:18:29

'Go on, then, you deserve it! Make mine a 99, eh?' Thank you very much.

0:18:290:18:33

'Only ?45 of their ?400 budget spent and what spoils.

0:18:330:18:39

'A selection of trunks, a brass rose-sprayer and an oil painting of Brighton. Top dealing, duo!'

0:18:390:18:45

Oh!

0:18:450:18:47

Do you collect? I do. I collect antiques.

0:18:480:18:51

Not so much furniture. More objet d'art, more sort of curios.

0:18:510:18:55

My biggest problem is I can't bear to get rid of things.

0:18:550:18:59

Do you know... That's going to be the problem today.

0:18:590:19:02

Cos I'll find things and go, "I'm not going to sell that!"

0:19:020:19:05

'Successful antique experts are often part great detectives, part obsessive collectors,

0:19:060:19:12

'and here in Portsmouth there's a collection that combines the two.

0:19:120:19:16

'Portsmouth Central Library houses arguably the largest collection

0:19:160:19:21

'of Sherlock Holmes and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle-related material in the world.

0:19:210:19:27

'Obsessively collected over a lifetime by Richard Lancelyn Green,

0:19:270:19:32

'it consists of 16,000 books,

0:19:320:19:34

'40,000 documents and 3,000 objects. Wow!'

0:19:340:19:38

Hello. I'm James. Nice to see you. Hello.

0:19:380:19:42

'Laura Weston is showing them round.' Come with me.

0:19:420:19:46

'Richard Lancelyn Green was generally considered

0:19:480:19:51

'the world's foremost scholar on the subject of Sherlock Holmes

0:19:510:19:55

'and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

0:19:550:19:58

'Richard bequeathed his collection to Portsmouth Central Library

0:19:580:20:01

'as it was here that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

0:20:010:20:04

'wrote his first Sherlock Holmes story.'

0:20:040:20:07

The first book was A Study In Scarlet. And that's where Sherlock Holmes was born.

0:20:070:20:11

Yeah. And it just took off from there, really.

0:20:110:20:14

'The collection contains some very rare items,

0:20:140:20:17

'including original magazines in which Sherlock Holmes stories were published.'

0:20:170:20:21

What we have here is the Strand magazine.

0:20:210:20:24

Now, magazines were not magazines as we know it.

0:20:240:20:28

They were actually books. So this one here dates from 1892.

0:20:280:20:33

'There are also some first-edition books.'

0:20:330:20:37

The Hound Of The Baskervilles. I love the fact that it's got an advert

0:20:370:20:41

for Fry's pure cocoa on the front of Hound Of The Baskervilles!

0:20:410:20:46

When you can't sleep at night because you've read the book,

0:20:460:20:48

you can have your cup of cocoa and you'll go to sleep.

0:20:480:20:51

'Richard's fanatical collecting

0:20:510:20:54

'let him into a lengthy legal wrangling

0:20:540:20:57

'to obtain personal paperwork of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's.'

0:20:570:21:00

This is an original letter from Conan Doyle to his son

0:21:000:21:05

basically saying to his son, "You cannot have any more money,

0:21:050:21:08

"your allowance should be enough. Darling Daddy." Darling? Oh, no!

0:21:080:21:13

'On Richard's death in 2004, he'd been collecting veraciously for 40 years.

0:21:130:21:19

'Laura's taking the chaps to the basement for a closer look at the extent of the archives.'

0:21:190:21:25

He literally had piles and piles and piles of objects and items that he just lived with.

0:21:280:21:32

It's interesting because collectors are often quite strange individuals.

0:21:320:21:37

People now believe that the collector's gene is more in males than females.

0:21:370:21:41

And if we have a collectors' sale at the auction

0:21:410:21:43

for cigarette cards, postcards, coins, stamps, medals,

0:21:430:21:47

there's not a woman in the audience. Wow. It's all men.

0:21:470:21:51

It's something strange about us. I'm not sure what it is.

0:21:510:21:54

There's lots of women watching going, "Yeah, that's my husband. Why does he collect that rubbish?"

0:21:540:21:58

'Richard's death was in some ways attributed to his obsession with his collection.

0:21:580:22:04

'He was distraught at being unable to stop the private sale of Conan Doyle papers

0:22:040:22:10

'which he suspected the late daughter of the author

0:22:100:22:13

'had bequeathed the National Library.

0:22:130:22:16

'His behaviour became erratic

0:22:170:22:19

'and he was later found by police garrotted on his bed.

0:22:190:22:24

'All clues pointed to murder,

0:22:240:22:27

'but the coroner returned an open verdict

0:22:270:22:29

'and relatives claimed he took his own life

0:22:290:22:32

'in the manner of a Sherlock Holmes plot. Well, well.

0:22:320:22:36

'Another investigation complete,

0:22:360:22:38

'so it's time for our own super-sleuthing duo

0:22:380:22:42

'to continue with their search for antique supremacy.'

0:22:420:22:45

I am laughing inside because we've got the picture in the boot!

0:22:460:22:51

It is, really. See, we've got a long-lasting friendship. Yeah.

0:22:510:22:55

I bet Martin and James haven't. HE LAUGHS

0:22:550:22:59

We are for life, not just for Christmas. Ahh!

0:22:590:23:03

Here we go. I am excited! Shop number two!

0:23:030:23:06

Can we leave the picture here? Yep. No-one's going to take it.

0:23:060:23:09

No-one's going to take it? They're not going to take it!

0:23:090:23:12

'The next port of call on their race for riches

0:23:130:23:16

'is Parminter's Antiques, and dressed and ready for the occasion is the very dapper Ian.'

0:23:160:23:22

You look the part! You work in this shop. It's working!

0:23:220:23:27

Thank you very much. You've got a fabulous shop here.

0:23:270:23:30

And we've got a dog. And you've got a dog!

0:23:300:23:32

Is he head of security? Yes, he is. Head of security.

0:23:320:23:35

'And as he guards one painting,

0:23:350:23:38

'Lucy's spotted another.'

0:23:380:23:40

I notice something over here. Now, I went straight to that as I walked in

0:23:400:23:45

and I thought that was absolutely endearing.

0:23:450:23:48

I love that. Look, the little kids in bed, mum and dad.

0:23:480:23:52

It has a certain elegance. Some people condemn these things as being sentimental.

