John Nettles and Barbara Flynn Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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John Nettles and Barbara Flynn

Actors John Nettles and Barbara Flynn search for treasure around Devon and Dorset. John also hears the harrowing story of a D-Day training exercise that ended in tragedy.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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We are special, then, are we?

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Oh, that's excellent.

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..paired up with an expert...

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We're a very good team, you and me.

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..and classic car. Their mission?

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To scour Britain for antiques.

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I really want to get ahead.

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Oh, I love it.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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Yes!

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But it's no easy ride.

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There's no accounting for taste.

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Who will find a hidden gem? Who will take the biggest risks?

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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-Do you like them?

-No.

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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-Are you happy?

-Yes.

-Promise?

-Ecstatic.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal,

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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We're in the beautiful West Country for a celebrity road trip

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with stage and screen stars John Nettles and Barbara Flynn.

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Do you know the last time we were in a car together...on film?

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It's many, many years ago in an Austin A7.

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Austin A7!

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And we were about to get married in a series of A Family At War

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-and you didn't drive.

-No, no, that's true, that's true.

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I had to put my leg over and do the gear and the clutch at the same time

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-as you...

-That's it. I do remember that.

-It was hysterical.

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We'll have none of that on this programme, thank you.

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John Nettles received unorthodox driving lessons

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as Barbara Flynn's love interest in A Family At War.

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And was a memorable Tom Barnaby in Midsomer Murders for many years.

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But he'll perhaps always be best known

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for playing Jim Bergerac, the handsome Jersey detective

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who drove a 1949 Triumph Roadster.

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Our celebs are in a 1965 Mark 2 Jaguar.

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This is a lovely thing.

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Isn't it just? Though it looks more Morse than Bergerac.

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Since falling for John Nettles in A Family At War,

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Barbara Flynn has carved out a distinguished career

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on stage and screen, including The Beiderbecke Trilogy,

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A Very Peculiar Practice, Cracker, Cranford and the film, Miss Potter.

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Barbara and John each have £400 to spend

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in the battle for antique glory.

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It is one of my favourite things, looking for things.

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-Are you good at haggling?

-No. Do you like..?

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I am a complete coward. I'm very English.

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"Oh, I'll pay the price." "Everybody be nice to each other."

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"Not going to argue about it."

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I'm not sure our experts will stand for that.

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But they're jolly excited about their 1949 Triumph Roadster.

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Now, this car, I believe was the car that Bergerac had in Bergerac.

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So it's going to be a great surprise.

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Well, I hope so. Yeah. I mean, what a treat.

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Great idea.

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Auctioneer James Braxton loves anything old,

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if it's got great quality and design.

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While Christina Trevanion specialises in antique jewellery,

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but claims no expertise on John Nettles.

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I hear your mother is a fan.

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I'm afraid I rather blame John Nettles

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for one of the worst family holidays, when we went to Jersey,

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hoping to get a glimpse,

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and I was a fairly stroppy teenager at the time

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and poor old mum had to go solo in search of John.

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Today, our celebrities and experts start their road trip

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in Chudleigh and meander the highways and byways

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of South Devon, before nipping into Dorset,

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finishing at an auction in the cathedral city of Wells in Somerset.

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The small market town of Chudleigh will be a delightful starting point

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for a happy reunion between John and that lovely Triumph Roadster.

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The worst car I ever drove on screen was the Triumph Roadster,

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the Bergerac series.

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And it's the worst machine in the world to drive.

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Uh-oh!

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There we are.

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Oh, no!

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Look! He looks absolutely ecstatic.

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-This is his car.

-No, no, no!

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I better not sit on it.

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-I take back all I said.

-How do you feel? This Is Your Life.

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I take back all I've said about it, it's a wonderful car.

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-Good morning. How are you?

-I'm all the better for seeing you.

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-Do you recognise that at all?

-I do recognise that, yes.

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A lot of my DNA is on that, I would think.

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It's very nice, I love it to pieces.

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Have we thought about who's going with who and what we want to..?

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-I'm going with you. There's no question about that.

-Oh, OK!

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Tradition means there's no question about who drives the Roadster.

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The car predates seat-belt laws, which is why John and Christina

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aren't wearing any as they head straight down memory lane.

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-Did you have to do a lot of driving?

-Endless driving.

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Didn't have much of a script. 10 series of Bergerac, three scripts.

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-10 series? Gosh.

-So we had a lot of car shots.

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You'd never catch us doing that, John. Much...

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But it was unbelievably popular.

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-It was a fantastic series, wasn't it?

-It was.

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John lives in Devon these days, so he knows this patch,

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but what about the world of antiques?

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Not a... A tiny little bit.

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-I like silver work and so on.

-Good, OK.

-Glassware.

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I know what I like,

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but that's quite different from what is valuable in the auction room.

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So, John has definite tastes and admits he's rubbish at haggling.

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Let's go.

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I wonder how that'll work out?

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So, what have we got here?

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Devon Metal Detector. This is our first shop. This looks good.

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The name's a tad misleading.

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It's also a second-hand shop

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with all sorts of interesting bits and bobs.

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-Hello.

-I say... Oh, hello! Lurking behind the cabinets, Phil.

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-How are you? Are you well?

-Very well, thanks.

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-You're looking terribly tanned. Where have you been?

-Just come back from Mevagissey. Brilliant.

-Oh, lovely.

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Oh, John's from Cornwall.

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-Indeed I am. The unfashionable part - St Austell man, myself.

-Are you?

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-Well, great.

-Down in Mevagissey, eh?

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-Pentewan, as well.

-Pentewan? Beautiful.

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Now, I thought when you're in Cornwall, it was called Snozzle.

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It is called Snozzle. Down Snozzle, yeah.

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Crikey, I'm not even going to ask.

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On with the shopping.

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You take that end, I'll take this end. Let's go, get rummaging.

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OK, but no Snozzling, please.

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John is keen on military history and even wrote a book

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about the Channel Islands during World War II.

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He is quick to find a military item.

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-What have you found?

-These are from the Great War,

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which declares itself to be "The Great War For Civilisation.

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"1914-1919." What do you think? Have a look.

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Well, the key for medals is that they have to be in good condition.

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And these look like they're in absolutely mint condition.

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Look, these ribbons have barely been touched,

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they're still incredibly fresh, aren't they?

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You have the miniatures over there, as well.

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So these would be your dress ones which you would wear

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-instead of the large ones.

-I see, yes.

-If we look around...

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Can I give you those for a second?

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If we look, what should happen...

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They are actually named, as well.

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"PTE," which is Private, "WHJ Blake, Devon R."

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-A Devon boy, was he?

-He was a Devon...

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Certainly a Devon regiment.

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And they suffered enormous casualties in the First World War.

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-Did they?

-Yes, particularly at the beginning of the war,

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the demands on... The suffering was great.

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So that's...particularly poignant, that.

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I wonder whether he survived. That would be certainly interesting

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and I think that's the key for medal collectors.

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That there is something for them to research,

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they've got that historical aspect as well as having something tangible.

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They've got something to research, as well,

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so I think that's why the market is really quite popular.

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Yes, it's got a huge emotional resonance.

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The document that comes with the medals

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has few clues about Private Blake.

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-I think they're interesting. Shall we go and ask how much?

-I think we should.

-OK.

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So, Phil, we were interested in... We've got some medals here.

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-Do you know where they came from?

-Nothing whatsoever.

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No, only what's on there.

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-I do have something else here which might interest you.

-Right.

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It's to do with the First World War.

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It's a picture of the Royal Engineers Riding Squad.

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"1st Riding Squad, Royal Engineers, Aldershot, 1918."

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-Last year of the war.

-Yes, right at the end of the war.

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And they still have some horses left.

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I don't think they're related, whatsoever,

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but it could be an interesting...

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Combination, a composite set.

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Yes, exactly. So, Phil, what are we talking about for the group?

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Obviously, we've got the medals

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and now we've just introduced a picture.

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85 and 35, 120.

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-So, 85 for the medals...

-Yeah.

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-..and then 35 for the picture.

-But we could do a really good deal.

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-£75...

-75?

-..for the lot.

-OK.

-That's an absolute steal.

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I wonder what John "Let's Not Haggle" Nettles thinks.

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I think it's a reasonable price. I'd quickly steal it.

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Can I squeeze you any more?

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Oh, watch and learn, John.

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-We said 70... Well, we said 50!

-No, you did not!

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-I'll do you 70.

-£70. Super.

-Excellent.

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So the first lot's agreed at £70 with Christina's help.

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I think that's terrific.

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Meanwhile, Barbara's comparing notes with James.

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I like well-crafted things, no matter what they are.

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-The shape and form...

-Quality of materials?

-Definitely.

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So, classy things for a classy girl.

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I think these two will get along fine.

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Cos you're sitting next to a Leo, I don't lose easily.

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-You're sitting next to a fellow Leo.

-You are?

-First of August.

-No!

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I'm the fifth. Well, that's all right then, we're on the same page.

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Barbara and James have left Chudleigh

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and they're heading 10 miles down the road to Ashburton.

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Ashburton's a place full of traditions,

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most notably its ale-tasting ceremony,

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which goes back over 700 years.

