Phil Vickery and Martin Offiah Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Phil Vickery and Martin Offiah

Rugby stars Phil Vickery and Martin Offiah take to the antiques trail around Bristol with the help of experts Margie Cooper and Christina Trevanion.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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We are special then, are we?

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Oh, that's excellent!

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..paired up with an expert...

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I'm getting stressed.

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..and a classic car.

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Their mission? To scour Britain for antiques...

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I have no idea what it is.

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Oh, I love it!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no easy ride.

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There's no accounting for taste.

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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Who will take the biggest risks? Will anybody follow expert advice?

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-Do you like them?

-No.

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There will be worthy winners, and valiant losers.

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-Are you happy?

-Yes...

-Promise?

-..ecstatic.

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Time to put your pedal to the metal,

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this is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Yes.

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On this Celebrity Antiques Road Trip

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we're expecting a bit of a scrum...

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Let's get the show on the road!

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..between rugby stars Phil Vickery

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and Martin Offiah.

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Life on the open road!

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I feel like I'm literally going to war!

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And in a competition this intense,

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they might as well be.

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Now, Martin "Chariots" Offiah -

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to give him his Sunday name -

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is a legend of rugby league

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and one of the greatest try scorers of all time,

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most notably for teams Widnes and Wigan.

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Since retiring from the game he's become a popular sports pundit

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and has turned his talents to appearing on Strictly...

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Oh-h!

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I say!

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I used to watch you as a kid playing league,

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because you were a proper superstar, weren't you?

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Well, you're showing my age there!

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I'm obviously a generation before you.

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..while Phil Vickery's name is legend

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in the world of rugby union.

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Known as the Raging Bull,

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this former England captain was part of the winning side

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for 2003's glorious victory in the Rugby World Cup.

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Since he left the game, he's also made a name for himself in the media

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winning 2011's Celebrity MasterChef.

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Bravo, eh?

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So, we can expect this to be a competitive event.

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I feel like I'm on a roller coaster, right now.

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It certainly is going to be a wild ride.

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And today Martin and Phil are driving a sturdy Land Rover

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dating from way back in 1952.

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So, how did we end up in the middle of the West Country,

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going uphill, in what I think is a 1950s...

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Land Rover.

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-Oh-h!

-Whoa!

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I'm asking myself the same question -

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why I'm letting YOU drive ME around in this vehicle.

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Well, we're here in Gloucestershire on the Antiques Road Trip...

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You are indeed!

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The Land Rover was manufactured before seat belts were mandatory -

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hence the boys aren't buckled up, but the car's 1950s transmission

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seems to be giving them a bit gyp.

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What's this...?

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ENGINE REVS

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What gear's that?

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You'll get used to it.

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She's warming up now. She's happy. She's warming up.

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What do you know about antiques?

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-Seriously, you must know something.

-I know they're made out of wood.

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Obviously, wood antiques are made out of wood.

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Er...yes.

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But, fear not, guiding these two sporting heroes

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are two grand dames of the antique world,

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auctioneer Christina Trevanion

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and silver expert Margie Cooper.

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It's Thelma And Louise, this!

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It IS like Thelma And Louise!

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If you say so.

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They're piloting a 1980 Corvette Stingray.

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And is it good to drive?

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It is very good to drive.

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Each with £400 to spend,

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our two pairs will journey from Stroud in Gloucestershire

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around the winding byways

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of the south-west

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to end up in an auction

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in the city of Bristol.

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My agent didn't really explain this!

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We get that a lot, Martin.

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But, no matter, it's time for celebrities to meet experts.

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Oops...! Martin seems to have lost this hat.

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But he's keeping his head... (just about.)

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Hey, look at this!

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It's a Land Rover!

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It's stalled.

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(Oh, dear.)

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-Do you want me to give you a push?

-I can't believe it.

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Oh, it's a Landie!

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Oh, God! That's what happens

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when you leave him in charge of anything.

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That's what you call a road trip!

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Very nice to meet you!

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Made it...just.

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Not a problem.

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And they've already decided Christina will pair with Martin

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and Margie with Phil.

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Now, have we decided...

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who is going to go in... which vehicle?

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Yeah, I've decided.

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I've decided.

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It took you all of a nanosecond.

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Am I going to be pushing this?

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We could be stranded.

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-Yeah! Oh, well, I don't mind being stranded with you.

-OK.

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That's fine. It's all good.

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You ARE getting on swimmingly.

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It's time for the off.

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-Have fun, guys.

-It's part of the excitement.

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And the pretty Cotswold town of Stroud

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makes for a delightful place for Martin and Christina

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to start the day.

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They're leaving the vehicle for the time being

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and striding off towards the Antiques Emporium

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where they're meeting dealer Jenny.

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-Hello.

-Hi. What's your name?

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-I'm Jenny.

-Martin.

-Hi, I'm Christina.

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Time for a proper rummage in this centre's ample stock.

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I love a good rummage.

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Oh, good. So do I.

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Jolly good.

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They're really casing the joint here.

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So, what are we looking for, Martin? What do you like?

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I am looking for a deal.

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Phil has made it perfectly clear on day one that he wants to win this.

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And I am in his own backyard, so...

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-Oh.

-I'm a London boy.

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-So, does he live around here?

-Yeah, he's from Gloucester -

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from these parts, as they say.

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And he's told me that,

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there's no way that a city slicker is going to come

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-to his neck of the woods and win.

-And make any money.

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-Oh, that is fighting talk!

-Isn't it?

-We've gotta win!

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This match is definitely on.

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But does Martin have any form in the antiques game?

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I've got a few antique-y pieces.

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You know, ornate mirrors and... a few bits and pieces here and there,

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stuff I've bought abroad,

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and I've been to a few car-boot sales.

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I love it that you've been to car-boot sales,

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so get down, get rummaging.

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I have bought something at a car-boot sale and sold it for a profit at auction.

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I never do that. Well done.

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Very impressive, Martin.

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Who's the expert here, again?

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So having a good old rummage here.

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Soon, Martin spotted something hidden in a jumble of stock.

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What's this?

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A slot machine.

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I wonder if this works.

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Is this something that I could potentially sell...

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in an auction?

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I mean, it's jolly quirky, isn't it?

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It's a fruit machine, or one-armed bandit,

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probably dating from the 1970s.

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Would you have that in your house?

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Yes, I used to have arcade games in my house

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when I lived in Manchester.

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-I used to charge people 20p to use them.

-You didn't!

-I did!

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Hey, you're a shrewd customer, Martin. I like it.

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Ticket price on the fruit machine is a substantial £140.

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Time to speak to dealer Jenny.

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How long has it been there?

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-A while.

-THEY LAUGH

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-Deep in the back.

-Deep in the bowels. Yes.

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-It weighs a ton.

-Does it?

-Yes.

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It is full of old coins. So you're OK.

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-Oh, really?!

-Yep.

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You've just got no key to get into it.

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So it'll be a rank frustration. A bit like having a money box...

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That you can't open!

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But it does light up when you plug it in.

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Does it work?

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Yes, it works in as much as you would call it

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a very sort of boys-toy lamp, I think,

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rather than fruit machine.

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It is being sold as a decorative item rather than a functional game.

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So will that help them on the price?

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Can we come under the hundred pounds? Is there any chance?

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-Yeah...

-We would want to be getting it for £60.

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-You're going to take it away today?

-We're going to take it away...

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So you're going to move everything, tidy up afterwards.

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Cold, hard cash. And I've got a rugby player to help me lift it out.

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Cool. 80 at the absolute death.

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And it'll be just for the fun of watching you try and dig it out.

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So, are we doing a deal?

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-Yes, we'll do the deal for 80.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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Deal done at £80.

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Now, they just have to get it out of there.

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Good thing Martin's here, eh?

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Come on, Muscles!

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That bold deal shows he's got the brawn and the brains.

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-Keep going, keep going.

-Keep going?

-Yeah, we've got a hill to climb yet.

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Now, Phil and Margie are motoring on in the Corvette.

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And Margie's quizzing Phil on his knowledge of the competition.

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So, do you know Martin?

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-I do know Martin, but we're a generation apart.

