Lincolnshire Flog It!


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Lincolnshire

Antiques series. Flog It! comes from Normanby Hall, an English country house in north Lincolnshire, with Paul Martin and experts Michael Baggott and Caroline Hawley.


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Today, we are in North Lincolnshire,

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and that is the magnificent Humber Bridge.

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I tell you, that's such a spectacle.

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It separates Yorkshire from Lincolnshire. It's the sixth-largest

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single-suspension bridge of its type in the world.

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But, right now, off to the valuation day,

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and let's hope people from both sides of the Humber join us.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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There's been a house on the Normanby Estate since the 16th century.

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After captaining one of the 200 ships mobilised by the English Navy

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against the Spanish Armada,

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in 1588,

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Edmund Sheffield chose Lincolnshire

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as the place to build himself a country manor house.

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But it's the gardens of Normanby Hall

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that are all ship-shape and ready to welcome our crowds here today.

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All laden with antiques and collectables,

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hoping to make a fortune at auction.

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Of course, there's one question they would like to ask our experts.

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Which is...?

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-ALL:

-What's it worth?!

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Our cameras and the Flog It! crew are setting up for a garden party

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in the pretty grounds of this country house estate.

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All we need now are the experts.

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And keeping our new arrivals in line

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is Michael Baggott.

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Bag inspection. Who's next?

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And Yorkshire lass Caroline Hawley has sailed across the border

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to dig out some exotic treasures.

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How have you come across these?

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There aren't many tribes living around these parts!

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Our experts will be using every single part

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of this gorgeous location today, from the beautiful gardens

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to the Regency splendour of the manor house.

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But first up, we're going around to a quiet part of the gardens

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where Michael Baggott is very excited

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about what's in that box.

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-John, this is a really lovely box that you brought in...

-Thank you.

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..because I'm familiar with these boxes

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-and I know what should be inside them.

-Yes.

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So, with a measure of trepidation,

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I shall open it.

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-I'll keep the fingers crossed on that hand.

-Right.

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Oh, fantastic. Fantastic!

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We've got a beautiful pair

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of early pistols.

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How did you come by these?

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I bought them at an antiques fair

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at Duxford Aerodrome,

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approximately 15-17 years ago.

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These are little works of art.

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-They are target pistols...

-Right.

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..rather than duelling pistols. The question is,

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-who would have commissioned them? Who would have owned them?

-Right.

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Really, every young gentleman of wealth

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would have at least one pair of pistols.

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I think,

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specifically with this target grip on the sights,

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-they might have been for a gentleman that competed in a shooting competition.

-OK.

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We've got this beautiful handle, which is walnut.

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-And the maker's name "Kavanagh".

-Kavanagh, yes.

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And we've got "Dublin", there.

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I think the firm of Kavanagh in Dublin

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were established at the end of the 18th century, in the 1790s.

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These pistols wouldn't be this early.

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I would have placed them, probably, 1820s to 1830s.

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So, John, dare I ask, at this antiques fair,

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how much did you pay for them?

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You dare ask.

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I paid about 3,500 for them.

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Really, at the time,

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that was not a bad buy, and you didn't overpay at all.

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-So you can relax.

-That's a comforting thought.

-HE LAUGHS

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Let's be sensible and say £3,000 to £5,000, if you're happy with that?

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I'd be very happy with that.

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Let's put a fixed reserve of £3,000.

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To be honest, I wouldn't be surprised

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to see them touch the top end of that, you know, John.

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-That would be excellent.

-Thank you very much for bringing these in.

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-It's a pleasure, and thank YOU, sir.

-It's a pleasure, John.

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That's a high estimate. Will it pay off?

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Or will the guns miss their mark in the saleroom?

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The back gardens are very busy with people clutching their antiques,

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ready to be valued, and Caroline has found something

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that's come along for a picnic.

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Anne, what a lovely bear!

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The sort of bear that would have graced a nursery

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in a beautiful house like this.

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-He would.

-Tell me a little bit about him.

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Have you had him a long time?

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-50 years, that I know of.

-50 years?!

-Yeah.