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Apparently lots of beer has to be drunk,

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in order to test its quality. Of course.

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Barbara and James aren't distracted by such things, though,

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although you'd be forgiven for wondering...

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-It's nice, where are we?

-I don't know... Ashburton.

-Ashburton.

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Top marks, team.

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They're straight into Etcetera Etcetera,

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which has five rooms full of wares dating from the Georgian era

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to the 1980s.

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Looks like these two have spotted something already.

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-Is that Newlyn..?

-That's very nice. Arts And Crafts.

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It's not detailed enough for Newlyn, is it?

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Impressive knowledge.

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-Onwards and upwards.

-Moving on.

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That's quite an oriental-looking handle on it.

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That looks pretty lightweight to me.

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This lady knows her stuff.

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What will her eagle eye pick out next?

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-That's very nice, isn't it?

-It is.

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I got rid of one a long time ago and I think I really regretted it,

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because it's that little book

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-that you don't want to lose in a big bookcase.

-Exactly.

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And you've got them handy on a desk.

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It's a bit of a bargain, isn't it, 28?

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Talk of books makes James wonder how Barbara learns her lines.

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-Do you learn it visually or not?

-Yes, I sometimes write it out.

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But if it's well-written, it's easier to perform.

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But it's all different. That's really why I love it,

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-because it's never the same.

-Never the same.

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I love variety and I love to stretch and do different things.

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I've been so fortunate, I've done a lot of comedy and tragedy.

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They're very close. As we know. As we know in life.

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But it's... Oh, I've got a great job.

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So far, Barbara's playing the role of antiques hunter

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with the greatest of ease!

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It's quite honest.

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-It's quite stable, it's not at all rickety.

-Put some books in.

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-Just perfect, isn't it? I like that.

-That's a possibility.

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Sounds positive for the book trough.

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Back in Chudleigh, Christina has found some silver,

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surprise, surprise!

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-Whilst you were hunting over there...

-You were hunting over here.

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..I was hunting over here and this is probably a little bit girlie for you.

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Oh, no. What are they? Are they buttons?

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They are buttons, yes, exactly right.

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They are little buttons.

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Originally, there would have been six.

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Unfortunately, we only have five.

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But these are some of the nicest buttons I've ever seen.

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They are solid silver.

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They've got a maker's mark down here, and also a nice hallmark

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which tells us they are Birmingham and they date to 1901, so Edwardian.

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-Brilliant. They're very pretty, aren't they?

-They are pretty.

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-Silver, is it?

-Solid silver and there are button collectors

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and I just think these are really rather dinky.

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Then I also found these,

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which I think are basically the poor man's version,

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which is in silver plate, but still very sweet. Have a look at those.

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It's all gone a bit floral, hasn't it?

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-We've gone from warfare to flowers.

-That's all right.

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This is very sort of Yin and Yang, isn't it?

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Teamwork will get you far in this game.

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If we put those buttons with those buttons,

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how much could you do those for?

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£20 and I'll give you those.

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-Oh, Phil!

-How about that?

-You are a star.

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-I've also got this that might be of interest to you.

-What's that?

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-I thought maybe a sponge went in there for...

-Oh, very possibly.

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-Could have been.

-Yes, very possibly. For...

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-In the bathroom?

-A damp sponge for stamps.

-Oh, for stamps!

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To have it on your desk. For the bathroom!

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I can imagine this sitting on the side of the bath.

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Do carry on.

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It's only easy when you know.

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This chunky little piece was made by Sanders and Mackenzie of Birmingham

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in 1930 and the interior is silver-gilt.

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-So what's on that, Phil?

-That's marked at 20.

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Look, how about if I did you 20 and 10?

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£30 for the three.

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-Couldn't ask for better than that, could we?

-What do we think?

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No, he's never going to make a haggler.

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I think that's brilliant.

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With the two sets of buttons and the silver pot at £30,

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and the medals and the army photo at £70,

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John and Christina have their first two lots in the bag.

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-That's a round hundred.

-Pleasure doing business with you.

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Back in Ashburton, Barbara and James are still at Etcetera Etcetera.

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The book trough's already a hot favourite

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and James has his attention on something else.

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-Talking about something well made, feel the weight of that.

-Beautiful.

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-Absolutely beautiful.

-Feel the weight of that lid.

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-It's heaven.

-Isn't it lovely?

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-It's just a really lovely item.

-It has a key.

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It's got a lovely weighted lid. Look, this is gorgeous for a start.

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That's a lovely detail, the wood is in lovely condition.

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James has found a George III mahogany tea caddy

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dating from around 1780.

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It's had a little restoration and a replacement key.

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The lock and key were vital in the days

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when tea was a precious commodity. Ticket price is £95.

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An object of beauty, isn't it?

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But it should be about 50 or 60 quid.

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Ouch! That's going to take some haggling.

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Will dealer Robert prove to be a soft touch?

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And I had to buy it off a little old lady who needed the money

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to feed her children.

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Not a soft touch.

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With that little old lady in mind...

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JAMES LAUGHS

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-..can we..?

-So we've got 95,

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so...I think it's going to have to be £75.

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There's not a lot of leeway in that.

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-And then the trough?

-It's very, very cheap, isn't it?

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-28.

-Always could be cheaper.

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Oh, yes, I think so.

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-You know, one would have to have a very brown furniture...

-No.

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-So it's a bit of a gamble, really.

-If you fill it with coloured books,

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it'd look fantastic in any house.

0:15:520:15:54

-Yes, but...

-Don't worry about the brown malarkey.

0:15:540:15:56

But not everyone knows that, you see, not everyone knows that,

0:15:560:15:59

that's the trouble.

0:15:590:16:00

-Seems Barbara's no soft touch either.

-£20.

0:16:000:16:04

20?

0:16:040:16:05

So far, the book trough's down from £28 to £20

0:16:050:16:09

and the caddy's reduced from £95 to £75, making a total of £95.

0:16:090:16:14

John would have shaken hands long ago, but not Barbara.

0:16:140:16:17

I don't know whether maybe 80 would be in any way discussable?

0:16:190:16:25

-I don't mind a discussion...

-Good.

0:16:250:16:28

I'm not sure about the outcome.

0:16:280:16:30

Nor am I!

0:16:300:16:32

Shall we call it £85 for the two? How does that sound?

0:16:320:16:35

-It's better, isn't it?

-Well, yeah, not for me, but...

0:16:350:16:39

Gosh, she's good.

0:16:390:16:40

In an auction situation,

0:16:400:16:42

-would be rather lovely to see it...

-Go on, Robert, can we do 80?

0:16:420:16:46

Be rather lovely. Go on.

0:16:460:16:48

It would be a lovely round number, if you could possibly see your way.

0:16:480:16:51

-OK, we'll do it for £80 for the two.

-Splendid.

0:16:510:16:55

So, in a haggling tour de force,

0:16:550:16:58

Barbara's secured her first two items -

0:16:580:17:01

-the book trough for £15 and the caddy for £65.

-Thank you.

0:17:010:17:04

-Bye-bye, thanks a lot.

-Good luck.

0:17:040:17:07

That was fun.

0:17:070:17:08

Was, wasn't it?

0:17:080:17:09

John and Christina are back in the car, though,

0:17:090:17:12

heading 30 miles south to Slapton Sands.

0:17:120:17:15

John's knowledge of military history should stand them in good stead

0:17:170:17:20

in this area.

0:17:200:17:22

In 1944, it played a pivotal, but little-known role

0:17:220:17:25

in top-secret American training for the D-Day landings at Utah Beach.

0:17:250:17:31

But dreadful Allied errors resulted in more casualties

0:17:310:17:35

than on Utah Beach itself.

0:17:350:17:37

Local man Dean Small is John and Christina's guide.

0:17:410:17:45

Dean, what exactly happened here?

0:17:450:17:48

This beach was used as part of the practice landings for D-Day

0:17:480:17:53

in a big operation called Operation Tiger.

0:17:530:17:56

This being the beach chosen to simulate Utah Beach in France.

0:17:560:18:00

It had been planned for many months.

0:18:000:18:03

Thousands, 30,000, I believe, acres of local land were evacuated,

0:18:030:18:07

farmland, homes, etc.

0:18:070:18:09

On the 27th of April, 1944, British forces bombarded the coast

0:18:110:18:16

with live fire in order to simulate real battle conditions.

0:18:160:18:21

The plan was to stop firing just before the American troops

0:18:210:18:24

practised their landings at Slapton Sands.

0:18:240:18:28

-The bombardment was to soften up the coastal defences.

-Absolutely.

0:18:280:18:32

-And after that, the troops should come ashore.

-Yes.

0:18:320:18:35

So the landing craft came round that point, up to the beach,

0:18:350:18:38

and what happened then?

0:18:380:18:40

At a certain time,

0:18:400:18:41

they would have arranged for the bombardment of the shoreline

0:18:410:18:45

and the hills in the distance,

0:18:450:18:47

but, at the last moment, they changed that time.