-Right.

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So I just crossed over with him at the end of his career,

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but he's someone who I used to watch as a kid and be inspired by,

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-particularly from his rugby league days.

-Really?

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He was tough, he was fast, try scorer,

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just an unbelievable talent.

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He could do things which...

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..other guys just wouldn't even be able to comprehend, so...

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So, he's not going to do that in the shops, is he?

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I doubt there'll be room, Margie.

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He's very competitive.

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He likes a bit of fun.

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But let me assure you, he won't want to lose.

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So...it's going to be interesting.

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And we cannot let Martin beat us.

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Oh, no! You're putting pressure on me now.

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You're really going to have to...

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TRY, Margie! Ha!

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They're heading for the town of Cirencester,

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an ancient market town known as the Capital Of The Cotswolds,

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where they're heading for Cirencester Antiques Centre,

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and meeting dealer Brian.

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-Morning.

-Hello, good morning. Welcome to Cirencester.

-Thank you.

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-You're Brian.

-I'm Brian.

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There's plenty to see in this shop, so best get stuck in.

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Martin and Christina were pretty focused on their buying,

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but these two seem happy, well, just to have a lark about.

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HE BLOWS TUNELESSLY

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Hey, I don't think that strikes the right note.

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Can you see the resemblance?

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You could be brothers.

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Soon, Margie's quizzing Phil on his triumphant turn on TV's MasterChef.

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Who was your judge?

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-John Torode and Gregg Wallace.

-Oh, Gregg Wallace.

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-Gosh.

-Yeah. Well, Gregg's easy, just anything sweet.

-Yeah.

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-HE IMITATES GREGG:

-Oh, nice.

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Hey, an uncanny impression, Phil.

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-That's modern, that's been tampered with.

-It has, yeah.

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-Yeah, it has, yeah.

-That's not...

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-POSH ACCENT:

-I say, I watch these type of shows, you know.

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Glad to hear it, Phil.

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And his discerning eyes soon settled on something else.

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-I like this.

-Do you?

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It's a leather pouch,

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designed to hold magazines for a sub-machine gun,

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military in origin and dating from the mid-20th century -

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ticket price is £45.

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-Have you got the key, darling?

-Yes, sure.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Just get this open.

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Phil is smitten with this piece of vintage militaria.

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I like it, because it looks used. I like it. I'd like to buy it.

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-Would you?

-At the right price.

-I can try and do a bit for you.

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-What's a bit?

-Cos it's 45...

-Yeah, but it's not worth 45, is it?

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-That's the reality of it.

-How about...

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-Yeah?

-25.

-..35?

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-£30.

-£30? Got a deal. Nice doing business.

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Blimey, Phil doesn't mess about, he's off like a shot.

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And they've got their first item for £30.

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Now, Margie's got her eye on something.

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-Those little things at the back there.

-What have you spotted?

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It's a pair of solid silver salts in the form of baskets

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and they've really taken silver expert Margie's fancy.

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Ticket price is £48.

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And, you know, they're Victorian.

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-I think they're quite sweet.

-They're sweet.

-Which gives me pressure.

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You're the encyclopaedia of silverware extraordinaire.

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-I just like those.

-If you like them, I like them. We like them.

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-If they can be 30, I'll close the deal on those.

-How about 35?

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Shall we split?

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OK, then. Go on. Deal.

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And with all the coordination of a professional athlete.

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So we're going to what? £32.50?

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But these two know what they want.

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And they know how to get it -

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a second sterling deal all wrapped up in record time.

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-Right, that's lovely, thank you very much, Brian.

-It's a pleasure.

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Martin and Christina, meanwhile, are still back in Stroud

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and driving to their next shop.

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The trusty old Land Rover seems to be back to full health.

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-Best car ever for the Road Trip for me.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

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There is a lot to be said for good old-fashioned engineering, I think.

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-Oh, honestly...

-I thought you were going to say, "They made things to last back then!"

-Yeah, exactly.

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So, let's hope they can find something as ancient and durable

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in their next shop. They're heading for Armchair Antiques.

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-Hi. Hi, Christina, how are you?

-Hi, very well, thank you.

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-Pleased to meet you.

-What's your name?

-My name's James.

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-James. Hi, James.

-Hi, James, Martin.

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-Martin, pleased to meet you, how are you doing?

-This is... This is...

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all looking very clocky.

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This shop indeed specialises

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in selling and restoring antique clocks...

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..though there are some other items dotted about, as well.

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Dartboard, yeah, that's my recreation. That's not for sale.

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THEY LAUGH

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So how much money would you want for said comics in a box?

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They'll be £100.

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Holy baloney, Robin!

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-AMERICAN ACCENT:

-Holy baloney, Robin!

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Whilst Martin had his pick this morning,

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this afternoon Christina's taking the lead.

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-What's this?

-Oh, that one, yeah. That's quite nice.

-Oh, here we go.

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So this is, obviously, a canteen of cutlery.

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It is, indeed - an Edwardian, silver-plated canteen of cutlery,

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presented rather cunningly in a mahogany table.

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Well, we've got fish knives and forks there, jam spoons,

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sauce ladle, we've got, obviously, a carving set.

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Something missing there.

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-I think...

-Well, it looks like a nice piece.

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-I haven't seen anything like this before.

-That's rather attractive.

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-What have you got on that, James?

-I've got 100 on it at the minute.

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-I like it...

-Can be negotiable...

-..but don't like it that much.

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What's the best we could do with this, do you think?

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What sort of price were you thinking of, then? Don't say 30.

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-I was thinking, if...

-40?

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Crumbs, Martin, you're getting the hang of the hard haggle.

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-£40 then and, yeah, we'll shake on that.

-Oh, blimey! Oh!

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OK! Thank you.

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Run, run, run!

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What a deal! Talk about tackling them low.

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They get the table and all the cutlery inside for a bargain £40.

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But they're still scouring the shop for more items.

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This is a bit random. Why have you got a Canterbury underneath here?

0:15:310:15:34

Oh, we collect so many things over the years.

0:15:340:15:37

It's got quite a lot of dust on it, James.

0:15:370:15:39

-That's been there for a while.

-Is that for sale?

0:15:390:15:42

It can be, yeah. Don't know why I put it there, to be honest.

0:15:420:15:45

That's all right. Oh, blimey, I've just managed to pull it to pieces.

0:15:450:15:49

It's a bit...

0:15:490:15:50

-Oh, blimey! I really have managed to pull it to pieces, look.

-Oh, no!

0:15:500:15:54

Is that to try and get the price down?!

0:15:540:15:56

I wouldn't put it past her, James.

0:15:560:15:58

-It looks like a magazine rack.

-Yeah, it's a Canterbury, exactly.

0:15:580:16:01

It is, indeed, a Victorian Canterbury,

0:16:010:16:04

used for storing magazines or sheet music.

0:16:040:16:06

What would you like for it?

0:16:060:16:08

I'm open to offers, really,

0:16:080:16:10

-because I actually didn't know I had it, so...

-Oh, really?

0:16:100:16:14

Pretty embarrassed, really.

0:16:140:16:15

I do think it needs a lot of TLC.

0:16:150:16:17

-I mean, it's a project piece, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

0:16:170:16:19

I mean, this...

0:16:190:16:22

Well, it is now.

0:16:220:16:24

Would you kill me if I said a fiver?

0:16:240:16:26

It saves it getting any more dusty. Yeah, go on, then, we'll do a fiver.

0:16:280:16:32

Yeah?

0:16:320:16:33

It's an antique and it's a fiver, so...

0:16:330:16:36

-hopefully we can't lose.

-No.

0:16:360:16:38

Another bargain on the rack James didn't even know he had.

0:16:390:16:43

Thank you very much. James, you're a star.

0:16:430:16:45

Right, have you got a duster and some glue?

0:16:450:16:48

We'll sell it like that - we'll still make money.

0:16:480:16:51

Over in Cirencester, Phil and Margie are back in the car

0:16:530:16:56

and country boy Phil is filling Margie in on some of his interests.

