David and Carrie Grant Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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David and Carrie Grant

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Husband-and-wife vocal coaches David and Carrie Grant swap singing in harmony for battling it out with antiques.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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-I like that.

-Are paired up with an expert...

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We've had some fun, haven't we?

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..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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The mission, to scour Britain for antiques.

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-Yes.

-Fantastic.

-I'd do that in slow-mo.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction...

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-Come on, boys!

-..but it's no easy ride.

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-Da-dah!

-Who will find a hidden gem?

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-Oh! Sell me!

-Who will take the biggest risks?

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Go away, darling.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I'm trying to spend money here.

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There will be worthy winners...

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-Yes.

-..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal.

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This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today it's all about hitting the right notes.

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I kind of feel like this is a really mean machine

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and you're driving it like a granny.

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Don't knock granny-driving.

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Change gear, babe.

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That will be the one.

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Cruising along in this throaty 1970 Trident Clipper

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are husband and wife singing duo David and Carrie Grant,

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who are swapping singing in harmony

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for a spot of competitive antique-ing.

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Oh, yes.

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Even after 30 years your first base attitude is,

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-"I'm going to beat you."

-Of course.

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Like, literally, for 30 years you've been saying that

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and for 30 years you've been losing.

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Oh, come on!

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David Grant is an '80s pop icon.

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# I'd play out after dark and they would come get me... #

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Yeah! He was a regular in the UK charts,

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clocking up 14 hits and becoming a television favourite.

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David Grant, the man himself, for the Yellows.

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His wife Carrie was a hit-maker herself

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and, in 1983, as part of the group Sweet Dreams

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she represented the UK at the Eurovision Song Contest.

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After becoming coaches and judges on successful shows like Fame Academy,

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David and Carrie have become familiar faces on our screen.

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David, have you decided to stick with your new trainers,

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or are you going to go back to those smelly old ones?

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But for all that showbiz talent,

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it's shopping skills they'll need today.

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Don't get me wrong. You're good at shopping

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but I am good at spotting a bargain.

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You know the cost of nothing.

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You don't even know the cost of a loaf of bread now.

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So how do you think that you're going to go into a shop

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and suddenly gain this gift of knowing the value of something?

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Because, baby, I'm not going to be buying bread.

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I don't know what you're going to be buying,

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but let me tell you something, I've already won

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if you're going to go and buy loaves of bread.

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Our competitive couple will be guided away from the bread aisle

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by the expert hands of our auctioneers,

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Will Axon and Mark Stacey.

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They're bopping along in this pre-seatbelt-era

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1961 Morris 1000 in custard yellow.

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And I hear Mark is a fan of Carrie's European past.

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She was in a group called Sweet Dreams

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that were in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1983

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with I'm Never Gonna Give You Up.

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I know you have an encyclopaedic knowledge...

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Not encyclopaedic, but I love Eurovision.

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# Ooh-ah, just a little bit Ooh-ah, a little bit more... #

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Mark Stacey, douze points.

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Will Axon, nil points.

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Well, that concludes the judging from our expert jury.

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Time for our hopefuls to meet their mentors.

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-Good morning.

-How are you, Mark? I'm David.

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-Nice to meet you, David.

-Hi!

-Lovely to meet you.

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David, Will. How are you?

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Nice to meet you. How are you?

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-Carrie. How are you?

-I'm good, thank you.

-Good.

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We are so looking forward to this.

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We are. We've decided our pairing.

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-Am I with you?

-Yeah, because I love Eurovision.

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Come here, you. Come here and give me a man hug.

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-We are a team.

-We are all bonded, cos this is our car...

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No, I think you'll find the man with the keys always wins.

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Take a little look in there, you'll see my handbag, reserved.

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Try and start the car with a handbag.

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I'll keep the keys. Come on.

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You talk about starting the car. Let's do it.

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HORN BEEPS

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HORN PLAYS "DIXIELAND"

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-Now that's a horn.

-And it's got a horn!

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This should be fun.

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Carrie and David will have £400 each to spend

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and their journey starts off in Landbeach in Cambridgeshire.

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They'll explore Suffolk and Hertfordshire

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and nip into Bedfordshire

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before heading north to Norfolk for an auction in Downham Market.

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-Are you good at shopping?

-I'm really good at shopping, yes.

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-I am. Yeah.

-Are you good at bargaining?

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-I'm not.

-I'll help you.

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I'm relying on you heavily for everything, to be honest.

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That worries me a bit, you know.

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You know, it's not that I mind losing to her.

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Not really. It's just that it would make my life unbearable if I did.

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-It's just bragging rights at home, isn't it?

-Big-time.

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Well, let's get things moving, then!

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And with a rural auction coming up,

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this could be the perfect place for David and Will

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to start their shopping adventure.

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-Hello there!

-How are you doing?

-Will, how do you do?

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-Yeah, good.

-I'm David, hi.

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David, yeah. I'm Stan from Stantiques.

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Stantiques, good!

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Like what you did there, Stan.

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This place is jam-packed.

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Have a look round, guys, see what you can find.

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-Thank you.

-Let's have a wander, David, let's have a wander.

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What...

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-Oh!

-What have you got there?

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Straight in with a...shooting stick.

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Are you a man of country pursuits?

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No! What do you think?

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A lot of people have one.

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If you're going to have one for decorative purposes,

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you want the old bamboo one with the cane seat, really.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

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-OK.

-But, you know, it's a start, you're showing that you're keen.

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A bit of taxidermy.

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How do you feel about dead animals?

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Oh, I like this stuff. You see what I did there?

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OK, um...

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Yeah. In the UK, all animals are protected by law,

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and items from endangered foreign species can be sold,

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as long as they predate

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the 1947 Cites agreement, don't you know!

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I'm liking the wild boar.

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Yeah, how much is the wild boar?

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Best, best price, 120.

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What?

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Come on!

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120?

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Well, it's a price, at least we've got something to think about.

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Well, taxidermy isn't to everyone's taste and could be a big gamble,

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even at a rural auction.

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Meanwhile, Carrie and Mark are toddling along the road

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to Newmarket, the birthplace of horse racing,

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and they are under starter's orders in their first shop,

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Treasures Antiques.

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And it's big!

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Is that two floors?

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-It is.

-I need a week in here!

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So, plenty of interesting things to get you going.

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Do you know, that reminds me of Will!

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-Why?

-Because he's such a bore!

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How long did it take him to think that one up?

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Do you think we should split up?

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Yeah. I mean, yeah. I don't know what to look for, but, yes.

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I think you've got an eye.

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Oh, yeah? Nothing like throwing her in at the deep end, Mark.

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I feel like some of the stuff I've seen here

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is actually from my childhood home.

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Hornsea, Springtime, wow.

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Mark, I really like this as a set, look.

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-Is that good?

-I love it.

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-'60s, isn't it?

-Yeah, 1960s.

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You know, I love the simplicity of it

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and it is very in vogue in certain areas.

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It would look lovely in your house.

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So I've got to stop buying for myself?

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Yes, but that's a very common thing to do when you are shopping, isn't it?

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Now, I've found something which I think you'll hate.

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You just took that out of your pocket.

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-I did.

-Were you trying to nick it?

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No! I just think there's something about it.

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I think this is an antique.

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There's a lot of modern tribal stuff around,

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but antique tribal stuff is quite collectable.

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You can see there's a lot of dust and dirt in there.

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I'm not being funny, but you're saying that in rural areas,

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they won't go for a 1960s butter dish,

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but they'll go for something that's tribal, with no arms...

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-You hate it, don't you?

-I beyond hate it.

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OK. Thanks, Carrie.

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Bye.

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Lordy, this could be a long day.

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Meanwhile, in Landbeach, David and Will are still browsing.

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Little stationary boxes,

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these all look like they should have cutlery in.

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-Yup.

-They look like sort of fish services, fruit services,

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that sort of thing. You've got tins that are collectable...

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-Oh! Well caught.

-Steady, Will.

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-Let's see if there's anything in this little box.

-Let's have a look.

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Go on, open her up.

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-Well, there you go, the fish service.

-Ah!

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The Victorians loved to complicate things.

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There's not much of a market for that, these days.

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-Do you use a fish service?

-Um, no.

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Well, anything more practical?

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Now what have you found?

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-Look at that!

-That's kind of cool, isn't it?

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-Yeah!

-Good old saw.

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What kind of age would that be?

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Looking at the wear and so on,

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it's got to be sort of turn-of-the-century, hasn't it?

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-Wow.

-Sort of 1900, something like that, maybe a touch later,

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1910 or something.

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So this could be a century old?

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-Yes.

-Do you think this is the kind of thing that might be of interest?

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I do, I quite like it.

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I quite like it. Again, it's got a sort of sculptural quality about it, hasn't it?

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-But do you like it?

-I do, I really like it.

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I think David might get the hang of this rather quickly.

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Just as well. Will has spotted something else.

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What do you reckon to that bad boy?

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-See it?

-Wow! Yeah!

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It's a little hand plough,

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not too big, so it's, you know, accommodatable. If that's a word!

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It's definitely not.

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It evokes the Fens, in my mind.

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-Yes.

-Doesn't it? I mean, all you see around is ploughed fields,

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ploughing competitions left, right and centre...

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-Are there still now?

-There's one held every year, just down the road.