0:18:470:18:50

That didn't filter down through to the men

0:18:500:18:53

that were landing on the beach,

0:18:530:18:54

so unfortunately the first wave of men that landed on the beach

0:18:540:18:58

were landing on a beach that was under fire. Yeah.

0:18:580:19:01

Oh, my goodness me.

0:19:010:19:04

The exact number of casualties isn't known,

0:19:040:19:07

but in another phase of Exercise Tiger,

0:19:070:19:10

tank-carrying vessels assembled along the coast

0:19:100:19:13

in Lyme Bay and disaster struck again.

0:19:130:19:16

The early hours of the morning, about 2am,

0:19:180:19:20

radio frequencies were confused and the Germans picked up on it

0:19:200:19:25

and a flotilla of E-boats were attacked

0:19:250:19:27

in the early hours of the morning.

0:19:270:19:29

The vessels were poorly protected

0:19:290:19:31

and three were hit by the German enemy boats.

0:19:310:19:34

Many of the troops on board were drowned.

0:19:340:19:37

Estimates of total casualties during Exercise Tiger vary,

0:19:370:19:40

but are generally thought to be well over 700.

0:19:400:19:44

-Was there any kind of enquiry into this?

-It was kept completely secret.

0:19:440:19:48

There was no doubt about it, they had to keep it secret.

0:19:480:19:51

They didn't want the Germans to know

0:19:510:19:54

obviously about the imminent D-Day landings

0:19:540:19:56

and so they were trying to protect that.

0:19:560:19:59

-And there were no leaks?

-No. Yeah, I mean, amazingly so.

0:19:590:20:03

Some lessons were learned and when D-Day came,

0:20:060:20:09

fewer Americans died at Utah Beach than had died during Exercise Tiger,

0:20:090:20:15

though of course casualties elsewhere were high.

0:20:150:20:18

Long after D-Day,

0:20:210:20:22

the tragic events of Exercise Tiger remained virtually unknown.

0:20:220:20:27

It was Dean's father, Ken,

0:20:270:20:29

who brought the story to the wider world.

0:20:290:20:32

He used to beachcomb on this beach regularly in the early '70s

0:20:320:20:36

and, during that time,

0:20:360:20:38

he came across bits of shrapnel, bullet heads, tunic buttons.

0:20:380:20:42

-All military things.

-All military things.

0:20:430:20:45

And he couldn't understand why, it didn't make any sense.

0:20:450:20:49

The finds prompted Ken to start asking questions.

0:20:500:20:54

Gradually, he pieced together the terrible reality

0:20:540:20:57

of what had happened.

0:20:570:20:59

He also made another find that was quite remarkable.

0:20:590:21:02

-Good Lord. So your father found this?

-Yes.

0:21:040:21:08

This is the ultimate metal-detecting find, isn't it?

0:21:080:21:11

It is quite amazing, isn't it? Amazing.

0:21:110:21:14

This is a Sherman tank, Duplex Drive,

0:21:140:21:17

so it was an amphibian tank designed to float in the water

0:21:170:21:22

and could be launched off a large ship either out at sea

0:21:220:21:26

or across rivers, lakes, etc.

0:21:260:21:28

The discovery of the tank resulted from Ken Small

0:21:280:21:32

chatting with a local fisherman.

0:21:320:21:34

He told him that there was this object on the sea bed

0:21:340:21:37

that they would often snag their nets on.

0:21:370:21:40

And he was... Dad was so curious,

0:21:400:21:42

eventually he persuaded this fisherman to go and have a look

0:21:420:21:44

and that's when they realised that it was a Sherman tank.

0:21:440:21:48

The 32-tonne truck was three-quarters of a mile out at sea

0:21:490:21:53

and 60 feet below the surface.

0:21:530:21:56

But, having uncovered the tragedy of Exercise Tiger,

0:21:560:22:00

Ken was determined it should become a memorial to the lives lost.

0:22:000:22:04

In 1984, it was salvaged.

0:22:040:22:06

There were no dead bodies in there, were there? Was there anything else?

0:22:080:22:12

Yeah, it was fully operational inside

0:22:120:22:15

-and this is the rangefinder from the tank.

-It's in good nick, isn't it?

0:22:150:22:21

It is in amazing condition, yeah. There were two of these,

0:22:210:22:24

the other one was given to the driver of the tank, who my dad met.

0:22:240:22:27

-Really?

-His name was Horace Johnson and now his son has it.

0:22:270:22:31

Sadly, Ken died in 2004,

0:22:330:22:36

but thanks to his total dedication, lives lost in Exercise Tiger

0:22:360:22:41

are regularly commemorated and have a permanent memorial.

0:22:410:22:46

Barbara and James are hitting the road once more.

0:22:490:22:52

Barbara, any of your roles prepared you for this antique hunting?

0:22:520:22:56

Cranford, I suppose you could consider that we were...

0:22:560:22:59

Well, I suppose,

0:22:590:23:00

a lot of us could be considered to be rather antiquey, ourselves.

0:23:000:23:03

My parents loved antiques and so I've got a great fondness for it.

0:23:030:23:07

And a great respect for true craft.

0:23:070:23:09

They're heading for the sea, the resort of Paignton to be precise.

0:23:090:23:15

Paignton's residents are sometimes referred to as Pudden-eaters,

0:23:150:23:19

thanks to a centuries-old tradition of creating giant puddings

0:23:190:23:23

to mark the granting of the town's charter.

0:23:230:23:26

Once again, Barbara and James are not succumbing to local habits,

0:23:260:23:29

focusing instead on the stock at Pimlico Antiques.

0:23:290:23:33

Collectables, snappy dressers, you name it and Paul's the man.

0:23:330:23:37

-Hello.

-Welcome to Pimlico.

-Thank you very much, Paul.

0:23:370:23:40

-Hello, James.

-Hello.

-Welcome to Pimlico.

-Thank you.

0:23:400:23:43

There's a lot to consider.

0:23:430:23:45

Quite useful, isn't it?

0:23:450:23:47

Like a travelling toilet mirror.

0:23:470:23:49

Doesn't go with our flash purchases so far.

0:23:490:23:53

Barbara's keeping standards high.

0:23:530:23:56

Eminently practical, these, aren't they?

0:23:560:23:58

They are. Gosh, I remember those, but I'm not sure,

0:23:580:24:01

-got some holes in it.

-I know.

0:24:010:24:03

It's done a life already, hasn't it?

0:24:030:24:05

Try again, James.

0:24:050:24:06

-Barbara, did you play the violin?

-My sister did.

0:24:060:24:09

-It was deeply...

-Painful?

-..painful, yes.

0:24:090:24:12

If at first, you don't succeed...

0:24:120:24:14

I like the glaze on that, I love the glaze of this one.

0:24:140:24:16

This is more that lovely eggshell. Sort of matte, isn't it?

0:24:160:24:20

The pottery charger features enamelled orange lilies

0:24:220:24:25

and there's a Japanese-inspired one, too.

0:24:250:24:28

They're priced at £25 each.

0:24:280:24:30

-£25?

-£25. That's a good price, James.

0:24:300:24:34

Try telling Barbara.

0:24:340:24:36

Too much for us.

0:24:360:24:37

For the two, Paul, what? Tenner? 15?

0:24:370:24:40

Did they cost you a king's ransom

0:24:400:24:42

or were they part of a mighty house clearance?

0:24:420:24:45

No, James, they're not a king's ransom,

0:24:450:24:47

but for the two, I would let you have them for £20.

0:24:470:24:53

£30 off sounds good to me. But I am no Barbara Flynn.

0:24:530:24:57

-18?

-I think...

-18?

0:24:570:24:59

-See, Barbara's been to Egypt.

-Oh, stop.

-She's a top haggler.

0:24:590:25:04

This is not my... Could be...

0:25:040:25:08

-15.

-15.

0:25:080:25:10

-15?

-No, I like the better price,

0:25:100:25:12

the 18 that you suggested the first time.

0:25:120:25:15

I wasn't really concentrating then.

0:25:150:25:18

Oops! That could cost you.

0:25:180:25:20

The 18 would give me my money back.

0:25:200:25:22

-Would it? Really?

-Yes.

-For the two?

0:25:220:25:25

As I like you, £18. There you go.

0:25:250:25:28

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

-No need to kiss me.

-OK!

0:25:280:25:32

So with another strong haggle,

0:25:320:25:35

the pair of chargers are reduced from £50 to £18.

0:25:350:25:38

Crikey! And Barbara and James have their first day's shopping

0:25:380:25:42

all wrapped up. Best to get some shuteye now,

0:25:420:25:44

because tomorrow is another day of shopping and haggling and fun.

0:25:440:25:47

Nighty-night.

0:25:470:25:49

It's a new day and John's acting confident.

0:25:540:25:57

-They can't be any competition.

-Oh, really?

-No, no, no!

0:25:570:26:00

You wait till you see what we've got.

0:26:000:26:02

-We'll give you a good run for your money.

-It'll have to be good,

0:26:020:26:05

I tell you, to beat us.

0:26:050:26:07

Well, let's assess the prospects.

0:26:070:26:09

Yesterday, Barbara and James set their sights on great craftsmanship.

0:26:090:26:13

-Feel the weight of that.