0:23:520:23:57

But it is quite sweet, isn't it?

0:23:570:24:00

I really like that.

0:24:000:24:02

'But they've already got one painting, so that one's staying put.'

0:24:020:24:06

I prefer that than the print you made me buy.

0:24:060:24:09

'And you do have impeccable taste, Lucy.'

0:24:090:24:11

Ian, this looks like Royal Doulton to me.

0:24:110:24:14

Yeah, they are Doulton. Concentrate, Lucy. Sorry!

0:24:140:24:17

Sorry, I like to try on the wares.

0:24:170:24:20

'She doesn't half!

0:24:200:24:22

'Debonair dealer Ian is always keen to help a lady with cash to splash.

0:24:240:24:28

'Hello, hello, hello.'

0:24:280:24:31

We need a biggie. We need to buy a big something. I've got something for you.

0:24:310:24:35

Have a look at that clock. Let's have a look.

0:24:350:24:38

If it comes in cheap, it can go out cheap. But it's got a nice,

0:24:380:24:41

very attractive look. It'll appeal to anyone, I think.

0:24:410:24:43

'It's priced at ?75.'

0:24:430:24:46

I'm just going to get my glasses. And it does actually go.

0:24:460:24:49

'Crikey! James really means business!'

0:24:490:24:52

So, here we are. We've got the clock. It's got an architectural element going on. Yes.

0:24:520:24:57

So you've got these Ionic columns, white onyx from the Atlas Mountains above Marrakech.

0:24:570:25:01

And it's got a mechanism on the back.

0:25:010:25:04

And it's nice that it strikes on a bell.

0:25:040:25:06

Does this leave you cold, Lucy?

0:25:060:25:09

'In a word.' Er, yeah.

0:25:090:25:11

It just looks a bit sort of old and like it wouldn't work, though.

0:25:110:25:15

I know that's part and parcel of antique-buying. Yeah. It's old. But do you know what I mean?

0:25:150:25:19

I just think it's a little over-budget for what we were looking to pay for it.

0:25:190:25:23

Gosh. What about 60 quid? Gosh.

0:25:230:25:26

I was thinking more 50 quid. 'You go, girl!'

0:25:260:25:29

You can have it for ?50 cos it's... ?50! Is that all right?

0:25:300:25:34

?50. OK. Well done, Lucy. 50 quid. Thank you.

0:25:340:25:37

'Cor, she's a top negotiator, that one.

0:25:370:25:40

'Lucy's scored them another piece of bargain booty.

0:25:400:25:43

'And there's no stopping her.'

0:25:430:25:45

I quite like that, as well, actually.

0:25:450:25:48

I... You don't like that.

0:25:500:25:53

Whenever I say that and you pause for a long time afterwards,

0:25:530:25:56

I know you're like, "That's not going to make any money!" No, it's got some age.

0:25:560:25:59

'They're bickering like an old married couple.' Does this come off?

0:25:590:26:03

Very unusual, that. That's so heavy. Feel that.

0:26:030:26:06

It's a real nice piece. That's a nice piece.

0:26:060:26:09

So what is it? What metal? It's silver plate.

0:26:090:26:12

I would put that on my table and put some candles... I like that.

0:26:120:26:16

Asking 100. That could be ?70.

0:26:160:26:18

And it's a lovely thing.

0:26:190:26:21

'Hello. What's going on here?

0:26:210:26:24

'I think she's got this nailed, James.'

0:26:240:26:26

I like that for 50 quid. Cos then we've got 50 and 50, 100 quid.

0:26:260:26:29

50 quid. I'm not even going to haggle. You're too easy-going!

0:26:290:26:33

'Ha! Lucy does it again, stashing a candelabra and an onyx clock for ?100.

0:26:330:26:40

'Their bag of swag is full and they've only spent ?145.

0:26:400:26:44

'What a triumph, eh?'

0:26:440:26:46

I like that picture. CJ Fox. Yeah, let's move on. HE LAUGHS

0:26:460:26:51

'So, with their cache of curiosity mounting,

0:26:510:26:54

'it's been a good day all round

0:26:540:26:56

'and the teams can rest easy. Night-night, you lot.

0:26:560:27:00

'It's a bright and shiny new day but the teams are dishing the dirt.'

0:27:040:27:08

So, did you have a fabulous day yesterday? Yeah, we had great fun.

0:27:080:27:11

I'm letting you into a little secret. James did choose something that I am not quite sure about.

0:27:110:27:15

Really? So it will be quite funny on auction day to see how much that makes.

0:27:150:27:19

How's Martin at the old haggle? He's on a learning curve with the haggling.

0:27:190:27:23

We bought three things yesterday,

0:27:230:27:26

and of the three things, he picked out two of them. Really? Yeah.

0:27:260:27:30

'Martin did indeed pick out two quirky items,

0:27:310:27:34

'an autographed menu and a Willey sketch.

0:27:340:27:38

'James chose a so-called steel ship's lamp.

0:27:380:27:42

'And that collection cost them ?145, leaving them ?255 for today.' Marvellous. Thank you.

0:27:420:27:48

'James and Lucy bought five pieces, the Brighton painting,

0:27:490:27:53

'the rose-sprayer, some tin trunks,

0:27:530:27:57

'a clock and a candelabra, also spending ?145.'

0:27:570:28:01

Now you're going to get that kiss! Mwah! Mwah!

0:28:010:28:04

'So they, too, have ?255 left to spend.'

0:28:040:28:08

I'm having a fabulous time with Lucy. She's great fun.

0:28:080:28:13

Many things started off at 100

0:28:130:28:15

and then miraculously they got down to 50.

0:28:150:28:17

I think she's going to go back from this experience

0:28:170:28:20

and look at things with very different eyes.

0:28:200:28:23

I really, really love antiques now.

0:28:230:28:25

My James is brilliant, as well. His knowledge is unbelievable! Isn't it amazing? It's, like, anything!

0:28:250:28:30

This little bit of pottery and he goes, "Oh, that's from 1930 by Brian Smith."

0:28:300:28:36

It's like, "What?"

0:28:360:28:38

'My James is better than your James!'

0:28:380:28:41

What are those cows doing in the middle of the road? Morning.

0:28:420:28:44

'Moooove over, cows.'