0:16:560:17:00

Myself and my wife at home have got a few horses,

0:17:000:17:03

but I'm actually more interested in what it brings to the countryside,

0:17:030:17:07

with the farriers and the shops.

0:17:070:17:09

-It's part of our heritage, isn't it?

-No, it is. It is.

0:17:090:17:12

I think it's an important part of our heritage.

0:17:120:17:15

With horses and heritage high on their agenda,

0:17:150:17:18

they really are in for a treat today.

0:17:180:17:20

They're heading for the outskirts of town to spend

0:17:200:17:22

the afternoon at Cirencester Park Polo Club...

0:17:220:17:25

..where they're meeting executive polo manager Tim

0:17:290:17:32

and assistant polo manager Kim.

0:17:320:17:35

-Hello.

-Welcome to Cirencester Park Polo Club.

-Thank you.

0:17:350:17:40

-Thank you.

-Nice to have you here.

0:17:400:17:43

This polo club, which bills itself as Britain's most historic,

0:17:430:17:47

certainly has an illustrious past.

0:17:470:17:49

With strong ties to the royal family,

0:17:490:17:52

the club was inaugurated under the seventh Earl Bathurst

0:17:520:17:56

in the grounds of his own estate, here in 1894.

0:17:560:18:00

We're celebrating our 120th anniversary this year -

0:18:000:18:03

120 years of history at Cirencester, that's quite a lot.

0:18:030:18:06

Which is a history full of stories.

0:18:060:18:08

But the game of polo has been around just a little longer than that.

0:18:080:18:13

Where did it come from and how long has it been a sport?

0:18:130:18:16

What's the history of it?

0:18:160:18:17

It originated in Persia, I think, going back before,

0:18:170:18:21

-I don't know, 600 BC, somewhere like that.

-Goodness gracious.

0:18:210:18:25

And then when the British Army was in India,

0:18:250:18:28

they saw it as a sport and brought it back and then

0:18:280:18:31

they were the ones that pretty much moved it round the world,

0:18:310:18:34

was the Army.

0:18:340:18:35

Polo came to British shores during the Victorian period

0:18:350:18:38

and was embraced most firmly by the highest echelons in society.

0:18:380:18:43

It's been played and loved

0:18:430:18:45

by several generations of our royal family

0:18:450:18:47

and it was the Queen's cousin, Lord Mountbatten,

0:18:470:18:50

who arguably gave us the game as it's played today.

0:18:500:18:54

Until about 1938, there wasn't too many rules at all and then I think

0:18:540:18:59

it was Lord Mountbatten,

0:18:590:19:01

who was a lover of the sport and played it a lot,

0:19:010:19:05

he formalised the rules in 1938.

0:19:050:19:08

And pretty much the same or very similar to what we use now.

0:19:080:19:13

Tim and Kim are taking our polo novices to see

0:19:140:19:17

one of the club's most prized possessions.

0:19:170:19:20

-My word!

-Here it is, the Warwickshire Cup.

0:19:200:19:23

-Wow! What a trophy.

-Wow, that is a trophy.

-Absolutely splendid.

0:19:230:19:27

The Warwickshire Cup is the oldest polo trophy in the country

0:19:300:19:34

and one of the most illustrious.

0:19:340:19:37

It's one of the sort of top three tournaments in the country.

0:19:370:19:41

So you've got the Gold Cup,

0:19:410:19:42

the Queen's Cup and the Warwickshire Cup.

0:19:420:19:45

Can you go to dinners off the back of winning this or not?

0:19:450:19:47

I'm sure they could, yeah.

0:19:470:19:50

Most certainly.

0:19:500:19:51

Stunning.

0:19:540:19:55

Just like you, Margie, stunning.

0:19:550:19:58

Well said, Phil, you're a gent.

0:19:580:20:00

But, of course, they can't come here without having a go themselves.

0:20:000:20:04

Anyone for a chukka?

0:20:040:20:05

-So, jump up.

-Right.

-And I'll help you.

0:20:050:20:08

No, you... Yeah.

0:20:080:20:09

First on these wooden steeds...

0:20:090:20:11

-This one's called Volcano.

-Volcano?

-Yep.

0:20:110:20:14

That's good, that's good.

0:20:140:20:16

Look at that!

0:20:170:20:19

Hey... Oh.

0:20:190:20:20

I thought you'd do that!

0:20:200:20:22

I tell you what, this polo lark's easy.

0:20:220:20:24

THEY LAUGH

0:20:240:20:25

Don't speak too soon, Phil!

0:20:270:20:28

Do you think we're ready for the real thing?

0:20:300:20:33

GRUNTING LAUGHTER

0:20:350:20:38

It's years since I've done this!

0:20:410:20:43

That's enough horsing about, you two.

0:20:430:20:45

Look at that - perfect!

0:20:460:20:47

Aggh!

0:20:480:20:50

Hey...!

0:20:500:20:51

Oh, yes!

0:20:530:20:54

Bang on, Phil.

0:20:540:20:56

Perfect. A little bit of tuition, they'd be right up there

0:20:560:20:59

and ready to start their new career as polo players.

0:20:590:21:03

Thank you very much, everybody. You've been very patient with us.

0:21:030:21:06

No, it's been great having you here. It really has.

0:21:060:21:10

Thank you very much.

0:21:100:21:11

At that final chukka,

0:21:110:21:12

it's the end of a terribly sporting first day on the road trip.

0:21:120:21:17

Night-night.

0:21:170:21:18

But nothing will keep this lot off the road for long

0:21:210:21:24

when a game is afoot.

0:21:240:21:26

The morning sun greets them back in the car and they are raring to go.

0:21:260:21:29

Martin and Phil are together in the Land Rover

0:21:290:21:32

and comparing notes on each of their team's dynamics.

0:21:320:21:35

I think we've established our relationship quite well -

0:21:350:21:38

ie, she drives, she's in charge, and I just sort of follow along!

0:21:380:21:43

I think there was a common theme there.

0:21:430:21:46

While Christine is in charge of your team,

0:21:460:21:48

I can assure you Margie's in charge of mine.

0:21:480:21:51

Although the chaps have each chosen an item so far.

0:21:510:21:54

I always think that a successful team

0:21:540:21:57

happens when everyone knows their role, you know what I mean?

0:21:570:22:00

If you're meant to be kicking the ball, you kick the ball.

0:22:000:22:04

If you're a grafter, you graft.

0:22:040:22:07

If you're a big money star, you've got to come up with some big plays.

0:22:070:22:10

So it will be interesting to see what roles these two big money stars

0:22:100:22:14

take on today.

0:22:140:22:15

Meanwhile, in the other car,

0:22:150:22:17

Margie and Christina are also comparing notes.

0:22:170:22:20

Well, I am enjoying Phil's company.

0:22:200:22:23

-My guy's an MBE.

-Ah!

-Is yours?

0:22:230:22:26

I shall ask mine when I see him.

0:22:260:22:28

Phil's an MBE too. Yes. Now, don't let's squabble, girls.

0:22:280:22:32

Look, he's been captain of England, and they won the World Cup.

0:22:320:22:36

Yeah, yeah... Martin's muscley-er than Phil.

0:22:360:22:38

Hey, ladies!

0:22:380:22:40

In we go.

0:22:400:22:41

They're all planning to meet up at the local rugby club.

0:22:440:22:46

Very appropriate.

0:22:460:22:48

But the boys seem to be a little lost.

0:22:480:22:51

Come on, guys - for ever waiting.

0:22:510:22:53

It wouldn't be a road trip without getting lost, would it?

0:22:530:22:55

Can't not get lost on a road trip.

0:22:550:22:57

It wouldn't be the Antiques Road Trip, I assure you!

0:22:570:23:01

MARGIE AND CHRISTINA CHEER

0:23:010:23:04

Here we are! We made it.

0:23:040:23:06

-We got lost.

-Where have you been?

0:23:060:23:07

MARGIE AND CHRISTINA: How'd you get lost?!

0:23:070:23:10

It's a rugby pitch.

0:23:100:23:11

-I know.

-Surely, you would know where every rugby pitch in the UK is.

0:23:110:23:14

Come on, then. Let's head off.

0:23:140:23:17

So far, Martin and Christina have spent £125 on three lots...