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So something like this, when would it have been used until?

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Again, I think if you are talking out in the provinces,

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probably up to the Second World War, that sort of period,

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maybe even could have been used recently after the Second World War.

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I think that might have potential.

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Shall we find out what it costs?

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Yeah, let's find out, because I like that, I do like that.

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Well, it's worth a shot, I suppose.

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Over in Newmarket, have our other pair agreed on anything yet?

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So, just round this corner...

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-Yes. Show me.

-I noticed these, and I just am attracted to them,

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I love them.

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-Yes.

-You hate them!

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Well, I don't hate them, um,

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but they are sort of measuring jars, aren't they?

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-Jugs.

-Yes, are they common?

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They look really unusual to me.

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Well, they are not that unusual, but I think they are £10 each.

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Oh.

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Yeah, let's forget that, then.

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I think... I like where you're going with that, but I think, you know,

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we can find maybe something a bit...

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Don't humour me, let's go somewhere else.

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I thought I was doing quite a good job then!

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Well, what did you have in mind, then, Mark?

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-Carrie?

-Yes?

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Are you a porcelain lady?

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Do you know, I walked past those earlier.

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-Did you?

-And I thought, I like those,

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but I'm just going to be told they're tacky.

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No, they are not. Do you want to take that one?

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Yes. Are they not tacky, then?

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I don't think so. They're French porcelain.

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Possibly made in the sort of Paris area, around about 1870,

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-and this...

-So I did have an eye!

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I was thinking they are bit gaudy, I'll be told that's a bit naff.

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You're right, they are gaudy, but they are meant to be,

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because that was the taste of the day.

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I quite like that sort of pale peach colour as well.

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I just love the whole thing, yeah.

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I mean, they're very flamboyant, aren't they?

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Hurrah, something on which they both agree!

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With a ticket price of £79, Naz is here to talk money.

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-We've seen these...

-Mm-hm.

-..and we quite like them.

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I think we've got to make an offer...

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It's my first chance at bartering, hang on.

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Could we have them for cheaper, please?

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Are you willing to barter with us?

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Give me a figure, then we'll work from there.

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-So, I...

-(50?)

-Oh, no!

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-No, no.

-Go on, then, what would you say?

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-£40.

-Can you come up a little bit?

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41?

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42?

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What about 45?

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Can we do 45?

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I can do 55.

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-Oh!

-55? How about 50?

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Can we do 50?

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Oh, my gosh! Did we just buy it?

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-Well, you did.

-Oh, is that it now?

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I was in full flow there!

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Oh, come on, £51...

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I think we could have got it for 45.

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Never mind, that's the first purchase of the Road Trip.

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Great! The Etruscan style vases for £50. Well done, Carrie.

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Now, how are the chaps getting along?

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I do like the look of this.

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Can you tell me anything about it?

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It's an old saw.

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Well, glad we cleared that one up.

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So, now, what would this cost?

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£15, David.

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15, OK.

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What if we had these two together?

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Are you liking the saw still?

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I still like the saw.

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-Yeah.

-What did you say for the saw?

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-Did you say...?

-300.

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I thought we said a tenner?

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Here we go. Nice try!

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But Stan still wants £15 for the saw.

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The plough actually looks like a push or wheel hoe,

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which would loosen the soil in your garden, and Stan's asking £25.

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What do you think, David?

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If I was shelling out £30

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and taking both of them, would that be...?

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Oh, that sounds like a very fair offer.

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Could we do that?

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It sounds reasonable.

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Boys, I could shake hands at £30, it's here and now.

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Come on, let's do it, let's get that first buy done.

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-Cool, all right.

-Nice one.

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So we have a saw...

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-Yeah.

-And we have a plough.

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-A saw plough!

-All we need is a farm.

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Oh, come on! I think I saw one on the way in.

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Right, let's see if it's for sale.

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Follow me. Thanks, Stan!

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-OK, yep.

-Thank you!

-Cheers.

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Ahem! Um, chaps?

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Hang on, we haven't paid him!

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We agreed on £30, yeah?

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We did, yeah.

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Well, what I have here

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is £100, which I would really like you to have.

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What are you up to, David?

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In exchange for what we've already got and the boar's head.

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Oh, that was a cheeky move.

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I know you're thinking, that's an awful lot of money for those things,

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but I want you to have it.

0:14:440:14:46

I really do, I don't want to scrimp, I just want to say, look...

0:14:460:14:49

-Listen... David...

-Put it in your hand.

0:14:490:14:51

-I couldn't do that. There's still meat on the bone there, boys.

-Yeah.

0:14:510:14:55

£100, you know, that's only a good dinner.

0:14:550:14:58

-What do you want for the boar's head, then?

-120.

0:14:580:15:01

-Oh! I still want 120 for it.

-Oh, no!

0:15:010:15:04

That's me on that, I'm afraid.

0:15:040:15:06

-Sorry.

-120.

-120, yup, so 150 in total for the three items, guys.

0:15:060:15:10

-Are we done?

-Yeah, nice little parcel.

0:15:100:15:13

Lovely, yeah, no worries.

0:15:130:15:15

No-one got hurt!

0:15:150:15:16

Except the boar!

0:15:180:15:19

We got there, and the boys are off to a flying start.

0:15:200:15:24

Back in Newmarket, it looks like Mark is on to something else.

0:15:260:15:29

Carrie, come and have a look at these.

0:15:300:15:32

Those little winning trophies there.

0:15:340:15:35

-Oh, yes!

-And they are modelled on horseshoes, aren't they?

0:15:350:15:38

In my teenage years growing up in Royston,

0:15:380:15:40

you'd see the racehorses going across the heath in the morning and,

0:15:400:15:43

you know, this is a really important subject

0:15:430:15:45

for this particular area of the country.

0:15:450:15:47

So can we find out how much they are?

0:15:470:15:49

Time for round two with Naz.

0:15:490:15:52

Stand by, girl!

0:15:520:15:53

There are great fun, aren't they?

0:15:530:15:55

-What are they made of?

-I think they are just tin.

0:15:550:15:57

And I'm guessing they would go on the horse...

0:15:580:16:01

What's it called? What do you keep a horse in?

0:16:010:16:03

-Horsebox!

-Stables?

0:16:030:16:05

Stables, oh, that's it.

0:16:050:16:06

-I tell you what...

-I've got to trust you with me horses!

0:16:070:16:11

These plaques are priced at £178.

0:16:110:16:14

I'm keeping your hands well away from this deal.

0:16:140:16:17

-Yeah.

-You just hold those.

0:16:170:16:18

You just hold them all and it'll keep you occupied.

0:16:180:16:21

Um, I tell you what,

0:16:210:16:22

because you lost a fiver last time,

0:16:220:16:25

let's say 105.

0:16:250:16:26

-Oh!

-Thank you so much.

0:16:280:16:30

-Yes!

-She said yes!

0:16:300:16:33

That's a whopping £155 on their first two items.

0:16:330:16:37

-Well, I'm pleased with these.

-I'm really pleased!

0:16:380:16:41

Time to catch up with the boys

0:16:430:16:45

and their new friend, don't you know?

0:16:450:16:48

Boris the boar! Boris the boar.

0:16:480:16:50

Oh! I've always fancied a fourth child.

0:16:500:16:53

Boris, you're mine.

0:16:550:16:56

David, Will and Boris the boar

0:16:580:17:01

have meandered their way

0:17:010:17:02

to the illustrious university city of Cambridge,

0:17:020:17:05

where amongst the bicycles and hallowed spires

0:17:050:17:08

lies a hidden footballing past.

0:17:080:17:11

What's all that about?

0:17:110:17:12

-You like your football?

-I love football.

0:17:120:17:15

-Do you?

-I absolutely love football.

0:17:150:17:16

I'm passionate about football.

0:17:160:17:18

When I was a kid, everybody in my school in East London

0:17:180:17:20

had an out of London team. It was always Manchester United.

0:17:200:17:22

Mine was Liverpool.

0:17:220:17:24

I started going to watch Liverpool whenever they were in London.

0:17:240:17:27

And then, years later, my cousin played for Liverpool...

0:17:270:17:30

-What?

-John Barnes. Yeah, he played for Liverpool...

0:17:300:17:32

John Barnes is your cousin?

0:17:320:17:34

-Yeah.

-Barnsey, the legend?

0:17:340:17:36

The legend that is John Barnes is my cousin.

0:17:360:17:38

-Oh, my God, how cool is that?

-Very, very cool.

0:17:380:17:41

David and Will are here to find out how this unassuming scrap of ground,

0:17:430:17:47

known as Parker's Piece,

0:17:470:17:49

is responsible for the rise of the world's most popular ball game.

0:17:490:17:52

Football fan Alan Ward is on hand to tell them all about it.

0:17:530:17:56

Alan, I've never known that this was the birthplace of football.

0:17:560:18:00

-Is that true?

-Well, it is true,

0:18:000:18:02

in the sense that this was the first time

0:18:020:18:04

that the rules were written down in one place, here at Cambridge.

0:18:040:18:08

-I've got you.

-So, before they formalised them,

0:18:080:18:12

what was football like?

0:18:120:18:14

Well, it was a pretty lawless game!

0:18:140:18:17

It was played...

0:18:170:18:18

It could be played over a whole day, with 100 people a side,

0:18:180:18:22

between two villages...