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He's resigned to living in the loft, in a black bag.

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No!

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You can't keep him... Why is he in a black bin bag?!

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I have three grandchildren, two under five,

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and he'd either end up headless or legless,

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cos they'd grab each end and pull.

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He's eyeless now.

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-Well, he's got one eye.

-That was before the grandchildren.

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-Is he called Nelson?

-No, he's called Billy.

-Billy!

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Can I have a cuddle?

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Well, it's not cuddly.

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No, it's not cuddly!

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-He's solid.

-He's solid -

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because he's stuffed with straw.

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Right.

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And he's all original.

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-A lot of these bears have had replacement pads.

-Yeah?

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He's not - he's completely original.

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There's no maker's button or label in him at all.

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I would say he dates from about 1920-1930.

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-So, way before your childhood.

-Yeah.

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And he's really in remarkably good condition.

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Have you any idea as to the sort of value,

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-if we can talk about value in front of him?

-No...

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Shall we close his ears? Sorry, Billy!

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-SHE LAUGHS

-No, I haven't.

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I haven't. It was just... We thought we'd come for a day out...

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And bring Billy Bear?

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I can imagine a lot of people liking him.

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And I think,

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at auction, I would put

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an estimate on him of £50 to £80?

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Yeah, that's fine.

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And if we put a reserve of...

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£40? Are you happy with that?

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-Definitely.

-What would you do with the money, if I can ask you?

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Buy my grandchildren a teddy bear each!

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-A cuddly teddy bear? A soft teddy bear?

-A toy teddy bear!

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-He's lovely. Thank you very much, Anne, for bring him in.

-You're welcome.

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Thank you, Billy Bear, for coming.

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-BEAR VOICE:

-That's all right. Bye-bye!

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And with our crowd still enjoying the gardens,

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our experts have moved inside the house.

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And it's Michael who has the candlesticks in the drawing room.

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Thank you very much for bringing these wonderful candlesticks in, Iversen.

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Were these your father's at all?

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No, my uncle's.

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-Your uncle's?

-Yes.

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-Did he serve in the military?

-In the First World War.

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Right.

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But he collected items. Guns, all sorts.

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-So he had an interest...?

-An interest in military, yes.

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If you've served in the military, these will have an appeal.

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-Mm.

-What we have, quite obviously, are a pair of candlesticks.

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-That's right.

-You don't have to be a rocket scientist for this.

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But what's very interesting is, we've got original,

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Victorian, I think, cavalry officers' swords.

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-Yeah.

-And we can see these are original sword handles

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because we've even got down to the shagreen fitments here,

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which is a shark or a ray-skin.

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And you've got these little silver twists of wire,

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-that's a bit of extra grip.

-Yes.

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You wouldn't expect to see that

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-on just something that's purely decorative.

-No.

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We've got, on the top of the fitting, here,

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-a registration number.

-Yes.

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This, number 2-7-8-7-8-8,

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-is around the turn of the century.

-Mm.

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Value. I think these are very good-looking.

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and I think we could...

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say £150 to £250 for them...

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Yeah.

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..and put a fixed reserve of 150.

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They might even go on from that, cos they're very quirky.

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-You're quite happy to see them go?

-Yes.

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-Hopefully they'll find another home at the auction.

-Yeah.

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Thank you very much for bringing them along.

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-Nice speaking to you. Bye.

-Thank you.

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Well, we are now halfway through our day.

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Our experts have made their first choices of items

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to take off to auction.

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I've already got my favourites. You've probably got yours.

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In case you've forgotten, here's a quick recap

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on what we're taking with us to the auction room in Lincolnshire.

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They were an expensive purchase,

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so John hopes his pistols hit the target in the auction room

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and make him a hefty profit.

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Anne doesn't think it's cuddly,

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but will someone fall in love with this teddy bear?

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And will Iversen's candlesticks set the saleroom on fire?

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Let's find out.

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We've journeyed south to Lincoln, a city with an impressive history.

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Sellers pay 15% commission here, so it's always worth doing your sums

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and checking for any extra charges.