-Beautiful.

0:26:130:26:15

Acquiring a tea caddy, a book trough

0:26:150:26:17

and a pair of chargers for a total of £98.

0:26:170:26:20

-Barbara's been to Egypt...

-Oh, stop.

-She is a top haggler.

0:26:200:26:24

It leaves them with £302 still to spend.

0:26:240:26:28

That was fun.

0:26:280:26:29

John and Christina did some yin-and-yang shopping

0:26:290:26:32

buying medals and a military photo, plus a group of pretty silver.

0:26:320:26:37

John was a less-than-tough negotiator.

0:26:370:26:40

Couldn't ask for better than that.

0:26:400:26:42

But, thanks for Christina, they secured their two lots for £100,

0:26:420:26:46

leaving the duo with £300 for today.

0:26:460:26:49

A pleasure doing business with you.

0:26:490:26:52

Whatever John's failings as a haggler,

0:26:530:26:55

Christina's rather smitten.

0:26:550:26:57

He is the most unassuming, most lovely,

0:26:570:27:00

-most modest person I have ever met in my life.

-Really?

0:27:000:27:03

-He is just a delight.

-Really?

0:27:030:27:05

And so knowledgeable. And how is Barbara to shop with?

0:27:050:27:08

-She's interested. Her mother was a great auction goer.

-Oh, good.

0:27:080:27:12

Down in Hastings, so she was always coming back

0:27:120:27:15

with treasures and bargains, as you do.

0:27:150:27:17

Treasures and bargains, eh? Follow that, James.

0:27:170:27:20

-Now that we're winning...

-Winning? Oh, you think? You wait!

0:27:200:27:24

John hasn't been winding you up about any purchases, has he?

0:27:240:27:27

A little bit.

0:27:270:27:28

-Just a little.

-But I'm staying cool.

0:27:280:27:31

As they cruise towards their first shop of the day,

0:27:330:27:35

James is curious to know what Barbara gets fired up by.

0:27:350:27:40

It's always the writing that I love.

0:27:400:27:42

I was very fortunate to work for Andrew Davies

0:27:420:27:44

in A Very Peculiar Practice playing a man-eater and a woman-eater doctor

0:27:440:27:47

in a very, very tight little white...

0:27:470:27:49

-I still get letters about that.

-Do you?

-Yeah, I do.

0:27:490:27:52

Yeah, and I'm still waiting for a reply.

0:27:520:27:55

-Oh, gorgeous!

-This is a beautiful Devon village.

0:27:560:28:00

It is picture-skew, isn't it?

0:28:000:28:03

Well, they're in picture-skew territory,

0:28:030:28:06

making their way north-east through Devon towards Honiton.

0:28:060:28:10

Unlike Ashburton, with its ale drinkers,

0:28:110:28:14

and Paignton with its Pudden-eaters, Honiton's ancient tradition

0:28:140:28:18

involves the gentry throwing hot pennies to the poor.

0:28:180:28:22

Well done, let's go in here.

0:28:220:28:24

Honiton's also home to Upstairs Downstairs and Lombard's,

0:28:240:28:28

adjoining shops with one owner selling just about everything,

0:28:280:28:32

from the 17th to the 20th centuries.

0:28:320:28:35

We're feeling the pressure now,

0:28:350:28:37

because we really, really want to get ahead.

0:28:370:28:40

Barbara dives straight in

0:28:400:28:41

with a dog's head carving on a walking stick.

0:28:410:28:44

That's a very fine dog's head, isn't it? Quite humorous. It's nice.

0:28:440:28:47

But owner Barry is keener to sell the stick stand.

0:28:470:28:50

The most interesting thing here would probably be the Coalbrookdale.

0:28:500:28:54

Oh, the stand we're talking about, is it?

0:28:540:28:57

The cast-iron stick stand comes complete with a drip tray,

0:28:570:29:00

and it's stamped Coalbrookdale,

0:29:000:29:02

dated 1843 and has a ticket price of £295. Cor!

0:29:020:29:08

For somebody who collects walking sticks

0:29:080:29:10

to have a signed and dated stick stand would be rather nice for them.

0:29:100:29:14

-It does add to it all.

-Yeah.

0:29:140:29:16

How much are you selling that for, then?

0:29:160:29:19

I could let you have that for £200.

0:29:190:29:21

£95 is a decent discount, but not to Barbara.

0:29:230:29:27

Would you throw us out if we offered you 175?

0:29:270:29:30

-No, I wouldn't.

-You wouldn't throw us out?

0:29:300:29:33

No, I wouldn't, because you're very nice people.

0:29:330:29:35

So 175 you might consider?

0:29:350:29:38

I couldn't consider that.

0:29:380:29:39

-If you can squeeze another tenner...

-Another tenner?

0:29:390:29:42

-I'm not sure.

-..we can do it.

0:29:420:29:43

-I'm not sure. I think we should walk out of the shop.

-I think 185...

0:29:430:29:46

-Isn't that the Egyptian way?

-We'd better go.

0:29:460:29:48

Time's against us, isn't it?

0:29:480:29:50

-Time is against us.

-Time is against us.

-Oh, what a shame.

0:29:500:29:54

No deal. Time to find something else.

0:29:540:29:57

John and Christina have also made their way to Honiton.

0:29:570:30:00

-They're headed for Bel-Ami...

-Oh, how pretty!

0:30:000:30:04

..which has seven rooms packed with antiques and collectables.

0:30:040:30:08

They have £300 to spend,

0:30:080:30:10

so it might be Christmas has come early for owner Sue.

0:30:100:30:13

John, this is what I need for driving around in our car. Look!

0:30:130:30:17

-Oh, blimey!

-That's good, isn't it?

-Do you think?

-Oh, really good.

0:30:170:30:21

-Is it for sale?

-No.

-Oh! THEY CHUCKLE

0:30:210:30:24

John's staying focused on serious shopping.

0:30:240:30:27

-Oh, Christina, that's very pretty.

-What have you spotted, my love?

0:30:270:30:31

-Flowers.

-Oh, that's pretty!

-Very pretty, that, isn't it?

0:30:310:30:35

Are you an art lover, John?

0:30:350:30:37

-I know what I like.

-Ah!

-And I like that very much.

-OK.

0:30:370:30:40

Very much indeed. That's beautiful.

0:30:400:30:42

John's found an oil on board painting of flowers.

0:30:420:30:46

It's signed by the artist, but the name's not familiar.

0:30:460:30:50

And there are no clues as to its origins. It's priced at £45.

0:30:500:30:54

Are you drawn to sort of modern art or more traditional?

0:30:540:30:59

-I'm a figurative man, myself.

-A figurative man.

-I like this stuff.

0:30:590:31:02

To me, it looks very sort of Japanese,

0:31:020:31:05

or Aesthetic in style, that sort of very minimalist look.

0:31:050:31:08

Yeah, it's very spare. It's not got that Victorian sentimentality.

0:31:080:31:12

-No, it hasn't.

-It's a nice composition.

-Mm.

0:31:120:31:14

-Altogether, very pleasing, aesthetically.

-Like it?

-I do. I do.

0:31:140:31:18

-I do.

-So, the painting's a definite, maybe.

0:31:180:31:22

And there's more browsing to do before decisions can be made.

0:31:220:31:26

A stone's throw away, art is also on the agenda for Barbara

0:31:260:31:29

-and James.

-They've just come in.

-This is a good find, is it?

0:31:290:31:34

Well, I should think they would be an investment for the future.

0:31:340:31:39

-They are...

-We're talking about tomorrow, Barry!

0:31:390:31:42

They're a seaside resort. They look sort of...

0:31:420:31:45

-Would you say West Country?

-Yeah, definitely Cornish, aren't they?

0:31:450:31:49

Look, look. All that sort of fishingy, don't they?

0:31:490:31:52

They are St Ives.

0:31:520:31:54

But they've got a lot of history on the backs,

0:31:540:31:57

-done a lot of exhibitions in different places.

-Have they?

0:31:570:32:01

-The artist, yeah.

-Rod Pearce.

0:32:010:32:04

Those oils, both on board, signed by Rod Pearce,

0:32:040:32:07

feature two scenes from St Ives, and the pair are priced at £285.

0:32:070:32:12

Rod graduated from Chelsea Art School in 1964

0:32:120:32:16

and his works hang in a number of private

0:32:160:32:19

and corporate collections, so these could make a good buy.

0:32:190:32:22

I quite like the way he's done the seagulls. Slightly Canaletto-ey.

0:32:220:32:26

And the light from that one...

0:32:260:32:28

Yeah, light's very good in that one.

0:32:280:32:30

At auction, I would expect these to make anywhere between 80

0:32:300:32:33

and 120, to be frank.

0:32:330:32:36

-How about £80?

-I would do them for your top estimate, your 120.

0:32:360:32:41

Looks like 80 every day.

0:32:410:32:43

-80 is good.

-I thought you said 85.

0:32:430:32:46

If you want to sell them to me at 85, I'll very happily give you 85.

0:32:460:32:50

-Um...

-Would you? I'd give him 80.

-Ooh, she's tough.

