Charles Dance and Geraldine James Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Charles Dance and Geraldine James

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Charles Dance and Geraldine James join experts Natasha Raskin and Will Axon on a trip round Wiltshire.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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Ooh, I like that!

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..paired up with an expert...

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We've had some fun, haven't we?

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..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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Their mission? To scour Britain for antiques.

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Fantastic!

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I'll do that in slow-mo.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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Come on, boys!

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But it's no easy ride.

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Ta-da!

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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Don't sell me.

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Go away, darling.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I'm trying to spend money here.

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There will be worthy winners...

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Yes!

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..and valiant losers.

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Put your pedal to the metal,

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this is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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On this road trip, we're treading the boards

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with two titanic British legends of stage and screen...

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Charles Dance and Geraldine James.

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So, when did we first meet, Gerald?

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I think it was 1981...or 2.

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Blimey!

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When we started Jewel In The Crown.

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These two indeed met as glamorous young thespians,

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starring in the classic 1980s TV drama

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of the British Raj in India, The Jewel In The Crown.

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-I'd been in Gandhi the year before.

-You were a team leader, weren't you?

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-I was boss.

-I remember, "Now we're going to go down to Janpath.

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"Then we're going to go in the gardens

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"of the Imperial Hotel and have tea."

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But we were very lucky to be there for six months.

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-Oh, hell, yeah.

-It gave us time. We saw so much of it.

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It was a joy.

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14 hours of high-quality film.

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Indeed it was.

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Since then, Geraldine has hardly been off our screens

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as a leading lady in everything from star-studded drama

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to classy, period pieces, and even the odd iconic comedy role.

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Today, she's still at the cutting edge,

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starring in the recent Emmy award-winning series Utopia.

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Her CV is simply stacked with too many goodies to remember.

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What was that play we did?

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Over There, Over Here.

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Over There?

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-Turning Over.

-Turning...

-SHE GIGGLES

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Turning to Charles,

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he too has played down the years with impressive range and bearing.

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He's portrayed dashing young bucks, stately patriarchs,

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and bloodcurdling villains

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with skill and relish to delight audiences everywhere.

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He's recently been lauded for his terrifying turn

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as the tyrannical Tywin Lannister in global megahit Game Of Thrones.

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Today, these two are driving a marvellous 1965 Mercedes 220.

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It was manufactured before seat belts were mandatory,

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and hence they aren't buckled up. Got it?

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-It reminds me of my wild youth.

-Oh, does it?

-Not having a seat belt.

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Did you have a wild youth, Gerald?

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-Some would say.

-You weren't thrown out of school, were you?

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-Several times. Three times.

-Were you really?

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-My father refused to have me home, so they had to keep me.

-No.

-Yes.

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Anyway...

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I say!

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Joining these two troopers on this trip

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are a pair of antiques auctioneers in full voice -

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Will Axon and Natasha Raskin.

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It's nice to meet a thesp, isn't it?

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Do you think you'll refine your accent a wee bit?

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Because I'm already doing it.

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-You're already going Rada.

-The warm-up.

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# La-la-la-la-la. #

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Don't give the day job up, Natasha.

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These two are piloting a 1970 Triumph TR6.

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Oh, you're handling this Triumph beautifully.

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-Thank you for saying so.

-Beautifully!

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With £400 to spend,

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we kick off today's shopping in Tetbury, Gloucestershire,

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and aim for an auction in Rayleigh in Essex.

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Now, here we are in south Gloucestershire,

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-off to spend some money.

-Yes, indeed.

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With that in mind, it's time for celebrities to meet ex...

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Oh, Lordy!

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Will!

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What is happening? Oh, my days!

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What have you done? I was saying you were driving it so nicely.

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-I don't want to touch it.

-Hang on, I'm going to open it.

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Oh, dear!

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Right. That's the engine.

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He's brilliant, isn't he? OK. Time for some shoe leather, I think.

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We'd better start walking.

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You lead the way. I don't have a clue how to get there.

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What time do you call this?

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Tash broke the car.

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It wasn't me. Believe me.

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-It wasn't me.

-Really?

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So nice to meet you.

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-How do you do?

-How are you?

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Nice to meet you as well.

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Now they've finally united,

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they've already decided that Geraldine will pair up with Will

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and Charles with Natasha,

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and the latter is nabbing the only remaining car.

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I'm going to have to try and blag some alternative mode of transport.

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-GERALDINE:

-I saw a bus.

-A bus will do.

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-NATASHA:

-Will, I feel so sorry for you. This car is lovely.

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I'm sorry, Geraldine, to turf you out.

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-GERALDINE:

-That's all right.

-See you later.

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Bye. Bye.

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Come on, then. We'll walk in their tracks.

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So, Charles and Natasha set sail...

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I've known Geraldine for quite some time now.

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In fact, honestly, she's one of my oldest friends.

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She's the most delightful woman.

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..while Geraldine and Will are rather stuck in port.

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Seriously? A Jag?

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Yes, but we can't just get in a car.

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Luckily, at the local crazy golf course,

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generous Jag owner Peter will give them a lift.

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Thanks, Peter.

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They're finally on the road.

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Meanwhile, Charles and Natasha have arrived

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in the town of Tetbury and are ready to shop.

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They're heading into Top Banana Antiques Mall...

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Hoping it lives up to its name. Are you ready?

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Well, as ready as I'll ever be.

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..where dealer Julian will greet them.

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-Hello, Julian.

-Aha! Nice to meet you.

-And you.

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Nice to meet you too.

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Shall we start on the shelves where we can actually pick some stuff up

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and have a good fondle?

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Very good idea, darling.

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I'm going to get this open so you can fondle in here too, OK?

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Oh, fantastic!

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I knew we'd come to the right place.

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-Right. OK.

-An awful lot of fondling is going on.

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Hey! I say.

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First they're going to scour the place.

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Ah! Natasha's found something.

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Having played so many wonderful, authoritative parts,

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look what's behind you!

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Look at that hat box!

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It's wonderful. It looks wooden.

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-Oh, it's tin.

-Hold my glasses.

-I will.

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It's pretty unusual, isn't it?

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-Let's face it.

-Let's see. Is there a hat inside?

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-It would be so nice if there were. No.

-There's no hat inside.

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It's a tin for a naval officer's bicorn hat,

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probably dating from the 19th century.

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Charles is quite keen on naval history,

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so that's piqued his fancy.

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It's a quirky thing, isn't it?

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It is, isn't it? You're absolutely right.

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We'll come back to that.

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-It's cool, isn't it?

-Well spotted!

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Cool! They're off to a good start.

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But what's that Charles has spied now?

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Those silver blocks, what...?

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These are just blocks of silver, then?

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They're ingots, aren't they?

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Just blocks that have been hallmarked.

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They are quite wearable.

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But as objects...

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I've never seen these things before.

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But then... Then again, I'm just an actor.

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An actor with an eye for antiques, Charles.

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It's an engraved silver ingot, hallmarked for 1977.

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On the ticket, £24.

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-Polished up.

-Yeah.

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Polished up, they're rather pretty things, aren't they?

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-Don't you think?

-They are rather smart.

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I'm going to talk to Julian about them.

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You do your stuff. I can't wait to see you in action.

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-I'll talk to him now.

-Do it. Why not?

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Oh, Julian!

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What's the best price you can do for me?

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I reckon we'll do it for £18.

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For £18?

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£18.

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I was hoping you might do it for something like 12.

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12! So, £15, we have a deal.

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-He's playing hard.

-Oh, cool!

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-Thanks, Julian. Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much, Julian.

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That's their first buy sealed.

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This has all the hallmarks of a promising day's shopping.

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NARRATOR CHUCKLES

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Meanwhile, Geraldine and Will are being ferried

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in generous bystander Peter's Jag.

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We have landed on our feet.

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Peter, you're very kind to give us a lift.

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And Will's coming out as a fan

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of one of Geraldine's recently celebrated roles

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in dark conspiracy drama Utopia.

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I mean, Utopia, it was an amazing piece of television.

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I'd be interested to see how you, sort of, saw it.

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It was extraordinary. For me, it all starts from the script.

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I read that and was completely hooked by the writing.

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It was so unusual and so mysterious.

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So shocking.

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All that is great. It's really good fun.

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There's more fun back in Tetbury,

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where Charles and Natasha are still combing through

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their first shop's ample stock.

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All manner of things in here.

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But what's this Charles has alighted upon?

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It's 2016.

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It's 100 years...

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since the Battle of the Somme, 1916.

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And we are rightly being reminded of that...

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bloody, horrible battle.

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It's a scrapbook containing photographs

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of combatants in the First World War.

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Charles is intrigued by it.

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However, let us see what Natasha thinks about it.

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She who must be obeyed.

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I'll say!

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-Natasha.

-Charles.

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What have you got?

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Well, have a look at that.

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OK. The Great War Press Cuttings.

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Yeah. Well, no, there are no cuttings in it,

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but there are these photographs.

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Oh, look at these.

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Hold on, are they actual...

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-They are, it looks like...

-Well, they're photographs, yeah.

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Whether they're photographs of photographs...

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They could well be.

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XXXI do, Charles.

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It looks as though the photographs

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might be commercially produced reprints.

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The book probably dates from the inter-war period.

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It's got £48 on it.

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Indeed. Well, I think, you know, we'd have to...

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we'd have to do better than that.

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With one book set aside,

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Charles is revealing himself to be a bit of a bibliophile.

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I've no idea what this is...

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..but it looks as if it might be rather lovely.

