Susan Cookson and Suzanne Packer Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Susan Cookson and Suzanne Packer

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Actors Susan Cookson and Suzannne Packer battle it out around the north west of England.


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Transcript


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-The nation's favourite celebrities...

-Ooh, I like that.

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-..paired up with an expert...

-Oh, we've had some fun, haven't we?

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..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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Their mission? To scour Britain for antiques.

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TUNELESS BLAST

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-Yes!

-Fantastic.

-I'll do that in slow-mo.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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Come on, boys!

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But it's no easy ride.

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Ta-da!

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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"Don't sell me!"

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Go away, darling!

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I'm trying to spend money here.

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There will be worthy winners...

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-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal.

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This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today we're dashing along in the company of two doyennes

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of drama and very good pals.

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-Here we are in this gorgeous car!

-And not a scalpel to be seen.

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Not a scalpel... No more resus, Sue!

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-No more resus!

-We've escaped!

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-It's like being out of school, isn't it?

-I know.

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Yes, former Casualty actors Susan Cookson and Suzanne Packer

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have swapped their scrubs to lend their bedside manner

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to a spot of antiquing.

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-Sue, I know you're going to beat me.

-Do you know what, I'm so not.

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-You know a lot about antiques.

-No, I...

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-You do.

-That's only because I'm old.

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-You've got a good eye.

-SUZANNE LAUGHS

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Susan's stellar career spans a wide array of roles from Clocking Off

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to Land Girls and top soap Coronation Street.

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She first appeared as Dr Maggie Coldwell in Casualty back in 2005.

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Now, you say yes if I touch a sore spot, OK?

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It was on the set of the hospital classic where our pair met

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and where Suzanne won a place in the nation's heart in nearly 500

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episodes as nurse Tess Bateman.

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A block of flats has collapsed on the Middlehill Estate.

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No, my...my daughter teaches there twice a month.

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But she's also well known for numerous top-drawer dramas,

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ranging from Dirty Work to Grange Hill.

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Have you got a strategy?

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-Leave it to the experts!

-Leave it to the experts!

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"What do YOU think looks good on this stall?"

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And we have just the expert guidance for you.

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I've been known to put people in the emergency position.

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But very often not during an emergency.

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NARRATOR LAUGHS Oh, crumbs!

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Helping to nurse our celebs through their antiques adventure are

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auctioneer James Braxton and dealer David Harper.

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These two are such well-known actresses, they've been

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-around for a long time.

-They are.

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I think they're going to be consummate professionals.

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-They will be.

-Yeah.

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And, you know, you never know, they could be antique collectors.

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I wouldn't be so sure.

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Have I ever even been into an antiques shop?

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-Ever ever? I don't think I have!

-You must have.

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I don't think I have, you know, Sue.

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Our pairs have £400 each to spend and will be pootling around

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the country in this 1960s Triumph Fury and a 1965 Sunbeam Tiger.

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So, without further ado...

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Yeah, what a car, isn't it? What a great car.

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-Look at that.

-That is a cracking car.

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-Very nice, isn't it?

-It's a Tiger!

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A Sunbeam.

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Hello! Good morning to you.

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-Hello.

-Lovely to meet you.

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-You too.

-Lovely to meet you.

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This is a beastie of a car.

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Oh, yes, I think it suits us.

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-It does suit you.

-Nice to meet you, James.

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-Nice to meet you.

-We're very excited about this.

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-Very excited.

-Why?

-Antiques is the way forward.

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-It really is.

-I think it probably is.

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The way forward? I thought it was the way backward!

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Sometimes you need to take a step back to move forwards.

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-Exactly.

-That's the way we look at it.

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Actually, yes! It's true.

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And we're both convinced that the other's going to win.

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-Oh, really?

-Are you?

-Yeah.

-Are you very competitive?

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-Of course.

-A little!

-Ooh! Ooh.

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A little bit.

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Shall we have the Tiger?

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Do you know, I was born in the Year of the Tiger.

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Come on. And I love tigers.

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-Go on.

-I'm taking Suzanne.

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-Susan.

-Dragon, Tiger!

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Dragon, Tiger. We've got the Fury.

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I've got a tigress in a Tiger!

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You've got a tiger in a Tiger.

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Wow.

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ENGINE STARTS

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Listen to that.

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- See you, guys. - Bye!

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Today our intrepid antiquers are exploring the highways

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and byways of South Yorkshire.

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Starting off their trip in Sheffield,

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they wind and loop their way around the county,

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before rushing west and leaping the county border

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into Lancashire as they head for an auction in Warrington.

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Right, let's get acquainted.

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David, I have no taste whatsoever, because I have...

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I can't believe that.

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Honestly, I have zero knowledge of antiques.

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It's great that you don't know anything about antiques, because

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I can just make it up as I go along and you're going to believe me.

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There you go.

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Well, that's encouraging.

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What will the others look for?

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-I like

-Arts and Crafts. So do I.

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And William Morris's famous "It either has to be useful or beautiful."

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Anything in your house should be useful or beautiful.

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Yeah.

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So I need a very big skip.

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That's what I need in my house at the moment.

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It sounds positive all round.

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At least local girl Susan is in for a treat.

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She'll be showing James around some of her old haunts.

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So you've been here before, have you?

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A long, long time ago I've been in here and it's huge,

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there's lots to see.

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Hey, look at this.

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-Hello.

-Hello, hi.

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-Hello. James.

-I'm Jill Mitchell.

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Hi, Jill. Susan.

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Hi, nice to meet you.

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Nice to meet you too, Jill.

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This family-run business is crammed to the rafters.

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So, plenty to get stuck into.

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They're so much, isn't there?

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All the flotsam of life, isn't there?

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Come on, come on.

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Leap out at me!

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Come on, see, because we're going to win Suzanne, see.

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Yeah.

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Speak to me.

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Handmade glass egg.

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What would you do with a glass egg?

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Where are you going to put your glass egg?

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-My friend had a pram like that.

-Really?

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And I used to go and play with it.

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"Can I play with your Jill's pram?"

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She was a bit old for it.

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So I would play with it.

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You coveted her pram?

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When I was about, yeah, 23.

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JAMES LAUGHS

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That's quite fun.

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That's agate.

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Moss agate.

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So it's a stone, like a crystal.

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And often associated with Scotland.

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And moss has been just caught, like fossils.

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While this pair get their heads around all this shop has to offer,

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the other team are still on the road and are

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still getting to grips with what they might be looking for.

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-So you're interested in social history.

-Yeah.

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Is there any particular period of time that really intrigues you?

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My favourite bit of history was always the Tudor

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-and Elizabethan period!

-Right!

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And I doubt we're going to get bits of antiques from there!

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Just blown my idea, yeah!

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Couldn't you say something like the late 19th century?

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No, I couldn't, actually, because that's probably

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a bit of a gap for me.

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-So you're talking, like, 1530...

-Yes.

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Right, let's try and find something from 1530.

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-I doubt whether that would be possible.

-Yeah, thanks, Suzanne.

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Oh, sorry!

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Good luck with that.

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I wonder how the other pair are faring.

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I like this.

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Now, why do you like that?

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-Well, I think it's very fashionable at the moment.

-Yeah.

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What are they saying it is?

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-Deco... Deco, yeah.

-It's De...

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-DUBIOUSLY:

-Phwuhhh...

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Do you think it's Deco? It's later, isn't it?

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It's later. Do you think it's more '50s?

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-Yeah. I think it's more '50s.

-Right.

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You know, Deco wouldn't have the frilly bits, would it?

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Right, OK.

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Deco was all about angular lines, it was about the new industrial age.

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But it wouldn't have had that engraving in it, in the glass?

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Then you get the frilliness towards the late '30s.

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-So you start getting flowery, cottagey things.

-Yeah.

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So that's either late '30s or '50s.

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Shall I dare to take it off?

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You should always look at...

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Ooh, what a weight!

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It's a lovely back to it.

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-Ooh!

-A heavy back, isn't it?

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-In your own time.

-Let me get over here.

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Easy, James.

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I think I'm getting too big for antique shops, you know.

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It's rather like having a sort of rhino coming in.

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-But good nick, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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I'm not even going to look at the price.

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Let's forget it has a price tag.

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Typical Braxton tactic.

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Let's see what owner Jill has to say.

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-Jill, we like this.

-Right.

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-Susan's got one at home.

-Yes.

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And I bought mine in a...

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a charity shop.

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Right, yes.

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-For £3.50.

-Oh, my word!

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Well, we can't do £3.50 on it.

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What was you sort of thinking?

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£4? Five?

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I would like 25.

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Ooh, gosh.

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I think more realistically probably about 60 quid

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or something like that.

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What about the 50?

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Let me go away and just have a...

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-Quiet think?

-A conflab with my husband!

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Because then it's not just on me!

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Have a conflab with your husband.

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-(Go on.

-Go on, go on.)

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£50! That's...on my head.

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Oh, I think you should shake Jill's hand.

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Thank you.

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-Jill, thank you.

-You're very welcome.

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No, no, that's fine.

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-It's always nice to buy something of quality.

-Yes.

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That sounds like a great deal for a nice item.

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The 1950s mirror is yours for just £50.

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-Yay!

-Isn't that good?

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Very good.

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Whilst James and Susan pack up their wares, David and Suzanne

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have arrived at Kelham Island Museum to hear the incredible story

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of the forgotten women who helped win World War II.

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By the end of the war, over seven million women in Britain had

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been called up to fill the jobs

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of the men who'd left to fight the Nazis.

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Here in Sheffield, their work was vital.

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The factories in the city supplied munitions for the front line

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and Sheffield steel was used to build the tanks,

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Spitfires and warships.

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Suzanne and David are lucky enough to meet Kathleen Roberts,

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one of the city's heroic women of steel.

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How did you get to work in the steel industry here in Sheffield?

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Because of the war.

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You had no choice.

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And you got your calling-up papers just like the...the boys did.

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I started in this inspection department,

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and the men were terrible.

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-Why?

-They didn't want to show us anything.

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What was the problem?

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Was it that unusual to see women in a factory?

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Yeah, they didn't think we should be there.

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And so they got...a bit uppity about it, but eventually they came round,

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and we all became good friends.

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Well, they had to.