0:28:440:28:48

Here we go. Whey! Hello, boys!

0:28:480:28:52

Ting-ting! Ting-ting, off we go!

0:28:520:28:55

You've got no idea what you're up against here, guys. Losers!

0:28:550:28:59

We haven't even started yet! That is so inappropriate! Hi. How are you?

0:28:590:29:03

I've missed you so much!

0:29:030:29:05

Be very, very careful with that man.

0:29:070:29:09

Mwah, mwah, mwah. Remember who your husband is!

0:29:090:29:12

THEY LAUGH

0:29:120:29:14

'James and Martin are scooting nearly 40 miles northwest of Portsmouth,

0:29:160:29:20

'through the New Forest, to Burley, a picturesque little village

0:29:200:29:24

'where folklore says there once lived a dragon. No sign of it now, though.'

0:29:240:29:28

Today's really important. I want to feel like we've found something really special.

0:29:280:29:33

Yeah. Like, nobody else has spotted it.

0:29:330:29:36

I mean, the dream is to be rummaging around in a box or at the back of the shop

0:29:360:29:41

and you find that thing and you almost don't want to go, "Aghhh!"

0:29:410:29:44

because it's going to give the game away, but actually, that's what you feel.

0:29:440:29:48

'The chaps have parked up off the beaten track.

0:29:490:29:53

'They've been tipped off about an antique fair, but they're having difficulty finding it.'

0:29:530:29:57

Do you know where the antiques thing is? Yes, down the road. Village hall.

0:29:570:30:01

Village hall where? Down, end of the road.

0:30:010:30:04

Hello. Do you know where the village hall is?

0:30:040:30:06

Burley village. It's got to be round here somewhere.

0:30:060:30:09

Burley Village is a different place. 'Who said that?'

0:30:100:30:13

Is it? What do you mean? What's this? This is Burley. Right.

0:30:130:30:17

Down that road there's another village called Burley Village.

0:30:170:30:20

'Hello! Where's that voice coming from?'

0:30:200:30:22

So this is Burley village but not Burley Village. This is a village called Burley.

0:30:220:30:26

Right. Down there, there's another village called Burley Village.

0:30:260:30:30

'Obviously.' So this is a village called Burley,

0:30:300:30:33

but that's a village called Burley Village? Yes.

0:30:330:30:36

That's not complicated at all, then.

0:30:360:30:38

So how far's Burley Village? Less than a mile that way.

0:30:380:30:42

And why is the sign for Burley Village pointing this way?

0:30:420:30:44

Oh, well, I don't know that. I'm sorry.

0:30:440:30:47

Oh, right. Have you ever thought you've walked into the Twilight Zone?

0:30:470:30:50

THEY LAUGH 'You're the ones taking directions from a bush!

0:30:500:30:55

'And finally, they find someone to point them in the right direction. And ta-da!'

0:30:550:31:01

That's Burley Village hall rather village hall.

0:31:010:31:04

'Finally, the bargaining can begin,

0:31:040:31:06

'if they can tear themselves away from their fan club, that is.'

0:31:060:31:10

All right, my dear. It's for my mum's Christmas card.

0:31:100:31:13

Your mum's Christmas card? I knew it was Lovejoy. 'Ahem!

0:31:130:31:17

'Martin's keen to get back on track

0:31:190:31:21

'and has weeded out a little regal novelty.'

0:31:210:31:23

James, this is from the Coronation. Very timely this year.

0:31:230:31:27

A paper-opener thing.

0:31:270:31:30

'So, the chaps are hoping to cut a deal for the letter-opener with Anita.'

0:31:300:31:34

What price is it? Eight. Eight?

0:31:340:31:37

Could you do it for five for us? No.

0:31:370:31:39

Six? Erm...

0:31:390:31:42

Seven. Seven? ?7?

0:31:420:31:46

'Despite Anita's hard sell, the men aren't convinced and decide to continue browsing.

0:31:470:31:52

'They're not discovering the hidden riches they'd hoped for,

0:31:520:31:56

'but James thinks combining a few pieces into a commemoration theme might be the answer.'

0:31:560:32:01

The paper knife that you found... Yes. ..if we link it with this,

0:32:010:32:05

and I know it's not exciting, but it just adds something else.

0:32:050:32:10

It's the same, "Honi soit qui mal y pense". What does that mean?

0:32:100:32:13

"Evil be to he who evil thinks." Ah. Windsor.

0:32:130:32:16

Same period, '53, go with it,

0:32:160:32:20

it might add a bit of something to the lot.

0:32:200:32:23

And then we've got a model of Shakespeare's house by WH Goss.

0:32:230:32:28

Goss was a manufacturer of this very fine bisque porcelain.

0:32:280:32:34

I'm not taking the Mickey here, but really? You've got to be kidding.

0:32:340:32:38

In its day, that was worth 90 to 100 quid.

0:32:380:32:41

This? Yeah. Why? Because Goss is a very collectable factory

0:32:410:32:45

and that's quite a rare one. But...

0:32:450:32:48

I just imagine putting this on the table in front of Lucy and James and going, "There."

0:32:480:32:53

'Small can be beautiful, though.

0:32:530:32:56

'Time to get dealing with Eileen, who owns the Goss piece.

0:32:560:32:59

'It has a ticket price of ?20.'

0:32:590:33:03

Would you throw that commemorative beaker in with it? Yes, OK.

0:33:030:33:07

So that and that. Well done. Oh, OK. That's brilliant, then.

0:33:070:33:10

Thank you. Come on, then. Paper knife. Let's have a go. OK.

0:33:100:33:15

'Now, if you can get the letter-opener for less than ?7,

0:33:150:33:18

'you've got the beginnings of a commemorative collection.'

0:33:180:33:21

Would you do it at a fiver so that we can have that and that for ?10?

0:33:210:33:25

You're a wonderful human being. Thank you so much!

0:33:250:33:28

That's really kind. Thank you.

0:33:280:33:30

Well, all I'd say is, it wasn't quite what I was anticipating.

0:33:300:33:34

But at least we got something.

0:33:340:33:36

'You should've traded your autograph. It'll be worth a fortune one day, remember?

0:33:360:33:40

'The boys are leaving Burley Village Hall. Or is that the village hall in Burley?

0:33:400:33:44

'They've acquired another clutch of curios for auction.'