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Conducting our auction is Colin Young,

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and it's the pistols up first.

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-The collectors know what they're looking for.

-Yup.

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If somebody wanted to start to collect pistols,

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what are the legislations?

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Do you need an arms licence?

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Certainly, for something that's muzzle-loading, such as this,

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and of period, then, you don't.

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If they were actually reproductions made today,

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but still of that same manufacture,

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then you would need a licence.

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Because they are made and they are fireable,

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and they are a weapon.

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If you're thinking of investing in vintage firearms,

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please do your homework

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because you can get caught out.

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If you're unsure about it, just get it into the auction rooms,

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because we would always go to the Firearms Department for advice

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before ever offering anything for sale.

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-Hello, John. Good to see you again.

-Thank you.

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And Michael, our expert. I know they caught your eye.

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It's a niche market.

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They're the people that know what to look for,

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and these guns are right, aren't they?

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There's not one bit wrong with them.

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-Excellent.

-We're selling quality here.

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I appreciate that.

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Question is, will we get that three to five?

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Will we get the top end? We'll find out now.

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They're going under the hammer. Let's hand over to Colin Young.

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An original case. What shall we say for this lot? Who will start me?

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£3,000?

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2,500, anyone? 2,5?

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It's a bit low.

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2,000 bid.

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At 2,200 now?

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At 2,000 bid.

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We are too far off now.

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2,200 bid. 2,400, do I see now?

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2,600 bid, now? At 2,400 - at 2,600, surely.

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I'm afraid at that price, I do have to withdrawn them.

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Really, they should have made the top end of that,

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so, in a way, it's good

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they didn't scrape away at 3,000.

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I'm happy they didn't sell at that.

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-That's why you protect it with a reserve.

-Absolutely.

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Michael was so right to put that reserve on.

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Good luck with whatever you want to do with them.

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Do appreciate it. Thank you both.

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That was a surprise,

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but luckily, since the auction,

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John has had interest from a dealer who couldn't make it on the sale day,

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so he's still hopeful for a good result.

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Surely the teddy bear is a safe bet.

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Will someone in the auction room fall in love with him?

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Anne, it's good to see you again. Who's this?

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-This is Leah, my granddaughter.

-Hello! School holidays, now!

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That's right, so we thought we'd bring her along.

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-What do you think of the auction?

-Scary.

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It is a bit intimidating, isn't it?

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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Who will start me at 30?

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£30, anybody? 20 to go, then, surely.

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£20 bid.

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We're in at 20.

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We got £20.

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I've got 32.

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35. 38, I've got.

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£40 bid.

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£40 bid. 42, now?

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At £40 bid.

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Are we all done and finished?

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Going then at £40...

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Well done, Colin.

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Colin worked some magic there.

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Everybody loves a bear, don't they?

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They do, they do.

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Billy Bear has found a new home,

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and that's our first sale of the day.

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Onwards, and upwards, from now on.

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Next up, the candlesticks.

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Their shagreen handles are shark or stingray skin.

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Because some species of these creatures appear on endangered species lists,

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rules dictate you can't buy or sell any items made with shagreen

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after 1947.

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These ones are fine, because they're made more than 100 years ago.

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These would suit someone into militaria who throws dinner parties.

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Absolutely.

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A talking point.

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Let's find out if the bidders here will buy these,

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and use them. They're going under the hammer now.

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£100, anybody?

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110, 120... 120. 130. Let's get on.

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130, 140.

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150, 160.

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-We've sold them.

-Yes.

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160, 170.

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160, 170...

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There must be someone

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with a tethered horse outside -

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cavalry officer!

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200 bid. 220, do I see?

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No. Are we all done, then? On my left, then, selling.

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All done at £200.

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£200. Yes!

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That's good. I'm very happy with that.

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-They'll be worth every penny.

-Yes.

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Nice meeting you two.

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Thank you very much, Ivan.

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-Bye-bye.

-It's a pleasure.

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That's two sales out of three. Not bad.

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But it just goes to prove

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you cannot predict an auction.

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That's half the fun.

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Back inland, the valuations are in full swing.