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These women were trailblazers in a new world of working women,

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but their pay was around half that received by the men they replaced,

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despite the hardship and strain of wartime working demands.

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We lost our youth, having to work long hours in the works.

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-12-hour shifts.

-Wow.

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Nights and days.

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And so I just had...

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I'd come off nights Saturday morning and go back on days

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six o'clock Sunday morning,

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and that's how I went on for four years.

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The working conditions in steel factories were tough,

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and the noise from heavy machinery, like this 1,200-horsepower engine,

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was a constant companion to workers.

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So this noise would be going all day long?

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Wow.

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-There was a steam hammer.

-Yeah.

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-"Boom, boom..."

-Wow.

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And that was going 12 hours, nights and days.

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That's what caused my loss of hearing.

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Workers had to maintain a relentless pace to supply the front lines

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and they took greater risks in harsh conditions.

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They had guards on machines and they never used them

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-because they could work quicker.

-Yeah.

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And they'd have fingers chopped off, you'd hear somebody scream

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and you'd think, "Oh, dear, what's happened now?"

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You know. Health and safety...

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-No.

-No.

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The factories were a prime target for German bombers.

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When the Sheffield Blitz began on the 12th of December 1940,

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a reported 300 Luftwaffe aircraft bombed Sheffield for nine hours.

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When the sirens went, just popped a tin hat on.

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Where did you go when the sirens went?

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We didn't go anywhere. We carried on working.

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-You're kidding me.

-No.

-Fully expecting to be bombed.

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No. Because we couldn't stop the machine.

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-How did that...

-So we had to stay with it.

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How did that feel?

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So the sirens are going, you're continuing to work,

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with a hard hat on, which will not protect you from a German bomb.

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No good at all.

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Fully expecting to be bombed.

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Explain how you felt.

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Well, if it's got your name on it you'll get it.

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-Wow.

-We became very philosophical about it.

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You know, we just...

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Well, and I wouldn't have gone anyway in the shelters,

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because they were ridden with rats, and I...

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-No way.

-You'd rather face the bombs!

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I preferred the bombs to the rats!

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I think I'd rather, too. You're not alone there.

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Despite over 600 deaths during the Sheffield Blitz,

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the attacks did not deter the workforce.

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It was just bad news everywhere,

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and so we just had to put our backs into it and...

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..get the stuff that the boys wanted, you know.

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And we were quite willing to do that,

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and so...if it hadn't have been

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for the women I think we would... we could have lost the war.

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The heroic women of steel have now been recognised here in Sheffield

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by a statue erected in their honour.

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How did this come about, that you managed to get this statue?

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Well, I got rather het up about seeing everybody getting recognised

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for what they did in the war and we weren't.

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This is what we're leaving the people of Sheffield,

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and I hope they like it.

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Meanwhile, James and Susan have journeyed 11 miles north

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to the village of Elsecar.

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Go on, Sue. Get in there.

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Bargains!

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hello.

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-Hello.

-Susan.

-Hi, Susan, I'm Carl.

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-Nice to meet you, Carl.

-Hi. James.

-Carl.

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Good to meet you. Good to meet you.

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-What a lovely place, isn't it?!

-Really good.

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Certainly is.

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Carl is one of over 100 dealers here, so there's

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plenty to choose from.

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They reckon that the majority of jewellery still in circulation today

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was made during the Victorian era.

0:15:020:15:05

They really pumped it out.

0:15:050:15:07

Really good-quality bronze, there.

0:15:080:15:10

But it's just the base.

0:15:100:15:12

Look at the base. It's not quite right.

0:15:120:15:14

Right.

0:15:140:15:16

It's funny, isn't it?

0:15:160:15:17

And it's that new... quite new-ish slate.

0:15:170:15:21

-Yeah.

-Always look at the bases.

0:15:210:15:23

Top advice, James.

0:15:230:15:25

Ooh, here comes trouble.

0:15:250:15:27

THEY LAUGH

0:15:270:15:28

After you.

0:15:280:15:30

Oh, gosh.

0:15:300:15:31

So, this is it, this is your shopping experience.

0:15:310:15:33

-Oh, there's so much!

-I know.

0:15:330:15:35

-It's a bit overwhelming, don't you think?

-It is overwhelming.

-Wow.

0:15:350:15:38

Let's find out your taste.

0:15:380:15:40

OK. OK.

0:15:400:15:41

-So the pressure's on you. What do you like?

-The pressure...

0:15:410:15:44

Well...

0:15:440:15:45

See, this appeals to me already.

0:15:450:15:46

Go on, tell me why.

0:15:460:15:48

First of all because I love things that have that sort of Japanese

0:15:480:15:51

-kind of lacquer look.

-Yeah.

0:15:510:15:54

And I could imagine that being very useful in terms

0:15:540:15:56

-of holding jewellery.

-Ah, right.

-Maybe.

-OK.

0:15:560:15:59

I can tell you that it's miniature furniture,

0:15:590:16:02

probably Eastern European.

0:16:020:16:05

Often a miniature piece of furniture was given

0:16:050:16:07

to you on your wedding day, but it would tell you that

0:16:070:16:09

-when you get home the big piece is waiting in your house.

-Wow.

0:16:090:16:14

Interesting.

0:16:140:16:15

And only £85.

0:16:150:16:16

-Oh, my goodness.

-What?

0:16:160:16:19

-(Quite expensive.)

-Ooh.

0:16:190:16:21

I get the impression you're a bit tight.

0:16:210:16:23

SHE LAUGHS

0:16:230:16:25

Charming.

0:16:250:16:26

Come on, what else do you like?

0:16:260:16:28

What else do I like?

0:16:280:16:30

Well, nothing is grabbing me here, although...

0:16:300:16:32

Yeah?

0:16:320:16:34

I'm always very keen to see things...

0:16:340:16:37

-ornaments that are of people of colour.

-OK.

0:16:370:16:40

-Because when I was growing up, you didn't see that.

-No.

0:16:400:16:43

-It was always...

-Yeah.

0:16:430:16:45

..you know, European-looking, or...certainly white.

0:16:450:16:49

Erm, I've never seen those figures before.

0:16:490:16:51

No, so do you know anything about these?

0:16:510:16:53

Well, I can tell you from here that they're probably glazed terracotta.

0:16:530:16:56

-Right.

-They're not old.

0:16:560:16:58

Do you think they actually belong together,

0:16:580:17:00

or is it just that they've been grouped together?

0:17:000:17:02

-I think they've been grouped together.

-Just grouped, yeah.

0:17:020:17:05

These handmade pieces look like they may have been made

0:17:050:17:07

in the Caribbean for the tourist trade,

0:17:070:17:09

maybe in the last 20 years or so.

0:17:090:17:11

Worth a closer look, perhaps.

0:17:110:17:13

I can absolutely tell you that it's not a machine, factory-made thing.

0:17:130:17:16

-No.

-This is in a little workshop somewhere.

0:17:160:17:18

-Yeah, I know, I would agree there, because it's not perfect!

-No.

0:17:180:17:22

Which makes it really charming.

0:17:220:17:23

And that does... Yeah, that does add to its charm.

0:17:230:17:25

If I'm going to be really honest,

0:17:250:17:27

it's probably not the best-looking baby I've ever seen.

0:17:270:17:29

(Oh, my God!)

0:17:290:17:31

I think they were half-asleep when they did the baby.

0:17:310:17:33

-They didn't do badly with the mum.

-The mother looks all right.

0:17:330:17:35

I think they were in a rush when it came to the baby.

0:17:350:17:37

Yeah, they could have spent a bit more time on the baby!

0:17:370:17:41

I think you're right.

0:17:410:17:43

These are not Carl's items, but he can negotiate for the vendor,

0:17:430:17:47

so what do you say, Carl?

0:17:470:17:48

The good news is, collectively they add up to about £50.

0:17:480:17:52

-Right.

-(And he's prepared to do them at 30.)

0:17:520:17:54

-30 quid the lot?

-Oh.

0:17:540:17:56

Would he go for complete half-price, do you think?

0:17:580:18:01

DAVID GASPS QUIETLY

0:18:010:18:02

-I mean...

-Carl, I can only apologise.

0:18:020:18:05

And then that's a good deal, isn't it?

0:18:050:18:07

I don't know what to say.

0:18:090:18:11

Don't shoot the messenger, but I'm going to say yes.

0:18:110:18:14

You're very good. You're VERY good!

0:18:140:18:16

-Shall we shake on that, then?

-Very good.

0:18:160:18:18

I think you already have.

0:18:180:18:20

That's Suzanne's first purchase of the trip.

0:18:200:18:22

£25 for the five figures.

0:18:220:18:25

Something to brag about, then.

0:18:250:18:27

Look who's here.

0:18:270:18:28

-Hands behind the back.

-Yes.

0:18:280:18:30

So, what have they got behind their backs?

0:18:300:18:33

No, ain't got anything!

0:18:330:18:34

-Have you been purchasing?

-Yes!

0:18:340:18:36

-We might have been.

-We might have been.

0:18:360:18:38

-We've bought. We've bought five objects.

-We have.

0:18:380:18:40

-No!

-No, you haven't!

0:18:400:18:42

Actually we have!

0:18:420:18:44

I didn't even realise, but we have.

0:18:440:18:46

Don't worry, don't worry, they're toying with us.

0:18:460:18:48

We've been in for, what, ten minutes?

0:18:480:18:50

The absolute truth is we have bought five.

0:18:500:18:52

Ten minutes and you've peeled off a tenner.

0:18:520:18:54

-We've bought five objects.

-Peeled off a tenner.

0:18:540:18:56

-OK.

-Yeah.

-Good luck!

0:18:560:18:58

Bye! Bye!

0:18:580:19:00

Watching you. Watching you.

0:19:000:19:02

I'd keep your eyes on the shelves.

0:19:020:19:05

There's shopping to do!

0:19:050:19:06

Oh, what have you found?

0:19:080:19:10

Look at that. Isn't that lovely?

0:19:100:19:13

And all made of oak, isn't it?

0:19:130:19:14

-Yeah. Yeah.

-Look at that grain!

0:19:140:19:16

Very sought-after.

0:19:180:19:19

It's much collected, isn't it?

0:19:190:19:21

-Yeah.

-A lovely sort of kidney-shaped...

0:19:210:19:23

You're medical, obviously.