0:18:220:18:24

-Oh, wow.

-And the idea was you got the ball, or the object,

0:18:240:18:27

from one place to the other.

0:18:270:18:29

Football's British origins began as a mob game.

0:18:290:18:32

This archive from the 1920s shows hundreds of men and boys

0:18:320:18:36

chasing a ball.

0:18:360:18:37

Rather fun. In fact, from the Middle Ages to the late 19th century,

0:18:370:18:40

the games were wild, no-holds-barred affairs,

0:18:400:18:44

pitting areas of the same town against each other

0:18:440:18:47

and ending up with gangs of men brawling in the streets.

0:18:470:18:49

It sounds like a really violent game.

0:18:510:18:54

Well, it was extremely violent, and often

0:18:540:18:56

the games were played on bank holidays,

0:18:560:18:58

because people didn't have any time off from work.

0:18:580:19:01

So it was a bank holiday, big game between two villages,

0:19:010:19:04

extremely violent, lots of people hurt and injured.

0:19:040:19:08

It was discussed as to whether the game would be banned

0:19:080:19:11

because people weren't able to go to work the following day.

0:19:110:19:14

Lots of people were injured and hurt.

0:19:140:19:16

To keep the workforce in one piece,

0:19:180:19:21

efforts were made to restrict these mob games,

0:19:210:19:24

although they continued to be played in some areas as annual spectacles.

0:19:240:19:28

Public schools and colleges adopted a rather less violent version

0:19:280:19:31

of the game, but the rules remained ambiguous.

0:19:310:19:34

Some schools allowed the ball to be handled, others did not.

0:19:340:19:38

This made playing against anyone

0:19:380:19:40

who came from a different school very difficult, naturally.

0:19:400:19:43

Get it?

0:19:430:19:45

So if the rules were sort of

0:19:450:19:46

slightly different throughout the country

0:19:460:19:48

and from college to college,

0:19:480:19:49

how did they decide which rules they were going to play under?

0:19:490:19:52

Was at the home team that decided?

0:19:520:19:54

Here in Cambridge,

0:19:540:19:56

the colleges would come to Parker's Piece and they said,

0:19:560:20:00

"Well, why don't we all just play to the same rules?"

0:20:000:20:02

And so, in 1848,

0:20:020:20:05

the Cambridge rules were written down

0:20:050:20:07

and that's the first time that the rules were formalised.

0:20:070:20:10

In 1848, a group of students pinned their Cambridge rules to a tree

0:20:100:20:13

here at Parker's Piece.

0:20:130:20:16

This was the first time that a single set of rules

0:20:160:20:19

was agreed by more than one college football team.

0:20:190:20:22

Alan has very kindly recreated the pinning of those rules today.

0:20:220:20:26

This is talking about throw-ins and goal kicks and how to kick off,

0:20:260:20:32

and no player must be tripped or pushed or held back by hand.

0:20:320:20:36

It's, like, things that we really take for granted.

0:20:360:20:40

There are still details missing,

0:20:400:20:42

like the number of players and length of a match,

0:20:420:20:44

but within 15 years the Football Association was created.

0:20:440:20:48

The FA used the Cambridge rules to form the modern game of football.

0:20:480:20:52

In an age of the British Empire, people travelled from these shores,

0:20:540:20:58

taking the rules of football with them

0:20:580:21:00

and sharing this new game with the world.

0:21:000:21:03

So are you saying, really,

0:21:050:21:07

that on various continents throughout the world,

0:21:070:21:10

footballing nations owe their footballing origins to Britain?

0:21:100:21:13

-Yes.

-Wow!

0:21:130:21:15

Slightly embarrassing that we are not any better at it, isn't it?

0:21:150:21:19

We won't go there.

0:21:190:21:20

Come on, let's go for it.

0:21:200:21:22

Come on, lend us the ball!

0:21:220:21:23

Oh, nice turn!

0:21:260:21:28

And so the game loved by so many today around the world

0:21:280:21:31

owes everything to a handful of students who had a kickabout here

0:21:310:21:35

in Cambridge in 1848.

0:21:350:21:38

Hey, pass the ball, lads.

0:21:380:21:40

Meanwhile, across the county border in Suffolk,

0:21:410:21:45

Mark and Carrie are continuing their search

0:21:450:21:48

at Clare Antiques & Interiors.

0:21:480:21:50

-Hello!

-Hello, Mark.

0:21:510:21:53

-Hi, nice to meet you, I'm Carrie.

-Hi, Carrie, I'm David.

0:21:530:21:55

Good to see you. We are going to have a good look round.

0:21:550:21:58

Wonderful, thanks very much.

0:21:580:22:00

In we go.

0:22:000:22:02

There's no hanging around, and just as well.

0:22:020:22:05

Carrie, surely you can persuade Mark to take a gamble on something.

0:22:050:22:09

This blue case of stuff...

0:22:110:22:13

Quality always sells.

0:22:130:22:15

Cheap doesn't.

0:22:150:22:16

I'm saying no more.

0:22:180:22:20

I'll just leave you with that thought for the day.

0:22:210:22:24

Something else, perhaps?

0:22:240:22:26

-That's absolutely ghastly!

-It's lovely!

-It's awful!

0:22:270:22:31

Oh, my gosh.

0:22:310:22:33

Maybe Mark's right about that one.

0:22:330:22:35

Another try?

0:22:350:22:37

Well, that's pretty, isn't it?

0:22:390:22:41

-A pair of glasses?

-Well, it's actually...

0:22:410:22:43

Yes, you can take the glasses out.

0:22:430:22:45

Those are cool!

0:22:450:22:47

Proper vintage glasses.

0:22:470:22:48

-They are, aren't they?

-Oh, wow.

-Try them on.

0:22:480:22:51

Oh, you look fabulous.

0:22:540:22:55

You look like a doctor!

0:22:560:22:58

You look as if you're just about to analyse me.

0:22:580:23:00

If my head's like that, I'm fine. It really works.

0:23:000:23:03

-But I love the case. Do you know what it's made of?

-No, what is it?

0:23:030:23:06

Oh, is it mother-of-pearl?

0:23:060:23:07

It is, mother-of-pearl, an abalone shell.

0:23:070:23:09

-And it's made of papier mache.

-No!

0:23:110:23:12

Yes. And it's Victorian.

0:23:120:23:14

That dates to about 1890.

0:23:140:23:16

-We're having it.

-You really like this, don't you?

0:23:160:23:18

I really, like, instantly warm to those.

0:23:180:23:20

There's £28 on the ticket.

0:23:200:23:23

Time to talk money with dealer David. Look out!

0:23:230:23:27

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:23:270:23:29

We've fallen in love

0:23:290:23:30

-with these vintage spectacles and the glass case.

-Wonderful, yes.

0:23:300:23:33

We're putting them into auction,

0:23:330:23:35

we're wondering whether we can get a really good price on them.

0:23:350:23:38

-I'll certainly do my best.

-Will you?

-Yup.

0:23:380:23:40

Well, we were wondering whether we could get it for 15.

0:23:400:23:42

I can't do 15, Mark, but I could stretch to 18.

0:23:420:23:46

-Shall we?

-We love 18.

-Thank you, we love 18, thank you.

0:23:460:23:48

-Thank you very much.

-That's very kind of you.

0:23:480:23:51

-Carrie, what can I say?

-Yes!

-That was wonderful.

0:23:510:23:54

We've ended the day on a high.

0:23:540:23:56

Turning into quite a team, aren't they?

0:23:560:23:58

£18 gets them their third item

0:23:580:24:00

and wraps up shopping on an eventful day.

0:24:000:24:03

Just time for our celebrity husband and wife

0:24:040:24:07

to catch up before they kip.

0:24:070:24:09

Because I'm such a beginner and newcomer to this,

0:24:090:24:11

I still have that genuine belief

0:24:110:24:14

that I will find something for a little bit of money

0:24:140:24:17

that's worth a lot.

0:24:170:24:20

-Do you know what I mean?

-Yeah.

-Like, "I'm going to be able to do that!"

0:24:200:24:23

They get on well, don't they?

0:24:230:24:25

Nighty-night.

0:24:250:24:26

It's a new day and time to compare notes.

0:24:320:24:35

Will was just so good.

0:24:360:24:37

He corrected me in a really nice way.

0:24:370:24:40

Like, I'd be going, "Let's buy this," and he'd go,

0:24:400:24:42

"Yeah, that's interesting. Do you like that?"

0:24:420:24:44

"That's interesting. That's really good."

0:24:440:24:46

Oh, really? Martin didn't do that.

0:24:460:24:47

-Martin corrected me in a horrible way.

-Really, like what?

0:24:470:24:50

-He just gave you the look.

-He just gave me the look.

0:24:500:24:53

He loves you really.

0:24:530:24:56

She was so nice a person to work with

0:24:560:24:58

and so enthusiastic in the shop,

0:24:580:25:00

but everything I showed her she seemed not terribly impressed with.

0:25:000:25:04

-You mean she hated?

-Yes.

0:25:040:25:06

Yeah. Yesterday Mark and Carrie bought a pair of vases,

0:25:060:25:10

some equestrian plaques,

0:25:100:25:11

some spectacles and a lovely frog-mouth spectacle case,

0:25:110:25:15

leaving them £227 to spend today.