0:23:180:23:22

..the one-armed bandit, the Victorian Canterbury,

0:23:240:23:27

and the canteen of cutlery presented in a table.

0:23:270:23:30

That gives them £275 left to spend today...

0:23:300:23:36

-Marvellous.

-Pleasure doing business with you, James.

-Thank you, sir.

0:23:360:23:39

..while Phil and Margie have spent a slight £62.50 on two lots...

0:23:390:23:44

..the pouch for a gun's magazine,

0:23:460:23:49

and the set of silver salt dishes.

0:23:490:23:51

So that leaves them with a generous £337.50 in their coffers.

0:23:510:23:55

-Do you carry a purse, Phil?

-I don't carry a purse, actually.

0:23:570:24:00

I don't, no.

0:24:000:24:01

Martin and Christina are on the road remembering Martin's playing days.

0:24:010:24:07

It must be amazing to walk out onto a rugby pitch

0:24:070:24:10

packed full of thousands and thousands of people

0:24:100:24:13

all cheering you on.

0:24:130:24:15

I must admit, on days like this, when it's sunny days,

0:24:150:24:18

it does sort of bring back memories of playing rugby,

0:24:180:24:21

especially seeing a rugby pitch like that.

0:24:210:24:24

This morning they're kicking off the day's shopping

0:24:250:24:28

in the fine city of Bristol

0:24:280:24:29

and the vehicle, thankfully,

0:24:290:24:30

has made it all the way there.

0:24:300:24:32

-We've made it! Well done!

-Oh, my good lord!

0:24:340:24:36

That deserves a round of applause.

0:24:360:24:39

Ah-h...!

0:24:390:24:40

And now it doesn't stall!

0:24:410:24:43

THEY LAUGH

0:24:430:24:46

Come on, that's worth a hug. Well done.

0:24:460:24:48

How sweet! They're heading into Rachel's Antiques,

0:24:480:24:51

where the owner, oddly enough, is called Rachel.

0:24:510:24:54

-Hi. I'm Rachel.

-Hi, Rachel.

-Hi. Martin.

0:24:540:24:56

I'm Christina, lovely to meet you.

0:24:560:24:57

Is Rachel ready for this hard-haggling pair?

0:24:570:25:00

There's a bit of jewellery there which is mainly silver.

0:25:000:25:03

If there's things you're interested in, I'm always ready to do a deal.

0:25:040:25:07

-A flexible lady?

-I'm very flexible.

0:25:070:25:09

Did a lot of karate for a long time. 20 years I did karate for.

0:25:090:25:13

Blimey, Rachel I'm not sure if that's a threat or a promise.

0:25:130:25:17

So, they'd better get on the hunt for a bargain.

0:25:170:25:20

Brilliant, brilliant. Right.

0:25:200:25:21

What money would you have on that?

0:25:210:25:23

What do you think of that?

0:25:230:25:25

Next door is a shop belonging to Rachel's dad Michael.

0:25:290:25:32

Leaving no stone unturned, they're searching there, too.

0:25:320:25:35

OK, this is Mike's Antiques.

0:25:350:25:37

Naturally.

0:25:390:25:41

That's very lovely.

0:25:500:25:51

It's a French moulded glass bowl in the Art Deco style

0:25:520:25:56

dating from the 1920s or '30s, maybe,

0:25:560:25:58

and Christina is taking the lead again this morning.

0:25:580:26:01

These mermaids are really beautiful, aren't they?

0:26:010:26:03

The weight of that...! It's phenomenal.

0:26:030:26:05

Don't let me drop it - oh!

0:26:050:26:07

Don't do that...!

0:26:070:26:08

Don't drop the ball.

0:26:080:26:10

You'd never live that down, would you?

0:26:110:26:15

It's nice that. Lovely. I like that.

0:26:150:26:17

Yeah? How much have you got on that?

0:26:170:26:19

I've got 45 on it, but I'm willing to negotiate.

0:26:190:26:22

If you wanted a couple of things, we can see what we can do.

0:26:220:26:26

I think we'd want to be securing it in the region of £15-£20, really.

0:26:260:26:29

I'll arm-wrestle you for it.

0:26:290:26:31

Steady on!

0:26:320:26:33

I don't think we need to resort to that just yet.

0:26:330:26:36

They like that, and will look for something else

0:26:360:26:39

they could strike a bigger deal on.

0:26:390:26:41

OK, well, let's take this with us.

0:26:410:26:44

Very disappointed I haven't seen any karate moves at all.

0:26:440:26:50

Well, this is action-packed.

0:26:520:26:54

I felt it, though, like...

0:26:540:26:55

I looking at this stand.

0:26:560:26:58

Umbrella stand?

0:27:000:27:02

He was retailing that at 85, because it's just a particularly nice one.

0:27:020:27:06

But I'll see if there's any movement in what he can do on it.

0:27:060:27:09

It's a Victorian brass umbrella stand

0:27:100:27:12

and another possible buy.

0:27:120:27:14

Do you like the look of that lamp?

0:27:170:27:21

Yes.

0:27:210:27:22

That's a very nice Art Deco lamp.

0:27:220:27:24

It would go very well with that bowl.

0:27:240:27:26

I like it! Look at you - tactics!

0:27:260:27:28

Creating a whole section of our sales in the auction.

0:27:280:27:31

I know. He is good, isn't he?

0:27:310:27:34

Can you reach over and get it?

0:27:340:27:35

I'll try.

0:27:350:27:37

She's moulded glass,

0:27:390:27:40

very Art Deco in style, especially with that chrome combination.

0:27:400:27:44

It's a decorative lamp from around the same inter-war period

0:27:440:27:48

as the glass bowl they also like.

0:27:480:27:51

So, normally that would retail at about 85, as well.

0:27:510:27:54

But obviously I can do better than that

0:27:540:27:56

because I know you've got to make a profit.

0:27:560:27:58

That's really kind, Rachel. Thank you.

0:27:580:28:00

The best I can do on that,

0:28:000:28:02

if you're interested in the umbrella stand, as well,

0:28:020:28:04

I can do them for 100 for the two - making that 55, and that 45.

0:28:040:28:08

OK. What about 100 for the bowl, the lamp and the umbrella stand?

0:28:080:28:14

You drive a hard bargain.

0:28:140:28:16

Buy two, get one free. Martin, what's your thoughts?

0:28:180:28:20

You know, it's...it is all about the business for us,

0:28:200:28:24

for us to make a profit, we really do need it at 100, I think.

0:28:240:28:29

He's worse than you!

0:28:290:28:31

He is, you know.

0:28:330:28:34

Look, I need to put you out of your misery -

0:28:340:28:37

-I'll do it for 100.

-Oh.

-But that's it.

-Shake on it?

0:28:370:28:41

Deal done for all three at a nice round £100.

0:28:410:28:44

Bargain!

0:28:440:28:45

Could you do it for 90?

0:28:450:28:47

Christina!

0:28:470:28:48

I'm joking!

0:28:480:28:49

I should think so, love.

0:28:490:28:50

-Definitely not.

-That's really kind.

-Thank you.

0:28:500:28:52

-I think that's enough to take to auction.

-I think that's plenty.

0:28:520:28:55

Bring it on!

0:28:550:28:57

Meanwhile, Phil and Margie are in the car.

0:28:580:29:00

And Phil's reminiscing about how he got his start in rugby.

0:29:000:29:04

I can honestly say I fell in love with rugby as a young lad.

0:29:040:29:09

Well, team sports.

0:29:090:29:11

I just loved being involved in a team.

0:29:110:29:14

I was very lucky. I played for England Under-16s.

0:29:140:29:16

I just fell into rugby which then became a career.

0:29:160:29:19

Even at the age of 19, when I moved up to Gloucester...

0:29:190:29:22

You know, I didn't want to leave home.

0:29:220:29:24

Growing up at home in Cornwall - it was a beautiful part of the world,

0:29:240:29:27

all your family, all your friends.

0:29:270:29:29

I genuinely loved it there.

0:29:290:29:30

But I remember Mum saying to me,

0:29:300:29:33

with me not wanting to leave,

0:29:330:29:36

she said home will be always be here for you.