0:32:500:32:53

So, I think we'll take them at 80, shall we, Barbara?

0:32:530:32:56

-Yeah, that's good. That's great.

-Thank you, Barry.

0:32:560:32:59

If you leave another 20 quid on the floor,

0:32:590:33:01

when you go, that would be much more appreciated.

0:33:010:33:04

I tell you what, ten.

0:33:040:33:06

-80 plus ten, and then you're in the money.

-That's 95, isn't it?

-No, 90.

0:33:060:33:12

-90.

-Is it? 90?

-90.

-OK.

-Are you happy with that? Yeah.

0:33:120:33:15

-Well done, Barry.

-Thank you very much.

0:33:150:33:17

I have lost a few little pennies, but I don't mind that.

0:33:170:33:20

-Cos you two are absolutely beautiful people.

-Oh!

-True, true.

0:33:200:33:23

So, cracking teamwork gets Barry's maths back on track

0:33:230:33:27

and a very generous reduction on the paintings, from £285 to...£90.

0:33:270:33:31

Wow! Fancy another go at the stick stand?

0:33:310:33:35

Come on, Barry. What can you do, eh?

0:33:350:33:37

-I think 150.

-Mentioned about 175, so...

-I was thinking 155.

0:33:370:33:42

-I wanted some more, so...

-155.

0:33:420:33:46

175.

0:33:460:33:48

Now, because it was my fault because I said 175, could you be a

0:33:480:33:53

very forgiving man and make me

0:33:530:33:55

look better in the eyes of James Braxton by getting it for 100...

0:33:550:33:59

-Darling, I can make you look better.

-No, no.

0:33:590:34:01

-we're still 170, that's so nice of you, Barry.

-OK.

-170.

0:34:010:34:06

-170.

-Yes? Oh, my goodness! I didn't ask your permission!

0:34:060:34:09

So, with the stick stand reduced from £295 to 170 and the paintings

0:34:090:34:15

snapped up for £90, Barbara and James's shopping is all done.

0:34:150:34:19

-Really good, eh?

-I'm really pleased.

0:34:190:34:21

-Why are we walking down here? The car's over there.

-I don't know.

0:34:210:34:25

Back at Bel-Ami, John's got his eye on something.

0:34:250:34:29

-Oh, Christina!

-Yes?

-Take a look at this.

0:34:290:34:32

What is this? Right, let's have a look at this. What have we got?

0:34:320:34:36

We've got a lamp. Oh, John, this is lovely!

0:34:360:34:39

You have got a good eye.

0:34:390:34:40

If you look underneath here, we've got

0:34:400:34:43

this wonderful Corinthian capital here

0:34:430:34:45

and it's got this lovely sort of fluted stem, very classical.

0:34:450:34:49

It looks to me like it's silver-plated, rather than silver.

0:34:490:34:53

But really lovely and it works as well, which is fantastic.

0:34:530:34:56

-That's good.

-So, what have we got on this?

0:34:560:34:59

Have you looked at the price before you've called me?

0:34:590:35:02

No, I haven't looked at the price. That's very naughty.

0:35:020:35:04

Prices and profits are key to victory, John.

0:35:040:35:07

£155, that's quite a lot.

0:35:070:35:10

Really, we want to get it for the region of £60 or £70,

0:35:100:35:13

in order to make a profit at auction.

0:35:130:35:16

But it's a lovely thing.

0:35:160:35:18

-Let's have a chat.

-We're going to have to haggle a little bit.

-Yes.

0:35:180:35:22

Do your best/worst.

0:35:220:35:23

John's in charge of haggling now. Stand by!

0:35:230:35:26

-Right, John?

-Now, er...

0:35:260:35:28

We're very fond, or fondish, of this.

0:35:280:35:30

We think it's a very lovely piece.

0:35:300:35:32

And it's er... And, but it's a little bit, if I may say,

0:35:320:35:36

beyond our budget at the moment.

0:35:360:35:38

I was wondering if you'd be ever so kind if you could...

0:35:380:35:41

He's terribly good, isn't he!

0:35:410:35:43

..possibly, possibly, erm...

0:35:430:35:45

..allow us a little?

0:35:450:35:47

Ha-ha! That's quite a performance.

0:35:470:35:49

Could still do with a little help from his expert, though.

0:35:490:35:52

What do you think you might be able to do us?

0:35:520:35:55

Bearing in mind he's played a policeman.

0:35:550:35:57

-He's got his handcuffs in his back pocket.

-I know.

0:35:570:36:01

I could probably let it go for about 80.

0:36:010:36:04

About £80?

0:36:040:36:06

80? Erm.

0:36:060:36:10

Another fiver less than 80, do you think?

0:36:100:36:13

What's your absolute best on it?

0:36:130:36:15

Um, my absolute, absolute best?

0:36:150:36:18

I could take off another ten but I wouldn't want to go below that.

0:36:180:36:21

-So, £70?

-Yeah.

-Oh, yes.

-Is that OK?

0:36:210:36:24

Oh, oh, oh! CHRISTINA LAUGHS

0:36:240:36:26

-Well, it's lovely.

-What are your thoughts?

0:36:260:36:29

My thought is, yes!

0:36:290:36:31

A team effort secures a hefty discount on the lamp

0:36:310:36:34

and shade, from £155 to £70.

0:36:340:36:37

But there's still the case of the £45 oil painting to crack.

0:36:370:36:43

And would I be really pushy if I said £80 for the two,

0:36:430:36:49

would that be completely out of the way?

0:36:490:36:51

Did you buy this with other things?

0:36:510:36:53

I did. And I've probably made my money so I'm going to say yes.

0:36:530:36:59

-OK. £80 for the two?

-For the two.

0:36:590:37:01

-Really?

-You're wonderful.

0:37:010:37:04

I know, I know!

0:37:040:37:05

-Thank you so much.

-Would you be happy to do it, £80 for the two?

0:37:050:37:08

-Yes, you can £80 for the two.

-Sue... I think I love you.

0:37:080:37:12

So do I! With a little help from Christina,

0:37:120:37:15

John, the supposedly hopeless haggler, has bagged

0:37:150:37:18

a total of £120 off the lamp and painting.

0:37:180:37:21

HE LAUGHS

0:37:240:37:25

And he seems pretty chuffed.

0:37:250:37:27

-Well done!

-What a lovely lady.

-What a lovely lady.

0:37:270:37:31

-We're on to a winning streak here.

-THEY CHUCKLE

0:37:310:37:35

HE SINGS: We're going to win, we're going to win!

0:37:350:37:38

John and Christina.

0:37:400:37:43

I'm pretty sure we will have a battle on our hands.

0:37:430:37:47

We will have a battle, won't we?

0:37:470:37:48

Nothing wrong with that.

0:37:480:37:50

But first, Barbara and James are leaving Devon behind,

0:37:500:37:53

to step back in time in Lyme Regis in Dorset.

0:37:530:37:56

The town's at the heart of the Jurassic Coast,

0:37:580:38:00

and famous for its fossils since the early 1800s.

0:38:000:38:04

All thanks to Mary Anning,

0:38:040:38:06

a poor local woman who made discoveries which helped

0:38:060:38:10

transform scientific understanding about the age of the Earth.

0:38:100:38:13

To find out more, Barbara and James have come to Lyme Regis Museum

0:38:130:38:17

to meet Paddy Howe, museum geologist and fossil expert.

0:38:170:38:22

-Paddy, isn't it?

-It is.

-Hello, James, hi. Very good to meet you.

0:38:220:38:24

Welcome to the Jurassic Coast.

0:38:240:38:26

She came from a very poor family.

0:38:280:38:30

This was really considered a slum area of the town.

0:38:300:38:33

But very keen, very observant, very driven.

0:38:330:38:36

Mary's family collected and sold shells and fossils

0:38:360:38:39

to help make ends meet.

0:38:390:38:41

And, in 1811, when Mary was just 12, she and her brother Joseph

0:38:410:38:45

made the world's first discovery of a complete ichthyosaur.

0:38:450:38:50

-Wow!

-Goodness me!

0:38:500:38:52

This is about 70% of the skeleton of an ichthyosaur.

0:38:540:38:58

-It's about the same size as one that Mary and Joseph found.

-Wow.

0:38:580:39:03

Joseph found the skull, and he showed Mary where to find

0:39:030:39:06

the rest of it the following year.

0:39:060:39:08

From that point, he wasn't really into fossils

0:39:080:39:10

-as Mary was.

-She took it over.

0:39:100:39:12

A huge tail. It must have swum pretty quickly.

0:39:120:39:15

Very, very powerful swimmers.

0:39:150:39:17

One of the most sturdy bones,

0:39:170:39:19

the biggest vertebrae are in the base of the tail.

0:39:190:39:22

The tail of the ichthyosaur is the engine, the tail.

0:39:220:39:25

So it's all powered from here.

0:39:250:39:29

And this, bigger than a big, great white shark.

0:39:290:39:33

A ferocious thing. You wouldn't want to be in the water with it.

0:39:330:39:35

Mary went on to discover and study thousands more fossils,

0:39:370:39:40

acquiring a detailed knowledge of anatomy.