0:25:150:25:18

I'm quite pleased with those.

0:25:180:25:20

I'm really pleased.

0:25:200:25:21

While David and Will picked up a boar's head,

0:25:230:25:25

a rustic saw and a push hoe.

0:25:250:25:27

Still, they have £250 to play with.

0:25:270:25:30

-Well done.

-Very good.

0:25:300:25:32

So when you were looking,

0:25:330:25:34

what kind of things were you looking for?

0:25:340:25:36

-Small things, big things...?

-I was looking for things

0:25:360:25:39

that would make a profit and beat you.

0:25:390:25:41

So that was basically the criteria?

0:25:430:25:45

And you?

0:25:450:25:47

Yeah, the same. Pretty much.

0:25:470:25:50

OK, chaps, time for round two.

0:25:500:25:52

Oh, look, here they are.

0:25:520:25:54

Oh, yeah, what a stylish couple...

0:25:540:25:57

-Oh!

-..we are.

0:25:570:25:58

Hello!

0:26:000:26:02

Do you know, that sounded a lot smoother with Carrie driving it.

0:26:020:26:05

No, it didn't.

0:26:050:26:06

It didn't, it just sounded a little more relaxed

0:26:060:26:09

because she doesn't actually give it loads.

0:26:090:26:11

Do we not deserve the red car?

0:26:110:26:12

I think you drove it beautifully.

0:26:120:26:14

-Thank you.

-It was so smooth.

0:26:140:26:16

-I think we've earned it.

-I think you misunderstand.

0:26:160:26:18

You see, the red car is the winner's car.

0:26:180:26:21

-Great, that's ours, then.

-Literally ours, then.

0:26:210:26:24

You haven't earned it yet.

0:26:240:26:25

-Excuse me!

-I'm not getting involved.

0:26:260:26:28

I'll make a deal with you - if you win...

0:26:280:26:31

..I'll buy you the car.

0:26:320:26:33

Get out of town!

0:26:350:26:37

Is matrimonial bliss suspended for the rest of the competition, then?

0:26:370:26:41

David asked me this morning...

0:26:410:26:44

Yes?

0:26:440:26:46

..how I got on yesterday and I told him that I'd bought everything.

0:26:460:26:52

No! Are you trying to wind him up?

0:26:520:26:54

-Yeah.

-Are you playing games with him?

0:26:540:26:57

Yes. I've been sending him secret texts calling him a loser.

0:26:570:27:01

Is this something you do on a regular basis or just for the show?

0:27:010:27:04

Oh, yeah, it's a competition.

0:27:040:27:06

I'm not sure if David is competitive about the antiques or just the car.

0:27:070:27:11

She has to earn driving this car by winning.

0:27:110:27:15

As that's not going to happen, she may not drive it again.

0:27:150:27:19

Exactly, she's had her chance, mate.

0:27:190:27:21

Our teams will be selling their antiques at an auction

0:27:210:27:24

in Norfolk's Downham Market.

0:27:240:27:26

But our first stop today

0:27:260:27:27

is in the Hertfordshire market town of Hitchin.

0:27:270:27:31

David and Will are at Marie Antiques for a rummage about.

0:27:310:27:34

So off you go, lads.

0:27:340:27:36

And where's Marie?

0:27:360:27:37

More spangly jewellery.

0:27:380:27:40

These are nice, though, aren't they, these hardstone pieces?

0:27:400:27:43

-They're lovely.

-If you wanted to buy things for Carrie here.

0:27:430:27:46

We're not buying for Carrie, we're buying for us for a profit.

0:27:460:27:49

-What about over here?

-Oh!

0:27:490:27:51

-What have you spotted?

-What's that?!

0:27:510:27:53

Well... Continuing on our animal theme, this looks like a fish slice,

0:27:550:28:00

I would imagine, by the fact that it's a fish.

0:28:000:28:02

Why's it shaped that way?

0:28:020:28:04

You don't want to lose your salmon steak, do you?

0:28:040:28:07

So you would cut it and lift it?

0:28:070:28:09

Yes, that would be for passing the fish.

0:28:090:28:12

Those bits... Serrated edges, or something?

0:28:130:28:16

I suppose you could if you wanted, but no,

0:28:160:28:18

I think the shape is decorative and slightly humorous.

0:28:180:28:21

Oh, yes, it's the most amusing fish slice I've ever seen

0:28:210:28:25

and it will cost you 45 with no chips.

0:28:250:28:28

I like this a lot.

0:28:280:28:30

It's not bad quality, actually.

0:28:300:28:31

Do you think that we might, like,

0:28:310:28:34

get some interest?

0:28:340:28:36

I think it's a bit quirky, isn't it?

0:28:360:28:38

A bit different.

0:28:380:28:40

We've got Boris the boar, why not have Freddie the fish?

0:28:400:28:43

Absolutely. Time to talk money with dealer, savvy Sheila.

0:28:430:28:46

-OK.

-Now...

0:28:460:28:49

-We like that.

-You like it.

0:28:500:28:51

I'm not surprised, it's a beautiful item.

0:28:510:28:53

-It's fun, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

0:28:530:28:55

But the price is just a little bit out of our comfort zone.

0:28:550:28:59

Can you give me an idea of where we can go with this?

0:28:590:29:03

I can do but it's a good item at 45,

0:29:030:29:06

but of course I will see if there is anything that we can do.

0:29:060:29:09

I just need to go out the back to check that.

0:29:090:29:11

-No problem.

-Thank you.

0:29:110:29:12

Fingers crossed the owner is willing to give a little discount.

0:29:120:29:15

Sheila makes the call.

0:29:160:29:18

-Think positive, think positive.

-Stand by.

0:29:180:29:20

-OK, guys.

-Good news or bad news?

0:29:200:29:22

I think you're going to find this is amazing news.

0:29:220:29:25

-Go on.

-OK. We like you.

0:29:250:29:27

-Aw!

-That's good.

-It's happened once before.

0:29:280:29:30

That's almost as unique as the fish slice.

0:29:300:29:32

That's unique what I've just said as well,

0:29:320:29:35

and so is this, because we're going to offer you that for £5.

0:29:350:29:38

-What?!

-Get out of town!

0:29:380:29:39

Oh, my goodness.

0:29:390:29:41

A Lady Godiva.

0:29:410:29:42

-Yes!

-He's straight in his pocket. I think that's a deal.

0:29:420:29:46

I should say so.

0:29:470:29:48

That's an incredibly generous discount!

0:29:480:29:51

-Goodbye.

-Bye-bye.

0:29:510:29:52

With £40 off, the boys get a once-in-a-lifetime deal.

0:29:520:29:56

They must be happy with that. Bonkers.

0:29:560:29:59

Do you know what? I'm going to kick my heels up.

0:29:590:30:01

Nice!

0:30:020:30:04

Elsewhere, Mark and Carrie have made

0:30:060:30:08

a 50-mile journey west, into Hertfordshire,

0:30:080:30:10

as they head for lovely Letchworth.

0:30:100:30:13

Oh, Letchworth Garden City.

0:30:160:30:19

-It sounds very nice.

-I have a really big connection there.

0:30:190:30:23

-Do you?

-I do.

-Tell me.

0:30:230:30:25

Cos my...mum and dad

0:30:250:30:29

owned the station shop.

0:30:290:30:32

My mum loved it. Once she retired, she did this for...about

0:30:320:30:37

maybe five or six years. They owned it,

0:30:370:30:39

and it was just brilliant.

0:30:390:30:41

She loved it cos she loved people.

0:30:410:30:43

I know nothing about the history.

0:30:430:30:45

-No, I don't.

-I'm sorry to say, ashamed to say.

0:30:450:30:48

Well, now's your chance.

0:30:480:30:49

Carrie and David are visiting the local museum

0:30:490:30:52

to find out how these leafy surroundings

0:30:520:30:55

sparked a social revolution.

0:30:550:30:57

To explain how this town changed the way people lived

0:30:570:31:00

in cities worldwide is curator Josh Tidy.

0:31:000:31:04

-Hello!

-Hello, welcome.

-I'm Carrie.

-I'm Josh.

0:31:040:31:07

-Hi, Josh. I'm Mark.

-Hello. Do come through.

0:31:070:31:10

Where did it all begin, Josh?

0:31:120:31:13

It all began with Ebenezer Howard, who was a social reformer

0:31:130:31:17

who was trying to solve the problems of the late-Victorian age.

0:31:170:31:19

In Victorian Britain,

0:31:210:31:22

people flocked to the cities looking for work,

0:31:220:31:24

but overcrowded homes, crammed next to factories,

0:31:240:31:27

meant workers were constantly subjected

0:31:270:31:30

to the smoke and squalor of their industrial surroundings.

0:31:300:31:33

Poverty was rife

0:31:350:31:36

and the average life expectancy was just 40 years.

0:31:360:31:39

But Ebenezer Howard, who'd grown up in London,

0:31:390:31:42

had a vision to change the way people lived.

0:31:420:31:45

He wanted to plan the construction of new towns

0:31:450:31:47

with an altogether different approach.

0:31:470:31:49

So the biggest influences on Howard

0:31:510:31:53

were industrial villages set up by factory benefactors,

0:31:530:31:58

like Cadburys, who created Bournville,

0:31:580:32:01

and Lord Lever, who created Port Sunlight up near Liverpool.