0:33:440:33:47

So, Lucy, are you feeling... Hair blowing in the... I'm just trying to see you through the mop. Look.

0:33:500:33:55

Hello, darling. Do the Grace Kelly. Shall I do the look?

0:33:550:33:59

Hold on a minute, it's gone wrong. 'Not very graceful.'

0:34:000:34:02

I can't see! Seriously. SHE LAUGHS

0:34:020:34:05

# She's a lady

0:34:050:34:08

# Whoa, whoa, whoa, she's a lady

0:34:080:34:11

# Talking about that little lady

0:34:120:34:15

'James and Lucy uncovered plenty of hidden treasure yesterday

0:34:160:34:20

'and today they're on yet another voyage of discovery,

0:34:200:34:23

'to Beaulieu in the New Forest.'

0:34:230:34:25

Look at this! Look at the ponies!

0:34:250:34:28

I just love the way all the horses roam freely, there's donkeys everywhere.

0:34:280:34:33

Yeah. Look, this house looks amazing!

0:34:330:34:35

So, how long have you worked on Homes Under The Hammer? For ten years.

0:34:350:34:39

Does anybody ever tire of property?

0:34:390:34:42

Weirdly, no. Even when property dipped,

0:34:420:34:45

people were still really interested in watching Homes Under The Hammer,

0:34:450:34:48

because they wanted to see how people were buying, what they were doing, what bargains they were getting.

0:34:480:34:53

Because, you know, some of the properties were flying out.

0:34:530:34:55

Martin's one of those lovely people who you can read. He's like a little open book.

0:34:550:35:00

He really is, and he will sulk.

0:35:000:35:03

If he likes my candelabra a little bit more than whatever he's bought,

0:35:030:35:07

it will show on his face. Really? Yeah.

0:35:070:35:09

We're nearly there. I don't know whether we're going to make the last hundred yards.

0:35:090:35:14

If we're downhill, we've got a chance.

0:35:140:35:16

'Ha-ha! They're spluttering their way to the Beaulieu Estate

0:35:170:35:21

'to visit a beautiful home

0:35:210:35:23

'on a property which has been in the Montague family since 1538.

0:35:230:35:27

'Unfortunately for Lucy, it's definitely not under the hammer.

0:35:270:35:30

'The estate holds one of the best-kept secrets ever.

0:35:320:35:36

'Who'd have thought this sleepy, scenic Hampshire village

0:35:360:35:39

'was once a base for sabotage and subversion?'

0:35:390:35:43

Isn't it glorious?

0:35:430:35:45

Let's get inside. Let's got on an adventure.

0:35:450:35:48

'During World War II, Beaulieu was the finishing school for the SOE,

0:35:480:35:53

'Churchill's Special Operations Executive,

0:35:530:35:56

'a plucky bunch of volunteers employed to sabotage the German war effort.

0:35:560:36:02

'Margaret Rolls has the history of these unsung heroes.'

0:36:020:36:06

Secret agents. Do we look like them?

0:36:060:36:08

Too noisy! So lovely to meet you, Margaret. I'm Lucy.

0:36:080:36:11

Hello. Hello. James. Hello, James.

0:36:110:36:13

'Over 3,000 agents passed through Beaulieu, coming from all over Europe,

0:36:140:36:18

'where they'd learn skills such as cryptography, navigation

0:36:180:36:23

'and how to survive off the land.

0:36:230:36:26

'Over three weeks, they finished their training here.

0:36:270:36:30

'They were given new identities and final instructions,

0:36:300:36:34

'all in utter secrecy.'

0:36:340:36:36

So, why Beaulieu? Well, it was a remote part of the country

0:36:360:36:41

and one of the administrators who was brought in

0:36:410:36:44

to help set up the SOE actually lived in the village

0:36:440:36:47

and he knew that there were a lot of large houses on the estate

0:36:470:36:51

that would be absolutely perfect to house these agents.

0:36:510:36:54

It was known as the Hush-Hush Operation here

0:36:540:36:57

and nobody in the village

0:36:570:37:00

or the Montague family had any idea.

0:37:000:37:02

Really? No. That is incredible!

0:37:020:37:05

That's the best-kept secret ever!

0:37:050:37:07

People during the war, they do say they were told what to say and if they didn't need to know,

0:37:070:37:12

they weren't told, they didn't ask.

0:37:120:37:14

'It was a massive secret to keep with some 175 staff and instructors running the operation.'

0:37:160:37:23

They were known as a shoal of pretty old fish.

0:37:230:37:25

You had some very intelligent, clever people

0:37:250:37:27

who taught things like coding and ciphers,

0:37:270:37:30

and then at the other end of the spectrum, you had people like Nobby Clark,

0:37:300:37:34

who was actually a gamekeeper on the Sandringham estate,

0:37:340:37:37

and he taught people how to live off the land and how to skin a rabbit,

0:37:370:37:41

the real basics of keeping themselves alive.

0:37:410:37:43

There was another rather handsome gentleman

0:37:450:37:48

called Captain Paul Dehn and he taught things like secret codes,

0:37:480:37:53

and he went on to become quite a famous scriptwriter in Hollywood. Really?

0:37:530:37:58

And some of his screenplays included Goldfinger, a Bond film.

0:37:580:38:02

'Once trained, agents were parachuted into occupied Europe.

0:38:040:38:08

'Their main task was to help resistance groups become more professional as working units,

0:38:080:38:14

'efficient in sabotage and intelligence gathering.

0:38:140:38:18

'To help agents with their dangerous job while remaining undetected,

0:38:190:38:23

'all manner of ingenious pieces of equipment were thought up

0:38:230:38:27

'by a very clever chap called Charles Fraser-Smith.'

0:38:270:38:30

He was the Q of his day. He was the Mr Fix-It.

0:38:300:38:34

He might get a phone call that said, "We want 600 cameras but they've got to be very, very small."

0:38:340:38:39

He was constantly thinking of ways in which is could conceal useful things

0:38:390:38:44

for the agents so that they could have them with them

0:38:440:38:46

and if they were caught, it wouldn't be noticed

0:38:460:38:50

that it wasn't actually a real hairbrush. Yes!

0:38:500:38:54

Or that there's a compass at the end of a pen

0:38:540:38:56

or something hidden in a domino.