0:19:230:19:24

It's nice, isn't it, because if you were sitting

0:19:240:19:26

with that tray like that...

0:19:260:19:28

See, having your tea.

0:19:280:19:30

I don't think the Mouseman... I don't think the Mouseman...

0:19:300:19:32

-Did he make it for TV suppers?

-Well, he might have done.

0:19:320:19:34

He might have done. Catching up with the times.

0:19:340:19:36

-For the Queen.

-Two mice.

0:19:360:19:38

Two mice.

0:19:380:19:39

Mouseman work was first carved by Robert Thompson

0:19:390:19:43

in the early 20th century.

0:19:430:19:45

A mouse featured on every item he produced, a tradition

0:19:450:19:48

which has been continued by his family company.

0:19:480:19:51

This one has a ticket price of £290.

0:19:510:19:54

What could that be, Carl?

0:19:540:19:56

Think cheap.

0:19:560:19:57

CARL SIGHS

0:19:570:19:58

Well, I'll try, and I'll say 200 quid.

0:19:580:20:01

200 quid.

0:20:010:20:02

How does that sound?

0:20:020:20:04

She doesn't sound convinced, James.

0:20:070:20:08

Well, it's much sought after, and one to keep in mind.

0:20:080:20:12

Hang on, what's this?

0:20:120:20:14

The first thing I ever broke in the auction room I worked at

0:20:140:20:18

was a decanter.

0:20:180:20:20

-First and only!

-Always be suspicious.

0:20:200:20:22

-Feel how it fits.

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:20:220:20:25

And then, it's really tight, isn't it?

0:20:250:20:28

Because if you get a decanter stopper

0:20:280:20:30

and it's sort of frosted, it means it's generally been ground,

0:20:300:20:34

so when they were finished, they were always tight.

0:20:340:20:38

So, what you want to do is you want to check that the stopper fits,

0:20:380:20:42

and it should be polished.

0:20:420:20:44

Is it all right? Not cracked?

0:20:440:20:47

No, that's good.

0:20:470:20:48

-Yeah.

-And then you've got silver around the edge, there.

-Yeah.

0:20:480:20:51

That's... That is very lovely.

0:20:510:20:53

Ticket price is £75.

0:20:530:20:56

What do you think, Carl?

0:20:560:20:57

The best on the decanter...

0:20:570:20:59

-..would be 40.

-40.

0:21:000:21:03

Well, that sounds promising. We could have a deal in the offing.

0:21:030:21:06

What are the others up to upstairs?

0:21:060:21:08

-Look what I found.

-Oh! Oh!

0:21:080:21:11

-Now, they probably aren't worth very much maybe now.

-OK.

0:21:110:21:17

I mean, I can imagine somebody thinking,

0:21:170:21:19

"Well, I'll hold on to these because maybe ten, 20 years

0:21:190:21:22

-I can sell them on and I could make myself a pretty penny.

-OK.

0:21:220:21:25

And it's quite odd. I've never seen them...

0:21:250:21:28

-Like metal.

-It's metal.

0:21:280:21:30

-The Metal Box Company.

-Yeah.

0:21:300:21:32

-I think they were chocolate biscuit box makers.

-Right.

0:21:320:21:35

-They scream the 1950s, don't they?

-Wow. Yeah.

0:21:350:21:38

And '50 things are quite cool and quite trendy.

0:21:380:21:41

Yeah, '50s stuff is really cool at the moment.

0:21:410:21:43

-How much are they?

-You know I hate spending money, David.

0:21:430:21:47

-OK.

-I think you're going to shock me, aren't you?

-I think I am.

0:21:470:21:50

-How much?

-They are £2.

0:21:500:21:52

-For the pair?

-For the pair.

0:21:530:21:55

-Well...

-Unless I misread the price tag...

0:21:560:21:59

Did it say £200?

0:21:590:22:02

Do you think I would've picked them up at £200?! No!

0:22:020:22:05

-£2.

-£2. You can't go wrong, can you?

0:22:050:22:08

-I think for a bit of fun...

-I think so.

-Take a chance.

0:22:080:22:10

-Let's just have them.

-I'll stick with the price,

0:22:100:22:12

I'm not going to negotiate on this one.

0:22:120:22:13

-I know I'm being a bit soft.

-No, you are.

0:22:130:22:16

I know, I know, it's not my usual form.

0:22:160:22:18

You've lost that hard edge, I'm so disappointed.

0:22:180:22:20

-That hard edge is gone.

-Come on!

0:22:200:22:21

Well, Carl still has some business to settle elsewhere first.

0:22:210:22:25

If we said 175 on the tray...

0:22:250:22:29

..are we getting near?

0:22:290:22:31

Come on, he's a kind man.

0:22:310:22:33

I really love the mouse.

0:22:360:22:38

-Well, we'll have to have a deal, won't we?

-Yeah.

0:22:380:22:40

We have to have a deal.

0:22:400:22:41

I'll say 180.

0:22:410:22:43

-Shall we?

-Yeah. I think we should.

0:22:430:22:45

I would shake his hand.

0:22:450:22:46

So, we'll have that decanter at 40, and that at 180,

0:22:460:22:51

and we've got two really lovely lots.

0:22:510:22:53

-Yeah, yeah, I'm happy with that.

-You're happy with that?

0:22:530:22:56

-Yeah, yeah.

-We got there in the end.

0:22:560:22:58

That's a sizeable £220 for two items.

0:22:580:23:02

Right, let's go.

0:23:020:23:04

-Go on.

-Come on.

0:23:040:23:06

Right, Carl, your work is not done just yet.

0:23:060:23:09

We're ready to settle up, aren't we?

0:23:090:23:11

I think we're done, Carl, yeah.

0:23:110:23:12

We also would like to take these.

0:23:120:23:15

-£2.

-So, we owe how much?

0:23:150:23:17

-27 in total.

-£27.

0:23:170:23:18

They were actually £2 each.

0:23:180:23:21

-Oh.

-Oh.

0:23:210:23:22

Anyone feel awkward now?

0:23:220:23:24

-Oh, that's a bit expensive.

-Oh, here she goes! Right, OK.

0:23:240:23:27

What about just £2 for one and chuck the other one in for free?

0:23:270:23:32

A two-for-one deal, Carl, that's all she is looking for.

0:23:320:23:34

-I think we've got room for that.

-Oh, you're so kind!

0:23:340:23:37

-Thank you so much.

-Two-for-one, OK.

0:23:370:23:39

Thrifty Suzanne and David

0:23:390:23:41

are taking the opposite approach to their opponents,

0:23:410:23:43

by polishing off their shopping for the day for just £27.

0:23:430:23:47

Time for our celebs to catch up and swap notes.

0:23:480:23:51

You know like sometimes with wooden furniture...

0:23:510:23:54

If it's got woodworm, that's usually...

0:23:540:23:57

-Yeah, brings down the value, doesn't it?

-No!

0:23:570:23:59

-That will show its age.

-OK.

0:23:590:24:00

And if it hasn't got woodworm, it could be a repro.

0:24:000:24:02

What happens if it, like, comes from Buckingham Palace?

0:24:020:24:05

The spit and polish they put on those things.

0:24:050:24:07

So I can't imagine there's going to be...

0:24:070:24:09

They'll be classy woodworm!

0:24:090:24:11

Yeah! They'll be really upper crust woodworm.

0:24:110:24:13

They're only going to eat the best wood.

0:24:130:24:15

Nighty night.

0:24:150:24:16

Another day dawns on our road trip.

0:24:190:24:22

I've got to say, James, you are looking red hot.

0:24:220:24:25

But cool.

0:24:250:24:26

And time to reflect on everyone's performances today.

0:24:260:24:30

Did Susan buy what she likes?

0:24:300:24:32

She did.

0:24:320:24:33

I did try and sort of muscle in a couple of things that I thought

0:24:330:24:37

might make a profit, but they were met with...

0:24:370:24:41

not quite grimace, but disappointment.

0:24:410:24:43

-I felt sorry for James!

-Yes.

0:24:440:24:47

Most of the time I was just standing there, like, "I don't like that."

0:24:470:24:51

And a couple of things, he said, "Do you like that?" I said, "No".

0:24:510:24:53

-Oh, bless.

-"Put it back!"

0:24:530:24:56

So, you were do your job properly, then, were you?

0:24:560:24:58

-I was.

-That's surprising.

-I know.

0:24:580:25:00

-Disappointing! How about you?

-No, I did my job dreadfully.

0:25:000:25:03

I think you're being modest there.

0:25:030:25:05

Yesterday, Suzanne and David picked up a pair of commemorative plates

0:25:050:25:09

and a set of handmade figures,

0:25:090:25:11

leaving them with a rather grand £373 left to spend.

0:25:110:25:15

Oh, I get the impression you're a bit tight.

0:25:160:25:19

THEY LAUGH

0:25:190:25:21

While Susan and James got their hands on a mouseman tray,

0:25:210:25:25

a whiskey decanter, and a 1950s mirror...

0:25:250:25:27

Right, let's go. Go on.

0:25:270:25:29

..Leaving them with £130 in their pocket.

0:25:290:25:32

Time to get everyone back together again.

0:25:320:25:34

Look at the big smiles!

0:25:360:25:37

-You two look very happy.

-Whoa!

-Oh, hello!

0:25:390:25:41

-Oh, hello! Oh, God.

-You've arrived, have you?

0:25:410:25:44

-Hello!

-We've arrived.

-How are you? Good?

-Yes.

0:25:440:25:47

Yeah, good.

0:25:470:25:48

-Hi, good morning.

-How are you?

0:25:480:25:50

-Oh, very well.

-You look fantastic.

-Thank you.

0:25:500:25:52

-You do, too.

-Look at that jumper, that is...

-Oh!

-Is it a jumper?

0:25:520:25:55

-We're raring to go.

-Raring to go.

0:25:550:25:57

Well, we'd better go, because we're short of time, now.

0:25:570:25:59

-Oh!

-OK.

-OK.

-Yeah.

0:25:590:26:00

They've only bought a couple of sort of slightly underperforming lots.

0:26:000:26:05

Oh, that's not very kind.

0:26:050:26:07

We might just go and have a light lunch!

0:26:070:26:10

-Oh!

-I'm doing my best!

-Awww...