0:32:010:32:04

They were really looking

0:32:040:32:06

at increasing the productivity of the workers.

0:32:060:32:09

So healthier, happier workers would obviously be off sick less

0:32:090:32:13

and produce more.

0:32:130:32:15

Howard was inspired by that,

0:32:150:32:16

but also felt it should apply to everyone

0:32:160:32:19

and not just to do with increasing productivity.

0:32:190:32:22

In 1898, Ebenezer Howard published his book, Garden Cities Of Tomorrow.

0:32:220:32:27

He set out his vision of people leaving industrial cities behind

0:32:270:32:31

to work in the new towns,

0:32:310:32:33

that offered employment and the benefits of a rural lifestyle.

0:32:330:32:37

The book really sets out his vision for garden cities

0:32:380:32:42

and is packed full of diagrams,

0:32:420:32:45

which is where he best illustrates his ideas,

0:32:450:32:48

including this one, the three magnets.

0:32:480:32:51

It's a very simple idea but very neatly expressed.

0:32:510:32:53

It's combining all of the best parts of town

0:32:530:32:56

and the best parts of country life,

0:32:560:32:57

without either of the worst parts.

0:32:570:32:59

So you end up with different uses for different areas of the town.

0:32:590:33:02

You have areas for workers' housing so they can walk to work.

0:33:020:33:06

You also have planned green spaces right in the heart of the town

0:33:060:33:10

so people can enjoy that.

0:33:100:33:11

-It's amazing, isn't it?

-It's fantastic, actually.

0:33:110:33:13

He wanted it really to be a network of associated towns.

0:33:130:33:16

In fact he thought if the idea was really a success,

0:33:160:33:20

he thought the problem might be that London would wonder what to do

0:33:200:33:25

with the empty husk cos everyone had left.

0:33:250:33:27

-THEY LAUGH

-What a lovely thought!

0:33:270:33:29

Indeed.

0:33:290:33:31

The diagrams were simple

0:33:310:33:32

but Howard's ideas were a sea change in town planning.

0:33:320:33:36

Zones were created to separate housing and industry

0:33:360:33:39

and communities were surrounded by agricultural land

0:33:390:33:42

in what became the country's first green belt.

0:33:420:33:45

Residents could access invigorating green spaces

0:33:450:33:48

and, most revolutionary of all,

0:33:480:33:50

rent paid in these new towns was invested back into the community,

0:33:500:33:54

rather than lining the pockets of landlords.

0:33:540:33:57

In 1903, the new town of Letchworth

0:33:570:34:00

became the world's first garden city.

0:34:000:34:02

Its village greens, Arts and Crafts-style houses

0:34:020:34:06

and zoned areas were the realisation of Howard's dream.

0:34:060:34:10

Letchworth soon attracted the attention of people

0:34:100:34:13

excited to see what life in this new garden city was like.

0:34:130:34:17

This is Andrew Muir and he is one of the early settlers

0:34:170:34:21

that were affectionately known as "cranks".

0:34:210:34:24

Lots of people were interested in this simple life

0:34:240:34:26

and...rational dress.

0:34:260:34:29

They rejected the formal attire of Edwardian England

0:34:290:34:34

and went with these smocks.

0:34:340:34:35

That would have been outrageous at the time, right?

0:34:350:34:37

Letchworth and its cranks were regarded as a curiosity

0:34:370:34:41

by the rest of the country.

0:34:410:34:44

People came up from London on a day trip to have a look at them.

0:34:440:34:49

Forget the city, just look at the people!

0:34:490:34:50

-Indeed.

-Yeah.

0:34:500:34:52

Howard's revolutionary Letchworth Garden City

0:34:520:34:55

became a blueprint for new towns across the world.

0:34:550:34:57

Locations like Sao Paulo and Christchurch in New Zealand,

0:34:570:35:01

as well as parts of New York and Los Angeles,

0:35:010:35:04

all owe their design to Letchworth,

0:35:040:35:07

the garden city that remains a testament

0:35:070:35:09

to Ebenezer Howard's dream of a utopian living environment.

0:35:090:35:14

How interesting.

0:35:140:35:15

Meanwhile, Will and David

0:35:160:35:18

have one last stop on their shopping trip

0:35:180:35:21

and are pootling west to Barton-Le-Clay.

0:35:210:35:24

Their final stop is

0:35:240:35:26

in this local antiques centre.

0:35:260:35:28

-Here we are.

-OK.

0:35:280:35:30

Listen, just don't buy any more ploughs.

0:35:300:35:31

OK, I'm sorted with that.

0:35:310:35:33

LAUGHTER

0:35:330:35:35

This place is huge!

0:35:350:35:37

There's plenty here for them to spend their remaining £245.

0:35:370:35:41

How about you go that way and I'll go this way?

0:35:410:35:44

Go on, then. See you later.

0:35:440:35:45

There's a lot here.

0:35:500:35:52

Oh-ho-ho!

0:35:560:35:58

Quite nice.

0:36:000:36:02

That might be a goer for our rural lot.

0:36:020:36:07

One of the first presents that I ever got

0:36:080:36:11

that I was really, truly excited about, was a camera.

0:36:110:36:16

As a child, just having a camera was a great thing

0:36:160:36:19

and I loved it, I cherished it, I loved taking photos.

0:36:190:36:23

This reminds me of that excitement.

0:36:230:36:26

First World War. This is from 1912 to 1914.

0:36:280:36:31

Even before the war, people had these.

0:36:310:36:35

In fact I really like this.

0:36:350:36:37

David loves it and it is ticketed at £35.

0:36:370:36:41

Oh, here comes Will.

0:36:410:36:43

Hello, young sir, can I interest you in any fresh milk?

0:36:430:36:46

-What do you reckon?

-DAVID LAUGHS

0:36:460:36:48

I'm ready for the American football field.

0:36:480:36:50

You've got to be kidding!

0:36:500:36:52

Really? I thought, to add to our country lot.

0:36:520:36:55

So do you put two buckets on the end of those?

0:36:550:36:57

-Two buckets, off you go.

-Oh, wow!

0:36:570:37:00

Do you think anyone would buy this?

0:37:000:37:02

I don't know. Unless you want to veto me.

0:37:020:37:05

No, I'm not the expert.

0:37:050:37:07

We've just got money burning a hole in our pocket

0:37:070:37:09

and I want to try and spend as much as we can.

0:37:090:37:12

-OK.

-What is it?

-What was it?

0:37:120:37:14

It was at £48 and it's now £28.

0:37:140:37:18

Tell me, what have you been looking at?

0:37:180:37:20

I've been looking at these cameras. I love old cameras.

0:37:200:37:24

-Do you?

-This one has particularly caught my attention.

0:37:240:37:27

That's two items to think about.

0:37:270:37:29

The owner of the yoke has left them their number.

0:37:290:37:32

Time to make a call.

0:37:320:37:34

Thank you.

0:37:340:37:35

Hello, Stan. We saw your milkmaid's yoke

0:37:370:37:39

and we wondered if you might be able to help us out.

0:37:390:37:42

At the moment, you've got 28 on it.

0:37:420:37:44

Would a nice round 20 buy it?

0:37:450:37:48

Yeah, 20 quid?

0:37:480:37:49

Are you happy with that? All right, then, lovely.

0:37:490:37:52

-Toodle-pip!

-Yes!

0:37:520:37:55

That's an £8 discount and the yoke is theirs.

0:37:550:37:58

But if you want anything else, you will need to get a move on

0:37:580:38:00

cos here comes the yellow peril.

0:38:000:38:02

-That cheeky whatsit.

-I tell you what...

0:38:020:38:04

-How long have they had in here?

-I have no idea, Carrie.

0:38:040:38:07

Taking all the best stuff!

0:38:070:38:09

Well, they are certainly trying their best, Carrie.

0:38:090:38:11

-Carrie, we have no time to waste.

-Let's get straight in there.

0:38:110:38:15

Are we going to spend all our money?

0:38:150:38:18

Only if it's going to make us lots of money.

0:38:180:38:21

I'm finally getting the hang of it.

0:38:210:38:23

You are getting the hang of it.

0:38:230:38:25

These two have £227 weighing them down.

0:38:250:38:28

Oh, nice!

0:38:380:38:39

£480.

0:38:390:38:40

Put it back.

0:38:400:38:41

You tell him, Carrie.

0:38:410:38:44

Cameras, do they sell?

0:38:440:38:46

Only certain ones.

0:38:460:38:48

That's a code for "no".

0:38:480:38:51

Well, don't tell David, then!

0:38:510:38:52

Although the boys have their eye on something else.

0:38:520:38:55

I absolutely love this.

0:38:550:38:59

A little mahogany fist?

0:38:590:39:00

It's like a... Maybe not mahogany.

0:39:000:39:02

A fruitwood or perhaps a little boxwood

0:39:020:39:05

or something like that.

0:39:050:39:06

It's a fist, but check this out.

0:39:060:39:08

Good spot, Will!

0:39:100:39:12

What is that?

0:39:120:39:13

It's a novelty pipe bowl carved in the form of a clenched fist.

0:39:130:39:18

Ticketed at £29, it's certainly an unusual lot,

0:39:180:39:21

but wait, there's more.