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Ooh, look at that!

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It's an illustrated copy of the epic poem Evangeline

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by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

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This limited edition was published in the late 19th century.

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Aesthetically, I think that's really rather beautiful.

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When I was at art school I did typography and photography,

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and...erm...

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as a piece of book design, it's really rather lovely.

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I bet this is probably an eye-watering amount.

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Oh, I don't know. 40 quid...

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Again, I'm going to talk to Natasha, I'm afraid.

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She's my guiding light.

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What catches my eye is that each book plate,

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one of the really nice ones, if we get to this, by Frank Dicksee...

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-Are you familiar with that name?

-No, I'm not, but I hope you are.

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So proper Victorian artist, really...

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Paintings like La Belle Dame Sans Merci.

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Easy for you to say!

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Really evocative, stirring subject matter

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in a kind of Pre-Raphaelite style.

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She knows her stuff, doesn't she?

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That she does.

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But they've now assembled a large pile of items they like -

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the World War I scrapbook,

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the edition of Evangeline,

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and the bicorn hat tin they saw earlier.

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So, with their heads set on a hard haggle, off they go to Julian.

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Ticket price on all that is £173.

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To cut not too fine a point on it...

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Mm-hmm.

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..I'd like to leave this shop...

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-With some pennies back?

-..with that, that, that...

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..and I'd like some change from 100.

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Oh, my God! Now, that is hard work.

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Listen, I've been doing maths rapidly

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and re-working and shaving and chipping and re-doing and re-adding.

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I reckon 140 quid.

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How about 115 and we leave the shop?

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120 and we do a deal now.

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Go on. Thank you very much, thank you.

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Phew!

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With full use of Charles's trademarked steely gaze,

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a deal is struck.

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But while they're paying up...

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Let's call it 130.

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Charles, Charles...

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130, deal.

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Oh, Charles!

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I could keep lunch in there, couldn't I?

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You certainly could.

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Meanwhile, in that lovely Jag,

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Geraldine and Will have travelled about 20 miles,

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and Geraldine is filling Will in on a little of her family background.

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My parents were both in the medical profession.

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They met in a hospital.

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My mum worked at Guy's during the war.

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As luck would have it, this morning, they're heading for a place

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that can shed a bit of light on the fascinating early history

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of British public medicine -

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the Mechanics' Institute of Swindon's Railway Village.

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They are indeed driving to the town of Swindon,

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where they're meeting Daniel Rose,

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chair of the Mechanics' Institute Trust.

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The Railway Village here was built in the 1840s

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to house the workforce employed in the huge Swindon workshops

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of the Great Western Railway.

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The railway was one of the grand marvels

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of the Victorian industrial age,

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designed and built by the most famous of our engineers,

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Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

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Was this all Brunel's idea?

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It was Brunel's design that laid out the Railway Village

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that we see today and all of these buildings around us.

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Yeah.

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It was the GWR that brought the workforce to Swindon.

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The railway brought the people.

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That's right, and with all those people that arrived

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to work in the railway works, they needed somewhere to live.

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They needed facilities and recreational opportunities.

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The jobs created by GWR's workshops attracted people

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to this previously quiet area,

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but the cottages of the railway village

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were soon under great strain.

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Hundreds and then thousands of workers descended on this area,

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but there just wasn't enough supply of housing.

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There was meant to be 300 cottages that Brunel was meant to build

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in this area. People recorded in their diaries at the time

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and started to vote with their feet the fact that

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it was a pretty dull place and wasn't a very healthy place, either.

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There was a real risk that Swindon would fail

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and it was thanks to the efforts of the workers themselves

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that saved the place and turned Swindon into a success.

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The Mechanics' Institution was formed in 1844

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for the benefit and enlightenment of those employed by the GWR.

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In the coming years, it would provide all the necessary facilities

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for New Swindon to become a thriving community.

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Medical care, entertainment and education

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were all eventually provided for the workforce.

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Who funded all these community endeavours?

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The workers themselves came together.

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The Great Western Railway gave them the land,

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but then they had to raise funds, so they sold shares,

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but essentially the workers themselves built and paid for

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and governed the organisation of the building.

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-Did they have a theatre?

-They did.

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The theatre was upstairs in the Mechanics' Institution.

0:15:480:15:51

You can see it here today. It was built in 1854.

0:15:510:15:53

It's a beautiful building.

0:15:530:15:54

And that was really the centre of Swindon social life.

0:15:540:15:59

Today the building is boarded up,

0:15:590:16:01

but there are proposals to redevelop it.

0:16:010:16:03

Over the years, even greater facilities were provided

0:16:030:16:06

to the Swindon works employees.

0:16:060:16:08

Here, a medical fund society brought a level of health care

0:16:080:16:11

that had never before been enjoyed by ordinary working people.

0:16:110:16:15

So, all these little rooms, what are they?

0:16:150:16:18

Are they different treatment rooms?

0:16:180:16:20

Yeah, so there was a range of different therapies available

0:16:200:16:22

in this building, including the swimming baths

0:16:220:16:26

and the Turkish baths, but also a range of medical care.

0:16:260:16:29

There was doctors, there was a dentistry

0:16:290:16:31

-and there was also a range of other therapies.

-All for free?

0:16:310:16:34

Yes, all for free because people contributed

0:16:340:16:36

to the Medical Fund Society through their wages.

0:16:360:16:38

These innovations at Swindon continued into the 20th century,

0:16:380:16:42

and when the idea of a National Health Service was raised,

0:16:420:16:45

its architects knew just where to look.

0:16:450:16:48

Of course, it was then in the 1940s,

0:16:480:16:51

when Nye Bevan visited Swindon during the formation

0:16:510:16:55

and the ideas of the NHS,

0:16:550:16:56

that came here and studied the Medical Fund Society

0:16:560:16:59

and took inspiration from what happened here

0:16:590:17:02

as part of the blueprint that he put together

0:17:020:17:04

for a National Health Service.

0:17:040:17:06

So, the vision of the Mechanics' Institution

0:17:060:17:09

helped to provide universal care for the whole of the country

0:17:090:17:12

and this building is still caring for the people of Swindon today.

0:17:120:17:16

The building is still fully operational,

0:17:160:17:18

which is an amazing thing.

0:17:180:17:19

There are therapists in here,

0:17:190:17:20

so there are chiropractors and osteopaths and physiotherapists,

0:17:200:17:23

that kind of thing, along with just people going for a swim.

0:17:230:17:27

Now, Charles and Natasha are motoring to the town of Cirencester

0:17:280:17:32

in Gloucestershire. They're heading into Cirencester Antiques Centre,

0:17:320:17:35

a very cosmopolitan choice.

0:17:350:17:37

Here we are - Cirencester.

0:17:400:17:42

Change here for Moscow, Stockholm and Paris.

0:17:420:17:45

Cirencester, yeah!

0:17:450:17:47

OK, you ready to buy some more stuff?

0:17:470:17:50

-Indeed.

-OK, so am I.

0:17:500:17:52

And they're straight off and browsing.

0:17:520:17:55

What do you have?

0:17:580:17:59

Is that a wee frame? Oh!

0:18:000:18:02

It's a cute one for all the family.

0:18:030:18:05

It is, isn't it?

0:18:050:18:07

Oh, and look, it's actually quite theatrical

0:18:070:18:10

-because it's got curtains.

-It is.

0:18:100:18:11

Let's see it up.

0:18:110:18:12

Very nice!

0:18:130:18:15

And then reveal to us...

0:18:170:18:19

-That's rather nice, isn't it?

-It is cute.

0:18:210:18:23

It probably dates from the early or mid 20th century

0:18:230:18:27

and has a ticket price of £42.

0:18:270:18:30

Hmm, we really want it for about 15-20.

0:18:300:18:32

We do, darling, we do.

0:18:320:18:33

Maybe even less.

0:18:330:18:35

But what has Natasha spotted now?

0:18:350:18:37

Maybe we could beef up our lots a wee bit,

0:18:370:18:39

that nice press cuttings folder,

0:18:390:18:41

maybe we could add a little bit of trench art to it, perhaps.

0:18:410:18:44

Yeah, yeah.

0:18:440:18:45

Trench art is work produced by soldiers in the First World War,

0:18:450:18:49

usually items crafted from materials readily available

0:18:490:18:52

on the battlefield, like these empty shell casings.

0:18:520:18:56

-OK.

-So, they're quite naive and quite sweet and genuine.

0:18:560:18:59

And also they're cheap.

0:18:590:19:01

They are cheap.

0:19:010:19:03

-HE MOUTHS

-Yeah!

0:19:030:19:05

They are, at £18 the pair.

0:19:050:19:07

So, they've certainly got their sights on those,

0:19:070:19:09

but there's another battle coming as Will and Geraldine are here too.

0:19:090:19:14

Watch out!

0:19:140:19:15

Go on, after you.

0:19:150:19:16

Get in!

0:19:180:19:19

And look who's waiting in the wings.

0:19:190:19:22

-Uh-oh!

-Have we been spotted?

0:19:220:19:24

Oh, that's a good question.

0:19:240:19:26

Look at him. Look, he's found something, he's found something.

0:19:260:19:29

Let's say hello, come on. Let's go and wind them up.

0:19:290:19:31

-NATASHA:

-Hello!

-Hello!

0:19:310:19:33

-WILL:

-What are you hiding?

-Nothing.

0:19:330:19:35

-Absolutely nothing.

-Are you staying upstairs, are you going downstairs?