0:29:360:29:38

-Aw-w!

-And that kind of... I'll never forget that.

0:29:380:29:42

How lovely.

0:29:420:29:44

They're driving to the village of

0:29:440:29:46

Kington St Michael in Wiltshire...

0:29:460:29:48

..a calm and pretty little place to start their own day's buying.

0:29:500:29:55

Here they're aiming for Kington Antiques And Interiors...

0:29:550:29:58

-We've arrived.

-We have arrived!

0:29:580:30:00

In the boiling heat.

0:30:000:30:01

..where they're meeting dealer Richard. Hi, Richard.

0:30:010:30:04

-Hi.

-Hello.

-Morning.

0:30:040:30:07

Lovely day.

0:30:070:30:08

Phil's feeling the heat this morning.

0:30:120:30:14

-Nice fan. Nice if it's warm.

-Suits you, Phil.

0:30:140:30:16

Oh, that's nice, isn't it? Lovely.

0:30:190:30:21

Soon enough something's caught his eye.

0:30:250:30:28

-Can I have an orange?

-Yes, you help yourself.

0:30:280:30:30

They're fresh out of the fridge this morning.

0:30:300:30:33

Thank you.

0:30:330:30:34

See anything you fancy?

0:30:350:30:36

Apart from the orange?

0:30:360:30:38

While team player Martin's mainly following his expert's lead today,

0:30:380:30:42

former England captain Phil seems keen to take the reins from Margie.

0:30:420:30:46

What's the scales worth?

0:30:480:30:51

I love it more than anything because it's got that Post Office.

0:30:520:30:55

I would buy that. If I was looking and saw that I would buy that.

0:30:550:30:58

It's a set of mid-20th century Post Office scales.

0:30:590:31:02

There's no ticket price on them.

0:31:020:31:04

The reason for that is I use them, but I guess I could sell them.

0:31:040:31:08

I just have to try to find some more.

0:31:080:31:10

But they took months for me to track those down.

0:31:100:31:13

Have you got any tissues? I've got a few tears.

0:31:130:31:16

Hey!

0:31:160:31:17

And Phil's certainly got the sportsmanlike

0:31:170:31:20

scent of competition in his nostrils this morning.

0:31:200:31:22

So how much are they for sale? It's in the shop. I can see it.

0:31:220:31:26

It must be for sale.

0:31:260:31:27

£25, minimum.

0:31:280:31:30

I need to lie down. I'm getting stressed.

0:31:310:31:34

It is stressful trying to buy these things.

0:31:340:31:36

I'll let you take them for £15.

0:31:380:31:40

I think you'd make a good margin on that.

0:31:400:31:43

-Why?

-Because they're not available.

0:31:440:31:47

They obviously are, because you've got one.

0:31:470:31:50

He's getting a bit smart there.

0:31:500:31:52

He is.

0:31:520:31:54

£12.50.

0:31:550:31:57

You drive a hard bargain.

0:32:000:32:02

-Thank you very much.

-No problem.

0:32:020:32:03

They had the scales for a very reasonable £12.50

0:32:030:32:07

and they're wandering onwards.

0:32:070:32:09

Come on. Come on.

0:32:090:32:10

Martin and Christina are still in Bristol.

0:32:120:32:15

Having had a very successful morning shopping,

0:32:150:32:18

they're heading for Cameron Balloons where they're going to

0:32:180:32:21

learn about some extraordinary sporting achievements.

0:32:210:32:24

They're meeting company director Craig and John,

0:32:250:32:28

the archivist of the British Balloon Museum and Library.

0:32:280:32:31

-Hello. Nice to meet you.

-I'm Craig, nice to meet you.

-I'm Martin.

0:32:310:32:34

I'm John.

0:32:340:32:35

Welcome to Cameron Balloons,

0:32:350:32:37

the largest manufacturer of hot air balloons in the world.

0:32:370:32:40

Cameron is indeed the world's pre-eminent maker of

0:32:400:32:44

hot-air balloons.

0:32:440:32:45

The company's founder, Don Cameron,

0:32:450:32:47

is the godfather of UK hot air ballooning in the modern era

0:32:470:32:51

and this Bristol institution really helped the pursuit take off.

0:32:510:32:55

As well as bringing ballooning to the people, this factory also

0:32:550:32:59

manufactured the balloon which completed the first non-stop

0:32:590:33:03

round-the-world flight.

0:33:030:33:04

But hot-air ballooning has been around for much longer than

0:33:040:33:07

you might think and John is taking Martin and Christina to see a museum

0:33:070:33:11

display at Cameron's which sketches

0:33:110:33:13

the early history of balloon flight -

0:33:130:33:15

the very beginnings of mankind's ascent into the skies.

0:33:150:33:18

-When does it date back to?

-Right, so ballooning started in 1783,

0:33:180:33:25

with the Montgolfier brothers in Annonay in France.

0:33:250:33:29

They were paper manufacturers.

0:33:290:33:31

The Montgolfier brothers noticed that the smoke

0:33:310:33:34

rising from a chimney would cause a small paper bag to float upwards.

0:33:340:33:39

Smoke lifted the bags up the chimney.

0:33:390:33:42

-So they made bigger and bigger bags until...

-Out of paper?

-Out of paper.

0:33:420:33:47

That's correct because they were paper manufacturers.

0:33:470:33:49

So they thought they'd make bigger and bigger and bigger ones

0:33:490:33:52

and we can then get people in them.

0:33:520:33:54

When was the first balloon flight?

0:33:540:33:57

The first manned hot-air balloon flight was 21st November,

0:33:570:34:01

1783 in France, in Paris.

0:34:010:34:04

-Here's a picture here of the balloon.

-Wow!

0:34:040:34:08

They took off and flew five or so miles.

0:34:080:34:11

The flight was particularly hazardous as, in the days

0:34:110:34:14

before gas burners, the heat needed to lift the hot-air balloon

0:34:140:34:18

was provided by an open fire.

0:34:180:34:21

The fire was suspended in the middle at the bottom there.

0:34:210:34:24

-And they would throw straw onto it...

-Oh, my good lord.

-..from here.

0:34:240:34:29

And they also had long sticks with sponges on

0:34:290:34:33

and water to put the flames out that were coming onto the paper balloon.

0:34:330:34:38

No, you're kidding!

0:34:380:34:40

-That's unbelievably brave.

-They would throw straw and cow dung onto it...

0:34:400:34:46

-Cow dung?

-Yes. Because they thought it was smoke which made it fly.

0:34:460:34:51

They didn't realise it was just hot air.

0:34:510:34:54

So they wanted something to generate lots of smoke.

0:34:540:34:57

The early balloonists were very smelly.

0:34:570:34:59

Must have smelled really nice.

0:34:590:35:00

Smelly they might have been, but this was the birth of human flight.

0:35:000:35:04

So you've told us a little bit about the history of ballooning.

0:35:080:35:10

What about ballooning today?

0:35:100:35:12

Modern ballooning started in this country in the 1960s.

0:35:120:35:16

In 1967 or 1966, there was a group formed, the Hot Air Group,

0:35:170:35:24

including Don Cameron, the owner of this factory. They built a balloon

0:35:240:35:30

made of Ripstop nylon and carrying propane gas in cylinders.

0:35:300:35:37

It just caught on as a sport then.

0:35:370:35:38

And modern balloonists were keen to push the frontiers of the sport.

0:35:460:35:50

What's the furthest distance anyone's travelled in a balloon?

0:35:500:35:54

Furthest is around the world.

0:35:540:35:56

That was done by Breitling Orbiter 3 which was made in this factory.

0:35:560:36:01

In 1999, a two-man team completed

0:36:010:36:04

the first nonstop round-the-world balloon trip in just under 20 days,

0:36:040:36:09

ensuring a place in history for themselves and their balloon.

0:36:090:36:14

-That was made here?

-That was made here. Just upstairs here.

0:36:140:36:17

Oh, my goodness. That's amazing.

0:36:170:36:19

Having learned a bit about the history of ballooning, I think

0:36:190:36:22

it's time for Martin and Christina to get in a balloon, don't you?