0:38:560:38:59

Ian Fleming, who wrote all the James Bond books,

0:38:590:39:02

he was in naval intelligence during the Second World War,

0:39:020:39:05

and it's commonly believed that he got a lot of his ideas for James Bond's gadgets

0:39:050:39:10

from the original Q...

0:39:100:39:12

Really? ..Mr Charles Fraser-Smith.

0:39:120:39:15

'World War II was the first time women were recruited

0:39:170:39:20

'into strategic positions of danger in a war situation.'

0:39:200:39:24

They were incredibly brave. They could've walked away at any time,

0:39:240:39:28

yet they volunteered to do this really, really dangerous work

0:39:280:39:32

knowing that they might not come home again.

0:39:320:39:35

'Many of the women became radio operators,

0:39:370:39:40

'one of the most dangerous jobs in the SOE

0:39:400:39:43

'with the added risk of carrying a very obvious piece of equipment with them.'

0:39:430:39:47

It looks very heavy. You've hit the nail on the head, Lucy.

0:39:470:39:51

It was such a dangerous occupation to have

0:39:510:39:53

because all the time that you were sending messages back to England,

0:39:530:39:56

there was a chance that the Germans had managed to track you

0:39:560:40:00

and pick up your signal.

0:40:000:40:02

So the average lifespan of a wireless operator

0:40:020:40:06

was actually six weeks. Really? Really? Yes.

0:40:060:40:10

Wow! Just six weeks. So... That is unbelievable.

0:40:100:40:15

And they would've known this. Yes, they weren't under any illusion.

0:40:150:40:18

One that a lot of people will have heard of was Violette Szabo.

0:40:200:40:23

She completed one very successful mission

0:40:230:40:26

and she was offered the opportunity to stand down because she had a young daughter,

0:40:260:40:31

but she chose to go back.

0:40:310:40:34

Unfortunately, damaged her ankle landing from her parachute jump,

0:40:340:40:37

the Germans were waiting for them, she couldn't get away.

0:40:370:40:40

This is so sad. This is making me feel very sad.

0:40:400:40:44

I mean, how tough were these women?

0:40:440:40:46

They were amazing. How tough were they to put themselves in these positions?

0:40:460:40:50

They really did.

0:40:500:40:52

Margaret, I have thoroughly enjoyed these stories.

0:40:570:41:00

It's just been amazing meeting you.

0:41:000:41:02

Thank you so much. You're very welcome. It's been a real pleasure.

0:41:020:41:06

'With one final piece of plunder left to procure,

0:41:070:41:10

'it's James and Martin's last shop,

0:41:100:41:14

'The Magpie's Nest, overflowing with the shiny stuff.

0:41:140:41:17

'James's attention has been caught by a creepy-crawly beastie of a brooch with no price on it.'

0:41:200:41:26

I like that. It's nine-carat.

0:41:260:41:29

Gold at an all-time high. Probably 1930s.

0:41:290:41:32

Generally, insects and that type of brooches are actually very, very fashionable at the moment.

0:41:320:41:36

And do you reckon these are real stones? Yeah, that's amber. And it's got a peridot.

0:41:360:41:40

A peridot. A what? A peridot. Like a citrine.

0:41:400:41:44

Amber, which is a resin, basically a tree resin.

0:41:440:41:46

Yeah, that's the thing you get mosquitoes in and you get dinosaurs off them.

0:41:460:41:49

'This is not Jurassic Park.'

0:41:490:41:52

If you get a mosquito in one, it's worth a fortune, it's worth a lot more.

0:41:520:41:56

It's just gone up. There isn't a mosquito in it.

0:41:560:41:59

'More's the pity.' What could the best on that be?

0:41:590:42:03

45. I could do that for 40 for you.

0:42:030:42:05

Permission to make an offer? Yes, sir.

0:42:050:42:08

30? 35?

0:42:080:42:11

30 would make a big difference to us.

0:42:110:42:13

Please? You drive a hard bargain. HE LAUGHS

0:42:130:42:17

Shake the lady's hand, you've got a deal. Thank you very much. Lovely.

0:42:170:42:21

'Caught in a web of delight with the brooch,

0:42:210:42:24

'Martin fancies a little box to present it in, too.'

0:42:240:42:27

I want to make it look as posh as possible.

0:42:270:42:29

What he's asking for is

0:42:290:42:32

a 1905 Faberge box.

0:42:320:42:37

Can we be really cheeky? 'Probably.'

0:42:370:42:39

That's more like it. Look.

0:42:390:42:41

That's... Oh, that's a necklace box. It doesn't matter!

0:42:410:42:44

No, no, no. Look! Shush! Look, how beautiful is that?

0:42:440:42:48

'Oh, just pick a box, already!

0:42:480:42:50

'Now, there's one sure way of getting them out of the shop.'

0:42:540:42:58

Now, that is what I call a good shopping experience. Oh, yes.

0:42:580:43:01

THEY LAUGH

0:43:010:43:03

'Plus, they've amassed a super stash of treasures,

0:43:030:43:05

'spending only ?195 of their ?400 budget.

0:43:050:43:09

'It's time for our kings and queens of curiosity

0:43:110:43:14

'to unveil their secret stashes.'

0:43:140:43:17

Go on. What? Ta-da! Do you like our trendy picture?

0:43:170:43:22

Well, sort of. What you mean? Do you like it or not?

0:43:220:43:25

No, no, it's great, they produce a lot in the Far East these days.

0:43:250:43:28

That is stylish. It's just awful. How much? 30 quid.

0:43:280:43:32

Would you give 30 quid for that? Well, no.

0:43:320:43:35

OK. Eight pounds. Yeah, you can paint over it. It's cheaper than wallpaper, that.

0:43:350:43:39

That is on trend. 'It's on something.'

0:43:390:43:43

CLOCK DINGS 'Saved by the bell!'

0:43:430:43:46

How prophetic. It works! Put it there!

0:43:460:43:49

White onyx from the Atlas Mountains. ?50 for that. That's all right.

0:43:490:43:54

Candelabra? Is that silver plated?

0:43:540:43:57

It's amazing, yes. It's lost its shades. It should have big storm shades on the outside ones.

0:43:570:44:01

Right. Very, very heavy. That was quite funny. It started off at 100

0:44:010:44:06

and James kind of just did that, and I went, "?50!" And he went for it. Bargain.