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Normanby Hall is enjoyed by over 150,000 people each year,

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and was home to Samantha Cameron, wife of the Prime Minister,

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in her early childhood.

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It's a real local treasure,

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and Michael has got his hands on some treasure of his own!

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Jan, Joe...thank you. What can I say?

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These are lovely things.

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-They smack of being family pieces. Is that right?

-Yes.

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Where did they come from in the family?

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My grandad.

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He was an undertaker,

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when he was a young man.

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So I can imagine him wearing it on his waistcoat

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as he's walking in front of the...

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Yes, of course, you had to be turned out immaculately.

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-It would have been de rigueur to have a watch and chain.

-Yeah.

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What do you think's the most interesting one?

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That's lovely.

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That's lovely, and that one?

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That's a scruffy, old one I thought I might throw away!

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SHE LAUGHS

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This is actually the oldest thing on the table.

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-Oh, is it?

-Right. What date's that?

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It's a pair-cased silver watch.

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Pair-cased, cos it's got a pair, P-AIR, of cases.

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The outer case for protection...

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Oh, and that's lovely.

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When you would have a watch serviced,

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by a jeweller,

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they would do a little bit of advertising

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and they would sometimes put in a watch paper.

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There are several in there, I think.

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"J Farrer, Watch and Clock Maker, Doncaster."

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We will have the date

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when it was done.

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1840.

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Oh, really?

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So we know it's at least as old as 1840

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but, if we open this case up...

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-Have you ever had it open?

-No.

-There you go.

-Oh, wow!

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That's beautiful.

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Daft, really.

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They're miniature masterpieces,

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-and you'd never see it unless you opened it to look at the movement.

-No!

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It defeats me, cos look at the outer case.

0:15:040:15:06

-Yeah!

-Plain as a pipe staff.

-Precisely!

0:15:060:15:08

Then we have this gold one.

0:15:080:15:10

This is 18-carat gold.

0:15:100:15:12

We have the date letter there for 1829.

0:15:120:15:16

So it's still a George IV watch.

0:15:160:15:19

-Yes.

-There are certain things about this movement

0:15:190:15:23

-that I can readily see are unusual.

-Right.

0:15:230:15:26

The way this is driven -

0:15:260:15:29

we have this subsidiary little wheel here, and this bracing.

0:15:290:15:32

It's not a typical movement.

0:15:320:15:35

Which, to my mind, is a little bit special.

0:15:350:15:38

Then, lastly, we've got a bit of gold!

0:15:380:15:41

-Yeah!

-Nine-carat gold...

0:15:410:15:42

Albert watch chain.

0:15:420:15:44

This is, sadly, down to its gold weight, these days.

0:15:440:15:48

There's a reasonable sum of money on the table.

0:15:480:15:51

What do you think the values are?

0:15:510:15:53

-Oh, no idea.

-Have a wild stab in the dark.

0:15:530:15:56

-Oh...

-150.

0:15:560:15:58

150, the lot?

0:15:580:16:00

No, maybe...

0:16:000:16:02

a little bit more.

0:16:020:16:03

SHE LAUGHS

0:16:030:16:05

-My wallet is coming out.

-150 for that one.

-There are condition issues with that,

0:16:050:16:08

but it's lovely.

0:16:080:16:09

Let's put £100 to £200 on it, with a fixed reserve of £100.

0:16:090:16:12

-Wow!

-Which is better than the bin.

0:16:120:16:14

Watch chain -

0:16:140:16:16

that's going to be about £300 to £500...

0:16:160:16:18

-Ooh!

-It will probably make the thick end of the 500 on that.

-Wow!

0:16:180:16:22

-Put a reserve of 300 on that.

-Oh, crumbs!

0:16:220:16:24

Watch...

0:16:240:16:26

glass-less, boring, plain-movement watch.

0:16:260:16:29

Let's put...

0:16:290:16:32

£500 to £800 on it.

0:16:320:16:34

We'll put a fixed reserve of £500,

0:16:340:16:36

-and we'll see where it goes.

-Wow!

0:16:360:16:39

-Never!