0:39:400:39:43

Her finds include another first, the plesiosaur.

0:39:430:39:47

The fossils stimulated scientific and religious debate

0:39:470:39:50

about the age of the Earth.

0:39:500:39:53

And the gentlemen scientists of the day flocked to Lyme to see her.

0:39:530:39:57

Here is this woman who is discovering all these fossils.

0:39:570:40:02

And she brought it forward. That's an incredible thing.

0:40:020:40:04

All the scientists of the day were all working with her,

0:40:040:40:07

getting their knowledge from her, getting the information, getting

0:40:070:40:10

the finds from her, and using that to push the science forward.

0:40:100:40:13

So, she really is seminal in palaeontology.

0:40:130:40:16

Mary's contribution is widely recognised now

0:40:180:40:20

but, in her lifetime, things were very different.

0:40:200:40:23

As a woman, she couldn't join the major scientific institutions,

0:40:230:40:27

and many of the so-called gentlemen

0:40:270:40:30

were happy to take credit for her ideas.

0:40:300:40:33

Mary's private writings suggest she was all too aware of the injustice.

0:40:330:40:37

-This page, just titled, Woman.

-"And what is woman?

0:40:370:40:41

"Was she not made of the same flesh or...

0:40:410:40:45

-"The same flesh and blood as lordly man?"

-Lordly man!

-Lordly man!

0:40:450:40:50

-Lordly.

-Lordly.

0:40:500:40:51

It carries on.

0:40:510:40:53

"Yes, I am most destined, doubtless, to become his friend,

0:40:530:40:55

"his helpmate in his pilgrimage, but surely not his mare."

0:40:550:40:58

It's so biblical.

0:40:580:40:59

"For is not reason hers?"

0:40:590:41:01

So, I think, here, she is really expressing that anything a man can do,

0:41:010:41:06

she can do equally well.

0:41:060:41:07

And that she is as good as any man.

0:41:070:41:10

Mary Anning never knew how greatly she'd come to be admired.

0:41:110:41:15

But, today, Barbara and James are getting a chance

0:41:150:41:18

to follow in her footsteps.

0:41:180:41:20

Paddy's lined up some promising stones

0:41:200:41:22

for them to have a go at fossil finding.

0:41:220:41:24

So, quite ordinary, grey rocks there.

0:41:240:41:27

They're some of the most dull rocks you will see on the beach.

0:41:270:41:30

They're not round like most pebbles. They're quite angular.

0:41:300:41:35

Sharp edges or flat edges.

0:41:350:41:37

-A good skimming stone.

-Yes, actually.

0:41:370:41:40

Look at that.

0:41:420:41:44

-Oh, my goodness!

-Wow. That's not bad, is it?

0:41:440:41:48

-Would you like to have a go?

-You betcha.

-Go on, get bashing.

0:41:480:41:51

-You'll have to hit it quite hard.

-OK.

0:41:510:41:53

Think you're Mary Anning, OK?

0:41:530:41:56

Wow.

0:41:580:41:59

I'm not making...

0:42:020:42:04

Shall I have a go? I'm feeling lucky, Paddy.

0:42:040:42:07

-Remember, viewers, safety in the workshop, OK?

-Oh!

0:42:090:42:13

-Are you all right?

-Oh, no.

0:42:130:42:15

Go on, give it some welly, James!

0:42:180:42:21

-It's not as easy as it looks.

-It isn't easy, is it?

0:42:210:42:23

No, it isn't. Which is why Paddy believes in

0:42:250:42:27

the "here's one I made earlier" principle.

0:42:270:42:31

Hit it just there.

0:42:310:42:32

-And inside...

-Ah!

-That's amazing.

0:42:320:42:36

-That's incredible.

-Isn't that lovely?

0:42:360:42:38

Extraordinary.

0:42:380:42:39

And, at 65-million-plus years old,

0:42:390:42:41

the oldest antique yet on the programme.

0:42:410:42:45

John and Christina are still focused on shopping,

0:42:450:42:47

and they're tootling up the road to their next stop in Colyton.

0:42:470:42:51

Hey, look at that! We could... A fossil!

0:42:520:42:55

I think they've been fossil hunting.

0:42:550:42:56

We could take that and say we found it.

0:42:560:42:59

-SHE LAUGHS

-Works for me!

0:42:590:43:01

Christina and John are at Colyton Antiques Centre

0:43:010:43:04

where Vera and George are masterminding operations today.

0:43:040:43:07

A variety of dealers offer everything,

0:43:070:43:09

from furniture to, well, bundles of fluff.

0:43:090:43:12

-That's Katie.

-Oh, Katie, hello!

0:43:120:43:16

-Oh, look at you, Katie.

-How much for this?

0:43:160:43:19

THEY ALL LAUGH

0:43:190:43:20

-Would you do a deal on the dog?

-Do a deal on the dog?

0:43:200:43:23

-Hello, Katie.

-But she's hardly antique.

0:43:230:43:25

Oh, Katie, do you want to come antiques hunting with us?

0:43:250:43:28

-What do you think?

-No!

-No.

0:43:280:43:30

THEY LAUGH

0:43:300:43:32

Even without Katie's assistance,

0:43:320:43:34

Christina's quick to sniff something out.

0:43:340:43:36

John, what do we think about a milk churn?

0:43:360:43:38

-A milk churn?

-Do you remember these?

0:43:380:43:40

LMD, London Midland Dairy.

0:43:400:43:43

-That sounds good, doesn't it?

-Do you remember those?

0:43:430:43:45

-Would they have used those for deliveries?

-Yep.

0:43:450:43:48

We did, with glass bottles...

0:43:480:43:50

With cardboard tops.

0:43:500:43:52

-SHE LAUGHS

-Very good.

0:43:520:43:54

That's excellent.

0:43:540:43:55

-What do you think?

-Yeah, yeah, it's lovely.

0:43:550:43:57

I think we'd want to get it for £5 or £10. What's on it?

0:43:570:44:00

-Ooh, £32.

-Ah. But it's in the sale.

-Sale?

0:44:000:44:05

-So there might be some flexibility.

-So, is it haggling time?

0:44:050:44:07

I shall go and strong-arm George and see.

0:44:070:44:09

Looks as if John's embracing the art of haggling.

0:44:090:44:12

That is a milk churn.

0:44:120:44:15

CHRISTINA LAUGHS

0:44:150:44:17

You taught me last night, recognised that right away.

0:44:170:44:19

-Is it state-the-bleeding-obvious day!

-Yes, yes, yes.

0:44:190:44:23

-A slight...

-A slight profit.

0:44:230:44:25

The sale price, £32.

0:44:250:44:28

I'm not entirely sure it's that collectable

0:44:280:44:30

because it's a bit late for milk churn collectors.

0:44:300:44:33

What, 1960s? Is it?

0:44:330:44:36

I'm wondering. This is...

0:44:360:44:38

-Late '50s.

-Yeah, late '60s, '70s.

-Really?

0:44:380:44:41

I don't know. You probably remember them slightly better than I do.

0:44:410:44:44

-Thank you! Thank you very much!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:44:440:44:46

I'm not sensitive at all!

0:44:460:44:49

1960s, '70s before my time! Before my time.

0:44:490:44:52

We were hoping maybe £5 or £10 might buy it.

0:44:520:44:56

-What's your thoughts, George?

-I think 10 would be more likely.

0:44:560:45:00

-10? That's good, isn't it?

-What do you think?

0:45:000:45:03

-I think that's very good. I'd pay £10 for that.

-Would you?

0:45:030:45:07

-I'd pay more for that.

-No, no, no!

0:45:070:45:09

-No, John, shush!

-Sshh-sshh.

0:45:090:45:13

-No, it's not worth £10.

-HE MUMBLES

0:45:130:45:15

I think £10 is very fair. Yeah.

0:45:150:45:19

In which case, thank you.

0:45:190:45:21

So, Christina's managed to steer John away from a haggling disaster

0:45:210:45:25

and, with the milk churn, their shopping is finished.

0:45:250:45:28

One good churn deserves another!

0:45:280:45:30

But will everything turn sour when they reveal all to the opposition?

0:45:300:45:34

-Well, that's rather...

-Oh, thank you.

0:45:340:45:36

That looks nice.

0:45:360:45:37

-That's a very nice tea caddy.

-That's very sweet.

0:45:370:45:40

-Very heavy.

-What did you pay for that?

0:45:400:45:43

Aha, £65.

0:45:430:45:45

-Did you!

-65.

-Very nice, I like that.

0:45:450:45:48

Some pictures in the front there.

0:45:480:45:50

Oh, lovely, little street scenes.

0:45:510:45:54

-Where's that?

-St Ives, I think.

-Oh, lovely.

0:45:540:45:57

-Quality of life.

-Great skies.

-It's nice, straight from the Tate!

0:45:570:46:01

That'll be news to them, John!

0:46:010:46:03

How much did you pay for your stick stand?

0:46:030:46:05

-We paid quite a lot of money for that.

-We did, we did.

0:46:050:46:08

-£170.

-Oh, wow, OK.

0:46:080:46:10

-It's signed Coalbrookdale, and dated.

-Oh, lovely.