0:26:100:26:13

No, I know where this is going to end.

0:26:130:26:15

Come on, come on, let's go.

0:26:150:26:16

And they'll be my tears!

0:26:160:26:17

Well, hopefully there'll only be tears of joy

0:26:170:26:21

as we embark on another day of shopping.

0:26:210:26:23

I know it's not totally Audrey Hepburn, but...

0:26:230:26:27

we've got the top down, got the glasses, I've got

0:26:270:26:30

some kind of headgear...

0:26:300:26:31

We're away! I'm into this now.

0:26:310:26:33

You look very smart.

0:26:330:26:34

Yeah, you should be worried for your job, now.

0:26:340:26:37

I am worried.

0:26:370:26:38

We were really stuck in the 20th century yesterday.

0:26:380:26:41

We were. What was it, '50s and '80s?

0:26:410:26:43

-We want to go past...

-Further back.

-Further back.

0:26:430:26:46

-That's it.

-Yeah.

0:26:460:26:47

-We've got to get serious today, David.

-All right, I do apologise.

0:26:470:26:51

Do you know what? I think he went easy on me yesterday.

0:26:510:26:53

-OK, let's try and find a real antique, shall we?

-Let's do it.

0:26:530:26:56

Yeah, that would be nice.

0:26:560:26:58

David and Suzanne are getting things underway this morning

0:26:580:27:00

in the market town of Penistone.

0:27:000:27:03

So, we're going to get serious, eh? We're going to buy a real antique.

0:27:030:27:07

Definitely. We've got to. It's a competition, after all.

0:27:070:27:10

Time to get serious, then.

0:27:100:27:12

I'm not sure what they were doing yesterday, but never mind.

0:27:120:27:15

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hello, there. Hello, there.

0:27:150:27:18

-Hi.

-Nice to meet you, I'm Ben.

0:27:180:27:19

-Hi, Ben. Suzanne.

-Hi, Ben. Hiya.

0:27:190:27:21

David, David. Good to see you. Nice to meet you. This yours?

0:27:210:27:23

It is, yeah. Mine and my dad's.

0:27:230:27:25

-Right.

-Wonderful.

-Show me what you like.

0:27:250:27:27

-Oh, God, I've got a bit nervous.

-No! Where's this come from?

0:27:270:27:31

-I don't know.

-Got a bit serious, now.

0:27:310:27:33

-It's a delayed reaction.

-I know it is!

0:27:330:27:36

Did anyone catch if they were taking this seriously?

0:27:360:27:38

Right, David, time to take a celeb under your wing.

0:27:380:27:41

You've got to sort of hone in on

0:27:410:27:44

-a cabinet that you like the look of.

-Oh.

0:27:440:27:46

Because they will probably have the same taste as you,

0:27:460:27:49

-do you see what I mean?

-Oh, yes, no, I see what you're saying.

0:27:490:27:52

Like you bypass cupboards I just have no interest.

0:27:520:27:54

-No interest. Yeah. No.

-Yes,, I like that.

-OK.

0:27:540:27:56

So, what does pique your interest?

0:27:560:27:57

Now, that looks very...

0:28:050:28:06

I don't even know what it is, but it looks very old.

0:28:060:28:09

-Ah!

-Train bus ticket machine.

-That's a bit bonkers.

0:28:090:28:14

Ah, well, there you go. That's where you put your ticket in.

0:28:140:28:16

-Put your finger in.

-OK.

0:28:160:28:18

-BAH!

-SHE FLINCHES

0:28:180:28:19

THEY LAUGH

0:28:190:28:23

You had me for real, then.

0:28:230:28:25

Gonna kill me! What's that say there, now?

0:28:250:28:28

Newcastle on Tyne...

0:28:280:28:29

You see, another real, heavy, industrial...

0:28:290:28:32

Industrial item.

0:28:320:28:34

You would have found that exact design in America,

0:28:340:28:37

Australia, Canada, all over.

0:28:370:28:38

-Ah!

-Right. That lifts way up there.

0:28:380:28:41

What's that? That is the original ribbon. My...

0:28:410:28:43

Oh, listen. Ah, there you go. OK.

0:28:430:28:45

You are interested in time travel.

0:28:450:28:48

-I am.

-And people and connecting to people from the past.

0:28:480:28:51

-Right.

-I'm now going to take you on a journey into the past.

0:28:510:28:55

-Oh, hang on.

-You're going to hear something...

0:28:550:28:58

-..real people heard.

-I'm ready.

-Yeah, tune in.

-I'm tuning in.

0:28:580:29:01

-Real people heard 100 years ago. Ready?

-Yeah.

0:29:010:29:04

-Are you feeling that?

-Yeah.

0:29:060:29:08

I definitely did. I definitely did.

0:29:080:29:11

-We're not going to buy this, though, are we?

-Well, why not?

0:29:110:29:14

Do you think this would be a good purchase?

0:29:140:29:16

I think it's a bit wild! It's an oddity.

0:29:160:29:18

And when you are buying things for auction, oddities are brilliant,

0:29:180:29:22

because you can't value them.

0:29:220:29:24

Well, YOU can't, David,

0:29:240:29:26

but dealer Ben has priced it up at £48.

0:29:260:29:29

Look at those screw heads.

0:29:290:29:30

They've almost disappeared into the metal, can you see that?

0:29:300:29:33

I don't know how to respond to that!

0:29:330:29:37

"Look at those screw heads!"

0:29:370:29:39

-Am I meant to get excited?!

-Yes!

0:29:390:29:41

SHE LAUGHS

0:29:410:29:44

I'm getting excited.

0:29:440:29:45

OK!

0:29:470:29:48

-Now, I am interested in purchasing this.

-Right.

0:29:480:29:51

But I think this is a little excessive.

0:29:510:29:53

So what's your best price at this current time?

0:29:530:29:56

-25 and it's yours.

-Oh, 25!

0:29:560:30:00

The way I feel, if Ben said you could have it for 20 quid,

0:30:000:30:02

I'd take a chance, it's not much of a chance.

0:30:020:30:04

We might lose £18, right.

0:30:040:30:07

But if it sparks a little bit of interest,

0:30:070:30:09

-might make you 80. But I don't...

-20...

0:30:090:30:11

-£20 strike you?

-Yeah, go on.

-Oh!

-Good man!

-You are good.

0:30:110:30:16

Well done, chaps.

0:30:160:30:17

An old ticket machine at better than half price.

0:30:170:30:20

Anything else catching your attention?

0:30:200:30:23

-Don't know.

-No? No...

0:30:260:30:29

OK, I know we want to go early 19th century,

0:30:290:30:32

but I can't help but be drawn to...

0:30:320:30:34

What? What have you been drawn to?

0:30:340:30:35

-OK... Am I hot?

-See if you can tune in.

0:30:350:30:39

-Yeah, OK, you're hot.

-I'm hot, am I?

-You're hot, baby.

0:30:390:30:42

I'm very hot. Not looking at the hat, are we? No...

0:30:420:30:44

Well, if you want to look at the hat.

0:30:440:30:46

No, that doesn't appeal to me at all.

0:30:460:30:48

-It's very big.

-Big?

-And it's very close to you.

0:30:480:30:52

-It's very mid-...

-Ohhh!

0:30:520:30:55

It's just cool and trendy.

0:30:560:30:59

-Now.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, go on, what would you put in there?

0:30:590:31:02

-I would put maybe a tea service.

-Yeah.

0:31:020:31:04

It's a sideboard for a dining room. You'd put bottles of liquor.

0:31:040:31:07

What would you have? I don't know. What would you have? Babycham.

0:31:070:31:10

-Babycham, you'd have in there!

-Oh, Babycham!

-Yes.

0:31:100:31:13

-It's in very good condition.

-It really is.

0:31:130:31:16

You know, honestly, take this and put it into - seriously -

0:31:160:31:19

-a London interior design shop.

-Yeah.

0:31:190:31:23

And it's going to be several hundred pounds.

0:31:230:31:25

It really is.

0:31:250:31:26

OK, well, it's marked at £50, reduced.

0:31:260:31:31

I think it's remarkably cheap.

0:31:310:31:33

-Do you want to talk to Ben?

-Yes, let's talk to Ben.

0:31:330:31:35

-OK.

-I mean, you are, you've actually convinced me.

0:31:350:31:39

Ben. OK, I want to make an offer on this.

0:31:390:31:44

OK.

0:31:440:31:46

-£20.

-No, more than that.

0:31:460:31:49

-More than 20?

-It's going to have to be £35.

0:31:490:31:52

Oh, I'd say 25.

0:31:520:31:54

Meet you in the middle at £30.

0:31:540:31:56

-27.50?

-DAVID GASPS

0:31:560:31:58

Go on, then, you've got a deal.

0:32:000:32:01

OK. I'm going to shake immediately on that,

0:32:010:32:03

because I think that's an excellent deal.

0:32:030:32:06

So, David and Suzanne's tactics are clear.

0:32:060:32:09

Buy them cheap.

0:32:090:32:10

The mid-20th century sideboard is theirs for £27.50.

0:32:100:32:14

-I'm not so nervous, now.

-Good!

0:32:140:32:16

-We've done really well. Great.

-Brilliant.

-Fantastic.

-Excellent.

0:32:160:32:20

Meanwhile, James and Susan are back on the road

0:32:210:32:24

and heading towards the city of Sheffield.

0:32:240:32:27

When I was on Casualty, I used to get lovely letters.

0:32:270:32:30

-I don't think I ever got a nasty letter off anyone.

-Yeah.

0:32:300:32:32

But when people start asking your advice, you know,

0:32:320:32:35

or "can you recommend something for my haemorrhoids?"

0:32:350:32:37

No, I can't, I'm an actor!

0:32:370:32:39

Well, it's time for Susan to turn her hand to something new,

0:32:390:32:43

as she and James travel back into Sheffield

0:32:430:32:45

to spend some time in the Botanic Gardens.

0:32:450:32:49

Created by Robert Marnock,

0:32:490:32:51

one of the 19th century's leading garden designers,

0:32:510:32:54

these gardens are a testament to the desire of local people

0:32:540:32:57

to provide a fresh green environment

0:32:570:32:59

in the heart of a thriving industrial city.

0:32:590:33:01

Here to tell all is curator Ian Hunter.