-Crumbs!

-Happy?

0:16:390:16:41

-Definitely.

-Happy you came?

0:16:410:16:43

Oh, yeah!

0:16:430:16:44

I'm happy you came! I'm delighted!

0:16:440:16:46

It's fantastic - it's made my day, really. Wonderful things.

0:16:460:16:49

And that proves you should never throw things away.

0:16:500:16:54

Or at least, bring them to a Flog It! valuation day first.

0:16:540:16:57

In the garden, Caroline is also saving something

0:16:570:16:59

from the rubbish tip and it is a Flog It! favourite.

0:16:590:17:01

John, I am shocked to hear what you were just about to do

0:17:010:17:07

with this magnificent piece of Cornish studio pottery.

0:17:070:17:11

-Tell me.

-Well, it was destined for the bin.

-No!

0:17:110:17:16

Yes, that is where it was going

0:17:160:17:18

until someone said to me it was worth a little bit of money.

0:17:180:17:22

Well, it is, John. How did you come by it for a start?

0:17:220:17:27

At a car-boot sale at Emswell.

0:17:270:17:30

I was just looking around for something to stand some flowers in.

0:17:300:17:34

And what did you pay for it at the time?

0:17:340:17:36

About £10-£15, I can't exactly remember. It was no more than £15.

0:17:360:17:40

That is a very, very good buy.

0:17:400:17:43

-Do you know anything about Troika pottery?

-Not really.

0:17:430:17:47

It was a company set up in the late '60s, in St Ives in Cornwall,

0:17:470:17:52

and it is still in existence today, the factory,

0:17:520:17:55

although it is making less pieces than it did ten years ago.

0:17:550:17:59

-I can imagine.

-You really don't like this, do you?

0:17:590:18:02

You really do not like it. So really you are keen to sell it.

0:18:020:18:08

Well, it is a wheel vase.

0:18:080:18:10

It is a 15 inch one which is good.

0:18:100:18:12

It is much bigger than the run of the mill

0:18:120:18:15

which are considerably smaller than this.

0:18:150:18:18

It's covered in very stylised symbolic features.

0:18:180:18:25

If you look at it, there are parts of anatomy.

0:18:250:18:29

Various places on the front,

0:18:290:18:32

you can see the shape of almost a face and a body.

0:18:320:18:36

And they are very often in muted colours,

0:18:360:18:39

as this is, the sort of browns, greens, blues and greys.

0:18:390:18:43

This is in very good condition.

0:18:430:18:45

If we turn it around,

0:18:450:18:47

this is beautifully marked

0:18:470:18:49

on the bottom, as you can see, Troika,

0:18:490:18:51

Cornwall, and the monogram here,

0:18:510:18:53

very clearly written AB, which stands for Alison Brigden.

0:18:530:18:59

-That's the maker?

-Yes, the designer of this piece.

0:18:590:19:02

You might be surprised to know that it does have a pretty good value.

0:19:020:19:07

Is it still going to the bin or not?

0:19:070:19:10

Not now.

0:19:100:19:12

Well, I would suggest that this, because of its size,

0:19:120:19:16

I would suggest it has a value of between £200-£300.

0:19:160:19:19

-Oh, right.

-Are you happy with that?

-Very good.

0:19:190:19:22

And if we put a reserve of 200,

0:19:220:19:26

perhaps a discretionary reserve, are you OK with that?

0:19:260:19:30

-Yes, absolutely.

-So we shall go ahead and sell it for you.

0:19:300:19:33

Yeah, that's absolutely fine.

0:19:330:19:34

Michael Baggott is joined by Linda in the back gardens.

0:19:370:19:42

-May I open this up?

-Yes, certainly.

0:19:420:19:44

We have got, that is marvellous, a drawing set. Look at that.

0:19:440:19:49

Beautiful ivory rule,

0:19:490:19:51

wonderful scales on it,

0:19:510:19:53

and we have the maker on it, E Halse & Son of London.

0:19:530:19:57

It is very contentious now to sell ivory that was made after 1947.