0:46:100:46:14

-1843.

-Very nice.

0:46:140:46:16

So you want two stick obsessesors to turn up and fight for it.

0:46:160:46:20

£170 for a piece of Coalbrookdale, that's very good.

0:46:200:46:24

-Well done. And are you pleased?

-It's very handy.

0:46:240:46:27

Erm... Delighted, delighted!

0:46:270:46:30

-Yes, delighted.

-Delighted. Delighted?

0:46:300:46:32

Your delight is delightful.

0:46:320:46:33

But what about John and Christina's buys?

0:46:330:46:36

There it is.

0:46:360:46:38

-Da-da!

-Look at theirs!

0:46:380:46:40

This is an interesting ensemble, isn't it?

0:46:400:46:43

It is interesting, yes.

0:46:430:46:46

So, talk me through it.

0:46:460:46:48

These are medals from the First World War,

0:46:480:46:50

given to a lowly private, but nonetheless valuable.

0:46:500:46:53

Very, very valuable, you understand.

0:46:530:46:55

But these are special favourites.

0:46:550:46:58

What about your ghastly picture?

0:46:580:47:00

-CHRISTINA:

-Ghastly!?

0:47:000:47:02

It's not quite the same as yours. It's a different school of thought.

0:47:020:47:05

-BARBARA:

-Do we need to see it from the front?

0:47:050:47:08

Very interesting. What did you pay for your pictures?

0:47:080:47:11

-BARBARA:

-They were really... It was...

0:47:110:47:14

-Guess how much we paid for our picture?

-About £2!

0:47:140:47:17

-No, that's terrible, no, no.

-How much?

0:47:170:47:20

-CHRISTINA:

-We paid £10. OK, we feel we've overpaid now. It's beautiful!

0:47:200:47:24

The execution, the subject matter, the colour differentiation,

0:47:240:47:27

-the background colours.

-Good luck with that!

0:47:270:47:30

Crikey, that's crushing. So, what's the bottom line?

0:47:300:47:33

Would you swap or not?

0:47:330:47:35

Would you swap? I'm not sure I would, actually.

0:47:350:47:39

There's no need to be that snooty about it!

0:47:390:47:41

I'm not snooty.

0:47:410:47:43

I'm getting very attached to these things. They've been with us now.

0:47:430:47:47

-And, good luck.

-Good luck!

0:47:470:47:49

-Yes, very best of luck.

-THEY ALL LAUGH

0:47:490:47:52

Well, it was gloves off in front of each other.

0:47:520:47:54

What will they say in private?

0:47:540:47:55

I didn't like the picture?

0:47:550:47:57

I didn't like the picture. I wouldn't give it house room.

0:47:570:48:00

I did love our things on the table, I thought they looked really classy.

0:48:000:48:04

-They looked handsome.

-Clean and nice and singular,

0:48:040:48:06

and instantly individually appealing.

0:48:060:48:08

I rather liked what they had, I have to say.

0:48:080:48:10

-Of course, not as good as what we've got.

-Of course not.

0:48:100:48:13

-I do like their stick stand rather a lot.

-Yes, I did too.

0:48:130:48:16

-But I think we will look forward to tomorrow with confidence.

-Oh, good!

0:48:160:48:19

Quiet confidence.

0:48:190:48:21

-Isn't it awful to be so competitive?

-I know, it is.

-The name of the game.

0:48:210:48:24

You've hit the nail on the head, Barbara.

0:48:240:48:27

And, as auction day dawns, the celebs are still in fighting spirit.

0:48:270:48:31

I think we're away, I think we're flying.

0:48:320:48:35

In the final analysis, when push comes to shove,

0:48:350:48:38

and people have to put their hands in their pockets,

0:48:380:48:40

I think they'll pay more for our stuff than for yours.

0:48:400:48:43

Good luck, John, the best of British.

0:48:430:48:46

The result hinges on an auction

0:48:470:48:49

in the Somerset cathedral city of Wells.

0:48:490:48:53

Construction on the cathedral began around 1175.

0:48:530:48:56

But our teams are forsaking its glories

0:48:560:48:59

in favour of some auction action.

0:48:590:49:01

What a great car, isn't it a great car?

0:49:010:49:04

CHRISTINA: Hello, hello! Hello, guys!

0:49:040:49:06

Come on. Losers!

0:49:060:49:08

McCubbing and Redfern hold monthly sales of antiques and collectables.

0:49:080:49:14

Auctioneer Allen Meechen has the gavel today.

0:49:140:49:16

So, which lots look like winners to him?

0:49:160:49:19

I like the Cornish paintings, a pair.

0:49:190:49:22

It's a modern painter, Rod Pearce.

0:49:220:49:25

Some of his paintings have been known, a single painting,

0:49:250:49:28

have been known to go up to £1,000.

0:49:280:49:30

But we'll see how things take us in the course of the day.

0:49:300:49:35

The milk churn, you're in the land of milk and honey.

0:49:350:49:38

A lot of farmers here.

0:49:380:49:39

So, let's hope they turn up today and they're not sunbathing.

0:49:390:49:43

Each of our teams started with £400.

0:49:430:49:45

Barbara and James strove for

0:49:450:49:48

craftsmanship and style in their five lots.

0:49:480:49:51

And, despite some hard-core haggling, spent £358.

0:49:510:49:56

That was fun.

0:49:560:49:57

John and Christina's five lots turned out to be an eclectic mix of

0:49:570:50:01

militaria, girlie things, and more.

0:50:010:50:03

But they didn't splash so much cash,

0:50:030:50:06

a mere £190.

0:50:060:50:07

I think that's terrific.

0:50:070:50:09

Our experts and celebs are sitting comfortably, so let the games begin!

0:50:090:50:13

Yes, you too.

0:50:140:50:16

Here we are.

0:50:160:50:17

The best of luck, best of luck.

0:50:170:50:20

First up is Barbara and James's pair of St Ives paintings

0:50:200:50:23

which the auctioneer thinks have potential.

0:50:230:50:26

Rather nice ones, these, I've got plenty of bids on it.

0:50:260:50:28

Going straight in at £120. 130 I'm looking for.

0:50:280:50:32

Bingo, bingo!

0:50:320:50:34

130 I'm looking for. 120? Are we all done? All finished.

0:50:340:50:38

No! Going...

0:50:380:50:40

Where? Did someone say something then? No.

0:50:400:50:42

£120. I'm going to sell at 120.

0:50:420:50:46

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well!

0:50:460:50:48

-It's a profit.

-It is a profit.

0:50:480:50:50

It's not a grand, but it's a decent start nevertheless.

0:50:500:50:54

As far as I'm concerned, we're all on the same team,

0:50:540:50:56

so I would have loved you to have made a lot more money.

0:50:560:50:59

We feel the same...

0:50:590:51:00

Not a convincing performance, Barbara!

0:51:000:51:03

Now, how will John's much-ridiculed floral painting perform?

0:51:040:51:07

I've had two small bids here at £15.

0:51:070:51:10

Looking for 20.

0:51:100:51:12

-Oh, got £15 already.

-That's all right.

0:51:120:51:14

20 anywhere? At £15.

0:51:140:51:17

At £15.

0:51:170:51:19

GAVEL BANGS

0:51:190:51:20

-So, that's £5.

-A little working profit.

0:51:200:51:22

-It's a little, yes.

-A little gem.

0:51:220:51:25

A fiver's not to be sniffed at.

0:51:250:51:27

-I'd be jolly pleased with 15.

-It's a warm-up.

0:51:270:51:30

THEY LAUGH

0:51:300:51:32

Now, it's Barbara's book trough, her first find.

0:51:320:51:35

£18 I'm going in at.

0:51:350:51:36

-Hey, here we go.

-20 into the room.

0:51:360:51:39

At 20, 22, 24.

0:51:390:51:41

25, 26, 26 currently.

0:51:410:51:44

28 anywhere?

0:51:440:51:46

All done at £26, it would seem we are.

0:51:460:51:50

-Oh, we're happy with that.

-Are we?

0:51:500:51:52

£11 helps Barbara and James build a respectable pot of profits.

0:51:520:51:57

I tell you what, in this business, it's all about small gains.

0:51:570:52:00

How will John and Christina's milk churn fare now?

0:52:000:52:04

£40?

0:52:040:52:06

What!

0:52:060:52:08

20 then?

0:52:080:52:09

Go on!

0:52:090:52:10

20 I've got, thank you, sir.

0:52:100:52:12

25? Any advance to 25?

0:52:120:52:14

25 bid. 30. Can I tempt you with 30?

0:52:140:52:17

People with taste, I like it. SHE LAUGHS

0:52:170:52:19

-BARBARA:

-The taste of milk!

0:52:190:52:21

Are we all done, all finished at 25?

0:52:210:52:25

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yay.

-Well done.

0:52:250:52:27

-Well done, you.

-THEY LAUGH

0:52:270:52:29

John and Christina have more than doubled their money with that one.

0:52:290:52:33

There's money in junk, isn't there? CHRISTINA LAUGHS

0:52:330:52:36

That's the kind of unnecessary comment we can do without.