0:44:060:44:10

Come on, then, let's have a look. JAMES MIMICS FANFARE A mighty ball.

0:44:100:44:15

Oh, my God! Is that how much you paid for it? ?380? No, that was the starting price.

0:44:150:44:20

Lighthouse binnacle?

0:44:200:44:22

It's probably off a sailing ship from the 19th century, not a lighthouse, we think.

0:44:220:44:27

A lighthouse wouldn't need to be gimballed because it's stationary. 'He's brilliant, that boy.'

0:44:270:44:32

Put your candle in there. Two candles in there.

0:44:320:44:34

I like that, actually. And you can imagine this out of Pirates Of The Caribbean, can't you?

0:44:340:44:39

You can. You can. 120.

0:44:390:44:41

It's a weird thing. It's a weird thing.

0:44:410:44:43

This is from the private collection, this is the artist's studio of William Lionel Wyllie,

0:44:430:44:50

who was well-known as a marine artist.

0:44:500:44:55

And this came from Portsmouth dockyard. Oh!

0:44:550:44:57

And a Wyllie engraving makes 1,000 quid sometimes.

0:44:570:45:00

How much did you pay for that? How much do you think? Around 200? 150?

0:45:000:45:04

The pen and ink was a fiver. Oh!

0:45:040:45:08

And we bought a print in a frame for another fiver. Very good. And we put that in there in the pub car park.

0:45:080:45:13

Oh, so you have created, you have created that. A tenner. A tenner.

0:45:130:45:17

I just thought of you guys. It's a Homes Under The Hammer house! It's a Homes Under The Hammer!

0:45:170:45:22

You've got William Shakespeare's home under the hammer now!

0:45:220:45:26

But the thing we're most pleased with,

0:45:260:45:28

most pleased with... Is the brooch? ..nine-carat gold. Solid gold. Solid gold.

0:45:280:45:34

With an amber there and what was it? Peridot.

0:45:340:45:37

I think that should make 100.

0:45:370:45:40

Really? We paid 30. OK.

0:45:400:45:43

Double your money!

0:45:430:45:46

So, there we go. Good luck. Well done. Good luck to us. MARTIN LAUGHS

0:45:460:45:50

'A little bit cocky, Martin.

0:45:500:45:52

'It's all smiles and backslapping while they're in each other's company,

0:45:520:45:56

'but what do they really think about each other's lots?'

0:45:560:46:00

James will be going, "I'm not worried. It's all a load of junk. Ours is better."

0:46:000:46:05

I'm a little bit worried that you look a bit worried.

0:46:050:46:07

No, I just... It was quite an unusual selection, that sort of gimballed affair.

0:46:070:46:12

The swinging light. I did instantly go, "Wow! I like that."

0:46:120:46:16

I'm not jealous at all of anything they've got.

0:46:160:46:19

The picture's cheap.

0:46:190:46:21

You know, it's the sort of thing you'd see on a high street.

0:46:210:46:24

The clock? The clock's horrible!

0:46:240:46:26

I think we've got the better lot. I think we're going to win.

0:46:260:46:29

If there's any justice in the world, we're going to win. Oh, yeah.

0:46:290:46:33

Exactly. Is there justice in the world? No.

0:46:330:46:35

'Everything goes under the hammer, including the tiny house, at auction. So, off we go.

0:46:350:46:42

'The treasured troops are pushing around 200 miles northeast to Lincoln.

0:46:430:46:48

'Lincoln's Cathedral is a fine example of English Gothic architecture.

0:46:500:46:54

'The city sits on the River Witham.'

0:46:540:46:57

This is the big one. The day when you have to face defeat.

0:46:570:47:00

I don't think so. I'm feeling pretty confident.

0:47:000:47:03

Enjoy this moment.

0:47:030:47:05

Do you really think you're going to win? Yeah. Stop it!

0:47:050:47:08

My only concern is...

0:47:080:47:10

ENGINE SPLUTTERS ..er, is...

0:47:100:47:12

Is that you've forgotten how to drive!

0:47:120:47:15

'Cor, I hope they make it!' I love the picture I bought.

0:47:160:47:19

You don't love that picture. I do. It's got 70s written all over it.

0:47:190:47:24

It has that lovely integrity of time.

0:47:240:47:26

Integrity of time, what are you talking about?

0:47:260:47:29

It was a halcyon time

0:47:290:47:32

of beards, flares and platform shoes.

0:47:320:47:34

I don't remember it. I'm too young. Are you sure this is the road the auction room's on?

0:47:340:47:38

'Unique Auctions is a very busy auction house indeed

0:47:410:47:44

'in the hotbed of antiques that is Lincolnshire.'

0:47:440:47:47

Hello, hello, hello.

0:47:480:47:51

James! Good to see you. Are you feeling like you're going to have a good day?

0:47:510:47:54

We were actually saying it's going to be a close call,

0:47:540:47:57

but shall we go inside? It looks like the weather is not with us.

0:47:570:48:00

There we go. There we go.

0:48:000:48:02

And 30. And 5.

0:48:020:48:04

'Today's Master of Ceremonies is Terry Woodcock.' Well done, 17.

0:48:040:48:10

The tin trunks are the most saleable thing, they're the ones I've got the most confidence in today.

0:48:100:48:15

The spray pump, that will struggle.

0:48:150:48:17

Because we normally sell those in big boxes.

0:48:170:48:19

With the Wyllie sketch, a very, very rare sketch, a good investment picture.

0:48:190:48:24

It could be ?100, it could be ?200.

0:48:240:48:27

'Our shop-smart pair, Lucy and James, only spent ?145 of their ?400 budget on five lots.'

0:48:290:48:36

Oh, mind that light.

0:48:360:48:38

'Martin and James forked out a smidgen more, spending ?200 of their ?400.

0:48:380:48:44

'They also have five lots.'

0:48:440:48:46

That is what I call a good shopping experience. Oh, yeah.

0:48:460:48:49

'Lucy and Martin have seen their fair share of auctions,

0:48:490:48:53

'but usually there's more than ?400 at stake.'

0:48:530:48:56

People aren't spending tens of thousands of thousands of pounds, which they normally do,

0:48:560:49:01

which I normally do at a property auction.