0:19:350:19:38

Yeah, we've done downstairs. Have you been...?

0:19:380:19:40

We'll go downstairs, then, in that case.

0:19:400:19:41

Yes.

0:19:410:19:42

That's a terrible limp you've got there, sir!

0:19:420:19:45

I know, it's such a shame. He's had it all day.

0:19:450:19:47

He did have something behind his back.

0:19:470:19:48

You two'd better stop spying on the opposition and get browsing.

0:19:480:19:52

-Glasses.

-You like glass?

-I love glass.

0:19:520:19:55

-Hmm.

-Will?

-Yes?

0:19:560:19:59

See, that's a very interesting pattern on that.

0:19:590:20:03

-Is that Torquay Ware?

-Well, it must be.

0:20:030:20:05

-Yeah, Torquay.

-Isn't that unusual?

0:20:070:20:08

I've never seen that pattern before.

0:20:080:20:10

You do know your stuff, Geraldine. Impressive!

0:20:100:20:13

-It's quite pretty, isn't it?

-It is quite pretty. It's £8.

0:20:130:20:16

-It's got potential.

-OK.

0:20:160:20:18

Shall we leave it here? Yeah, hide it behind a plate.

0:20:180:20:21

You're learning quick.

0:20:210:20:24

Leave it with me.

0:20:240:20:25

We shall.

0:20:250:20:26

Devon Pottery.

0:20:270:20:29

Why do I keep honing in on this stuff?

0:20:290:20:31

Is it just cos I know it?

0:20:310:20:32

-Well, I think we've got to buy a piece of Devon pottery.

-33.

-33 quid?

0:20:320:20:36

Another piece of pottery from the West Country,

0:20:360:20:38

this one made in the Devon town of Dartmouth.

0:20:380:20:42

This jug could be paired with a beaker to make a job lot

0:20:420:20:45

from the sunny south-west.

0:20:450:20:47

They're building up quite a haul, these two.

0:20:470:20:49

But elsewhere, Charles and Natasha are still on the hunt.

0:20:510:20:54

-What's that?

-I don't know.

0:20:540:20:55

Is that some sort of...? Is that not for tickets on a bus?

0:20:550:20:58

-It is.

-Is that a conductor's ticket machine?

0:20:580:21:00

Give him your money, the ticket comes out,

0:21:000:21:03

and I guess it goes like that and out comes your ticket.

0:21:030:21:08

The ticket machine probably dates from the 1960s,

0:21:080:21:11

and there's £69 on the ticket.

0:21:110:21:14

There's the ticket thing, look.

0:21:140:21:16

-Oh, look, it even comes with a spool of paper.

-That goes in there.

0:21:160:21:19

-Ooh, I say!

-Oh, that's cool.

0:21:190:21:21

Now, that's got my juices running, OK?

0:21:210:21:24

That's what I wanted to hear.

0:21:240:21:26

There's a thought.

0:21:260:21:27

These two also have the little picture frame

0:21:270:21:29

and the pair of trench art vases in mind.

0:21:290:21:32

Shopkeeper Will intends phoning the three dealers.

0:21:320:21:35

First on the blower, Nicky, who owns the £42 picture frame.

0:21:350:21:39

And I'd love to know what your very, very, very best price would be.

0:21:390:21:44

30 quid?

0:21:450:21:47

All right, that's a deal.

0:21:490:21:50

All right.

0:21:520:21:54

Thank you very much, Nicky, thank you.

0:21:540:21:56

Bye.

0:21:560:21:57

-OK.

-She must like you. She doesn't normally go that low.

0:21:570:22:00

Oh, how good is that?

0:22:000:22:02

Next up, Neil, who owns the pair of trench art vases

0:22:020:22:05

with a ticket price of £18.

0:22:050:22:08

What's the very best you can do for that?

0:22:080:22:10

How about half price, nine quid?

0:22:100:22:12

Sorry?

0:22:140:22:15

Is that Raj, did you say?

0:22:160:22:18

No, you're speaking to Charles.

0:22:200:22:22

Charles Dance, my name is.

0:22:220:22:23

Hello!

0:22:250:22:26

You're a gentleman!

0:22:290:22:31

Thank you very, very much indeed, Neil.

0:22:310:22:33

Thank you. Bye-bye.

0:22:350:22:37

£9? £9.

0:22:380:22:40

How good is that? Well done, Raj!

0:22:400:22:42

Yes! Yes, "Is that Raj?"

0:22:420:22:45

Yes.

0:22:450:22:46

A case of mistaken identity notwithstanding,

0:22:460:22:50

that's another winner.

0:22:500:22:51

Now, what about the ticket machine, which had £69 on its own ticket?

0:22:510:22:56

Can I make you an offer?

0:22:560:22:57

Somewhere between 35 and 40.

0:22:590:23:01

Would you, really?

0:23:040:23:05

You're a gentleman. Thank you very much.

0:23:050:23:08

Thank you. Bye-bye.

0:23:080:23:11

-40.

-£40, well done!

0:23:110:23:13

Charles's mellifluous tones make that a phone haggling hat-trick.

0:23:130:23:18

We have got quite a swag bag, Charles.

0:23:180:23:21

A swag bag!

0:23:210:23:22

Hear him roar!

0:23:240:23:25

They've got that lot for a total of £79,

0:23:250:23:28

but Geraldine and Will are still on the hunt.

0:23:280:23:31

Listen to Charles Dance down there, bartering away.

0:23:310:23:36

I can hear him, you know.

0:23:360:23:37

I DEMAND I have this for nothing!

0:23:370:23:39

I think he's enjoying himself.

0:23:390:23:40

I'm enjoying myself, but I'm just feeling a little bit

0:23:400:23:43

that I should have committed my cash.

0:23:430:23:47

And on that note...

0:23:470:23:49

-Do you like silver?

-Yes, I do like silver.

0:23:500:23:52

I remember, in India, all the silver jewellery.

0:23:520:23:54

If we can find a bit of Indian silver,

0:23:540:23:56

perhaps we could go with that.

0:23:560:23:57

And dealer Brian might have just the thing to remind Geraldine

0:23:570:24:01

of her Indian adventures.

0:24:010:24:03

-Is that Indian?

-Yes, very Indian.

-Oh, yes!

0:24:030:24:07

It's a little silver embossed box with a ticket price of £78.

0:24:070:24:13

I've dropped the price, just like Brian's going to.

0:24:130:24:16

Put that to one side for us.

0:24:160:24:18

-OK.

-And we can always battle it out.

0:24:180:24:20

That's a possibility,

0:24:200:24:22

but elsewhere, there's one more exotic item.

0:24:220:24:25

-That's nice.

-That's quite nice, that architectural carving.

0:24:250:24:28

What is it?

0:24:280:24:30

Mind your back. Mind your head.

0:24:300:24:33

Oh, Lordy!

0:24:330:24:34

It's an ornate carved lintel,

0:24:340:24:36

apparently hailing from a Moroccan riad, ticketed at £110.

0:24:360:24:40

Please stop picking it up, you're going to hurt yourself.

0:24:400:24:43

Well, I'm just having a look at it.

0:24:430:24:45

Yes, stop trying to lift that

0:24:450:24:46

and let's see if dealer Brian can lower some prices.

0:24:460:24:50

-Hi.

-Hi, Brian.

0:24:500:24:52

First up, the West Country pottery, ticketed at £41 combined.

0:24:520:24:57

Your very best price.

0:24:570:24:59

The very best, how about 30?

0:24:590:25:01

£30 for the two?

0:25:010:25:03

That's quite good, isn't it?

0:25:030:25:04

-It is quite good.

-It's not quite as good as 25 would be.

0:25:040:25:08

-That's not good, that's naughty.

-That's not good for you.

0:25:080:25:11

That's naughty!

0:25:110:25:12

But, hang on, we had the little silver box as well

0:25:120:25:16

you've got behind the counter, didn't we?

0:25:160:25:18

Yeah, I kept that for you.

0:25:180:25:19

-Yeah.

-In the catacombs I found this one, a lovely Chinese one.

0:25:190:25:24

-Oh, look out.

-And it's fine work on that.

0:25:240:25:28

That's a better finish, isn't it?

0:25:280:25:30

Now, that I like.

0:25:300:25:31

Yeah, more refined, better quality than perhaps the Indian piece.

0:25:310:25:37

I like the feel of that better than that.

0:25:370:25:40

-I like that.

-Do we have a price on that?

0:25:400:25:41

There isn't a price on it, which is slightly worrying.

0:25:410:25:44

That one's 85, but I can do it for 60 for you.

0:25:440:25:47

I think Brian has done us a good turn there,

0:25:490:25:53

so my part of the bargaining, I'm going to say yes at £60.

0:25:530:25:58

Brilliant, brilliant.

0:25:580:26:00

And what of the Moroccan carved lintel, priced at £110

0:26:000:26:03

and owned by a dealer off-site?

0:26:030:26:05

If he said it's 50 quid, I'd say we'd have it,

0:26:050:26:08

but that's a big ask.

0:26:080:26:10

That's a big ask, isn't it?

0:26:100:26:12

£50 is a big ask, isn't it?

0:26:120:26:14

Oh, wow, he's in a very good mood.

0:26:140:26:17

-55.

-Shall we go for it?

0:26:170:26:20

Let's go for it. We've got to, really.

0:26:200:26:22

Will you thank him very, very much?

0:26:220:26:23

Geraldine says thank you very much.

0:26:230:26:25

Brilliant, and Will.