0:33:010:33:05

Can you tell us why Sheffield felt the need to have

0:33:050:33:09

these kind of gardens?

0:33:090:33:10

In the early 1800s, there were very few parks

0:33:100:33:13

and gardens around the city.

0:33:130:33:16

The town was developing as an industrial centre,

0:33:160:33:20

and actually, we needed green spaces for people's health.

0:33:200:33:24

Botanic gardens were first established in Italy,

0:33:240:33:27

for the study of medicinal plants.

0:33:270:33:29

But in the Georgian age of exploration,

0:33:290:33:32

botanical gardens like this one promoted the cultivation

0:33:320:33:35

of new and exciting splendours.

0:33:350:33:38

Money was raised by the people of Sheffield

0:33:380:33:40

to provide this green space,

0:33:400:33:42

and the gardens were created to improve the general wellbeing

0:33:420:33:45

of the local population,

0:33:450:33:47

although the attraction wasn't just restricted to the plants.

0:33:470:33:51

It actually opened as a combined zoo and botanical gardens,

0:33:510:33:54

so we had bears in the bearpit.

0:33:540:33:56

We also had a troupe of monkeys, and all sorts of our animals.

0:33:560:33:59

You're standing in the bearpit here.

0:33:590:34:01

The chance to see wild beasts from far-flung places

0:34:010:34:05

was limited to travelling menageries.

0:34:050:34:08

The bizarre animals and plants

0:34:080:34:10

within Sheffield's new Botanic Gardens drew in big crowds.

0:34:100:34:14

Its opening days saw 12,000 visitors,

0:34:140:34:18

but soon the gates were closed to the public,

0:34:180:34:20

with access limited to just a handful of days each year.

0:34:200:34:23

A membership fee meant only the wealthy could enjoy it.

0:34:230:34:26

The garden went through various times of sort of boom and bust.

0:34:260:34:30

The initial society went bankrupt and was replaced by a new society,

0:34:300:34:34

and then, in the 1890s, the gardens were bought by

0:34:340:34:37

the Sheffield Town Trust, because it was going through another period,

0:34:370:34:41

and that's when the gardens were made free to entry for everybody.

0:34:410:34:44

Oh, right!

0:34:440:34:45

Leafy places to promenade within smoke-filled cities

0:34:450:34:49

became popular in Victorian Britain.

0:34:490:34:52

As the number of free-to-enter parks in the region increased,

0:34:520:34:55

the Botanic Gardens were forced to open their doors

0:34:550:34:58

to everyone all year.

0:34:580:35:00

-How big is the garden?

-The garden is about 19 acres.

-Wow.

0:35:000:35:02

So it's... It's not huge, but it's a fair size.

0:35:020:35:06

-It's very intense, though, isn't it?

-It is.

-There's a lot of work here.

0:35:060:35:09

Yeah, a lot of intensive horticulture, a lot of

0:35:090:35:11

-very formal areas as well.

-Yeah.

0:35:110:35:12

Robert Marnock's designs were in the gardenesque style.

0:35:120:35:15

It meant flowerbeds and trees were to be positioned

0:35:150:35:19

within Sheffield's Botanical Gardens in a very fastidious fashion.

0:35:190:35:23

It's about art, not nature, so each plant has its own

0:35:230:35:27

position, its own style.

0:35:270:35:28

It's about showing off the plants to their full potential,

0:35:280:35:32

so every tree has the space to develop fully,

0:35:320:35:35

so it can have its full crown, beautiful symmetrical crowns.

0:35:350:35:38

Gardening should be about art and celebrating the plants themselves,

0:35:380:35:42

so you've got the trees planted as specimens,

0:35:420:35:44

and you've got very narrow beds,

0:35:440:35:46

so that you can walk along either side

0:35:460:35:48

-and see every single plant...

-Yes.

-Oh, I see!

0:35:480:35:50

-..and appreciate each plant.

-Rather than a border?

-Yeah.

0:35:500:35:53

-Rather than a border.

-I've got you.

0:35:530:35:54

It's about appreciating each individual plant

0:35:540:35:56

and the beauty of each plant.

0:35:560:35:58

Sheffield's Botanic Gardens host an incredible collection of

0:35:580:36:01

5,000 species and remains

0:36:010:36:03

one of the best examples of the gardenesque style of design.

0:36:030:36:08

The 19 acres are now looked after by a team of gardeners,

0:36:080:36:11

who maintain the neat and lush surroundings.

0:36:110:36:14

Time for Susan and James to earn their crust.

0:36:140:36:17

I'm worried about my hole, I think it's a bit deep.

0:36:170:36:19

I'm...I'm quite tired, having done all of this now.

0:36:190:36:22

-Yeah.

-But can you not ruin this last bit?!

0:36:220:36:24

You've got to get the lines right.

0:36:240:36:26

-Yeah, get the lines right.

-I've got...

-Don't ruin all my work!

0:36:260:36:29

-I know, you've done a fabulous job.

-Yeah.

0:36:290:36:31

Robert Marnock's vision to show off the artistic beauty of nature

0:36:310:36:35

was his gift to the people of Sheffield,

0:36:350:36:37

where the garden remains a testament to him

0:36:370:36:39

and a peaceful haven in the heart of a bustling city.

0:36:390:36:42

While their opponents relax in the Gardens,

0:36:470:36:50

Suzanne and David are on the other side of Sheffield

0:36:500:36:52

for their final stop.

0:36:520:36:54

Still in search of that elusive item of a certain age.

0:36:540:36:58

-Hello, how are we?

-Hi, I'm Suzanne.

0:36:580:37:01

-I'm Danny.

-Hi.

-Danny, David Harper.

-Hiya.

-Very good to meet you.

0:37:010:37:04

Are you... Is this all yours?

0:37:040:37:06

Not all mine. We are a collective.

0:37:060:37:08

-OK.

-But I am the Big Cheese, as they say.

0:37:080:37:10

The Big Cheese?! We're honoured!

0:37:100:37:12

How very mature and tasty!

0:37:120:37:15

Right, you've got a whopping £325.50 left to spend.

0:37:150:37:19

Get cracking!

0:37:190:37:20

Oh, there you go.

0:37:220:37:23

-Who do we have here?

-Aw!

0:37:250:37:26

-Is he the Buddha of Good Fortune?

-I'm going to rub his tummy.

0:37:260:37:29

I don't think he's Victorian, however, do you?

0:37:290:37:31

-He is not.

-No.

-I don't even think he's wood.

0:37:310:37:34

-I quite like those candlesticks.

-Do they look old to you?

0:37:340:37:37

-No, not at all.

-No, they don't look old.

0:37:370:37:38

-We're barely looking at anything at all.

-No.

-Do you know what?

0:37:380:37:41

-I really need to focus here.

-Yeah.

-Shall I find something really old?

0:37:410:37:44

-Let's find... Oh, please, yes.

-OK, follow me, follow me this time.

0:37:440:37:46

-Yeah, OK.

-Let's find you something old.

0:37:460:37:48

Ah, change of tactics.

0:37:480:37:50

So while David picks up the reins...

0:37:500:37:52

..James and Susan have meandered their way to Barnsley,

0:37:540:37:57

famous for coal mining and glass-making

0:37:570:38:00

and the home to their final shopping destination of the trip.

0:38:000:38:04

-Hi!

-Hello, hello.

0:38:040:38:05

Hi.

0:38:050:38:06

-Hello. James.

-James, Rachel, pleased to meet you.

0:38:060:38:09

-Susan.

-Hi, Susan, Rachel, pleased to meet you.

0:38:090:38:12

Nice to meet you, Rachel. We want some really lovely little pieces.

0:38:120:38:15

-Really lovely antiques?

-Yes.

0:38:150:38:16

We can find you some really lovely antiques

0:38:160:38:18

-and perhaps a bargain as well.

-Yeah, we definitely want bargains!

0:38:180:38:21

-You heard it here first.

-Yeah, bargains.

0:38:210:38:24

-This is the right place to come.

-Take us to your bargains.

0:38:240:38:26

-Come this way.

-Come on.

0:38:260:38:29

I think this is a particularly interesting unit, because there are

0:38:290:38:31

-one or two really nice bits on here...

-Yeah, yeah.

0:38:310:38:33

that I think you might find. I'm sort of thinking Arts and Crafts.

0:38:330:38:36

-OK.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Well, look, down there.

0:38:360:38:39

-Look at this.

-Look at that!

-Already waiting for you there.

0:38:390:38:42

-What do we think?

-Look at that! That's Arts and Crafts-y, isn't it?

0:38:420:38:45

-Yeah, definitely.

-Nice brass.

0:38:450:38:46

Is it marked at all? Always look for that.

0:38:460:38:49

Newlin. Cornish.

0:38:490:38:52

Lots of stuff came from the Lake District, didn't it?

0:38:520:38:55

-The Keswick School.

-Oh!

0:38:550:38:57

-So they had a lot of copper deposits up there.

-OK.

0:38:570:39:00

So, wherever you find the metals, you tend to find the schools.

0:39:000:39:03

There's no maker's name, but a ticket price of £12.

0:39:030:39:06

What can you do on that?

0:39:060:39:08

Well, I think we can do a fairly decent place on that.

0:39:080:39:11

Oh, don't... Is there a price?

0:39:110:39:12

-Yes, there is a price.

-I never seen a price.

0:39:120:39:14

-There's a price on that.

-What was that, a fiver?

0:39:140:39:16

-Well...

-What did Rachel say?

0:39:160:39:18

If you went down to five,

0:39:180:39:19

you're maybe pushing it a bit too much.

0:39:190:39:21

Erm, we could perhaps do eight on it.

0:39:210:39:24

What about six?

0:39:260:39:29

If we went down that low, that would be the absolute definite

0:39:310:39:34

and I could not push that any further.

0:39:340:39:36

-Is that OK?

-Six have we, Saints?

0:39:360:39:39

OK, the Saints, six go on them.

0:39:390:39:41

-Yeah, let's!

-Well done, Rachel.

0:39:410:39:43

Blimey! Susan's become quite the negotiator!

0:39:430:39:46

That's a speedy and rather good deal.

0:39:460:39:49

How's the hunt for old things going in Sheffield?

0:39:490:39:53

Something old-old. Old...

0:39:530:39:55

OK, old like that.