0:49:010:49:03

There is still a buzz in the room, though, isn't there? Yeah, yeah, yeah, yes. It's a calmer buzz.

0:49:030:49:08

'Let's hope the calm buzz turns to a mild hum of excitement

0:49:080:49:11

'for James and Lucy's rose sprayer, up first.'

0:49:110:49:15

?7. It's got to make over seven. It won't make five.

0:49:150:49:19

Will anyone start me at ?20? Who'll start me at ?10, then?

0:49:190:49:22

Come on, surely. 10. 5 I've got there, 5.

0:49:220:49:25

5. 6. 6. At 6, ?6.

0:49:250:49:28

7, fresh bid. 8 I've got.

0:49:280:49:30

9 I've got. At ?9. You'll regret it when you do the garden.

0:49:300:49:34

10 I've got. 11 I've got. Well done.

0:49:340:49:36

You've got the garden to do. 11 I've got, the lady here.

0:49:360:49:39

It's not exactly rocketing, is it? Let's face it.

0:49:390:49:41

?11 and going at 11. 11 it is.

0:49:410:49:44

They didn't give it away. I told you it was rubbish.

0:49:440:49:46

'Not a terribly promising start for James and Lucy

0:49:460:49:49

'but it's still all to play for.

0:49:490:49:51

'Hoping to start a bidding frenzy with the ?5 Wyllie picture

0:49:510:49:56

'and ?5 frame, it's Martin and James's turn.'

0:49:560:49:59

It's original, as opposed to a print. In inverted commas.

0:49:590:50:02

What do you mean in inverted commas? It's got no signature.

0:50:020:50:05

It came from his studio!

0:50:050:50:07

Charles Lionel Wyllie. We have the provenance, as well.

0:50:070:50:10

It was sold by Christie's in 2010. Smoke and mirrors.

0:50:100:50:13

Who'll start me at ?100?

0:50:130:50:15

Start me at 50, then. I'll take it. 55. 60. 5.

0:50:150:50:20

Some people are buying it. 70.

0:50:200:50:22

75, fresh bid. 80.

0:50:220:50:25

85. How much did you pay for it? 10.

0:50:250:50:28

100. At 100.

0:50:280:50:30

At 100 I've got. 110.

0:50:300:50:33

120. 120. I don't believe it. Out.

0:50:330:50:36

120 in the room here. I am stunned. Selling it in the room at 120.

0:50:360:50:40

Yes! I am shocked!

0:50:410:50:45

'The Wyllie sketch has drawn them a healthy lead.'

0:50:450:50:48

Excuse me, did I get the wrong James?

0:50:480:50:50

You did. No, you didn't. Of course you didn't.

0:50:500:50:54

'Lucy and James are hoping for more than a flicker of interest

0:50:540:50:57

'from the crowd with their silver-plated candelabra.'

0:50:570:51:00

He's getting his jacket off. 'He can sell it, too, if he gets stuck.'

0:51:000:51:04

At 25 I've got. 30. 35. 40.

0:51:040:51:08

45. 50 fresh bid.

0:51:080:51:11

55. Come on! And 60, fresh bid. Yes!

0:51:110:51:14

At ?60. At 60, you're all out?

0:51:140:51:16

At ?60. I'm selling at 60. HAMMER BANGS

0:51:160:51:20

Profit. Profit.

0:51:200:51:23

'Their hope of a large profit is snuffed out.

0:51:230:51:26

'Another disappointment.' Could've been a lot worse.

0:51:260:51:29

'Can Martin and James continue creeping ahead

0:51:290:51:32

'with little Incy-Wincy here?'

0:51:320:51:34

I love this brooch. If someone else buys it... You'll buy it off them.

0:51:340:51:37

You're not allowed. I've had that chat.

0:51:370:51:40

I've already had that chat cos I want to buy it.

0:51:400:51:42

I think it's beautiful. Who'll start me at ?70?

0:51:420:51:45

30 then? 30 I've got.

0:51:450:51:47

35. 40. 45. 50.

0:51:470:51:49

55. 60.

0:51:490:51:52

Oh, well done. At 60. 65, fresh bid.

0:51:520:51:54

70. I've got 70 in the corner.

0:51:540:51:57

Are you all done? At ?70, selling at ?70. No! Are you all finished?

0:51:570:52:01

70 it is. Thank you, at 70. That's still very good.

0:52:010:52:05

'They more than doubled their money on the spider brooch,

0:52:050:52:08

'stretching them well into the lead.'

0:52:080:52:10

Look at these boys, they're never satisfied, are they?

0:52:100:52:13

'Will the clock chime success for James and Lucy?

0:52:130:52:16

'It's time they got into the game.'

0:52:160:52:19

You don't like the clock? It is horrible.

0:52:190:52:22

They used to make ?300, ?400. I'm starting this one with me at 70.

0:52:220:52:27

I'm now looking for 80. 80.

0:52:270:52:30

90. 100. 110. Go on!

0:52:300:52:33

115. 120.

0:52:330:52:36

Keep going! 130. Come on.

0:52:360:52:38

140. At 140. 140 it is. Come on!

0:52:380:52:43

140, are you all done? Selling at 140. 140 it is.

0:52:430:52:47

Well done. Dong!

0:52:470:52:51

'Ding-dong, eh? Now we've got a real competition on our hands.'

0:52:510:52:55

There is no accounting for taste.

0:52:550:52:58

Ugly from behind. Ugly from behind. Yeah, well.

0:52:580:53:02

'Who's ugly from behind?

0:53:020:53:04

'It's Martin and James's lamp up next.

0:53:070:53:09

'Will it float the crowd's boat or will it have them all at sea?'

0:53:090:53:13

I'm excited about this next one. I'm excited.

0:53:130:53:16

Why? To see it go down!

0:53:160:53:18

They did put it on the front cover of their auction catalogue.

0:53:180:53:21

Martin, that's the first time you've ever got front cover. Thank you.

0:53:210:53:25

Who'll start me at ?100? Who'll start me at 50, then?

0:53:250:53:29

Start me at 30, then? What? 30 I've got here. At ?30. At ?30.

0:53:290:53:33

?40. ?40. 50. 60.

0:53:330:53:35

70. 80. 90. 100.

0:53:350:53:38

110. 120. At 130. I'm looking for 140 now.

0:53:380:53:43

Go on! 130 it is.