0:26:250:26:26

So, those three lots combined are now offered for £145 in total,

0:26:260:26:32

but Will's got other ideas.

0:26:320:26:34

So, can we say 130 for...?

0:26:340:26:35

-Absolutely, yeah.

-Good heavens! Thank you.

0:26:350:26:37

-This man has been a godsend.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:26:370:26:40

What a deal!

0:26:400:26:41

And they've got everything they need in this shop too.

0:26:410:26:44

Well, we'll revert to type now.

0:26:440:26:46

You pay the man and I'll go and get the heavy things.

0:26:460:26:49

And with that, the curtain falls on a fabulous first day

0:26:490:26:53

on this road trip. Nighty-night, darlings!

0:26:530:26:56

But these players are such stuff as dreams are made of.

0:26:590:27:03

The morning greets them on the road and ready for more.

0:27:030:27:06

Did you have a good time yesterday?

0:27:060:27:08

I felt like a kid in a toy shop.

0:27:080:27:10

I absolutely loved it. You?

0:27:100:27:13

I think it was OK.

0:27:130:27:14

Thank God for Natasha.

0:27:140:27:16

Have you bought anything that might be a tiny bit risky?

0:27:160:27:20

Erm...

0:27:200:27:22

I think it's ALL a tiny bit risky!

0:27:220:27:26

You catch on quick, Charles!

0:27:260:27:28

And their devoted experts are moving too,

0:27:280:27:31

and in a replacement car.

0:27:310:27:33

Is that a 1970 Citroen DS20 I see?

0:27:330:27:36

I think it is.

0:27:360:27:37

Well, Will, bien fait, well done!

0:27:370:27:40

Where did you come across this French beauty?

0:27:400:27:43

Le Citroen!

0:27:430:27:44

Tres jolie!

0:27:440:27:46

So far, Charles and Natasha have amassed a whopping seven items -

0:27:460:27:49

the Great War scrapbook, the bicorn hat tin,

0:27:490:27:53

the volume of Evangeline,

0:27:530:27:55

the silver ingot, the pair of trench art vases,

0:27:550:27:58

the bus conductor's ticket machine, and the little picture frame.

0:27:580:28:02

Blimey!

0:28:020:28:03

They still have £191 left to spend.

0:28:030:28:07

While Geraldine and Will have gathered three lots -

0:28:080:28:11

the Moroccan lintel,

0:28:110:28:13

the Chinese silver box,

0:28:130:28:15

and the two pieces of West Country pottery.

0:28:150:28:17

They still have £270 in their pockets.

0:28:170:28:20

Oh, they look cool, don't they?

0:28:200:28:22

Look at that!

0:28:220:28:23

There they are.

0:28:230:28:24

Good morning!

0:28:240:28:25

OK, let's get this show on the road.

0:28:250:28:27

Don't ask.

0:28:270:28:28

Where exactly did you get that car, Will?

0:28:280:28:30

Now, Charles is reminiscing on his time

0:28:340:28:36

making the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie The Last Action Hero.

0:28:360:28:41

I was sat in the make-up room with F Murray Abraham,

0:28:410:28:45

who was also in the film,

0:28:450:28:47

and we were having possibly a rather pompous conversation

0:28:470:28:50

-about European art films, do you know?

-OK.

0:28:500:28:53

And Arnold came in on the back of it and he said...

0:28:530:28:56

-IMPERSONATING ARNOLD:

-"You know, you need the money you make in my films

0:28:560:28:59

"to make your art films."

0:28:590:29:01

He said, "You're absolutely right, Arnold."

0:29:010:29:04

And talk has turned to Hollywood in the other car too.

0:29:040:29:07

I did a film, a small bit in a film with Morgan Freeman.

0:29:070:29:10

-Wow.

-And I was beside myself.

0:29:100:29:12

-Starstruck.

-I was playing his lover.

0:29:120:29:15

And we had to have a love scene in a pile of hay.

0:29:150:29:19

He's such a wonderful man.

0:29:190:29:21

Mais oui.

0:29:210:29:23

This morning, these two are driving to Bath.

0:29:230:29:26

They've still got a whopping £270 to spend,

0:29:260:29:30

and they are strolling off to Bath Antiques.

0:29:300:29:32

-Hello.

-Welcome.

0:29:330:29:34

How do you do? I'm Geraldine.

0:29:340:29:36

Niceties concluded, time for a plan.

0:29:360:29:39

Shall we go round together or do you want to split up?

0:29:390:29:41

No, let's go round together.

0:29:410:29:43

-You shout if you see anything that catches your eye.

-I will.

0:29:450:29:49

-150?

-£150, no.

0:29:490:29:52

We don't know what we're looking for, do we?

0:29:520:29:54

We just want something that we like.

0:29:540:29:56

Something to jump out at us.

0:29:560:29:58

What's this big old thing?

0:29:580:30:00

Will seems to have lost Geraldine, but what's he found?

0:30:000:30:03

This has just caught my eye,

0:30:080:30:09

really just because it's big and impressive.

0:30:090:30:11

But just trying to ascertain if it's got any age to it.

0:30:110:30:15

Well, there's plenty of dust.

0:30:150:30:17

Just having a look for...

0:30:170:30:20

any wear on the foot.

0:30:200:30:22

It looks to have a little bit of wear, you know.

0:30:220:30:26

I mean, it's a big, impressive lot.

0:30:260:30:28

It's got a big, impressive ticket price too - £95.

0:30:280:30:32

Not signed anywhere, though, that's a shame.

0:30:330:30:35

Let's call in Geraldine.

0:30:350:30:37

-Oh, I was looking at that early on.

-Were you?

-Mmm.

0:30:370:30:39

It's obviously got a little bit of age to it.

0:30:390:30:41

Has it? Because that's what I...

0:30:410:30:43

I think so, because look,

0:30:430:30:44

do you see how you see these natural ripples

0:30:440:30:47

and then you've got these little air bubbles caught in it?

0:30:470:30:50

Time to talk money with Annette. Stand by, girl.

0:30:500:30:53

Ah!

0:30:530:30:54

Well, I've gone from the cellar, right back upstairs.

0:30:540:30:56

-Yeah?

-And right back down again?

0:30:560:30:58

And I've come back with this...

0:30:580:31:00

what I think is a rather nice glass centre bowl.

0:31:000:31:03

-Yes.

-It was tucked away upstairs...

0:31:030:31:06

-Yeah.

-..covered in dust...

0:31:060:31:08

-Yeah.

-..so it's obviously been there forever.

0:31:080:31:11

It's been there a while.

0:31:110:31:12

Price-wise, we would really need to be buying it

0:31:120:31:15

for as close to £20-£30 as we could.

0:31:150:31:18

OK, I'll phone Gill.

0:31:180:31:19

The vendor, Gill, isn't here today.

0:31:190:31:21

Fortunately, Annette has her on speed dial,

0:31:210:31:24

so over to you, Geraldine.

0:31:240:31:26

Hello, we've had a very good look round here,

0:31:260:31:28

and we're rather struck by your green glass bowl.

0:31:280:31:32

What are we asking?

0:31:320:31:33

-We're wondering if...

-25.

0:31:330:31:35

-..if you're prepared to accept 25.

-Yeah.

0:31:350:31:37

'So I would say, 28 and a half, you can have it.

0:31:370:31:41

-'And I have £28.50...'

-28 and a half.

0:31:410:31:44

-28 quid.

-28 and we sorted.

-I'm not faffing around with 50p.

0:31:440:31:47

We're sorted on 28.

0:31:470:31:49

Is that all right? Thank you, Gill.

0:31:490:31:53

An incredible discount on the dusty green bowl.

0:31:530:31:56

Well done, Geraldine.

0:31:560:31:57

I'll do the honours and carry the piece.

0:31:570:31:59

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Very nice to meet you, thanks a lot.

0:31:590:32:02

-Lovely to meet you.

-Thanks very much for your help.

0:32:020:32:04

-And you.

-Bye-bye.

-Bye.

0:32:040:32:05

Meanwhile, Charles and Natasha are aiming

0:32:060:32:09

for their first shop of the day.

0:32:090:32:10

I've got you at my right hand and I don't think we can fail.

0:32:100:32:14

That's the spirit!

0:32:140:32:16

This morning they are driving to Warminster,

0:32:160:32:19

but what are they going to find here?

0:32:190:32:21

Right. The object is to spend money.

0:32:210:32:25

Indeed it is. They're meeting dealer Laura. Hello.

0:32:250:32:28

Can I have a jelly baby?

0:32:280:32:29

Absolutely, go for it.

0:32:290:32:31

And with that little sweetener, they are on the hunt.

0:32:310:32:33

Intriguing, but who wants to buy it?

0:32:380:32:41

Sorry, forgive me.

0:32:440:32:46

Ha! There is one thing that has made an impression.

0:32:460:32:49

I haven't looked at the label, so I've no idea what this is.

0:32:510:32:56

It's very interesting, isn't it?

0:32:560:32:57

It's a bench that's been fashioned from a piece of farming equipment,

0:32:570:33:01

with a wooden top added.

0:33:010:33:03

The cast-iron base is Victorian.

0:33:030:33:05

1840s, circa 1840.

0:33:050:33:08

I think it says 1890s, Charles. You've forgot your glasses.

0:33:080:33:11

Honestly! If I believed you,

0:33:110:33:12

everything would be 50 years older than it was.

0:33:120:33:16

I know, Charles. The cheek.

0:33:160:33:18

I like it, I love it.

0:33:180:33:19

-You do?