0:19:570:20:00

It is illegal, so we need proof that it's earlier than that.

0:20:000:20:03

This is very much the case. We have got the maker's name

0:20:030:20:06

that can date it and so this is perfectly legal for us to sell.

0:20:060:20:10

This little ebony parallel rule, I don't think is original to this set.

0:20:100:20:16

What we would hope to see there is a protractor.

0:20:160:20:18

-Oh, I see, yes.

-So that's not there,

0:20:180:20:20

but we have most of the other little fittings.

0:20:200:20:23

-Are you a collector of scientific instruments, Linda?

-Not really.

0:20:230:20:26

I am a collector of older things and about 25 years ago,

0:20:260:20:32

an old gentleman gave me this, who knew that I was collecting things

0:20:320:20:36

to go in a cottage which I had purchased,

0:20:360:20:39

which was built in about 1845.

0:20:390:20:42

It's actually not...1845 in date.

0:20:420:20:47

-Oh, OK.

-That's a bit of a blow, isn't it?

0:20:470:20:49

It's a bit earlier, so that is all right! But they can be dated

0:20:490:20:54

from the middle of the 18th century up to about 1820, 1830.

0:20:540:20:58

Really, yes?

0:20:580:20:59

I think this one, from the style of the instruments,

0:20:590:21:02

probably falls in at about 1790 to about 1800.

0:21:020:21:05

Oh, gosh, that's interesting. Thank you.

0:21:050:21:07

It is a lovely set.

0:21:070:21:09

It is incomplete and there is slight damage to the box.

0:21:090:21:13

In these instances we can't really value it as a complete set.

0:21:130:21:17

We have to look at the individual items

0:21:170:21:19

-and assess a value that way.

-I see.

0:21:190:21:21

-I think we would put this at £100-£150.

-I see.

0:21:210:21:25

And we'll put a fixed reserve of £100 on it.

0:21:250:21:28

If it does well, what do you plan to spend the money on?

0:21:280:21:31

Well, I am quite a keen walker

0:21:310:21:34

so I think I will put that towards some walking in the Lake District.

0:21:340:21:38

That is marvellous.

0:21:380:21:40

-I'm set to go trekking to Everest base camp in October.

-Good grief!

0:21:400:21:44

So I need to get some practice in.

0:21:440:21:47

So we will be sending you up and round the mountain.

0:21:470:21:49

-Hopefully!

-When she comes! Thank you very, indeed, Linda.

0:21:490:21:52

And let's hope we can get Linda enough money to take to the hills.

0:21:530:21:58

Right now it's time to say goodbye to Normandy Hall,

0:21:580:22:00

our magnificent host location,

0:22:000:22:02

as we head off to auction for the very last time.

0:22:020:22:05

And here's a quick recap of what's going under the hammer.

0:22:050:22:08

There is a high estimate on Jan and Joe's pocket watches and chain.

0:22:080:22:12

Only time will tell if the saleroom agrees.

0:22:120:22:14

Will the Troika that was heading for the bin make John a tidy profit?

0:22:160:22:21

And will the scientific instruments help get Linda to Everest base camp?

0:22:220:22:26

Let's find out.

0:22:260:22:27

Well, the auction room in Lincoln is still bustling,

0:22:320:22:35

which is always a good sign for our items,

0:22:350:22:37

and my favourite item is up first, the scientific instruments.

0:22:370:22:41

We should get this away. We keep saying on the show,

0:22:410:22:43

quality always sells, we'll put it to the test right now,

0:22:430:22:45

it is going under the hammer here in Lincoln. Good luck.

0:22:450:22:48

Start me at £100. 100, 100? 80 to go then. 80? 50 if you like.

0:22:500:22:53

50 if you like, anybody. £50 bid. At 50, bid five. 55. 65, 70.

0:22:530:22:58

A bid from France. At 75 bid.

0:22:580:23:00

At 75, at 80...

0:23:000:23:02

-That's interesting, wasn't it, a bid from France on the internet.

-Yes!

0:23:020:23:06

Surely you are going to come back.

0:23:060:23:07

At 75 bid, at 80 now do I see? At 80 now.