0:39:210:39:23

What do you reckon to that?

0:39:230:39:25

What's that made of? What would that be?

0:39:250:39:27

That's horn and I'm almost certain that is silver-mounted,

0:39:270:39:31

though I can't find a hallmark.

0:39:310:39:33

I like this.

0:39:330:39:34

It could've been used at a pre-hunt meet.

0:39:340:39:37

It looks that kind of thing, doesn't it?

0:39:370:39:38

To maybe have a little glass of sherry before you're off.

0:39:380:39:41

Hold on a minute...

0:39:410:39:42

-Whisky.

-Oh! You have a man with a nose here.

0:39:420:39:46

Oh, yeah, you're right.

0:39:460:39:47

Whatever went in it, there's £22 on that beaker.

0:39:470:39:51

They now have several potentials to consider.

0:39:510:39:54

I say! How about Carrie and Mark?

0:39:540:39:56

It's a ladies' cigarette case

0:39:560:39:59

and it's, "Helen, from Roy, 8/6/1929."

0:39:590:40:05

It's Continental silver.

0:40:050:40:07

It's marked 925.

0:40:070:40:09

It's enamelled in this lovely lilac enamel.

0:40:090:40:12

And engine-turned underneath.

0:40:140:40:15

Gives it a lovely quality feel.

0:40:150:40:18

I like it. I like it...

0:40:180:40:20

-But?

-But...

0:40:200:40:22

-It's lovely quality.

-175? That feels like a huge risk.

0:40:220:40:26

It is a huge risk, but do we like taking risks?

0:40:260:40:29

I do.

0:40:310:40:32

-What would we say yes to?

-Oh, gosh.

0:40:320:40:34

It's a big ask, I think,

0:40:340:40:35

but if we could get it for 125 or less, it might stand a chance.

0:40:350:40:39

-It is a good-quality item.

-OK.

0:40:390:40:40

Do you want me to buy this?

0:40:400:40:42

I would like to find out what we could get it for.

0:40:420:40:45

You do that then, Mark, and let Carrie have a gander.

0:40:450:40:48

Oh, my gosh. That's adorable.

0:40:530:40:55

Mark?

0:40:570:40:58

Where has he got to?

0:40:580:41:00

-OK, thank you very much.

-No problem.

-I'll tell her.

-Oh, hello...

0:41:000:41:03

-Carrie.

-Yes.

-Don't shout at me.

0:41:030:41:05

I bought it.

0:41:050:41:06

-How much...?

-125.

0:41:060:41:08

OK.

0:41:080:41:10

The exact price.

0:41:100:41:11

I know, but it is lovely. It's worth a chance, isn't it?

0:41:110:41:15

We have got to make at least...

0:41:150:41:17

Four million.

0:41:170:41:18

Hey, that would be a find.

0:41:180:41:20

But that's a £50 discount for the cigarette case.

0:41:200:41:23

Now it's the boys' turn to chat with dealer Steve.

0:41:250:41:27

-OK.

-Right.

-We've got a few items that we've chosen

0:41:270:41:33

from your selection.

0:41:330:41:34

What shall we go for first? Let's go for this one.

0:41:340:41:36

OK, beaker first.

0:41:360:41:38

Steve has got the owner on the phone.

0:41:380:41:40

-There we go. It's Judy.

-Hi, Judy?

0:41:400:41:43

We've been rather taken by a little horn beaker.

0:41:430:41:46

It's got 22 on it.

0:41:460:41:48

Yes, I'm going to say yes to that and thank you very much.

0:41:510:41:54

-Judy, thank you so much.

-£15.

0:41:560:41:59

Schmoozer. That's a £7 discount for the beaker.

0:41:590:42:02

Now for the pipe.

0:42:020:42:03

-Sorry...

-It's on at 29.

0:42:030:42:05

I'm not going to try and break your back on it.

0:42:050:42:08

Would a straight 20 quid buy that?

0:42:080:42:10

-You know what? Let's do it.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:42:100:42:12

That's £20 for the pipe and £15 for the beaker.

0:42:120:42:16

Now for the camera.

0:42:160:42:17

Hope you've been watching, David, because it's your turn.

0:42:170:42:21

I've got quite a tight budget

0:42:210:42:23

and I was wondering if we could agree on a figure

0:42:230:42:26

that I could just part with now - around 20 quid?

0:42:260:42:29

If I go to 25?

0:42:290:42:31

This is all yours, remember.

0:42:310:42:33

OK, yeah. 25.

0:42:330:42:35

Shall I pass you back?

0:42:350:42:37

OK, thank you.

0:42:370:42:39

Well done.

0:42:390:42:40

£80 gets them the yoke, beaker, pipe and camera.

0:42:400:42:45

-That's been great.

-Enjoy those.

0:42:450:42:48

You grab those, I'll grab the yoke.

0:42:480:42:49

Let's hope it's a double-yoker, and their shopping is complete.

0:42:490:42:53

-Oh, no!

-Look out!

0:42:530:42:54

-Bags of stuff.

-This isn't fair.

0:42:540:42:58

-What have you got there?

-I wouldn't go in there.

0:42:580:43:00

We've had all the good stuff.

0:43:000:43:02

You've bought all the rubbish already?

0:43:020:43:04

Listen, they are like people in a dark room

0:43:040:43:06

looking for a black cat. Anyway, come on.

0:43:060:43:08

-Oh! Is he always that rude?

-Yes.

0:43:080:43:11

TIM LAUGHS

0:43:110:43:13

Now you have the place to yourself.

0:43:130:43:15

What's Carrie found?

0:43:150:43:17

-It's a child's chair.

-Yeah.

0:43:170:43:18

Actually, I'm quite impressed with you.

0:43:180:43:20

-Aw!

-I'm so glad you found this because I can sit down.

0:43:200:43:23

I like it for a couple of reasons.

0:43:250:43:27

People collect children's chairs and it's a rocker.

0:43:270:43:29

I just...

0:43:290:43:30

This is all turned, nicely turned.

0:43:300:43:32

There is a lot of wear on that so people have used that.

0:43:320:43:36

It tells of its history, doesn't it?

0:43:360:43:38

It does. But this is rather simple, here...

0:43:380:43:40

But it is only £35.

0:43:420:43:44

That's what I was thinking - Edwardian,

0:43:440:43:46

and if we could get it a little bit cheaper...

0:43:460:43:47

When is the Edwardian period?

0:43:470:43:49

That was when Edward was around.

0:43:490:43:51

You're absolutely right.

0:43:510:43:53

I'll tell you what, I'm not needed.

0:43:530:43:57

I think that's a possibility.

0:43:570:43:59

Well done, you.

0:43:590:44:01

We've not seen Steve for a while, so let's get him back in.

0:44:010:44:04

We want to be a bit mean if we can, sorry.

0:44:040:44:07

-I knew this bit was coming.

-I know.

0:44:070:44:09

THEY LAUGH

0:44:090:44:11

I'm sure the others were much nicer.

0:44:110:44:13

But, um...

0:44:130:44:15

we'd like to get it for about 20.

0:44:150:44:17

20? What's the price on there?

0:44:180:44:20

-35.

-I thought it was 22, wasn't it?

0:44:200:44:22

25...

0:44:220:44:25

-That's it, isn't it?

-Do you know what?

0:44:250:44:27

Yes.

0:44:270:44:29

-Shake his hand quick.

-There we go.

0:44:290:44:32

-I told you to shake his hand.

-He said yes!

0:44:320:44:34

Steve, thank you. We're thrilled with that.

0:44:340:44:36

Oh, my gosh. We're going to make money on that.

0:44:360:44:38

-I hope so.

-Thank you so much.

0:44:380:44:40

-We are all done. We're shopped out.

-We're good.

0:44:400:44:43

You certainly are.

0:44:430:44:45

Now, with all that shopping complete,

0:44:450:44:47

brace yourselves...

0:44:470:44:49

-Shall we show?

-Yeah, let's do it.

0:44:490:44:51

All right. Ready, steady...

0:44:510:44:53

-You've bought a warthog.

-A warthog!

0:44:530:44:57

Wow!

0:44:570:44:58

This is a wild boar, or at least, WAS a wild boar.

0:44:580:45:02

-It still is.

-I'm not sure about that.

0:45:020:45:05

What's that? What's that?

0:45:050:45:07

Well, this is our...

0:45:070:45:08

We've gone for a bit of a tactical lot here,

0:45:080:45:10

bearing in mind we're going to a rural auction house.

0:45:100:45:13

So we thought we'd get something that might appeal

0:45:130:45:15

to the rich farmer boys.

0:45:150:45:16

- That's a good lot. - It's quite fun.

0:45:160:45:18

What's the spoon, Will?

0:45:180:45:21

The spoon is actually just silver-plated.

0:45:210:45:23

It's also a fish slice.

0:45:230:45:25

- But it's kind of fun, isn't it? - How much was that?

0:45:250:45:27

We asked what her best price was.

0:45:270:45:29

-You won't believe it.

-She said a fiver.

0:45:290:45:30

No! You're going to make money on that.

0:45:300:45:34

The hand thing, what's the hand thing?

0:45:340:45:36

-I love it.

-A pipe?

0:45:360:45:38

- It's great, isn't it? - And you've put it with the horn?