0:53:430:53:46

'A tiny profit, which keeps them slightly in front.

0:53:460:53:49

'But hold onto your hats, it's the 70s Brighton painting next.

0:53:490:53:55

'Can James prove them all wrong and cash in on the canvas?'

0:53:550:53:58

My daughter's done better than that, stuck on the fridge.

0:53:580:54:02

There it is. Beautiful picture there.

0:54:020:54:04

I personally like it. I'm with you.

0:54:040:54:07

Who'll start me at ?20? 15. 20.

0:54:070:54:10

25. 30. This is a cheap, cheap picture.

0:54:100:54:14

That's cos it's rubbish!

0:54:140:54:17

34. Thank you. Somebody knows taste.

0:54:170:54:19

38. 42. Keep going, sir. 44. At 46.

0:54:190:54:23

At 48. At 48.

0:54:230:54:26

At ?48. 48 it is, thank you. Yeah!

0:54:260:54:29

'One in the eye for the doubters,

0:54:290:54:32

'and that includes you, Lucy.

0:54:320:54:34

'There's not much between them now.'

0:54:340:54:37

That is insane! That is bonkers!

0:54:370:54:40

Who bid that? THEY LAUGH

0:54:400:54:42

'Bonkers or brilliant?

0:54:420:54:45

'Next is Martin and James's celebrity-signed menu.'

0:54:450:54:48

On the back, it's signed by Elvis Presley,

0:54:480:54:51

by Gandhi... Sure, sure. ..Muhammad Ali.

0:54:510:54:57

Someone starts me at 20. What?

0:54:570:55:00

22 I've got. 24.

0:55:000:55:03

26. 28.

0:55:030:55:06

And 30. 32. 34. 36.

0:55:060:55:10

40. 44.

0:55:100:55:12

This is great! 46. Still at 46, are we all done?

0:55:120:55:17

Whoo!

0:55:170:55:19

Hey, hang on, where's mine?

0:55:210:55:23

'A tidy profit for the chaps.

0:55:230:55:26

'Only two more items to go, so anything could happen.

0:55:260:55:29

'And Lucy and James's trunks

0:55:290:55:31

'are the most saleable items here, according to Terry.'

0:55:310:55:34

Lovely. Who will start me at ?50?

0:55:340:55:37

No! Come on. At 30. I'll take 35.

0:55:370:55:40

And 40. And 45. And 55. And 65.

0:55:400:55:44

And 75. And 80. What?

0:55:440:55:47

And 85. And 85. And selling at ?85.

0:55:470:55:51

85 it is. What?

0:55:510:55:53

'The tin trunks triumphed

0:55:530:55:56

'and there's literally only a few pounds between them.'

0:55:560:55:58

Well done, you two. Hey, boys, it's all on the Goss now.

0:55:580:56:04

'Martin and James's final hope is their commemorative collection.

0:56:040:56:07

'Could this be their crowning glory?'

0:56:070:56:09

I knew you would take the Mickey out of me for my house.

0:56:090:56:12

But it is the cheapest house we've ever sold on Homes Under The Hammer.

0:56:120:56:15

Who'll start me at ?30? Who'll start me at ?20?

0:56:150:56:18

10. 10. ?10, then.

0:56:180:56:21

Oh, no! No! Come on!

0:56:210:56:24

?5, then. Oh, no! I've got ?2 bid.

0:56:240:56:28

And I have ?3 bid at the back. You are having a laugh!

0:56:280:56:31

?8. ?10.

0:56:310:56:33

?11 I have here.

0:56:330:56:36

This is really bad. We need 20. We need 20.

0:56:360:56:38

14. 16.

0:56:380:56:41

17 I've got. At ?17 at the back, at 17 selling.

0:56:410:56:46

Well done, 17.

0:56:460:56:47

How can we possibly be let down at the end

0:56:470:56:50

by a house at the auction? That's just ironic!

0:56:500:56:53

'The commemorative lot sealed Martin and James's fate.

0:56:530:56:57

'It will only serve as a memory they'd rather forget.'

0:56:570:57:00

Let's go and console ourselves. Have a little add up our sums.

0:57:000:57:04

'They haven't done the maths, but we have.

0:57:040:57:07

'The celebs each had ?400.

0:57:070:57:09

'Martin and James cashed in on four out of five of their items.

0:57:090:57:14

'After auction costs, they made a profit of ?114.06.

0:57:140:57:19

'So despite losing, they finish with

0:57:190:57:21

'a healthy ?514.06.

0:57:210:57:26

'Winning by a nose are Lucy and James,

0:57:260:57:28

'who racked up cash on all their lots, and after costs,

0:57:280:57:32

'made a profit of ?137.08,

0:57:320:57:35

'making their final total ?537.08. Well done!

0:57:350:57:41

'All profits, large and small, go to Children In Need.'

0:57:410:57:45

# But she always knows her place, she's got style, she's got grace

0:57:450:57:48

# She's a winner

0:57:480:57:51

# Talking about that little lady

0:57:510:57:55

Great fun. Great fun, really great fun.

0:57:550:57:58

Thank you for all that expert advice. Parting is such...

0:57:580:58:01

Come on, then. Bye, guys! Well done. It was brilliant!

0:58:010:58:04

Bye-bye. Well done, you.

0:58:040:58:06

I think somebody forgot to put the roof on. I'm feeling a wet bottom.

0:58:060:58:11

'Nobody likes a soggy bottom.

0:58:110:58:14

'But it's a small price to pay for victory.'

0:58:140:58:17

That was so much fun! Wasn't that brilliant?

0:58:170:58:19

And my other husband gave me superb advice, which was spot-on.

0:58:190:58:22

Don't get jealous. He took my woman and he took my car!

0:58:220:58:26

Oh, well, I'm back again, look, here I am.

0:58:260:58:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:280:58:32

.

0:58:320:58:32

Presenters of Homes Under the Hammer, Lucy Alexander and Martin Roberts, trade homes for antiques on this celebrity road trip. Paired up with a classic car, antiques experts James Braxton and James Lewis and £400 in their pocket, they scour the shops of Hampshire in search of a bargain to sell at auction for profit. A visit to a school for spies and revelations about a collection of Sherlock Holmes memorabilia add intrigue to their journey. All profits made go to Children in Need.


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