0:36:220:36:26

OK, yeah.

0:36:260:36:28

-Oh!

-Fantastic. Oh, wow!

0:36:290:36:33

A starter balloon might set you back around £13,000

0:36:350:36:39

so they might not pick one up on this trip

0:36:390:36:41

but Cameron's has made around 8,000 balloons like this one

0:36:410:36:45

in its more than four decades of history

0:36:450:36:48

and continues to help the world take to the skies.

0:36:480:36:51

-That is amazing.

-It is, isn't it?

0:36:520:36:55

So I know we haven't got you in a hot-air balloon per se

0:36:550:36:58

-but we have got you in a hot-air balloon.

-Technically.

0:36:580:37:00

Now you can tell people that you've been in a hot-air balloon.

0:37:000:37:04

But I'm not going up

0:37:040:37:06

-in a hot-air balloon.

-All right. Fair enough.

0:37:060:37:08

Well, I'll be blowed.

0:37:110:37:13

Phil and Margie, meanwhile, are driving to their last shop

0:37:130:37:16

and chewing over Phil's competitive sportsmanlike nature.

0:37:160:37:19

My nickname the Raging Bull. Because I am a bit of a raging bull.

0:37:200:37:24

-I'm sure you are. You're not really, are you?

-I'm not?

0:37:240:37:28

-You're a big teddy bear.

-I am a big cuddly bear.

0:37:280:37:32

-But I used to say all the time...

-You have to be.

0:37:320:37:35

-.."When you cross a whitewash, that's it."

-I'm going to have you.

0:37:350:37:39

Because I tell you what, I'm going to go for you

0:37:390:37:41

because I know you want to go for me.

0:37:410:37:43

-So the best form of defence is attack.

-Is attack.

0:37:430:37:47

And with that bullish attitude they're driving to Bristol...

0:37:470:37:50

..where they're sauntering off into Odds & Todds,

0:37:520:37:56

and meeting dealer Les.

0:37:560:37:57

This shop is a maze of a place -

0:38:020:38:04

absolutely stuffed with items

0:38:040:38:06

so they'll have to really dig deep to find their last buys.

0:38:060:38:09

Oh, Phil. You big softie.

0:38:100:38:12

Yes! A giant dart.

0:38:140:38:16

Phil Taylor could have used that.

0:38:180:38:19

Come on.

0:38:230:38:24

Careful now.

0:38:240:38:26

I love this place.

0:38:270:38:28

There's just so many random things.

0:38:290:38:31

Look at that.

0:38:320:38:33

Don't laugh, because this has got to be serious now.

0:38:360:38:39

THEY LAUGH

0:38:390:38:41

Come on, you two, enough larking about. There's shopping to be done.

0:38:410:38:45

Margie!

0:38:450:38:47

She's spotted something.

0:38:470:38:49

What is that down there?

0:38:490:38:51

You can't see half of it.

0:38:530:38:55

I need a man. I need a man. Phil! Are you coming?

0:38:550:38:59

No, not that.

0:39:040:39:05

Not that.

0:39:050:39:06

There you go. That's good, isn't it?

0:39:080:39:12

-That is wicked.

-Isn't that wicked.

0:39:120:39:14

It's old.

0:39:140:39:16

It's a very heavy Victorian cast iron oven door,

0:39:160:39:19

probably from a bakery.

0:39:190:39:20

What happened there? You've got it upside down.

0:39:250:39:28

I just wanted to check to make sure it's all in working order.

0:39:280:39:32

Ticket price is a fittingly hefty £125.

0:39:330:39:36

Time to speak to Les.

0:39:360:39:39

-I was thinking 50 quid.

-No.

-Go on.

-That's far too cheap.

-Go on, then.

0:39:390:39:45

-What's your next shot over the bows?

-I'll do £80 and that's it.

0:39:450:39:50

They're going to think on that and browse on.

0:39:500:39:52

How do you think that would go?

0:40:000:40:02

You might clean up.

0:40:020:40:03

Some yeti hair in it, as well.

0:40:060:40:07

Oh!

0:40:090:40:10

-I quite like that bamboo table.

-Bamboo table's good.

0:40:170:40:19

Not keen, Phil? It's a Victorian bamboo occasional table,

0:40:210:40:26

which in a later decade has been recovered with tiles -

0:40:260:40:30

on the ticket is £22.

0:40:300:40:32

-It's got a real chance, honestly.

-I've heard that before.

0:40:340:40:37

-It has for five quid.

-I can't do it for five quid.

0:40:370:40:41

-How long has this been here for?

-I'll do 15.

0:40:410:40:44

I'll get shot if I do any less.

0:40:440:40:46

I'm not worried about what's going to happen to you after.

0:40:460:40:50

Phil's continuing to flaunt his haggling chops.

0:40:510:40:55

If that's 10 quid, then I'll take that right now.

0:40:550:40:58

-12 quid you've got a deal.

-11 quid.

0:40:590:41:02

-Thank you, Les.

-I feel sorry for him now.

0:41:030:41:07

And a hug, Les?

0:41:070:41:08

Lucky you.

0:41:080:41:09

Can we see those?

0:41:090:41:11

Those look quite nice. What are those?

0:41:120:41:15

They are brass lamps.

0:41:150:41:17

Now, how about those, Phil?

0:41:170:41:18

-What do you think?

-I tell you what, I like those.

-Do you?

0:41:200:41:23

I think they're beautiful.

0:41:240:41:26

It's an assortment of solid brass lamps dating from the 1960s.

0:41:260:41:29

The smaller ones they're interested in are at £20 each.

0:41:310:41:35

But the ticket price won't stand when Phil has victory in his sights.

0:41:350:41:39

Rough, this chap, isn't he?

0:41:390:41:40

Nice of you to notice, Les.

0:41:400:41:42

We've just had a busy day, really.

0:41:420:41:45

I'm thinking 35 quid for three.

0:41:450:41:46

£36 for three. £12 each.

0:41:480:41:50

That's it.

0:41:500:41:52

Deal.

0:41:520:41:54

I don't care what they say about you, son, I think you're all right.

0:41:540:41:56

Come on.

0:41:560:41:58

Another hug. They're getting on very well.

0:41:580:42:00

Thank you very much.

0:42:000:42:02

Whoa, whoa! Whoa!

0:42:020:42:05

-Don't drop it on your foot.

-This infernal oven door.

0:42:060:42:10

I can't leave without it.

0:42:110:42:13

And what Phil wants...

0:42:130:42:15

I can't leave without it.

0:42:150:42:16

Me being the antiques expert I'm going to say I would like it

0:42:170:42:23

but we need...

0:42:230:42:24

-I can't do better than 80. That is it. Honestly.

-£75.

0:42:260:42:31

And I'll take it out that door and carry it myself.

0:42:320:42:34

Sweat, tears, blood.

0:42:340:42:37

-You're making me cry.

-75.

0:42:400:42:42

How's that for an offer?

0:42:420:42:45

At the last gasp they get the oven door as well.

0:42:450:42:49

And they're all bought up. Well done.

0:42:490:42:51

Which means it's time for both teams to unveil their buys.

0:42:510:42:54

Phil and Margie are up first.

0:42:540:42:56

THEY LAUGH

0:42:560:42:58

Well, that's a special reaction.

0:43:000:43:02

Once you've quite composed yourselves.

0:43:080:43:11

The brass lamps.

0:43:110:43:13

Margie saw these and thought, "They could do."

0:43:130:43:15

And I can see that being polished up and going in somewhere.

0:43:150:43:18

-Nice kitchen.

-So how much did you pay for those?

0:43:180:43:21

-We paid £36.

-That's not too bad. £12 each.

0:43:210:43:26

And then you've got some sort of leather battered man bag.

0:43:260:43:31

It's a military magazine holder for a sub-machine gun.

0:43:310:43:37

So it's military, it's old, it's real. I thought a nice little piece.

0:43:370:43:43

How much did you pay for that?

0:43:430:43:45

Paid 30 quid for that.

0:43:450:43:46

-And what on earth is that?

-This was the little daring one.

0:43:460:43:51

-Is that a bread oven?