0:45:380:45:42

I've put it with the horn beaker, which again we picked up today.

0:45:420:45:45

Hang on a minute, how many bits of this...?

0:45:450:45:47

This is a lot, that's a lot.

0:45:470:45:48

It is a lot. It's way too much.

0:45:480:45:50

That's a lot, that's a lot.

0:45:500:45:52

I think you've done really... They've done well.

0:45:520:45:54

-I think you have, to be honest.

-I hate to say it...

0:45:540:45:56

-No, I agree.

-But they've done extremely well.

0:45:560:45:58

- Hang on, we haven't seen your lot. - No, trust me, you've done well.

0:45:580:46:01

- Let's have a look. - Shall we?

0:46:010:46:03

Careful now.

0:46:030:46:06

-Oh, no, look.

-Oh, man!

0:46:060:46:09

I love this.

0:46:100:46:12

You bought that in there, didn't you?

0:46:120:46:13

- Carrie found that. 20 quid. - No way!

0:46:130:46:16

-£20.

-It was cheap enough at 35.

0:46:160:46:19

Oh, my goodness.

0:46:190:46:21

-We love these with the sun...

-Look at these.

0:46:210:46:22

And you've got the spectacles.

0:46:220:46:24

-Nice.

-Fabulous.

0:46:240:46:26

-This is perfect.

-I love them.

0:46:260:46:29

What's that clanking?

0:46:290:46:31

They look really stylish.

0:46:310:46:32

They're French - Paris, probably. Etruscan style.

0:46:320:46:35

They are really designer interior.

0:46:350:46:38

And I wanted them for 45.

0:46:380:46:39

- But Carrie shook hands at 50. - 50's still cheap, Mark.

0:46:390:46:43

From the really agricultural to the delicate and tasteful.

0:46:430:46:46

Oh, it's been nice.

0:46:460:46:48

It's damning me with faint praise.

0:46:480:46:51

On that note, I think we'd better leave.

0:46:510:46:53

Oh, well, let's see what he really thinks.

0:46:530:46:55

Mark's got a certain look,

0:46:570:46:59

and he's gone very well with those porcelain vases.

0:46:590:47:02

The little card case, the enamel card case - beautiful.

0:47:020:47:06

I don't think they'll get loads for the boar's head,

0:47:060:47:08

but that spoon thing and the pipe, those two things.

0:47:080:47:11

That spoon, I can't believe it. Five quid.

0:47:110:47:13

The glasses, the Victorian glasses, I love.

0:47:130:47:15

Yeah, that's quirky. And the chair.

0:47:150:47:17

I think the chair is their good lot there.

0:47:170:47:20

I really hope the silver enamel cigarette box does well.

0:47:200:47:22

-It might come back to haunt you, that one.

-It might do.

0:47:220:47:25

I don't like it when you wag your finger at me.

0:47:250:47:27

Time now to head north into Norfolk

0:47:310:47:33

for the auction in Downham Market.

0:47:330:47:35

Has anybody got any pre-auction jitters?

0:47:370:47:40

I feel like all of my bravado has left me.

0:47:400:47:43

DAVID LAUGHS

0:47:430:47:46

I've lost my mojo

0:47:460:47:48

with the fear of being beaten.

0:47:480:47:51

-Do you know what?

-I saw your stuff and I was like,

0:47:520:47:55

"OK, I'm going to lose."

0:47:550:47:58

For me, this whole thing has been about beating you,

0:47:580:48:02

but now we're here...

0:48:020:48:04

You still want to beat me.

0:48:040:48:06

Yes, I do, but if I beat you and you lose money,

0:48:060:48:08

I'll still feel like I've failed.

0:48:080:48:10

So is it a matter of who loses the most?

0:48:100:48:13

Who loses the most is the loser, yes.

0:48:130:48:17

Well, I'm glad that's straight.

0:48:170:48:19

Downham Market was once the hiding place for King Charles I

0:48:190:48:21

after his defeat at the Battle of Naseby.

0:48:210:48:24

But who will trounce who today?

0:48:240:48:28

CAR HORN TOOTS

0:48:280:48:30

Oh, I recognise that sound. Oh, no.

0:48:300:48:32

Loving it. He's like a boy with a new toy.

0:48:340:48:37

We hadn't noticed. Come on.

0:48:370:48:39

-How are you, mate?

-Good.

0:48:390:48:41

-All right.

-Are you ready?

-Yeah, come on.

0:48:410:48:43

No time to lose.

0:48:430:48:45

Let's remind ourselves what they bought.

0:48:470:48:49

Carrie and Mark spent the most,

0:48:510:48:53

splashing £318 on five lots for auction...

0:48:530:48:57

..while David and Will parted with £235.

0:48:580:49:02

After combining a few things, they also have five auction lots.

0:49:020:49:06

But what does Barry from Barry Hawkins Auctioneers

0:49:060:49:09

make of it all?

0:49:090:49:10

The little plough is, in actual fact, a hoe.

0:49:100:49:13

We see them time after time.

0:49:130:49:15

And then the whole lot altogether, with the yoke and saw,

0:49:150:49:19

is probably going to make £10 at the outside.

0:49:190:49:22

Now, the little cigarette case - absolutely delightful.

0:49:220:49:25

And that could, again, top £100.

0:49:250:49:28

While Barry relaxes with a cup of tea,

0:49:280:49:30

his colleague Julia is first up with the gavel.

0:49:300:49:33

Everybody ready?

0:49:330:49:34

Selling for £14.

0:49:340:49:36

First lot of the day is David and Will's silver-plated fish slice.

0:49:390:49:43

Who'll start me with this?

0:49:430:49:45

Start me with £20 on this nice little fish slice.

0:49:450:49:47

-£15, I am bid.

-Oh...

0:49:470:49:49

18, 20.

0:49:490:49:51

Here we go.

0:49:510:49:52

24, 26, 28, 30.

0:49:520:49:56

Selling for £30.

0:49:560:49:59

Well done, you.

0:49:590:50:01

What a really good buy. I'm so pleased for you.

0:50:010:50:03

WILL LAUGHS

0:50:030:50:05

I'm not bitter.

0:50:050:50:06

Very gracious!

0:50:060:50:08

Well, the generous discount on the fish slice

0:50:080:50:10

ensured a tidy profit.

0:50:100:50:12

That's some result. I'll take that.

0:50:120:50:14

Now, Carrie fell in love with the glasses

0:50:140:50:18

and Mark adored the frog-mouth case.

0:50:180:50:20

But will they take the fancy of the bidders?

0:50:200:50:22

The glasses are actually inside it.

0:50:220:50:24

Little glasses there.

0:50:240:50:26

Do you need them modelled?

0:50:260:50:28

£20.

0:50:280:50:30

15?

0:50:300:50:31

Oh, come on.

0:50:310:50:33

£10 I'm bid.

0:50:330:50:34

-£10, 12.

-You're

-in.

0:50:340:50:35

14. 16, 18. £18 with me at the moment.

0:50:350:50:40

-Come on.

-20 - £20 I have.

0:50:400:50:43

£20 I have. £20 - any more?

0:50:430:50:45

I thought they'd make more than that.

0:50:450:50:47

Selling at £20.

0:50:470:50:49

Carrie's first lot of the day and it's a small profit.

0:50:490:50:52

Your next best lot is coming up next.

0:50:540:50:56

- This is my favourite lot. - Oh, I love it.

0:50:560:50:58

Next, it's the combination lot of the treen pipe and beaker.

0:51:000:51:04

Nice little lot there.

0:51:040:51:06

Sale of the century moment, that.

0:51:060:51:09

Start off at £20 on that.

0:51:090:51:10

£20, I am bid.

0:51:100:51:12

25, 30. £30. 35, 40.

0:51:120:51:15

£40, £40. 45, 50. £50 with me on the book.

0:51:150:51:19

Oh, commission on it as well.

0:51:190:51:20

52. 55. £55 with me.

0:51:200:51:25

It's a profit.

0:51:250:51:26

65. 65 on the book.

0:51:260:51:28

They've got a lot of commission bids, haven't they?

0:51:280:51:31

Still cheap.

0:51:320:51:33

Selling for £65.

0:51:330:51:36

- £30 profit. - £30 profit.

0:51:360:51:39

We're doing all right, we're doing all right.

0:51:390:51:41

You know, I'm quite...

0:51:410:51:43

I'm quite relieved - we thought you might get more than that for that.

0:51:430:51:46

Is that a compliment or what?

0:51:460:51:48

Either way, it's two profits for the boys.

0:51:480:51:51

That's all your good luck now gone.

0:51:520:51:54

Thanks!

0:51:540:51:55

Hopefully, the good luck is heading your way, Carrie.

0:51:570:52:00

It's your pair of vases next.

0:52:000:52:02

Just look at those.

0:52:020:52:03

- They're very stylish. - What a pair.

0:52:030:52:05

Who will start me off?

0:52:050:52:06

£20 on those.

0:52:060:52:08

£20 on the vases.

0:52:080:52:11

£10 I am bid.

0:52:110:52:12

12, 14, 16, 18.

0:52:120:52:16

- Come up, it will come up. - No, it won't.

0:52:160:52:18

20, 22.

0:52:180:52:21

It's only got £130 to go.

0:52:210:52:23

24, £24.