0:23:070:23:11

85, 90, 95, 100.

0:23:110:23:12

100 surely, sir? At 95 bid. At 95 bid.

0:23:120:23:16

-He's hoping for some more.

-98 if it'll help you. At 95 bid.

0:23:160:23:20

98 now, do I see?

0:23:200:23:22

At 95 bid, are we all done? So near, yet so far.

0:23:220:23:26

At 95 bid, are we all done? 95, last call, then. 98 bid, do I see?

0:23:260:23:30

98, and £100 bid. At 100, 110 now, do I see? At 100.

0:23:300:23:37

-I would have been amazed if it hadn't sold.

-At £100, any more bids?

0:23:370:23:43

The hammer's gone down. Did it!

0:23:430:23:44

Just, though, wasn't it?

0:23:440:23:47

Excellent, really pleased about that.

0:23:470:23:49

-A bit of money towards the trip.

-Thank you, Michael.

-It's a pleasure.

0:23:490:23:52

A great result for Linda, that was a quality item.

0:23:540:23:56

Let's hope someone likes John's Troika vase

0:23:560:23:59

a little bit more than he does.

0:23:590:24:01

A wonderful wheel vase.

0:24:010:24:02

And I know you do not like Troika, you do not like this vase.

0:24:020:24:07

A lot of people out there don't like it. I love it. I come from Troika.

0:24:070:24:11

I've been flagging it up for years and years and years.

0:24:110:24:13

And I have had the pleasure of meeting Benny Sirota,

0:24:130:24:16

-one of the original three designers who formed Troika.

-Oh, right, yeah.

0:24:160:24:20

I'm a very privileged young man.

0:24:200:24:21

I like this kind of thing, I really do.

0:24:210:24:24

It sums up the texture of Cornwall.

0:24:240:24:25

-Let's hope it does well for you, John!

-Yeah, hopefully.

0:24:250:24:28

-It's a good size.

-It is.

-Let's put it to the test.

0:24:280:24:30

Here we go, it's going under the hammer now.

0:24:300:24:32

Good luck, everyone, this is it.

0:24:320:24:34

Always very popular when it comes under the hammer.

0:24:340:24:36

Who is going to start at 300? £300.

0:24:360:24:38

2 to go then, surely, 200, do you have for me now? 200 straight in.

0:24:380:24:42

£200 bid. 220, 240, 260,

0:24:420:24:44

280, 280, 300, 320, 340.

0:24:440:24:48

At 320, 340 anywhere else? Surely 40? At 320 the bid is nearby.

0:24:480:24:53

At 320 bid, at 40 for my last call. No? At £320 then.

0:24:530:24:57

-340, is that a bid?

-Gosh.

-No. I thought I'd better ask.

0:24:570:25:01

Selling then at £320.

0:25:010:25:04

-Sold at £320. Well done!

-Brilliant!

0:25:040:25:06

Just over the top end of the estimate. How about that?

0:25:060:25:09

-What are you going to do with that?

-Put it towards a holiday.

0:25:090:25:12

Put it towards a holiday, treat yourself.

0:25:120:25:16

-When are we going?

-Oh, John!

-There we go!

0:25:160:25:18

LAUGHTER

0:25:180:25:19

£320, that's not bad for a £15 investment,

0:25:190:25:24

and it just proves how subjective art is.

0:25:240:25:26

One man's trash is another man's treasure.

0:25:260:25:29

And speaking of treasure,

0:25:290:25:30

it's the gold and silver watches and chain, up next.

0:25:300:25:33

We've got the gold watch. We have the gold chain

0:25:330:25:36

and the silver watch.

0:25:360:25:39

Played around with the 18 carat gold watch after we saw it,

0:25:390:25:43

because initially I thought I had dated it incorrectly,

0:25:430:25:46

but I found that I had actually been right in the first place.

0:25:460:25:49

But what we have done is just put the reserve down a little bit

0:25:490:25:51

to £400 which I know you have spoken to the auctioneer about

0:25:510:25:54

-and you are happy with.

-Yes.