-It's a bread oven. Cast iron about 1880.

0:43:510:43:56

-With somebody from Bristol.

-Lovely.

-So we thought, "We're in Bristol."

0:43:560:44:00

We thought we'd go for that.

0:44:000:44:02

Might be somebody who'd want to do an architectural sort of...

0:44:020:44:04

-How much was that?

-Well...

-That was 75 quid.

0:44:040:44:08

-Gamble.

-It's a really nice feature, isn't it?

0:44:080:44:12

Especially as you're selling in Bristol as well. Like that a lot.

0:44:120:44:16

Well done.

0:44:160:44:18

So, their lots aren't so laughable after all.

0:44:200:44:23

Now for Martin and Christina.

0:44:230:44:24

That's nice. Glass!

0:44:260:44:28

-What do you think?

-So, what input did you have on any of this, Martin?

0:44:290:44:34

I chose that.

0:44:340:44:36

-Nice umbrella stand.

-So, we paid £100 for that, that and that.

0:44:360:44:40

-That's terrific.

-That is beautiful. I love that.

0:44:400:44:45

This is the bargain of the day even though it is slightly banjaxed.

0:44:450:44:48

-Beautiful. Brilliant.

-£5.

0:44:480:44:53

-And then I'm going to give you a lamp, Margie.

-Yes.

0:44:530:44:57

Don't drop it.

0:44:570:44:59

-Any marks on that?

-Sadly not.

0:44:590:45:02

But this may look like a normal tea table. No, my friends.

0:45:020:45:08

-Ta-da.

-Oh, my goodness.

0:45:080:45:11

-That's amazing.

-It's rather lovely, isn't it? With its original key.

0:45:110:45:15

How much did we get that for?

0:45:150:45:16

-£40.

-Ah!

0:45:160:45:18

-Who sold you that?

-We also got something else as well.

0:45:180:45:22

-You bought that, didn't you?

-1970s fruit machine.

0:45:230:45:27

-It's got money inside it as well.

-How much was it?

-£80.

0:45:270:45:31

Which is a bit of a risk. It was our first thing.

0:45:310:45:33

Certainly a bit of a wacky bunch. Very much like ourselves.

0:45:330:45:37

Come on, let's go off to the auction.

0:45:370:45:40

But before that, what do they have to say

0:45:400:45:42

when the other team's back is turned?

0:45:420:45:45

-If I hadn't seen their stuff, I was still confident...

-Really?

0:45:450:45:49

-..about what we managed to achieve as a team.

-Good.

0:45:490:45:52

I'd rather have their lots than ours.

0:45:520:45:54

That hurts me.

0:45:560:45:57

MARGIE LAUGHS

0:45:570:45:58

-But the fruit machine...

-I think it's an issue.

0:45:590:46:02

-What do you think of their stuff?

-Tat.

0:46:020:46:05

They're laughing at us. They're still laughing at us.

0:46:070:46:11

But that spurs me on.

0:46:110:46:13

-Is there anything you like?

-I like the oven door. That is an X factor.

0:46:130:46:17

It could be their secret weapon.

0:46:170:46:19

I think the baker's door for us will make or break our auction.

0:46:190:46:24

HE LAUGHS

0:46:240:46:26

I do believe we couldn't have done any better than we did

0:46:260:46:29

so got to be happy with that.

0:46:290:46:31

On this road trip, our teams have journeyed all

0:46:330:46:35

the way from sunny Stroud in Gloucestershire to end up

0:46:350:46:38

here at auction in the south-western city of Bristol.

0:46:380:46:41

Christina and Margie are driving to the auction house.

0:46:420:46:45

-Have you found that Phil is quite competitive?

-Yeah.

0:46:450:46:48

If you're not competitive you can't be a sportsman, can you?

0:46:480:46:52

Meanwhile, in the other car...

0:46:520:46:53

You were the one who was getting bolshie.

0:46:530:46:56

Don't tell me when I was getting bolshie. You're getting bolshie.

0:46:580:47:02

THEY LAUGH

0:47:020:47:04

I'm not bolshie.

0:47:040:47:07

Not competitive, at all.

0:47:070:47:09

Celebrities and experts are all about to

0:47:090:47:12

arrive at East Bristol Auctions.

0:47:120:47:14

Morning!

0:47:140:47:15

Morning, my friend.

0:47:170:47:19

How are you this morning? Are you ready for the fray?

0:47:200:47:24

Enough of the schmoozing, you lot. To the battlefield.

0:47:240:47:27

Auctioneer Evan Mcpherson will be holding the gavel today

0:47:290:47:32

but before the off what does he make of our teams' lots?

0:47:320:47:35

The fruit machine is a lovely thing. Real '70s kitsch.

0:47:350:47:39

The oven door is a nice thing. Bristol interest.

0:47:390:47:43

Silver salt is nice.

0:47:430:47:44

We do have a good following of silver

0:47:440:47:46

so hopefully we can do well with that.

0:47:460:47:48

We'll see who comes out on top.

0:47:480:47:49

Right, I think we're a team.

0:47:510:47:53

Martin and Christina started this trip with £400.

0:47:550:47:58

They spent £225 on six auction lots.

0:47:580:48:01

-What do you think? Nice hat?

-Very nice.

0:48:020:48:05

Phil and Margie also started with £400.

0:48:060:48:09

They spent £197 and also have six lots in today's sale.

0:48:090:48:15

THEY LAUGH

0:48:150:48:17

It's time for kick-off.

0:48:170:48:19

Here we go. Good luck.

0:48:190:48:20

First, it's the Victorian Canterbury for Martin and Christina.

0:48:230:48:27

Start me at 30 quid, then. A Vicky Canterbury for £30. 30.

0:48:270:48:31

Someone be brave £30.

0:48:310:48:33

With a hand at 30. Thank you. £30 seated.

0:48:350:48:38

Someone breathing a sigh of relief. At £30 with the lady seated.

0:48:390:48:44

Do I see any advance?

0:48:440:48:46

-That's nothing. Selling at £30.

-That's £25 profit.

0:48:460:48:52

A lovely profit on an item that was just gathering dust.

0:48:530:48:57

-Should have done better than that.

-You know what?

0:48:570:48:59

Seriously, that's fine by me.

0:48:590:49:01

Now one of Phil's picks - the military pouch for a gun's magazine.

0:49:040:49:08

It's a lovely thing. Dual form. It's a good handbag as well. If you want.

0:49:080:49:12

Loads of interest there. 24 on my screen there. Any advance on 24?

0:49:120:49:17

Do I see 26 anywhere?

0:49:170:49:19

26 in the room. Do I see 28? 30, sir?

0:49:190:49:24

30 in the middle of the room. Do I see any advance on 30? 32 anywhere?

0:49:250:49:30

Selling at 30.

0:49:300:49:32

That's not bad. Could have been worse.

0:49:350:49:40

It breaks even before costs.

0:49:400:49:42

But it's still early days.

0:49:420:49:44

Going down, man.

0:49:440:49:46

Next, it's Martin

0:49:480:49:49

and Christina's table containing a canteen of cutlery.

0:49:490:49:52

Start me at a oner.

0:49:520:49:54

100. 100 on my screen already. We're going to go past this. 110.

0:49:540:50:00

Golly.

0:50:000:50:01

100 my screen. Any advance on £100? That's still nothing.

0:50:010:50:06

£100, the service is probably worth that.

0:50:060:50:10

100, are we done?

0:50:100:50:11

Good profit. Cheap but good profit.

0:50:140:50:17

A tasty profit on that and Martin and Christina are leading.

0:50:170:50:21

We are currently £85 up,

0:50:210:50:24

less commission, but, yeah.

0:50:240:50:26

Now it's Phil and Margie's Victorian bamboo table with later tiled top.

0:50:280:50:33

Someone start me £20 for it. 20, 20, 20.

0:50:330:50:37

Someone give me a tenner.

0:50:370:50:40

10 with a hand. Thank you. Any advance on 10?

0:50:400:50:43

£10, they've gone quiet. Typical, eh?

0:50:440:50:47

£10.

0:50:470:50:49

Are we all done at £10? Sorry.