0:39:550:39:57

Erm... Nice.

0:39:570:39:59

OK!

0:39:590:40:01

-Old.

-OK!

-Yeah?

0:40:010:40:03

-We're looking for 100 years old.

-At least.

-At least!

0:40:030:40:07

-Yeah.

-Now, this is an oak coffer.

-Right.

0:40:070:40:10

It can be used for storing blankets or treasure.

0:40:100:40:13

-Right!

-Literally treasure.

-Uh-huh?

0:40:130:40:16

In times of trouble, a coffer could be filled

0:40:160:40:18

with all your worldly goods and taken off to

0:40:180:40:21

the hills. There are coffers today in Britain,

0:40:210:40:25

buried, undiscovered - full of things!

0:40:250:40:28

-Oh, amazing.

-If you look a bit harder now, you'll see something.

0:40:280:40:33

I see numbers.

0:40:330:40:35

And it says 1660.

0:40:350:40:38

-17th-century coffer.

-Yeah. Oh, there you go!

0:40:380:40:40

250 quid. How cheap is that?

0:40:400:40:43

-Bearing in mind how old it is!

-Not cheap enough,

0:40:430:40:46

given Suzanne's previous form.

0:40:460:40:48

So I want to talk

0:40:480:40:49

-to you about this one, though.

-OK.

0:40:490:40:51

-It's attractive.

-OK.

0:40:510:40:53

-Put your umbrellas and walking cane.

-OK, so you

0:40:530:40:55

-know exactly what it is?

-Yeah.

-It's called a

0:40:550:40:58

stick stand - sticks and umbrellas.

0:40:580:41:01

-This is a stick stand.

-Yeah. When was it made?

0:41:010:41:03

-So I would say 1840s, '50s?

-OK, very good.

0:41:030:41:06

It's certainly Victorian, but I think

0:41:060:41:08

just a little later, cos it's got that kind of

0:41:080:41:10

Gothic revival, so mid-19th century to kind of

0:41:100:41:13

-the last quarter of.

-Yeah.

-Let's say 1870.

0:41:130:41:16

OK, well, 40 years out, that's not bad, for an amateur!

0:41:160:41:19

Look, in the world of antiques, it's nothing! It's minutes out - that's all!

0:41:190:41:23

I think it's quite saleable. It's all down

0:41:230:41:25

to money, really. And I'm afraid it has to be cheap,

0:41:250:41:28

in the market the way it is, it has to be cheap.

0:41:280:41:30

Now you're talking Suzanne's language!

0:41:300:41:33

No ticket price, so time to get the big cheese in.

0:41:330:41:36

-Danny.

-Hey!

-Now then,

0:41:360:41:38

tell us everything you know about the stick stand.

0:41:380:41:40

I know it's a lovely Victorian stick stand.

0:41:400:41:43

-It's got its original liner.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:41:430:41:45

Arts and Crafts. A lot, lot going for it.

0:41:450:41:47

-Is it particularly cheap for us?

-I think it's really cheap.

0:41:470:41:50

-Is it?

-Yeah. I think it's priceless.

0:41:500:41:52

-15 quid?

-15 quid? What about 65 quid?

0:41:520:41:55

-Oh?!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:41:550:41:57

I thought I heard the word "cheap"!

0:41:570:41:58

-I know, I know.

-Oh, that's really interesting!

0:41:580:42:00

-It's a beautiful piece of Victoriana.

-Yeah, but...

-I know.

0:42:000:42:03

The market isn't so good, is it, though,

0:42:030:42:05

-for Victoriana these days?

-Unfortunately not.

0:42:050:42:07

-No.

-I agree with you.

-Sadly.

0:42:070:42:09

What's the absolute death on it?

0:42:090:42:11

-The absolute death on it is £45.

-You know what I'm like!

0:42:110:42:15

-I know!

-You know!

-Out of control, yeah!

0:42:150:42:17

-I mean...

-Well, I'm going to pass...

0:42:170:42:20

It seems a lot, it seems a lot,

0:42:200:42:22

-considering the market.

-Right, OK.

-That it's not selling.

0:42:220:42:26

-Yeah.

-I will throw the stick in with it.

0:42:260:42:28

-Ah!

-There you go.

0:42:280:42:30

-Do you know what, then? That's a deal, then.

-Are we happy with that?

-Yeah.

0:42:300:42:33

-Yeah, I'd be happy with that.

-OK.

0:42:330:42:34

-Yeah.

-Go on, then, shake his hand.

-Oh, thank you very much!

-You've done the deal.

0:42:340:42:37

-You're more than welcome.

-I learnt a lot there.

-Thank you, Danny.

-Thank you, Danny.

0:42:370:42:41

Well done, chaps! A Victorian stick stand,

0:42:410:42:43

with its very own stick, for £45.

0:42:430:42:45

That's it, done!

0:42:470:42:48

-Nothing else we can do.

-No.

0:42:480:42:50

But time's running out back in Barnsley.

0:42:500:42:53

-Look at this!

-What, what have you found,

0:42:530:42:56

-what have you found?

-I've just found a

0:42:560:42:58

silver photograph frame, so we've got the hallmarks there.

0:42:580:43:01

Where is it from? London. But it's in quite

0:43:010:43:03

bright condition. You could give that as a

0:43:030:43:05

-wedding present, couldn't you?

-Mm-hm.

0:43:050:43:07

It's quite a good stock item.

0:43:070:43:09

It's not terribly old, but it's bright. Condition, with

0:43:090:43:12

-something like this, is all.

-Yeah?

-And look at the back.

0:43:120:43:15

Always look at the back.

0:43:150:43:17

Because nobody's going to buy anything with a floppy stand.

0:43:170:43:19

Quite right! Rachel's off to consult the vendor.

0:43:190:43:23

Here's hoping she can bring back a discount to please Susan.

0:43:230:43:27

-The very best...

-The very best.

-..I could do this for, today...

0:43:270:43:31

-Today!

-Time and place, time and place.

0:43:310:43:34

-There would be 50% off.

-That's a discount.

0:43:340:43:37

-That would take us down to 12.

-That's a discount!

0:43:370:43:40

-Hmm!

-That would, unfortunately, guys, be

0:43:400:43:43

-the very best.

-Well, I'm...I'm almost happy

0:43:430:43:45

with that, but I know my friend here, Susan,

0:43:450:43:48

-is very unhappy, aren't you?

-Hmm!

0:43:480:43:51

-Go on. Go on. Go on!

-HE GUFFAWS

0:43:520:43:54

-Go on!

-Thank you.

-No, thank YOU!

-No, thank you.

0:43:540:43:57

Oh, you're welcome, you're welcome, you're welcome.

0:43:570:43:59

Become quite the pair, haven't they?

0:43:590:44:01

Another very generous offer from Rachel means

0:44:010:44:03

they wrap up their shopping with the silver photo frame

0:44:030:44:06

and an Arts and Crafts brass plate -

0:44:060:44:08

for a grand total of just £18.

0:44:080:44:11

-Time to show off your wares, then, lads!

-Come on, what's

0:44:110:44:14

-going on here?

-What?

-It looks like a house clearance!

0:44:140:44:16

Well, I mean, if you don't mind me saying,

0:44:160:44:18

that looks like a very disappointing collection.

0:44:180:44:20

-Oh, you haven't seen it, David.

-Oh, that's not nice!

0:44:200:44:22

-Size isn't everything.

-No, come on.

-Believe it! OK, let's

0:44:220:44:25

-have a look.

-Let's have a look.

-OK, go on.

0:44:250:44:27

-OK. OK!

-I've got it, I've got it.

-Wow!

0:44:270:44:28

-There we are.

-It's the double Mouser.

0:44:280:44:31

-Yeah.

-Double Mouser.

0:44:310:44:32

The elusive double Mouser!

0:44:320:44:34

-They got in there first.

-We got everything.

-Not one, but two.

-But two!

0:44:340:44:37

-Wow!

-I like that a lot.

-I am liking the decanter.

-Yeah.

0:44:370:44:40

-Yeah?

-That is a beautiful thing.

-That's to my taste.

-Silver.

0:44:400:44:42

-Silver collar.

-Is it silver?

-Silver.

-Oh, wow.

0:44:420:44:45

-And the stopper fits perfectly.

-Does it?

0:44:450:44:47

-Wow!

-And we've got the James Braxton brass tray.

-Brass tray.

0:44:470:44:50

-I would be disappointed not to see one.

-Arts and Crafts.

-Yeah?

0:44:500:44:53

-Arts and Crafts, Mrs Arts and Crafts.

-OK!

-Fave!

0:44:530:44:55

-Yeah?

-Yeah, and the mirror.

0:44:550:44:57

-Good-looking mirror that.

-Good-looking mirror!

0:44:570:44:59

Good-looking mirror.

0:44:590:45:00

-That is a lovely mirror.

-Go on, probe me on price.

0:45:000:45:03

-Oh, my goodness!

-That is in beautiful condition.

0:45:030:45:05

-Probe me on price.

-Well, the one that really concerns me, as the

0:45:050:45:08

opposition, is the double Mouser.

0:45:080:45:10

-It could be 200 quid all day long.

-Oh!

-Easily.

0:45:100:45:12

-Really?

-It could be.

-How much did you buy it for?

0:45:120:45:15

-Let me know!

-The double Mouser!

0:45:150:45:16

-180.

-Ah, well...

-LAUGHTER

0:45:160:45:18

So you'll get 200... You'll get 20 quid?

0:45:180:45:20

-See, he's smiling again now.

-OK, I feel a bit better.

0:45:200:45:22

-Do you?

-Because... Aw! I do, I feel a bit better.

0:45:220:45:25

-Oh, forget that!

-Double Mouser? Rubbish!

0:45:250:45:27

LAUGHTER I think they look nervous.

0:45:270:45:30

-Right, come on, stop laughing. Come on!

-OK, so...

0:45:300:45:32

OK, shall we do it gently?

0:45:320:45:34

-I think this is...

-I'm a bit nervous.

-Go on.

0:45:340:45:36

Look at that. What's that?

0:45:360:45:38

-Watch their faces when they see this.

-Tell me, tell me.

-Watch their faces.

-Oh, dear!

-OK.

0:45:380:45:41

-Oh, we have to do this!