-It is so cool, I think it is exactly...

0:33:190:33:22

Do you like it at 349 quid?

0:33:220:33:24

No, I don't. But I like its style.

0:33:240:33:27

I'm not sure about...

0:33:270:33:28

..the iron thing.

0:33:310:33:32

The iron what, Charles?

0:33:320:33:34

I have faith in the material, is what I have faith in,

0:33:340:33:38

and the fact that the Victorians just cast everything in iron.

0:33:380:33:40

But more importantly, do you have faith that it will sell?

0:33:400:33:44

-Yes. I mean, it's a cool thing.

-You do?

0:33:440:33:46

Oh, for sure it would sell.

0:33:460:33:47

That hefty ticket says it's owned by a dealer called Debs.

0:33:470:33:51

What man or a woman is Debs, Laura?

0:33:510:33:53

My mother.

0:33:530:33:55

-Oh!

-Oh, that's Debs! That Debs, that Debs.

0:33:550:33:58

And while Laura has a confab with her mum, they search on.

0:33:580:34:02

Oh, it's open.

0:34:020:34:04

Oh, Charles!

0:34:040:34:06

-When is a door not a door?

-I don't know.

0:34:060:34:08

-When it's A JAR.

-Oh!

0:34:080:34:10

Oh, the old ones are the best, Charles!

0:34:100:34:13

And this pair of hallmarked silver vases have some age too.

0:34:130:34:17

They're marked for 1904.

0:34:170:34:19

OK, let's have a look. These are typically Edwardian.

0:34:190:34:21

You have a look at that one and I'll have a look at that one.

0:34:210:34:23

At 160 quid.

0:34:230:34:25

Oh, 160?

0:34:250:34:26

-Yeah.

-OK, well...

-Well, reduced!

0:34:260:34:29

-Reduced.

-Reduced to 160?

-Reduced from 200.

0:34:290:34:31

These are not rare. These are stylish.

0:34:310:34:35

-So...

-Sorry, what did you say?

0:34:350:34:36

Hello!

0:34:360:34:38

Speak up, Natasha.

0:34:380:34:40

So I'd be looking for about half price,

0:34:400:34:43

-and I'd be looking for you to work your magic.

-OK.

0:34:430:34:46

Laura will try to contact the dealer who owns those.

0:34:460:34:50

But they've two pricy buys in mind and only £191 left.

0:34:500:34:55

It turns out Laura's mum, Debs, is in fact nearby.

0:34:550:34:59

Very close by, but hiding, yes.

0:34:590:35:02

Could she come out of hiding? Can I have a word with Mum?

0:35:020:35:04

-I'm sure you can. I shall go and see if I can pull her out.

-Fabulous.

0:35:040:35:07

Her mum, she's heard that Charles Dance is coming

0:35:070:35:10

and she's seen you playing these horrible villains,

0:35:100:35:12

and you've scared her into hiding!

0:35:120:35:14

No, I haven't, not at all.

0:35:140:35:16

-She's out there making herself a cup of tea.

-Treat it as a role.

0:35:160:35:19

Lull her into a false sense of security.

0:35:190:35:23

No, I shall lull her into a sense of security,

0:35:230:35:25

not a false sense of security.

0:35:250:35:26

-Oh, right, OK.

-I'll do my damnedest, anyway.

0:35:260:35:29

-Oh, there she is.

-There we go.

0:35:300:35:32

Oh, dear.

0:35:320:35:33

He doesn't bite, Mum.

0:35:330:35:35

-Hello, Debs, how are you?

-I'm Debs, pleased to meet you.

0:35:350:35:37

How very nice to see you.

0:35:370:35:38

God, he's smooth.

0:35:380:35:39

Time for a chat about that bench. Debs has priced it at £349.

0:35:390:35:44

I'm being really cheeky now.

0:35:440:35:46

Go on, then. Try me.

0:35:460:35:48

Um...

0:35:480:35:49

Can I have that for 85 quid?

0:35:500:35:52

You never straighten your hair, I hope, do you?

0:35:520:35:55

-No.

-Well, do you know, so many women do.

0:35:550:35:57

I know they spend hours with straighteners

0:35:570:35:59

getting the fantastic waves out of their hair, and you don't do it.

0:35:590:36:04

Don't ever straighten your hair.

0:36:040:36:05

-I won't.

-Brilliant.

0:36:050:36:07

Anyway, back...

0:36:070:36:10

I think that might have worked.

0:36:100:36:11

He is good, isn't he?

0:36:110:36:12

So, can we shake on 85 quid?

0:36:120:36:14

-As it's you.

-I owe you, all right?

0:36:170:36:18

I had a line in Game Of Thrones -

0:36:180:36:20

the Lannisters always pay their debts.

0:36:200:36:23

-And now...

-Good luck with it.

0:36:240:36:26

-..you are indebted to Debs.

-I shall come back...

0:36:260:36:28

Thank you, Debs! Very kind.

0:36:280:36:30

But now Laura's got the dealer who owns the silver vases on the blower.

0:36:300:36:34

Hello, Heather, it's Charles Dance, how are you?

0:36:340:36:36

'Hello, I'm very well, thank you.'

0:36:370:36:39

Good. OK.

0:36:390:36:40

What we're trying to do is leave this shop

0:36:400:36:43

with our shopping finished.

0:36:430:36:45

So I want to give you what we have remaining

0:36:450:36:48

in our hot little pocket, you see?

0:36:480:36:51

Am I pushing my luck to offer you 100?

0:36:510:36:54

You're an absolute angel, Heather.

0:36:540:36:56

Thank you very, very much indeed,

0:36:570:37:00

and thank you for being patient with us.

0:37:000:37:03

Enjoy the rest of your day.

0:37:030:37:05

'And you. Enjoy your shopping.'

0:37:050:37:07

All right, my darling, thank you.

0:37:070:37:08

Another devastatingly charming haggle from Charles

0:37:080:37:12

means they've spent all but £6 of their budget.

0:37:120:37:15

Isn't that fantastic?

0:37:150:37:16

May I? Thank you.

0:37:160:37:18

And they're wandering onwards.

0:37:180:37:20

I'm in complete awe of you, Charles Dance.

0:37:200:37:23

That was amazing!

0:37:230:37:24

Back in beautiful Bath, Geraldine and Will have just finished lunch.

0:37:260:37:30

All right for some, eh?

0:37:300:37:32

-That was delicious.

-Hang on a minute, what's going on here?

0:37:320:37:35

All right, lads?

0:37:350:37:37

What's going on here? You don't often see one of these

0:37:370:37:39

in the middle of the street. So what was the plan with this?

0:37:390:37:41

Well, I was going to put it in the office.

0:37:410:37:43

We've got an antique office... The antique office.

0:37:430:37:45

-Yeah?

-It's an old office, but it's packed full of antiques.

0:37:450:37:49

And this works quite well in there, but unfortunately, it won't fit.

0:37:490:37:53

This sounds like an opportunity.

0:37:530:37:55

A 19th-century French escritoire...

0:37:560:37:59

..seems to be going begging, rather.

0:38:010:38:03

We're on an Antiques Road Trip

0:38:030:38:05

and we are looking for things to buy.

0:38:050:38:07

Jeremy here has got this grand beast from a dealer nearby.

0:38:070:38:11

-How much was it?

-700 quid.

0:38:110:38:14

But since then... Which was quite good!

0:38:140:38:16

But since then, I've damaged the front...

0:38:160:38:17

-Ah!

-..by the front falling open, and also,

0:38:170:38:20

I think there's a little bit of live woodworm.

0:38:200:38:23

What do you reckon? We could help this man out, couldn't we?

0:38:230:38:26

Well, we haven't quite got anything like 700.

0:38:260:38:29

We haven't got 700 quid. Would you take 230 for it?

0:38:290:38:32

-Yeah, go on. Saves me packing it back in the van.

-Really?

-Really?

0:38:330:38:36

Really?

0:38:360:38:38

..French Empire stuff anyway. So, go on, then, go on. 230.

0:38:380:38:41

-Hey!

-What have we done?

0:38:410:38:44

-Thank you.

-I wasn't expecting that.

0:38:440:38:46

-It's all right.

-It's a deal.

0:38:460:38:47

A most unexpected alfresco buy, or al-desko buy.

0:38:470:38:52

Pay the man.

0:38:520:38:53

Oh, look. I've actually left myself a tenner.

0:38:530:38:56

-We need that for...

-But I need that for this afternoon.

0:38:560:38:59

Check your pockets, Will, you actually have £12 left.

0:38:590:39:02

-That's absolutely amazing.

-Thanks for that.

0:39:020:39:04

-Amazing.

-That's hilarious.

0:39:040:39:06

I'm not sure I just did that, did we?

0:39:060:39:08

You jolly well did.

0:39:080:39:10

Now, whilst motoring to their next stop,

0:39:100:39:13

Charles is filling Natasha in on his childhood.

0:39:130:39:15

I was brought up in Plymouth.

0:39:150:39:17

I was brought up by the sea.

0:39:170:39:19

It's very much part of my blood, I need to be by the sea at times.

0:39:190:39:24

I actually thought about joining the Navy.

0:39:240:39:27

So, they are driving to the environs of the village of Ilchester

0:39:270:39:32

and flying towards the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm Museum...

0:39:320:39:36

-Look, they saved a space for us and everything.

-Fabulous.

0:39:360:39:40

..where they are meeting curator Dave Morris.

0:39:400:39:43

Hello. This is Natasha.