0:52:360:52:38

-It's a triumph.

-THEY ALL LAUGH

0:52:380:52:39

Barbara and James took a pricey chance on the stick stand.

0:52:390:52:43

Now is the moment of truth.

0:52:430:52:45

I'm starting the bid at 120.

0:52:450:52:46

Take 10 to 130.

0:52:460:52:49

At £120. 130, 140, 150.

0:52:490:52:52

Sir, I've also got 150 here.

0:52:520:52:54

So, it's 160? 160, it's in the room.

0:52:540:52:57

170 I'm looking for?

0:52:570:52:59

At £160.

0:52:590:53:01

Fair and final warning at 160.

0:53:010:53:03

-GAVEL BANGS

-No stick enthusiasts here today.

0:53:030:53:06

So, it's a loss of £10.

0:53:060:53:09

If it's any consolation, I think it was a risk worth taking,

0:53:090:53:11

because it was a good-looking thing.

0:53:110:53:13

The medals and military photos struck a real chord with John.

0:53:130:53:17

Will the bidders feel the same?

0:53:170:53:20

£60? 60 anywhere?

0:53:200:53:22

World War I.

0:53:220:53:25

40 anywhere? 30?

0:53:250:53:28

Yeah, 30 I've got. £30.

0:53:280:53:30

-30 is bid. We're looking for 35.

-Go on, keep going, go on!

0:53:300:53:33

£35. 30 I've got.

0:53:330:53:35

Fair and final warning.

0:53:350:53:37

-At 30.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:53:370:53:38

Can I have a tissue?

0:53:380:53:40

We bought those with our heart.

0:53:400:53:43

Sadly, it was not to be.

0:53:430:53:46

-Our hearts were in the right place.

-Exactly.

0:53:460:53:48

James liked the look of the pottery chargers,

0:53:480:53:50

but there's no knowing how they'll do.

0:53:500:53:52

At £45 I'm starting the bid on that?

0:53:520:53:55

-50 into the room.

-Fantastic!

0:53:550:53:57

50. 55.

0:53:570:53:59

60. 60 I'm out. 65 I'm looking for.

0:53:590:54:02

65, sorry. 70.

0:54:020:54:04

75. 80. 85.

0:54:040:54:07

90.

0:54:070:54:09

No, 85, it's with you, sir.

0:54:090:54:11

90 I'm looking for.

0:54:110:54:13

At £85.

0:54:130:54:15

I think we are finished.

0:54:150:54:17

-Fair and final warning.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:54:170:54:19

That's really good.

0:54:190:54:20

That is an incredible £67 profit.

0:54:220:54:25

Well spotted, James.

0:54:250:54:27

-We're in the room, we're in the room.

-Back in the room.

0:54:270:54:30

John and Christina's lamp has classically good looks.

0:54:300:54:34

But can it command a handsome price?

0:54:340:54:36

Starting the bidding on it at £55.

0:54:360:54:39

-Hey!

-Now then.

0:54:390:54:40

At £55, come on, ladies and gentlemen.

0:54:400:54:43

Any? You must have seen it, over there.

0:54:430:54:45

-Right in front. There it is!

-There it is.

0:54:450:54:47

A lovely thing. Go on, go for it.

0:54:470:54:49

-Fair and final warning.

-Ooh, look!

0:54:490:54:52

Oh! 60. Believe it or not, I'd go 65.

0:54:520:54:56

CHRISTINA: Ooh, go on!

0:54:560:54:57

It's lovely.

0:54:570:54:59

Yes, it's beautiful.

0:55:000:55:03

At the moment, you've got it. 70 I'm out. 70 in the room.

0:55:030:55:06

75 anywhere else? At 70.

0:55:060:55:07

What a wonderful lady.

0:55:070:55:10

She is a wonderful lady.

0:55:100:55:12

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well done.

0:55:120:55:14

Thank you so much.

0:55:140:55:16

I'll get John to sign it.

0:55:160:55:18

I'll buy you a plug. I'll get you a plug.

0:55:180:55:21

It was a valiant try, Good effort, team.

0:55:210:55:25

Barbara and James loved the craftsmanship in the tea caddy.

0:55:250:55:28

Will anyone pay a premium for it, though?

0:55:280:55:31

Straight in at £45.

0:55:310:55:33

50 into the room. 50. 55.

0:55:330:55:35

60, sir? It's in the room at 60.

0:55:350:55:37

65 I'm looking for. 60 I have.

0:55:370:55:40

65 I'm looking for.

0:55:400:55:42

65, new bidder.

0:55:420:55:43

-70, sir?

-Go on.

-Yes, tea, tea!

0:55:430:55:46

70. 75?

0:55:460:55:48

Tea, you need it!

0:55:480:55:50

At £70, are we all done?

0:55:500:55:52

-Are you allowed to bid?

-No, I'm not bidding!

0:55:520:55:54

I'm not allowed to.

0:55:540:55:55

70... I'll take your bid, if you want?

0:55:550:55:57

I can't. I would.

0:55:570:55:59

At 70, are we all done?

0:55:590:56:01

It's all right. We ended up plus.

0:56:010:56:04

James. It's more stress. It's so stressful.

0:56:040:56:08

Stressful but worth it. That's another fiver for Barbara and James.

0:56:080:56:12

John and Christina's buttons in a silver jar make up the last lot

0:56:120:56:16

under the hammer. And they are hoping for a grand finale.

0:56:160:56:19

-I've got bids on.

-Ooh, he's got bids.

0:56:190:56:21

£25 I'm starting at. 30 into the room.

0:56:210:56:24

30. I've got 35, looking for 40.

0:56:240:56:27

-Got to be more than that.

-£35, looking for 40.

0:56:270:56:30

At 35.

0:56:300:56:32

No buyers left in the room! SHE LAUGHS

0:56:320:56:35

Commission bids are out, 40 I have.

0:56:350:56:38

-All done? I think we are.

-Oh, he's bidding!

-45, new bidder.

0:56:380:56:42

-50, sir? Are you sure?

-Go on, they're lovely!

0:56:420:56:44

The wife's going to talk about you when you leave.

0:56:440:56:47

-45 over there, they are pretty.

-They're very pretty.

-Very.

0:56:470:56:50

Go on, 50. It won't come again, I had to beg you.

0:56:500:56:53

-55?

-You, sir, Are you still bidding?

0:56:530:56:55

£50. At £50 here.

0:56:550:56:58

Seated at the front. Sold at 50.

0:56:580:57:00

Well done. They are lovely.

0:57:000:57:02

They're very lovely.

0:57:020:57:04

Boosted by a little extra sales patter,

0:57:040:57:07

the jar and buttons made a very useful profit.

0:57:070:57:10

But where does that leave our teams?

0:57:100:57:12

That was very close. Shall we go outside and do the maths?

0:57:120:57:15

-I think you can.

-Did you keep count? My brain's fried.

0:57:150:57:17

Well, a clear head and a calculator can reveal

0:57:170:57:20

that John and Christina's profits were up and down like a yo-yo.

0:57:200:57:23

But, after commission, they actually lost £34.20.

0:57:230:57:27

So end the trip with £365.80.

0:57:270:57:31

Barbara and James had their moments too.

0:57:310:57:33

But, thanks largely to the pottery chargers,

0:57:330:57:36

they're the victors on this road trip with profits of £20.02.

0:57:360:57:41

And a total of £420.02.

0:57:410:57:44

All profits, no matter how small, go to Children In Need.

0:57:440:57:47

-Oh, my goodness! That was full of highs and lows.

-It was.

-It was.

0:57:470:57:51

Incredibly good fun.

0:57:510:57:53

-I've done a bit of adding up.

-Have you? You've done the sums?

0:57:530:57:56

Yeah, and I can reveal that...

0:57:560:57:59

Christina and John are today's losers, I'm afraid.

0:57:590:58:02

BARBARA BURSTS OUT LAUGHING

0:58:020:58:04

Ohhh! Oh, I'm sorry.

0:58:040:58:06

It was cruel.

0:58:060:58:07

I'm continuing a long tradition, I'm sorry to say.

0:58:070:58:09

I knew it, you're a champ.

0:58:110:58:13

Well done.

0:58:130:58:14

A valiant attempt. Valiant.

0:58:140:58:16

There wasn't a lot in it.

0:58:160:58:18

-Anyway, to your cars.

-To the cars.

0:58:180:58:22

-Bye!

-Bye.

-Farewell!

-Bye-bye.

0:58:220:58:25

Very lovely, weren't they?

0:58:250:58:27

-It's been very, very enjoyable, hasn't it?

-It has been.

0:58:270:58:30

Boy, are we lucky?

0:58:300:58:31

-And I've loved my driver.

-JOHN LAUGHS

0:58:310:58:33

-And you.

-Oh, thank you very much!

0:58:330:58:36

It's been fantastic.

0:58:360:58:37

It certainly has!

0:58:370:58:39

Bergerac's John Nettles takes on actor Barbara Flynn in a search for treasure around Devon and Dorset. Barbara learns about the local woman who was a scientific pioneer. Military enthusiast John also hears the harrowing story of a training exercise for D-Day that ended in tragedy.