-Yeah, we got this as well.

0:45:410:45:43

-I forgot we had...

-Another table.

-OK.

-It's like a...

0:45:430:45:47

-Don't get too excited now.

-It's like a horror movie.

0:45:470:45:50

LAUGHTER

0:45:500:45:51

OK, tell me, James, which object do you like the best?

0:45:510:45:54

Er, the stick stand.

0:45:540:45:56

-Stick stand?

-Stick stand!

-Yeah.

0:45:560:45:58

-OK.

-Yeah.

0:45:580:46:00

You wouldn't get over my threshold with the rest.

0:46:000:46:02

-What's that?

-Ah, very special.

0:46:020:46:05

A late 19th-century train ticket machine.

0:46:050:46:08

-No?

-Really?

-It's got ribbon and everything in there.

0:46:080:46:11

-How much did you pay for that?

-20 quid?

0:46:110:46:13

-20 quid!

-Oh, right, OK.

0:46:130:46:15

How much was the vinyl-covered piece of furniture?

0:46:150:46:18

Oh! What do you think?

0:46:180:46:20

-OK, my arm was up my back?

-Yeah.

0:46:200:46:23

I don't know. Tenner?

0:46:230:46:25

-I was going to say 20 quid.

-20 quid?

-20 quid.

0:46:250:46:28

-I can't believe it, I can't believe it.

-How much is it?

-I can't remember.

0:46:280:46:31

-27?

-27.50.

-OK.

-£27.50.

0:46:310:46:34

-So you're close.

-Yes.

0:46:340:46:36

Do you think there's going to be a profit in that one?

0:46:360:46:39

-Moving on...

-LAUGHTER

0:46:390:46:42

-Well, it's been great!

-It's been really great.

-Yes!

0:46:420:46:44

-See you at the auction.

-See you at the auction.

0:46:440:46:46

-Well done.

-Maybe best man/woman win.

0:46:460:46:48

-Win!

-Yeah, may the best team... Team! Team!

0:46:480:46:51

-Yes, team!

-Excellent.

-Team effort.

0:46:510:46:54

There's no "I" in team. But there is one in -

0:46:540:46:56

-"Tell us what you really think."

-What do you think

0:46:560:46:59

of James and Susan's highly ordinary collection?

0:46:590:47:02

Oh, that's nasty!

0:47:020:47:04

But actually, I think it is. I think it's a bit predictable.

0:47:040:47:07

You look sort of slightly frowny, what's going on?

0:47:070:47:10

Well, I think because they've not paid

0:47:100:47:12

-very much for their items.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:47:120:47:14

-And ours were more expens...

-Well, would you pay a

0:47:140:47:16

-lot of money for theirs?

-No, I wouldn't. No, I wouldn't.

0:47:160:47:18

-The brass tray.

-No.

-That's not going anywhere. It's certainly not going in my house.

0:47:180:47:22

No, it's not going in my house either.

0:47:220:47:24

-We've sown our seed.

-OK.

-And we've spent about £300.

0:47:240:47:27

-They've just tickled over 100.

-OK.

0:47:270:47:30

We're going to win.

0:47:300:47:32

So, we're happy?

0:47:320:47:33

-I'm very happy, actually.

-I'm happy too.

0:47:330:47:34

-I'm very, very happy.

-Let's get to auction.

0:47:340:47:36

-Come on, you.

-Let's get to auction.

0:47:360:47:38

-We have it. Come on.

-I'm going to be so excited!

0:47:380:47:41

-I'm excited for tomorrow!

-Yeah, come on, let's go.

0:47:410:47:43

-Yeah, yeah, OK!

-Cup of tea, cup of tea?

0:47:430:47:45

Milk and two, thanks.

0:47:450:47:47

It's been a delightful jaunt around South Yorkshire,

0:47:470:47:50

but it's time to leave the county, in search of an

0:47:500:47:53

auction in the Lancashire town of Warrington.

0:47:530:47:56

-Oh, Suze!

-Aw!

-I am so excited about this.

0:47:560:48:01

Do you know, I am as well, because I've never done it.

0:48:010:48:04

-No.

-I've never ever been to an auction.

0:48:040:48:06

-It's so exciting.

-So, yeah!

0:48:060:48:08

We can say this, because we're good mates.

0:48:080:48:10

Do you honestly think you're going to make money?

0:48:100:48:13

Forget what James and David are saying!

0:48:130:48:15

-Do you reckon we'll make money?

-I think you have the

0:48:150:48:18

potential to make more money, cos you bargained very well.

0:48:180:48:22

Well, hopefully, it'll be

0:48:220:48:23

smiles all round at Warrington Auctions.

0:48:230:48:27

-Look at the size of this place!

-It's huge, isn't it?

0:48:270:48:29

That's a good sign, isn't it?

0:48:290:48:30

Yeah! The bidders are in the room and online. So here's hoping!

0:48:300:48:34

-Oh, here they are. Right.

-What a car!

0:48:340:48:36

Gosh, they look good now. They look smiley.

0:48:360:48:38

-What a car!

-Good morning!

-Good morning!

0:48:380:48:41

-Morning, morning, morning!

-Lovely to see you!

0:48:410:48:43

Lovely to see you, too. Oh, you're gorgeous and warm!

0:48:430:48:46

Hello. Mwah, mwah!

0:48:460:48:48

Suzanne, have you been to an auction before?

0:48:480:48:50

-Never.

-You're in for a treat.

0:48:500:48:52

-Yeah, I think so.

-Yeah.

0:48:520:48:54

-I'm excited.

-Come on.

-OK.

0:48:540:48:56

But before all the excitement starts,

0:48:570:49:00

let's remind ourselves of what everyone's bought.

0:49:000:49:03

James and Susan picked up five

0:49:030:49:05

auction lots for a total of £288.

0:49:050:49:07

Suzanne and David, on the other hand, parted with just

0:49:080:49:13

£119.50 but also have five lots for auction.

0:49:130:49:17

But what does auctioneer Peter Critchley make of it all?

0:49:170:49:21

I like the Gothic stick stand.

0:49:220:49:24

Original, nice condition, with the

0:49:240:49:25

original drip tray, which is very good.

0:49:250:49:27

The stick's a bit of a bonus. A lot of stick

0:49:270:49:29

collectors about, and so stick stands tend

0:49:290:49:31

to do very well here.

0:49:310:49:32

The wooden tray is probably the most valuable item brought in today.

0:49:320:49:35

Robert "Mouseman" Thompson.

0:49:350:49:38

We had a pheasant of his in here a couple of months ago,

0:49:380:49:40

which we sold for about £900, so it does make a

0:49:400:49:43

very good money if it's an original piece and in good condition,

0:49:430:49:46

which that tray is, so it's a very nice item.

0:49:460:49:49

That all sounds promising.

0:49:490:49:50

So, time to get things started.

0:49:500:49:52

First up are Suzanne and David's figures.

0:49:520:49:55

Nice things, these. Ten is bid. Ten is bid, looking for 12.

0:49:560:49:59

-Go on!

-£10 in the room. Is there £12 anywhere?

0:49:590:50:02

Is there 12?

0:50:020:50:03

Ten I have in the room, I sell at ten.

0:50:030:50:06

-Oh, oh!

-What did it...?

-I'm not telling you, I'm not telling you!

0:50:060:50:09

-£10 for the lot.

-Ten, it was the ugly baby

0:50:090:50:11

that was putting them off.

0:50:110:50:12

-I know, I know!

-Aw, drat!

-Darn it.

0:50:120:50:14

Harsh comment and a tough start.

0:50:140:50:17

The figures go for a maiden bid,

0:50:170:50:19

but there's plenty of time to make it all back.

0:50:190:50:22

-It's such an individual taste.

-Yeah.

0:50:220:50:24

Not everybody... But somebody's bought them!

0:50:240:50:26

Someone did buy them!

0:50:260:50:27

-You seem surprised!

-Cheeky devil!

0:50:270:50:29

How quickly words of comfort turn into cheek!

0:50:290:50:32

Ha, better watch out, Susan,

0:50:320:50:34

your Arts and Crafts tray is up next.

0:50:340:50:36

Ten online, ten online, looking for 12.

0:50:360:50:38

-Ten online!

-Made a profit already.

0:50:380:50:40

£10 online, is there 12?

0:50:400:50:42

£10 online, is there £12 anywhere?

0:50:420:50:45

Ten's the bid, then. I sell at £10 only.

0:50:450:50:49

Well, it didn't set the sale room on fire,

0:50:500:50:52

but it's a profit to start you off.

0:50:520:50:55

-It's a profit, it's a profit.

-Hey, Suze!

-It's a profit.

0:50:550:50:58

Well done!

0:50:580:50:59

Well done, James.

0:50:590:51:01

From one plate to another.

0:51:020:51:04

Well, two of them, actually.

0:51:040:51:06

Surely, Suzanne's haggled deal will come good?

0:51:060:51:08

-Ten online, looking for 12.

-Come on.

0:51:080:51:10

Ten online, is there 12 anywhere?

0:51:100:51:12

-It's warming up.

-Oh, it's got to be more.

-Ten's the online bid, then.

0:51:120:51:15

Is there £12 anywhere? Ten's the bid, selling at ten.

0:51:150:51:19

Does anybody buy in the room?

0:51:190:51:21

Mind you, it's still five times the money.

0:51:210:51:24

So, no royal collectors in the room today,

0:51:240:51:27

but a first profit for Suzanne and David.

0:51:270:51:28

-Hello?

-Hello!

0:51:280:51:31

-Hello.

-We're on the way back!

0:51:310:51:33

Aiming to halt the comeback in its tracks

0:51:350:51:36

is James and Susan's silver photo frame.

0:51:360:51:39

-I've got a feeling in my waters it's going to do well.

-I'm feeling, yeah,

0:51:390:51:42

optimistic for this.

0:51:420:51:43

You could nip to the loo, James, you've probably got time.

0:51:430:51:46

Start me off at just £10 on this one, please.

0:51:460:51:48

-Start me at ten.

-Someone's got to go for £10.

0:51:480:51:50

Ten is in the room, ten is here in the room.

0:51:500:51:52

-It's going crazy.

-Ten is in the room.

0:51:520:51:55

-I've got online 12.

-12? Yes!

-You're off.