0:39:430:39:45

This enormous hangar houses an impressive collection

0:39:450:39:49

of over 90 aircraft, which tell the story of the Royal Navy's adventures

0:39:490:39:53

in the skies.

0:39:530:39:55

Although you might naturally think of our naval forces

0:39:550:39:58

as being sea-bound, the Navy has, in fact,

0:39:580:40:00

been developing aircraft and flying missions for more than a century,

0:40:000:40:04

and Charles, for one, can't wait to find out more.

0:40:040:40:07

Tell me, how and why did the Navy take to the air?

0:40:070:40:11

One of the great necessities at sea

0:40:110:40:13

is to be able to see over the horizon,

0:40:130:40:15

so the Navy's been experimenting with tethered kites

0:40:150:40:18

and tethered man-lifting balloons for many, many years

0:40:180:40:21

in a bid to try and get that advantage

0:40:210:40:23

of looking over the horizon.

0:40:230:40:25

How many years, though?

0:40:250:40:26

-From the early 1900s.

-Really?

0:40:260:40:29

As soon as kites and balloons are being developed enough to lift a man

0:40:290:40:33

and think usefully about that,

0:40:330:40:34

the Navy starts to become interested in flying.

0:40:340:40:37

These early experiments with kites and balloons

0:40:370:40:39

showed the Navy what advantages aerial capability could offer

0:40:390:40:43

to the fleet, and in 1903, one great innovation

0:40:430:40:46

blew those possibilities sky-high.

0:40:460:40:49

The aeroplane comes along in 1903.

0:40:490:40:51

It's the first time a man has used powered, controlled flight,

0:40:510:40:54

and the Navy takes an immediate interest.

0:40:540:40:56

It can move away from the ship several miles and rove around,

0:40:560:41:01

pick up information, spot weather, spot landfall, use it tactically,

0:41:010:41:05

even begin to think about using it for search and rescue.

0:41:050:41:07

The plane behind them is a very early example of a naval aircraft.

0:41:070:41:12

Did a plane like that sit on the top deck of a battleship?

0:41:120:41:15

-Pretty much, yes.

-Really?

0:41:150:41:18

But a plane like that needs

0:41:180:41:20

quite a lot of metres to take off, doesn't it?

0:41:200:41:23

Exactly. And this is what they were learning fast,

0:41:230:41:26

as they were beginning to look at taking aeroplanes

0:41:260:41:29

and using them for the first time -

0:41:290:41:31

the platforms, the structures, the takeoff platforms

0:41:310:41:34

-were incredibly small.

-Yeah.

-Very precarious, very dangerous.

0:41:340:41:36

-Yeah.

-And they were relying as much on the ship steaming into wind -

0:41:360:41:41

that would just about get an aircraft airborne

0:41:410:41:43

in a very short distance.

0:41:430:41:45

-I don't like the "just about", do you?

-No.

0:41:450:41:47

If I was a pilot on that plane and somebody said,

0:41:470:41:49

"Well, you can just about take off..."

0:41:490:41:52

-Wow.

-They were learning fast that flying from ships was possible,

0:41:520:41:56

-but very, very dangerous.

-Yeah.

0:41:560:41:58

From the Navy's first hazardous forays into launching planes at sea,

0:41:580:42:02

they quickly began to develop more advanced technologies.

0:42:020:42:05

The experimental age is over,

0:42:050:42:07

aircraft are now needed and being used, of course, for war.

0:42:070:42:11

This is the beginning of World War I.

0:42:110:42:13

-Right.

-This is typical of one of the Sopwith aircraft

0:42:130:42:15

that would have been used by the Royal Naval Air Service

0:42:150:42:18

during World War I.

0:42:180:42:19

And straight away, lots of things are changing.

0:42:190:42:22

It's got more purpose, it's got a better engine.

0:42:220:42:26

The whole design has become more compact.

0:42:260:42:28

Yeah. And these floats mean that it can land and take off on water?

0:42:280:42:32

-Absolutely.

-So exactly how large a role did planes like this play

0:42:320:42:36

-during World War I?

-Enormous. It was huge.

0:42:360:42:40

Aircraft changed the shape of warfare as we know it.

0:42:400:42:44

From World War I, you are no longer just dealing

0:42:440:42:46

with foot troops and cavalry, you can now get airborne,

0:42:460:42:50

fly around over the battle zone,

0:42:500:42:53

look down, attack from above.

0:42:530:42:55

I mean, it put a whole new dimension, literally, into warfare.

0:42:550:42:59

Over the coming decades,

0:42:590:43:00

the Navy's air fleet would continue to make brave leaps forward.

0:43:000:43:05

One of the great sea changes came in the period following World War II,

0:43:050:43:10

when they began to swap wings for rotor blades,

0:43:100:43:13

developing Navy helicopters, like this one.

0:43:130:43:15

Four years after the end of World War II,

0:43:150:43:18

we got this as the new technology, the new helicopter age.

0:43:180:43:21

-Amazing.

-Am I allowed to get in there?

0:43:210:43:24

-Please do.

-No stress.

-Get in there, soldier.

0:43:240:43:26

Oh, my days!

0:43:260:43:28

Oh, brilliant!

0:43:320:43:35

There's not a lot of room in here.

0:43:350:43:37

You look great.

0:43:370:43:38

-Do I? Really?

-Yeah, wonderful.

0:43:380:43:40

Have you got the key, please?

0:43:400:43:42

Steady on, Charles.

0:43:420:43:44

Meanwhile, Geraldine and Will have motored the Citroen

0:43:470:43:50

40 minutes south-west to the village of Ston Easton.

0:43:500:43:53

Oh, two magpies.

0:43:530:43:55

-Two?

-Yep.

-That's a good sign.

-Very good sign.

0:43:550:43:58

Let's hope all is joyful as they aim for the next shop.

0:43:580:44:02

The Somerset Shop And Reclamation looks interesting.

0:44:020:44:05

-Oh, my days.

-Oh, my word.

0:44:050:44:09

-Slightly wish we had a bit more money.

-Hello!

0:44:090:44:12

Quite. You've only got £12 left in your kitty.

0:44:120:44:15

-How do you do? I'm Will.

-Hello, Will. How are you? I'm John.

0:44:150:44:18

-Hello, John.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:44:180:44:19

You're a small lad, aren't you?

0:44:190:44:20

Around 6'4", if you were wondering.

0:44:200:44:22

-Hi, Geraldine.

-Hello, Geraldine. John.

0:44:220:44:24

Very nice to meet you, what an amazing place.

0:44:240:44:26

What an amazing place you've got here!

0:44:260:44:27

Well, with everything from clocks to cart wheels, statues to sinks,

0:44:270:44:31

you are spoilt for choice. And what's this?

0:44:310:44:33

I don't believe it.

0:44:330:44:35

Look at that!

0:44:350:44:37

Ring any bells?

0:44:370:44:38

Yes, this one's in better nick

0:44:380:44:40

than the one you picked up yesterday too.

0:44:400:44:43

No regrets, though, eh?

0:44:430:44:45

Look, don't even ask how much it is, because we'll only be upset.

0:44:450:44:48

But that's interesting, isn't it?

0:44:480:44:50

He's got a coffin!

0:44:530:44:54

Well, this is the most extraordinary place I've ever been to in my life,

0:44:570:45:00

and I love reclamation places.

0:45:000:45:03

But I think this will need a little bit of a...sort through.

0:45:030:45:06

How about a nosy outside?

0:45:060:45:08

Oh, yeah. They can be quite fun.

0:45:080:45:11

People use those as doorstops.

0:45:110:45:12

Yeah, we've got some more of those in the showroom.

0:45:120:45:14

They've spotted a cobbler's last,

0:45:140:45:16

a foot-shaped tool that, when slotted inside a shoe,

0:45:160:45:19

provides a stable block for when nailing on a sole.

0:45:190:45:22

-So we've got those there.

-And they're working,

0:45:240:45:26

they put their shoe on there and...

0:45:260:45:28

Yeah, that's right. Sometimes they have...

0:45:280:45:32

Right, here's this one.

0:45:320:45:33

I think my arm's about an inch longer from when I picked it up.

0:45:330:45:36

Well, that's definitely the most interesting one.

0:45:360:45:39

I was just thinking as a doorstop, something like that.

0:45:390:45:42

Slightly industrial sort of look to it.

0:45:420:45:45

Some of the original paint.

0:45:450:45:47

So they are 12 quid each, normally.

0:45:470:45:49

Can we do two for 12?

0:45:490:45:51

Hey, that's buy one, get one free.

0:45:510:45:53

Will John BOGOF?

0:45:530:45:55

Um... I think I would, yes.

0:45:550:45:57

-Well, you're a fantastic person.

-Tell you what,

0:45:570:45:59

let's shake on it and I'm going to say thank you very much.

0:45:590:46:02

How kind. That final purchase means Geraldine and Will have spent every

0:46:020:46:06

single penny of their £400. Congratulations.

0:46:060:46:09

-OK, there you are.

-That's the last of our funds!

0:46:090:46:11

-Thank you.

-Thank you, John. Very nice to meet you.

0:46:110:46:13

-Pleased to meet you.

-An amazing place.

0:46:130:46:15

-All right, grab that one.

-Thank you.

0:46:150:46:17

And I'll grab... Always left with the heavy stuff, aren't I?

0:46:170:46:19

-Thank you, John.

-But you're so good at it.

0:46:190:46:22

Shopping completed, it's time for our actors

0:46:220:46:24

to take a peek at what the competition's bought.