0:50:490:50:52

Sugar!

0:50:520:50:53

Not a great loss so there's everything to play for.

0:50:550:50:57

An item Martin chose now -

0:50:590:51:01

the brass umbrella stand is next to meet the crowd.

0:51:010:51:04

60 quid get me going. 60, 60, 60.

0:51:040:51:07

£60 with a hand, 60, seated. That's no money. £60 for that.

0:51:070:51:13

Surely it's got to go on from there?

0:51:130:51:15

At £60 are we selling? 65. 70, sir?

0:51:150:51:19

With a hand. 75. 85. 90.

0:51:190:51:24

No, shakes his head.

0:51:240:51:26

85 with you, madam. Anybody else want to play? 85 middle of the room.

0:51:260:51:30

Are we done?

0:51:300:51:31

-Well done.

-£65 profit.

0:51:330:51:35

Blimey, where there's brass, there's brass. Well done, Martin.

0:51:360:51:40

It's fantastic.

0:51:400:51:42

MARTIN EXHALES

0:51:420:51:43

There's a lot of heavy breathing going on on this front row.

0:51:440:51:47

Phil thought their own brass items, the '60s lamps, were beautiful.

0:51:490:51:53

Will the buyers agree?

0:51:530:51:55

Bit of interest. I've got 22, 24 in my book. Do I see 26?

0:51:550:52:00

24 with me, do I see 26?

0:52:000:52:02

Industrial style lamp shades, all the rage at the moment.

0:52:020:52:06

24 with me. Do I see 26? 26, new bidder. 28. 30, yours.

0:52:060:52:12

30 thank you. Anybody else want to play? At £30 seated.

0:52:120:52:18

Selling at 30.

0:52:180:52:20

We're not losing a lot.

0:52:200:52:22

Unlucky - someone took a shine to them but it wasn't quite enough.

0:52:220:52:27

Next to meet the room, it's the first piece of Martin

0:52:270:52:30

and Christina's Art Deco glass, the lamp.

0:52:300:52:33

Someone give me 60 quid for it. 60 straight in on my screen.

0:52:330:52:38

Do I see an advance on £60? 65.

0:52:380:52:42

75. 85.

0:52:420:52:45

No, shakes the head. My screen 80. At £80.

0:52:450:52:49

Good. Doubled your money. Well done.

0:52:500:52:53

Another winner for them.

0:52:540:52:56

I'll see you later.

0:52:580:52:59

It's Phil and Margie's silver salts now. The auctioneer liked them.

0:53:040:53:08

Will the crowd?

0:53:080:53:09

Give me £50 for them.

0:53:100:53:12

£50. 40 start me. 30 back of the room. I've got 30. 2, 4, now.

0:53:120:53:19

36 on the screen. 38. 40 with a nod.

0:53:190:53:25

42 on my screen. 42 on my screen.

0:53:250:53:30

-We're in the black.

-At 46 standing.

0:53:300:53:33

Any advance on 46? Make somebody happy. Are we done?

0:53:330:53:37

Well done.

0:53:390:53:41

Our first profit.

0:53:420:53:44

A profit! Finally. And that sets them in high spirits.

0:53:450:53:49

Up next, it's the Art Deco glass bowl for Martin and Christina.

0:53:520:53:55

Will it fare as well as the lamp?

0:53:550:53:58

60 straight in. Thank you. No messing around. 70. 80, got 5? No.

0:53:580:54:05

80 with you, sir. 85 back in. Go on,

0:54:050:54:09

don't lose now. 90. £90. Do 92?

0:54:090:54:14

Go on. Make a fight of it.

0:54:140:54:16

With the hand 95. Don't be shy.

0:54:160:54:19

Go on, it's beautiful. It's really beautiful.

0:54:190:54:21

95. Well done, sir. 100, sir. No. Shakes his head. Are we done?

0:54:220:54:30

Well done.

0:54:320:54:34

Another clear winner.

0:54:340:54:35

Right, the weighing scales.

0:54:370:54:39

It's Phil's pick next.

0:54:390:54:41

The Post Office scales he nearly had to prise from the shopkeeper's hands.

0:54:410:54:44

20. Straight in on the screen. Do I see any advance on £20?

0:54:460:54:51

Good for you, sir. 22. He'll sign your shirt for that.

0:54:510:54:56

22. 22. 22.

0:54:560:54:58

Come on, someone else surely.

0:54:590:55:02

24 good for you. Don't let them go. 25.

0:55:020:55:05

eBay, postage, this is where it's at. 25 with you, sir. 26, madam.

0:55:060:55:10

Don't miss out. No.

0:55:100:55:12

25 then. Are we done at £25?

0:55:120:55:16

You've doubled your money, you little darling.

0:55:180:55:20

I was about to say that.

0:55:200:55:21

Good job, Phil.

0:55:230:55:24

Martin made the bold choice on their expensive '70s fruit machine.

0:55:260:55:31

Will the bet pay off?

0:55:310:55:33

-This is it.

-Start me at 100. 110 on my screen.

0:55:330:55:38

110 on my screen.

0:55:380:55:39

110. 120. 120 in the room. 120. 130 anywhere else?

0:55:420:55:48

-120 then, selling 120.

-Well done.

0:55:480:55:54

He's your best customer.

0:55:540:55:55

And they made good on that gamble.

0:55:550:55:59

Just got a gut feeling in my stomach that that oven door's going to go.

0:55:590:56:03

Yeah.

0:56:030:56:05

So everything indeed hinges on Phil and Margie's cast iron oven door.

0:56:050:56:09

Phil couldn't leave the shop without it but will it turn a profit?

0:56:090:56:14

Local interest. Lovely thing.

0:56:140:56:16

Upcycle it, do what you will. Put it in a wall in your garden.

0:56:160:56:19

Pizza oven. It's lovely. Good industrial.

0:56:190:56:24

Do whatever you want with it.

0:56:240:56:25

There you go.

0:56:250:56:27

I've got 60 on my commissions. I will start there.

0:56:310:56:35

I thought he said 160.

0:56:350:56:38

65, sir.

0:56:380:56:40

65. 70. 75. Got 5. I'm out. 75, 75.

0:56:400:56:46

Do I see 80? Come on.

0:56:460:56:49

£80. Think of doing the garden in the summer.

0:56:490:56:53

I'll take 76 if someone's prepared to put their hand up.

0:56:550:56:58

75 with you, sir. Are we done at 75?

0:56:590:57:03

It breaks even.

0:57:080:57:10

-You've done brilliantly. You've done well.

-We've done well.

0:57:100:57:13

We haven't disgraced ourselves.

0:57:130:57:16

These guys picked some beautiful pieces.

0:57:160:57:19

I think it's time for a celebratory cup of tea.

0:57:190:57:22

I might need something a bit stronger.

0:57:220:57:24

Martin and Christina romped away to be crowned today's victors.

0:57:240:57:28

Phil and Margie started this trip with £400,

0:57:290:57:32

after paying auction costs they made a small loss of £19.88,

0:57:320:57:37

and so end up with...

0:57:370:57:38

While Martin and Christina also began with £400,

0:57:420:57:44

after costs they made an absolutely incredible profit of £190.20

0:57:440:57:50

and finish up with...

0:57:500:57:55

Go team. All profits go to Children in Need.

0:57:560:57:59

It's over. It's over.

0:58:000:58:04

There we go. Nearly there.

0:58:040:58:06

-Well done.

-This is it. Thank you.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:58:090:58:13

-Come on, Margie. Let's go.

-Give you a lift home.

-Are you driving?

-Yeah.

0:58:160:58:21

It's been a very sporting trip.

0:58:230:58:25

Been a pleasure anyway, mate.

0:58:280:58:29

Thank you very much.

0:58:290:58:31

I'm certainly going to miss them. They've been an absolute joy.

0:58:310:58:34

They have.

0:58:340:58:35

Rugby stars Phil Vickery and Martin Offiah take to the antiques trail around Bristol with the help of experts Margie Cooper and Christina Trevanion. Phil swaps a rugby ball for a polo stick and Martin finds out about man's first ascent into the skies.