0:25:540:25:56

But I still think it'll make what it's going to make on the day.

0:25:560:25:58

Here's the first lot going under the hammer.

0:25:580:26:00

We are looking at £500-£800 for the gold watch.

0:26:000:26:03

Who is going to start me at 500?

0:26:030:26:06

Start me at 4 to go then, surely.

0:26:060:26:09

£400. 300 if we have to. 300 anybody?

0:26:090:26:12

300 bid, thank you.

0:26:120:26:14

-He's going cautiously.

-320 now, surely, 320,

0:26:140:26:18

340, I've got. 340, 360, 380.

0:26:180:26:22

-Oh, the penny has dropped.

-Here we go.

0:26:220:26:25

At 400 bid, 420 surely, 420 if you like, sir?

0:26:250:26:28

No, at 400, my bid is at the door. At £400 we are on the market.

0:26:280:26:32

At 400, is anybody else going to join in?

0:26:320:26:34

-Last call, done and finished then, selling at £400.

-Sold.

0:26:340:26:39

-That's brilliant.

-Well, it's £400, sold on the reserve.

0:26:390:26:41

OK, we are looking at 3 to 5 for the gold chain.

0:26:410:26:44

Who is going to start me at 300 for this? £300 bid. 320, surely?

0:26:440:26:48

At £300 bid, 320 anywhere else now? At 320, I make it. 320, 340.

0:26:480:26:54

-Straight in there.

-380, 400, and 20 now. 420?

0:26:540:26:59

They will have all worked it out with a calculator, the price today.

0:26:590:27:03

-480, 500. At 500.

-I didn't expect it to go for so much though.

0:27:030:27:08

520, 540, 560, 570.

0:27:080:27:12

580. No? At 570 bid.

0:27:120:27:16

At 570, on the market and selling at £570.

0:27:160:27:21

-Bang, the hammer's gone down.

-Lovely!

0:27:210:27:22

-That is brilliant.

-Brilliant.

0:27:220:27:24

Just the silver watch to go now.

0:27:240:27:26

Here we are, good luck, this is our last lot.

0:27:260:27:28

The Verge pocket watch, this time, start me at 100, 80?

0:27:280:27:31

At £80 bid, at 85, at 85 bid, at 90, do I see now? At 90, £90 bid.

0:27:310:27:35

Five then surely? Going, all done and finished at 95.

0:27:350:27:39

Surely a fraction more, 100, £100 bid. At 100 and 110 now.

0:27:390:27:42

There's always a watch collector in a sale.

0:27:420:27:45

Always someone who likes to tinker with the movement.

0:27:450:27:48

Are you going to come again now?

0:27:480:27:50

At £100, it is your last chance, it is going to sell.

0:27:500:27:52

Time is up.

0:27:520:27:54

Yes, the hammer's gone down, £100!

0:27:540:27:57

You've done really well, haven't you? I think that's £1,070 in total.

0:27:570:28:01

-Are you saving up?

-Yes, indeed.

0:28:010:28:03

We are going on a cruise, hopefully.

0:28:030:28:06

And then we are making a donation as well to Blind Veterans UK.

0:28:060:28:11

Our son lost his sight some time ago

0:28:110:28:13

and because he was an ex-service man,

0:28:130:28:15

they have done an awful lot to help him live independently.

0:28:150:28:20

-It is brilliant.

-Good, a very good cause.

0:28:200:28:22

Well, all the better then, all the better.

0:28:220:28:25

A brilliant result for Jan and Joe and that's it for today's show.

0:28:250:28:31

And as our experts have found out,

0:28:310:28:33

it is not easy putting a value on an antique.

0:28:330:28:35

That's why these places are such good fun, so join us next time.

0:28:350:28:39

But for now, from Lincoln, it is goodbye.

0:28:390:28:41

Flog It! comes from Normanby Hall, a traditional English country house in north Lincolnshire.

Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggott and Caroline Hawley. The team choose a selection of antiques to go to auction. Michael Baggott discovers a pair of pistols that cause quite a stir at the valuation day, but how will they fare in the saleroom?