0:51:550:51:59

In the room at 15. Looking for 18 now.

0:51:590:52:01

18 online. Do you want 20, sir?

0:52:010:52:04

20 bid, 20 bid, looking for 25. £25 online.

0:52:040:52:07

-Oh, hello!

-I'll sell online at £25.

0:52:070:52:10

-Yes! Yaay!

-Get in!

0:52:100:52:14

Oh, they're creaming us! We've got to get a move on here.

0:52:140:52:18

Don't worry. Don't worry.

0:52:180:52:19

Suddenly, it's all come alive.

0:52:190:52:21

Susan and James have more than doubled their money

0:52:210:52:24

on that frame.

0:52:240:52:25

-Great, Sue!

-Oh, come on!

0:52:250:52:27

Do you know what, though? They're all creeping up!

0:52:270:52:30

We're channelling the money!

0:52:300:52:31

Let's channel the money.

0:52:310:52:33

David hoped the Victorian ticket machine

0:52:330:52:35

would take Suzanne back in time,

0:52:350:52:37

but will it bring them a historic profit?

0:52:370:52:40

-Channel, channel!

-Channelling! Money!

0:52:400:52:42

-Here we go. Start this up with me at £40.

-£40!

0:52:420:52:46

-Start me at 20, then.

-Oh, come on, guys!

0:52:460:52:49

£20.

0:52:490:52:50

£20.

0:52:500:52:51

20 online. 20 online.

0:52:510:52:53

20 online! OK, we've started.

0:52:530:52:55

The engineering ticket punch now,

0:52:550:52:56

it's an unusual item. We've never had one before.

0:52:560:52:59

We'll never have one again.

0:52:590:53:00

-Nobody, nobody.

-Come on!

-Is there £25 anywhere?

0:53:000:53:03

-£20 the bid, then.

-Aw!

-I can't believe it!

0:53:030:53:06

-Broke even.

-Certainly did.

0:53:060:53:09

Someone has grabbed themselves

0:53:090:53:10

a quirky slice of history for a very reasonable price.

0:53:100:53:13

If only I'd been allowed to bid,

0:53:130:53:16

-I'd have been all over it.

-You would, James.

-He's...

0:53:160:53:18

-Like a rash!

-He's teasing us!

-Like a rash, wouldn't you?

0:53:180:53:21

Oh, yeah!

0:53:210:53:22

James was charmed by the delights of this decanter,

0:53:220:53:26

but will it serve them up a profit?

0:53:260:53:28

Start me at 30 on the lot, please. £30? Start me at 20, then. £20?

0:53:280:53:32

-Come on!

-Oh, come on!

0:53:320:53:35

20 online, 20 online.

0:53:350:53:36

25 online.

0:53:360:53:38

Is everybody asleep here?

0:53:380:53:40

Nothing in the room? £30 online.

0:53:400:53:44

£30 online. Keep going.

0:53:440:53:45

35 online. 35 online.

0:53:450:53:48

Looking for 40 now.

0:53:480:53:49

35 the bid, then.

0:53:490:53:52

-All online.

-Oh, wow! That's shocking!

0:53:520:53:54

It certainly knocked James for six.

0:53:540:53:57

Someone grabbed a bargain, leaving Susan and James

0:53:570:54:00

with their first loss of the day.

0:54:000:54:02

That's a bargain, then, they've got, then.

0:54:020:54:04

-Yeah, a bargain.

-A real bargain.

0:54:040:54:05

That's what I said. Now, can the sideboard

0:54:050:54:08

help Suzanne and David make a profit?

0:54:080:54:10

Fingers crossed.

0:54:100:54:11

-Start me at 20. 20 bid, 20 online. 20 online.

-Come on!

0:54:110:54:14

-There you go, I told you.

-Looking for 25.

0:54:140:54:16

£20 online. Is there 25 anywhere?

0:54:160:54:19

£20 the online bid and selling.

0:54:190:54:21

I can't believe it, I can't believe it.

0:54:210:54:24

Selling for £20 only.

0:54:240:54:25

-I can't believe it!

-Shocked! I am so shocked!

0:54:250:54:29

That is not bad for a skip buy.

0:54:290:54:32

Now, now, James! It's not a lot to pay

0:54:320:54:34

for a piece of furniture, but it means another loss

0:54:340:54:37

for Suzanne and David.

0:54:370:54:38

-We haven't done well, David!

-We haven't, have we?

0:54:380:54:41

And I thought we were such... I thought we were the A Team.

0:54:410:54:43

-We WERE the A Team! I think we're the Z Team now.

-Aw!

0:54:430:54:46

Can the 1950s mirror fare any better?

0:54:460:54:49

Start me at £30 for the Art Deco mirror.

0:54:490:54:51

-Start me at £30.

-£30 online.

0:54:510:54:55

35 in the room. Looking for 40 now.

0:54:550:54:58

-40 online, have we got 45?

-Come on, a little bit!

0:54:580:55:02

£40 is the online bid. Is there 45 anywhere?

0:55:020:55:04

-Come on.

-£40 for the Deco mirror.

0:55:040:55:07

Aw!

0:55:070:55:10

Aw, disappointment all round as the mirror clocks up a loss.

0:55:100:55:14

-I am not positive.

-Disappointed.

-I'm not positive about our last lot.

0:55:140:55:19

Suzanne and David's final lot is the Victorian stick stand.

0:55:190:55:23

With stick.

0:55:230:55:24

OK, Sue, this is it.

0:55:240:55:26

Start me at £80. £80.

0:55:260:55:28

-Come on.

-Come on! Let's get some action.

0:55:280:55:30

I've got 60 here, then.

0:55:300:55:32

-60 with me.

-OK, good, good.

0:55:320:55:33

Looking for 65. I've got 65 online.

0:55:330:55:36

-Do you want 70 at the back?

-Come on!

0:55:360:55:38

I've got 75 here. Do you want 80?

0:55:380:55:40

We're in the room at 80 now. Is there 85?

0:55:400:55:43

-That's more like it!

-In the room at 80,

0:55:430:55:45

is there 85? £80 in the room, is there 85 anywhere?

0:55:450:55:49

-Making back those losses!

-85 online, now 90?

0:55:490:55:51

90, sir? No.

0:55:510:55:52

85 online, is there £90 anywhere?

0:55:520:55:56

-85 online.

-Yes!

-Yes! Hey!

0:55:560:55:59

Well done! Well done, David!

0:55:590:56:02

-Well done!

-Aw, finally!

0:56:020:56:05

Oh, that is fantastic!

0:56:050:56:06

A great profit on their final lot, well done.

0:56:060:56:09

God, you do know your stuff!

0:56:110:56:13

-Oh, I'm impressed!

-Oh, shucks!

0:56:130:56:15

You've just gone right up there. Look, he's floating!

0:56:150:56:17

-Oh, stop!

-There he is!

0:56:170:56:18

-Oh!

-A bit more, go on.

0:56:180:56:21

Thank you very much! That did cheer me up!

0:56:210:56:25

Well, our last lot of the day

0:56:250:56:27

is the much anticipated Mouseman tray.

0:56:270:56:30

-James, I'm feeling a bit nauseous now.

-I am feeling nauseous.

0:56:300:56:34

-Are you?

-Yeah, I've got real butterflies.

-Hmm!

0:56:340:56:37

Start me at £150.

0:56:370:56:39

150 I have, 150 I have online.

0:56:390:56:42

Looking for 160 now.

0:56:420:56:44

Come on, it's beautiful.

0:56:440:56:45

Looking for 170.

0:56:450:56:47

160 I have, looking for 170.

0:56:470:56:49

170 I have, looking for 180 now.

0:56:490:56:51

170 I have. Looking for 180 now. 170 I have. Is there 180?

0:56:510:56:54

-170 I have.

-Come on, come on, it's beautiful!

0:56:540:56:56

-170 I have.

-Ohhhh!

-Aw!

0:56:560:57:00

Some lucky bidder has a lovely item

0:57:010:57:04

at that price. But what does that mean for the final totals?

0:57:040:57:08

Time to find out.

0:57:080:57:09

-Guys, I think we need a sugary tea.

-Yeah.

-Come on.

-OK, let's do it.

0:57:090:57:14

Susan and James started out this road trip with £400.

0:57:170:57:21

They've made a loss, after auction costs, of £58.40,

0:57:210:57:25

leaving them with a total of £341.60.

0:57:250:57:29

Suzanne and David also had £400.

0:57:290:57:33

They too made a loss, after auction costs, but only losing 60p.

0:57:330:57:37

That leaves them with a total of £399.40

0:57:370:57:41

and makes them today's winners!

0:57:410:57:44

-We are the winners.

-Yes!

-Oh, well, it's been a great journey!

0:57:450:57:48

-Hasn't it been wonderful?

-Yes, it has.

0:57:480:57:50

-It's been gorgeous, it's been gorgeous!

-It's been great!

0:57:500:57:52

-Thanks for being a great partner.

-Thank you so much.

0:57:520:57:55

-Congratulations.

-Oh, come here, James!

0:57:550:57:57

You know you... You know you want to!

0:57:570:57:59

-Away with you.

-Thank you.

0:57:590:58:02

I'm so glad we got this as a payment, Suze.

0:58:020:58:04

We definitely have got the best deal.

0:58:040:58:07

-Bye.

-Bye!

-Bye!

0:58:100:58:13

-Weren't they lovely?

-Lovely.

0:58:130:58:15

What a fantastic experience this has been.

0:58:170:58:21

And I'm not bothered at the outcome.

0:58:210:58:23

If I got the opportunity to do it again, I would.

0:58:230:58:26

-Would you?

-Yeah! Oh, yeah, in a heartbeat.

0:58:260:58:28

-Yeah. We'll be the experts next time.

-Oh, yeah!

0:58:280:58:31

Cheerio!

0:58:310:58:34

Actors and friends from Casualty, Susan Cookson and Suzannne Packer swap surgery scrubs for a 1965 Sunbeam Tiger as they battle it out around the north west of England, assisted by James Braxton and David Harper. Susan discovers her inner haggler, while Suzanne keeps the purse strings very tight as she bids to discover an item with some real age.

As the trip winds across Yorkshire, there is the chance to meet a very special woman from Sheffield and a look around some incredible gardens with an amazing history.