0:52:230:52:25

-That's such a bargain.

-Any more, any more?

0:52:250:52:27

Selling at £24.

0:52:270:52:30

Oh, that was...

0:52:320:52:33

Sorry, Carrie.

0:52:330:52:35

The buyer isn't sorry.

0:52:350:52:36

He's grabbed a real bargain.

0:52:360:52:39

But it's another loss for Carrie.

0:52:390:52:41

Do you know, I really am disappointed by that.

0:52:410:52:44

We're distraught this end(!)

0:52:440:52:46

Next, it's Carrie and Mark's biggest spend.

0:52:470:52:51

So it was £125.

0:52:510:52:53

If it sells for 1,000, we might win.

0:52:530:52:56

If it sells for 1,000, I'll give you the money myself.

0:52:560:52:59

£100 I am bid.

0:52:590:53:00

- Oh. - Well done, Mark.

0:53:000:53:03

110 anywhere?

0:53:030:53:04

Come on.

0:53:040:53:06

110 anywhere? 110. 120 on my book.

0:53:060:53:09

120 on my book.

0:53:090:53:10

-One more.

-125 in the room.

0:53:100:53:13

A voice at the back.

0:53:130:53:15

-We broke even.

-Come on.

0:53:150:53:18

Selling for £125.

0:53:180:53:20

-It's a disaster.

-That could have been a lot worse.

0:53:200:53:23

That could have been a lot worse.

0:53:230:53:26

That's it, Mark, stay on the positive side, mate.

0:53:260:53:29

Maybe a change of scenery will alter your luck.

0:53:290:53:31

The auction moves through to another space

0:53:310:53:33

for the rest of the lots,

0:53:330:53:35

and here comes Barry to shake things up.

0:53:350:53:37

Wakey-wakey! Ten.

0:53:370:53:39

It's fast and furious.

0:53:390:53:41

Certainly is.

0:53:410:53:42

12, £15, 15.

0:53:420:53:44

Time for David's camera.

0:53:440:53:46

5, 5, I'm bid a 5, let's see 8,

0:53:460:53:49

10 again, 12, I'll do it at 12.

0:53:490:53:51

15, 18, 18, 20, at 20, 20.

0:53:510:53:54

Up the top at £20. Quickly, at £20.

0:53:540:53:57

That's your first loss.

0:53:570:53:59

It feels horrible, right?

0:53:590:54:00

-Yes.

-It does, doesn't it?

0:54:000:54:02

It feels really like someone's punched you.

0:54:020:54:04

It's certainly not pleasant.

0:54:040:54:06

The first loss for David and Will in double-quick time. Stand by.

0:54:060:54:10

David, I just wish you'd bought all the lots.

0:54:100:54:13

We should have trusted you.

0:54:130:54:14

Right, Mark and Carrie need to make a comeback.

0:54:160:54:19

Next is their equestrian lot. Good luck, chaps.

0:54:190:54:22

Your start for that one, 30, £40.

0:54:220:54:25

At 5, I'm bidding 5, 5 and 8, 8 and 10,

0:54:250:54:27

10, 12, bid at 12.

0:54:270:54:29

15 and 18, 18 and 20.

0:54:290:54:30

I'm feeling for you, I'm feeling for you.

0:54:300:54:33

25, 25, 28, 28. 28, 30, at 30, 32.

0:54:330:54:36

Someone's going to pay a tenner each for them.

0:54:360:54:38

38, 38, come on.

0:54:380:54:39

Not going to get over 50.

0:54:390:54:41

At 50, come on, don't joke it off.

0:54:410:54:44

Shake it off.

0:54:440:54:46

One at the back, quickly, at £50.

0:54:460:54:48

Someone has grabbed a fantastic deal for those plaques,

0:54:480:54:52

leaving Carrie and Mark with another loss.

0:54:520:54:55

Listen, you could give the boar's head away

0:54:550:54:57

and we'd still lose.

0:54:570:54:59

- Yeah, that's true. - I can't believe that.

0:54:590:55:02

It's not over yet.

0:55:020:55:04

Boris, your time has come.

0:55:040:55:07

The boar's head.

0:55:070:55:09

It's good, isn't it?

0:55:090:55:10

It's rubbish.

0:55:100:55:11

Your start, 60, £70. A tenner. A tenner bid, 10, 15, 15, 20.

0:55:110:55:15

25, 25, 30.

0:55:150:55:16

Keep going, keep going.

0:55:160:55:17

50, I've got on my book, at £50, 60, 60, 70.

0:55:170:55:21

That's it. 80, 90.

0:55:210:55:22

£90, 90. £90, 90.

0:55:220:55:24

Come on! Oh, go on!

0:55:240:55:25

On the shelf at 90. Are you all done?

0:55:250:55:27

Round it up to 100.

0:55:270:55:29

-Oh. We got away with that, just.

-We did.

0:55:300:55:33

Despite some gentle encouragement from auctioneer Barry,

0:55:330:55:37

it's still a loss for the boar.

0:55:370:55:39

Can I just say, it was only when he got to 90

0:55:390:55:42

I realised he wasn't saying "17, 18, 19".

0:55:420:55:47

Well, pay attention,

0:55:470:55:49

because it's your combined agricultural lot next.

0:55:490:55:53

At £15, and 15, and £15, 15, 18, 18, 18.

0:55:530:55:56

Stop bidding.

0:55:560:55:58

18, you're quick, at 18, 20.

0:55:580:56:00

You going to go your age?

0:56:000:56:02

21. 22. 22, 4, 24.

0:56:020:56:06

-Creeping up.

-26, 28, 28...

0:56:060:56:08

Put that gavel down.

0:56:080:56:10

-At £30.

-It's 30, everything is at 30.

0:56:100:56:13

-No, stop it!

-£30, away from you, quick, £30.

0:56:130:56:16

You were lucky.

0:56:160:56:17

Yeah, but it's still a loss.

0:56:170:56:19

-Have we got anything left?

-Yeah, you've got your chair.

0:56:210:56:24

Which needs to make about £400 to catch up.

0:56:240:56:27

It's our final lot of the day.

0:56:270:56:30

Never before has so much rested on such a little chair.

0:56:300:56:34

Right, I have bids on the book.

0:56:340:56:36

One of £4.

0:56:360:56:38

- Oh! - Send them home, Barry.

0:56:380:56:41

4 I'm bid, 4, 4 and 6, 6 and 8, 8,

0:56:410:56:43

8 and 10.

0:56:430:56:44

He wasn't joking.

0:56:440:56:46

18, 20, 22. 22, 22.

0:56:460:56:48

-Come on.

-25. 28.

0:56:480:56:51

Come on! 30!

0:56:510:56:53

-Come on, at £30.

-No more, he says, no more.

0:56:530:56:56

Get in, quick, at £30...

0:56:560:56:59

-I think we've been just so unlucky today.

-Rubbish.

0:56:590:57:02

You made a profit.

0:57:020:57:04

Yes, a second profit of the day for Carrie and Mark,

0:57:050:57:08

but is it enough?

0:57:080:57:10

Time to do the maths.

0:57:100:57:12

Carrie and Mark started off with £400 and, after auction costs,

0:57:150:57:18

made a loss of £132.82,

0:57:180:57:22

leaving a total of £286.18.

0:57:220:57:27

Lovely couple, aren't they?

0:57:270:57:28

David and Will also began with £400.

0:57:290:57:32

After saleroom costs are deducted, they too made a loss,

0:57:320:57:34

albeit a smaller one of £42.30.

0:57:340:57:37

So after a final total of £357.70, they are today's winners.

0:57:370:57:43

Cheer up!

0:57:430:57:44

Humble in victory.

0:57:440:57:46

-Never.

-Never!

0:57:460:57:48

-But we're winners in life.

-We're winners in life.

0:57:480:57:50

-Off you go.

-I've never celebrated losing before.

0:57:500:57:53

-Get in the car.

-Come on then, Carrie.

0:57:530:57:55

- Well done, Will. - Cheers, Mark.

0:57:550:57:56

It's been good fun, mate. Listen, David,

0:57:560:57:58

-make the most of it, won't you?

-I will.

0:57:580:58:00

-Make the most of it.

-Thank you.

0:58:000:58:02

I am never going to forget this, you know that, don't you?

0:58:020:58:05

That's it, Carrie. Humble in victory,

0:58:050:58:07

gracious in defeat.

0:58:070:58:09

Would you ever go to an auction again?

0:58:100:58:12

Oh, yeah, I loved it, it's so exciting.

0:58:120:58:15

-Course you did.

-I tell you what's even better, though.

0:58:150:58:17

-What?

-Having lunch. Shall we find a pub and have one?

0:58:170:58:20

-Yeah - winner pays?

-No, loser pays.

0:58:200:58:22

-Winner pays.

-Oh, all right, I'll pay.

0:58:220:58:25

Cheerio!

0:58:250:58:26

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Husband-and-wife vocal coaches David and Carrie Grant swap singing in harmony for battling it out with antiques. With the help of experts Will Axon and Mark Stacey, the competitive celebrity couple uncover some unusual items to sell at auction in rural Norfolk.

David also visits a patch of inner-city grass in Cambridge, where today children play and dogs are walked, but which was actually the birthplace of football, while Carrie learns how Letchworth Garden City sparked a revolution in urban design.