0:46:240:46:27

OK, let's do it. Shall we do it, Charles?

0:46:280:46:30

-Show them?

-Right, you get that end. Two cloths.

0:46:300:46:32

Napoleon's hat!

0:46:320:46:33

That's the provenance.

0:46:330:46:35

Worn by Napoleon. Just the hat tin, not the hat included.

0:46:350:46:39

Well, it's all very prosaic.

0:46:390:46:41

I think it's a lunchbox.

0:46:410:46:43

-It's not. It's a bicorn...

-WILL:

-It would make a fine lunchbox.

0:46:430:46:45

It would, wouldn't it? Be a good lunchbox, that.

0:46:450:46:47

-Has it got anything in it? Does it open?

-Unfortunately...

0:46:470:46:50

It opens, but, unfortunately, there's nothing in it.

0:46:500:46:52

I reckon you paid 20 quid.

0:46:520:46:54

OK, times that by three!

0:46:540:46:56

-Really?

-Sure, why not?

0:46:560:46:59

That's good.

0:46:590:47:00

And, er...

0:47:000:47:02

Charles, take the lead on this one, because you loved it.

0:47:020:47:04

Well, this is trench art, right?

0:47:040:47:07

OK. Made from old shell.

0:47:070:47:09

Empty shell cases, from the trenches.

0:47:090:47:11

-Yeah.

-What did you...? Oh, trench art.

-And the book...

0:47:110:47:14

is...

0:47:140:47:16

Well, it says an album of press cuttings from the First World War.

0:47:160:47:19

-Yeah.

-Oh.

0:47:190:47:21

No cuttings, but there are these photographs.

0:47:210:47:22

-From the trenches.

-The First World War, from the trenches.

0:47:220:47:25

-Wow.

-There's a sort of interwar piece and...

0:47:250:47:27

And that's a bit of trench art.

0:47:270:47:28

-It's lovely.

-And that kind of goes with it.

0:47:280:47:30

-It does go with it.

-Time for act two. Curtains up.

0:47:300:47:33

-CHARLES:

-God!

-I wasn't expecting marquetry.

0:47:330:47:36

Quite jazzy, isn't it?

0:47:360:47:37

-Ooh!

-Would you believe me if I told you

0:47:370:47:39

we bought that off a couple of blokes in the street?

0:47:390:47:42

-Literally.

-No, I wouldn't believe you.

0:47:420:47:44

-No, well, it's true.

-You're so lucky!

0:47:440:47:46

We just happened to be in the right place at the right time.

0:47:460:47:49

Then the little bit of export Chinese silver, snuff box.

0:47:490:47:53

And knowing your luck, 50p or so?

0:47:530:47:55

Not quite. It was 60 quid.

0:47:550:47:57

Yeah. Well, now we're in the hands of auctioneers, so, guys...

0:47:570:48:00

-We are.

-Good luck, good luck!

0:48:000:48:02

See you there. Good luck, Natasha.

0:48:020:48:03

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

-May the best team win.

0:48:030:48:06

-Maybe.

-Do I mean that?

0:48:060:48:08

-I don't know if I do.

-Well done.

0:48:080:48:10

What do our thespians really think?

0:48:100:48:12

Time for some backstage gossip.

0:48:120:48:15

I think we've got them rattled.

0:48:150:48:17

-Did you see their faces when we revealed the cabinet?

-Yes!

0:48:170:48:19

-Yes!

-They thought it was a set-up!

0:48:190:48:21

Two guys in the street?

0:48:210:48:23

Excuse me! They bump into Steptoe & Son,

0:48:230:48:25

and they get a piece of Empire furniture!

0:48:250:48:28

Thank you, and goodnight.

0:48:280:48:29

After beginning back in Tetbury in Gloucestershire,

0:48:310:48:33

they're now on their way to an auction in Essex

0:48:330:48:36

and the town of Rayleigh.

0:48:360:48:38

So, are you excited?

0:48:380:48:40

I am excited.

0:48:400:48:42

-Right.

-I'm intrigued, a little trepidatious.

0:48:420:48:46

I'm convinced that rather extraordinary piece

0:48:460:48:50

of Empire furniture that you got literally off the back of a lorry...

0:48:500:48:54

-Literally.

-..is going to do very well.

0:48:540:48:57

Let's hope so.

0:48:570:48:59

Well, here we are.

0:48:590:49:01

-And here THEY are.

-Here they are, indeed.

0:49:010:49:03

Let battle commence.

0:49:030:49:05

Charles and Natasha spent £394 picking up six lots,

0:49:050:49:10

while Geraldine and Will spent all of their £400 budget -

0:49:100:49:14

don't you love it? - also on six lots.

0:49:140:49:17

I wonder what auctioneer Mark Stacey

0:49:170:49:19

thinks of what our actors have acquired.

0:49:190:49:23

The silver vase is Edwardian, very nice.

0:49:230:49:26

The Chinese box, the star of the show.

0:49:260:49:27

It's a fantastic box, plenty of interest.

0:49:270:49:30

Time for our teams to take centre stage.

0:49:300:49:33

Isn't this cool?

0:49:350:49:36

Best seats in the house.

0:49:360:49:39

Indeed. We're starting with Geraldine and Will.

0:49:390:49:43

Is there a calling for Moroccan hardwood lintels in Essex?

0:49:430:49:46

Commission bid's at 20. 22, 25 against you, sir.

0:49:460:49:50

28, 30 I've got.

0:49:500:49:51

Bidding. One more.

0:49:510:49:53

Climbing, it's climbing.

0:49:530:49:55

38, I'm out. At £38 at the far back.

0:49:550:49:58

Any advances at £38?

0:49:580:49:59

All done, you're all finished.

0:49:590:50:01

Hammer's up at £38 and selling...

0:50:010:50:03

Not quite the flying start they were hoping for.

0:50:040:50:07

Listen, things can only go up.

0:50:070:50:09

-I thought it was going to go for far less than that.

-Did you?

-Yeah.

0:50:090:50:12

How about your next lot, Geraldine?

0:50:120:50:14

It's your chance buy...

0:50:140:50:16

the street-found secretaire.

0:50:160:50:19

At 120, here with me.

0:50:190:50:20

130 online. 140 is bid.

0:50:200:50:22

-140.

-What did you pay?

0:50:220:50:24

-160.

-Creeping, creeping...

0:50:240:50:26

-Go on.

-At 170 now.

0:50:260:50:28

At £170.

0:50:280:50:30

-You're so close.

-Come on!

0:50:300:50:31

180 now. Internet bidding.

0:50:310:50:33

Surely someone in the room.

0:50:330:50:35

Coming in, sir. 190.

0:50:350:50:37

-Fresh bidder.

-He can see quality.

0:50:370:50:39

200 against you. 200, 210, 220.

0:50:390:50:42

Back online. 230 is bid, at £230 in the room.

0:50:420:50:45

At 230, 240 is bid.

0:50:450:50:47

250 is bid now.

0:50:470:50:49

260, 270 is bid.

0:50:490:50:51

-280.

-It's creeping.

0:50:510:50:53

-It's creeping.

-Internet is back in at £300 now.

0:50:530:50:57

One more, sir. Don't lose it.

0:50:570:50:59

310 now. 310 is bid.

0:50:590:51:01

310. All done, all finished at £310.

0:51:010:51:04

Hammer's going down...

0:51:040:51:06

First profit of the day.

0:51:060:51:08

Well done, well done.

0:51:080:51:11

Still cheap, though.

0:51:110:51:13

-How good was that?

-We made a little bit.

0:51:130:51:15

Next, Charles's agricultural bench priced originally at over 300.

0:51:150:51:19

At £20 now. Thank you, sir.

0:51:190:51:21

22, 25, 28, 30 against you.

0:51:210:51:24

Internet is coming in. £30 at the back.

0:51:240:51:27

35, thank you, bid.

0:51:270:51:28

At £35. 38.

0:51:280:51:30

Internet bidding at £38.

0:51:300:51:32

40 anywhere? £38 coming in on the phone.

0:51:320:51:35

Oh, the phone. Yeah!

0:51:350:51:37

Bid at £40 now.

0:51:370:51:38

Against you online. 42 is bid.

0:51:380:51:40

45 is bid.

0:51:400:51:42

45, coming back in online.

0:51:420:51:46

Thinking about it. 48 is bid.

0:51:460:51:48

£50 is bid.

0:51:480:51:50

50. Internet, 55, thank you. 55 is bid.

0:51:500:51:53

Savvy buyer on the net.

0:51:530:51:55

-Yes!

-£60 is bid.

0:51:550:51:56

Thank you, £60.

0:51:560:51:58

One more online. 65, thank you.

0:51:580:52:00

65 is bid.

0:52:000:52:02

-Yes, sir.

-£70 bid, thank you.

0:52:020:52:04

Coming back in online.

0:52:040:52:05

-All done, then.

-Oh, no!

0:52:050:52:08

I'll sell at 70, fair warning. Last chance then, please, at 70.

0:52:080:52:12

Rotten luck, Charles.

0:52:130:52:15

-Well done.

-It could've been worse.

0:52:150:52:17

-It could have been.

-Brilliant!

0:52:170:52:19

Charles could certainly do with a profit

0:52:190:52:22

on his First World War photo book

0:52:220:52:24

and trench art vases together as a job lot.

0:52:240:52:27

At £20, advance if you wish.

0:52:270:52:28

2, 5, 8, 30 bid now.

0:52:280:52:30

At £30. 32, 35.

0:52:300:52:32

Thank you. At £35.

0:52:320:52:34

-So close.

-38, 40 bid. At £40 now.

0:52:340:52:36

One more, sir. At £40 now.

0:52:360:52:38

All done, all finished.

0:52:380:52:39

Last chance, please.

0:52:390:52:41

It looks painful. At £40.

0:52:410:52:42

All done, all finished.

0:52:420:52:44

A profit of £1.

0:52:440:52:46

Still, a profit...

0:52:460:52:48

Just.

0:52:480:52:49

-We're OK.

-It's a loss, it's a loss.

0:52:490:52:52

Next, Geraldine's two lasts.

0:52:520:52:55

What can these cobble together? Oooh!

0:52:550:52:58

£10 is bid. £10 now, at £10.

0:52:580:53:00

Where's the 12? At £12, now.

0:53:000:53:02

12 is bid. 14 now.

0:53:020:53:04

14 bid. Shaking his head.

0:53:040:53:06

One more. 14, 16 bid now.

0:53:060:53:08

£16 now.

0:53:080:53:09

Just behind at £16.

0:53:090:53:11

Second row bid. Are we all done at £16?

0:53:110:53:14

£16.

0:53:140:53:15

Another positive return.

0:53:160:53:18

-Well done.

-That's a roaring profit.

-Very good.

0:53:180:53:21

A few more like that, Geraldine.

0:53:210:53:24

Now, what can Charles's 1960s ticket machine do?

0:53:240:53:28

Interest straight in at £20.

0:53:280:53:29

Bid at 20. Advance if you like at 20.

0:53:290:53:32

Internet, 22, 25, 28, 30 bid now.

0:53:320:53:35

Come along. 32, 35, 38 is bid.

0:53:350:53:38

Commission bid's at 40 now.

0:53:380:53:39

At £40.

0:53:390:53:40

One more. 42, 45.

0:53:400:53:43

At £45 now.

0:53:430:53:44

48, 50 is bid.

0:53:440:53:46

And 5.

0:53:460:53:47

60 is back with me.

0:53:470:53:49

At £60. It's a commission bid.

0:53:490:53:51

Are we all done? Are we all finished?

0:53:510:53:53

At £60, last chance then, please, at 60...

0:53:530:53:56

That's the ticket. A healthy profit there.

0:53:560:54:00

-Bingo.

-Well done.

0:54:000:54:02

Not bad.

0:54:020:54:04

Geraldine's job lot of West Country pottery is to go next.

0:54:040:54:08

Commission bid I have at £10.

0:54:080:54:09

10 is on the commission. 12 anywhere?

0:54:090:54:11

It's here with me at 10.

0:54:110:54:12

Any advances? It's a...

0:54:120:54:14

10, 12, thank you, madam.

0:54:140:54:15

14, against you.

0:54:150:54:16

16 bid. £18.

0:54:160:54:18

One more takes you. No.

0:54:180:54:20

£18. My commission bid, then.

0:54:200:54:22

All done, all finished.

0:54:220:54:23

Last time then at 18 on the commission.

0:54:230:54:26

Another little profit.

0:54:260:54:28

-They all count.

-Hey!

0:54:280:54:30

Very good, very good.

0:54:300:54:31

Job lot for Charles now.

0:54:330:54:34

The limited edition volume of

0:54:340:54:36

Evangeline and the wooden photo frame.

0:54:360:54:38

Straight in at £40.

0:54:380:54:40

It's here with me at £40.

0:54:400:54:41

Advance if you like. It's a maiden bid at £40.

0:54:410:54:43

Any advance? Coming in.

0:54:430:54:45

42, 45 is against you.

0:54:450:54:47

48 is bid and 50 now.

0:54:480:54:50

55, 60 bid.

0:54:510:54:53

At £60 on the commission, at £60.

0:54:550:54:56

65 anywhere?

0:54:560:54:58

Are we all done, are we all finished at £60?

0:54:580:55:00

Last chance, then, please, at 60...

0:55:000:55:02

He is slowly catching Geraldine.

0:55:030:55:05

It's fantastic, it's in great condition.

0:55:050:55:08

Next, Geraldine and Will's big green glass bowl.

0:55:080:55:11

Let's get going. 30 is bid.

0:55:110:55:13

Straight in at £30 bid.

0:55:130:55:14

At £30. Advance if you like.

0:55:140:55:16

At 30. 30, 32, 35, 38, 40,

0:55:160:55:19

all online. 42, 45 now.

0:55:190:55:21

45 is bid.

0:55:210:55:22

Any advances at £45?

0:55:220:55:24

All done? You all finished at £45?

0:55:240:55:27

Hammer's going down.

0:55:270:55:29

Big bit of glass.

0:55:290:55:31

Biggish profit.

0:55:310:55:33

Well done!

0:55:330:55:35

-Very good, girl.

-That's all right, isn't it?

0:55:350:55:38

Now, if Charles wants to get ahead, he needs his hat box to sell well.

0:55:380:55:43

£20 I've got. 22 against you.

0:55:430:55:46

25, 28, 30 bid, 32, 35...

0:55:460:55:51

Someone has got a hat with no box.

0:55:510:55:52

Seated at £35. 38, anywhere?

0:55:520:55:54

All done, then. All finished at 35.

0:55:540:55:57

Ouch! Hats off to you for trying, though.

0:55:590:56:02

Sorry I showed it to you, Charles.

0:56:020:56:04

Never mind.

0:56:040:56:05

Now, only two lots to go.

0:56:060:56:08

It's a battle of the silver.

0:56:080:56:09

First, Charles' pair of vases and the silver ingot.

0:56:090:56:13

£80 on the commission.

0:56:130:56:14

It's a maiden bid. Any advances?

0:56:140:56:16

5, 90, 5, 100 now.

0:56:160:56:19

100 bid. 110, 120.

0:56:190:56:21

-Well done.

-At 120 now.

0:56:210:56:23

All done, then? All finished.

0:56:230:56:24

Hammer's up at 120.

0:56:240:56:26

Hammer's going down.

0:56:260:56:27

£5 isn't to be sniffed at in this game.

0:56:280:56:31

-I think that was a good price.

-You did all right.

0:56:310:56:33

We've come out with our heads held high from that one.

0:56:330:56:36

Now our teams' last lot and the auctioneer's favourite -

0:56:360:56:39

Geraldine and Will's Chinese silver box.

0:56:390:56:43

Straight in at £60. 65, 70 is bid.

0:56:430:56:46

75, 80 I've got.

0:56:460:56:48

Against you, sir. 85, 90 is bid.

0:56:480:56:51

At £90 on the commission.

0:56:510:56:53

-We're going out with a bang.

-Online coming in at 95.

0:56:530:56:56

100, back on the commission, is with me.

0:56:560:56:58

At £100. 110 is bid.

0:56:580:57:01

-Creeping.

-120 I've got.

0:57:010:57:02

130 now online.

0:57:020:57:03

140 is back with me, commission bid.

0:57:030:57:05

-Heavens above!

-At 140 now.

0:57:050:57:08

I don't feel completely useless any more.

0:57:080:57:10

150 is now bid.

0:57:100:57:11

£150. 160 I've got.

0:57:110:57:14

£160 back with me.

0:57:140:57:16

Behave.

0:57:160:57:17

-For me.

-Selling at...

0:57:170:57:19

170. 170 back online.

0:57:190:57:21

170. Commission bids are out.

0:57:210:57:23

It's online at 170.

0:57:230:57:25

-170.

-How good is that?

0:57:250:57:26

All done, then? All finished at £170.

0:57:260:57:29

Final time at 170...

0:57:290:57:31

The big finale has brought the house down.

0:57:320:57:35

-That's the way to do it.

-Very, very good.

0:57:350:57:37

That might have got us out of trouble.

0:57:370:57:39

Excellent. I think it has got you out of trouble with a vengeance.

0:57:390:57:42

I'd say that is the perfect way to end this auction.

0:57:420:57:45

Shall we head out?

0:57:450:57:46

Time to do the maths.

0:57:480:57:51

Natasha and Charles started out with £400

0:57:510:57:54

and after paying auction costs,

0:57:540:57:56

they made a loss of £78.30,

0:57:560:58:00

leaving them with £321.70.

0:58:000:58:03

While Will and Geraldine, who also began with 400,

0:58:050:58:07

made after saleroom fees a profit of £89.69.

0:58:070:58:12

So with £489.54 they are today's victors,

0:58:120:58:16

with all profits going to Children In Need.

0:58:160:58:18

-It's been a hoot.

-Oh, it's been such a pleasure.

0:58:200:58:23

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:58:230:58:24

A standing ovation sees our marvellous players off. Bravo!

0:58:240:58:28

Well, enjoy the sunshine.

0:58:280:58:29

Thank you, it's been great.

0:58:290:58:31

-Goodbye.

-Thanks a lot.

0:58:310:58:32

-See you soon.

-Toodle-oo, you two.

0:58:320:58:34

Legends of stage and screen Charles Dance and Geraldine James join antiques experts Natasha Raskin and Will Axon on this road trip romp around Wiltshire.

Charles finds a pair of Edwardian silver vases he hopes will prove profitable at an auction in Essex. Geraldine, however, bumps into a chap in the street with a 19th-century French empire secretaire. It costs her a small fortune - will the gamble pay off?

A diversion from the shops sees Charles end up in the cockpit of a very old helicopter, while Geraldine learns how a small part of Swindon dating back 170 years influenced the creation of the modern NHS.