Suffolk 39 Flog It!


Suffolk 39

Antiques series. Flog It! comes from Ickworth House, a Georgian mansion in Suffolk. Paul heads to the Suffolk coast to explore the House in the Clouds in Thorpeness.


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Transcript


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"The fairies really own this house or so the children say,

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"In fact they, all of them, moved in on the same self day."

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Now that's a fanciful poem to write about a house but, then again,

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this is no ordinary house.

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This is the House in the Clouds!

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We're in Suffolk. Welcome to "Flog It!"

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Later on, I'll be exploring the mysterious House in the Clouds

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but first it's time to head to our valuation day venue,

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itself one of the most extraordinary buildings in Suffolk.

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Ickworth House, a neoclassical mansion.

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It was begun in 1795 by the fourth Earl of Bristol, a bishop

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who didn't go to church but had a passion for Italian architecture.

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So much so he diverted revenues from his diocese

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to indulge his excesses and fund the house of his dreams.

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For one day only, Ickworth House is home to "Flog It!"

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People are walking through the wonderful Italianate gardens

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ready to join our early birds,

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hundreds of people in the queue, already laden with antiques and collectables,

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all hoping for a favourable valuation from our experts.

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If they're happy with that valuation, what are you going to do?

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ALL: "Flog It!"

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And amongst the crowd, our experts are already hard at work.

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What about the other one? Now he's gone, pull out the Picasso.

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Today, we have the charming Philip Serrell.

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-What have we got in here, then?

-Oh, it's a train set.

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-Was that yours as a child?

-Mine and my older brother's.

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-So it's at least 100 years old, then?

-Absolutely!

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LAUGHTER

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And the equally beguiling Will Axon.

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Oh, look at that, a real box of treasure.

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It says "Cheltenham Spa".

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That might mean it's something like, Regency.

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Ooh, I'm a bit out of my depth here!

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So it's time for the "Flog It!" Crowd

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to make their way into the west wing and for our experts to head

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to their tables because there is plenty to fit in.

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Oh, how lovely!

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On today's show, these items were bought for a song.

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-I paid £1 for it.

-Oh!

-I think they were just trying to clear the stall.

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Well, good for you.

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-They're working out at 14 pence each.

-14p a go?

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I'll need to come and see you.

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110 downstairs. 120...

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But which will hit the high notes over at the auction?

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130... 140... 150...

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160... 170... 180...

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190... 200... 220... 240...

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With the good people of Suffolk settling into their seats,

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it's time to get on with the valuations and where better

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to start than an intriguing 19th century bundle on Philip's table?

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-Sheena, how are you?

-I'm good, thank you.

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-It's a lovely day, isn't it?

-It's beautiful.

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And you've brought along a little eclectic mix, here.

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-I have, yeah.

-Are they yours?

-Two of them are.

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The brooch actually was left to my daughter.

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-Who by?

-Auntie Bessie.

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-A family auntie?

-She was, yeah. She was a character.

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She used to like to go to auctions.

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So this little lot here is part of her eclectic mix that she might have bought through the years?

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It's possible. I mean, I had a lot more things but, when she died, we sent off to an auction.

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-Did they do well?

-They did, actually.

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-I was gobsmacked.

-Really? Let's hope that continues, shall we?

-Please!

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Right, let's see what you've got.

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These are a pair of French opera glasses.

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-They fold up and then that just fits in your bag.

-That's it, yep.

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-And these are a pair of little pince-nez, aren't they?

-They are, yeah.

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-Here goes.

-You'll do yourself a mischief.

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Gordon Bennett!

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How are they supposed to see through those?

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-It's not going to do it for me, is it?

-No, not a good look.

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These are going to be back-end of the 19th century.

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Then we've got a mourning brooch.

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This has got a nine-carat gold mark on the back

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like a little target brooch.

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Again, back-end of the 19th century but what's interesting

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about this is that, in the back, there's the remains of someone's hair.

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A lock of the dead person's hair would have been

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taken before they were buried and very often it was woven,

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-lattice-like, and put into the back and they became mourning brooches.

-Right.

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Very often, the front is enamelled black, you can have dates of

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when the person was alive, but I think they're quite interesting.

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-It's quite a fun Aunt Bessie lot that, isn't it?

-They are, yeah.

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-I think that we should sell it as one lot.

-Altogether, yeah.

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And I think auctionary value is going to be £50 to £100.

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-So a leg for a cow?

-A leg for a cow? What does that mean?

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Well, I want a cow.

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Right, OK. Is there a doctor near you?

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-Because I think you might need help.

-I've lost the plot, yeah.

-It's gone, completely.

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-It's because I moved.

-Really, you want to buy a leg for a cow?

-I want the whole cow.

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So you've got a little smallhold and you want a cow? How much does a cow cost?

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-I haven't a clue.

-About £500 or £800, isn't it?

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-Yeah, so going to have to do really good with these!

-We're going to have to do really well.

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-Let's put it in, estimate £50 to £100, fixed reserve, £40.

-Yep.

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Good on you. Let's hope we can go and get a cow.

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Well, people bring their possessions along for all sorts of reasons,

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although buying a cow might be a first.

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I was very pleased to see our next item walk through the doors.

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Tracey, thank you so much for bringing a piece of furniture in.

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-We brought it in for you.

-Thank you!

-That was the whole idea.

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We just don't see enough! Please bring furniture in because this is the only piece

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we have here today.

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I'm absolutely in love with it as well.

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I think this is a little treat and if I just go like that,

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you can see it flattens out into a good working surface.

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But if you do this...

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and put that up...

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you've got a lectern or a little easel.

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It's portable, you can fold it up.

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It's almost like a little bit of campaign furniture.

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Right, I like this, I'm off! How long have you had this?

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I've only had it about six months. Because we live in a modern place,

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I'm not allowed to have furniture like this in the house.

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So I buy stuff, photograph and measure it and everything

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-and then I sell it on to buy another piece.

-1930s, I would say.

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It's made by Hatherley in Gloucestershire.

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Now this design was patented by Charles Allen Jones

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in the 1880s, this whole geometric bracing.

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And you can see it in Hatherley stepladders.

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Do you know the good old Victorian stepladders?

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Well, I've had a couple of those myself, just to look at and monitor kind of thing.

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My dad has one as well!

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Sadly, we don't have it any more but it had exactly the same thing, made of English oak.

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I think it's faultless as well, it's had a lot of use, its nice

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and dry, but look at the top.

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Somebody has put something here that's stained the oak. I like that.

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That's part of this table's use and social history.

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It's got character and personality and I'm sure,

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with a bit of polish, this will look absolutely beautiful.

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Well, I think that's superb and just look at the lines on that.

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-Yes, it's classic, I think.

-That's 20th century modern at its best.

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-How much did you pay for this? £20. Is that all?

-Oh, yes.

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I think you could easily double your money at auction.

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-That would be great.

-Would you like to sell this?

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Yes, I need to sell it and buy the next piece.

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OK, well, let's put this into auction with a valuation

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of maybe £40 to £60 with a reserve on at £40.

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-That would be great.

-I'm sure you'll get that and hopefully you'll get the top end because somebody

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that loves design will absolutely love playing with this.

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And I'm not the only one who's having fun with today's items.

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Let's head over to Will Axon in the appropriately-named pleasure grounds.

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Well, you know what?

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I think I could see myself in the shoes of the third marquis,

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perhaps taking a stroll in my Italianate gardens

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with my rather fine, white metal-topped cane but Richard,

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this belongs to you, not me, and I'm not the third marquis.

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Unfortunately I don't live here, but you can't have everything!

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-No, that's quite correct.

-Tell me, where has this come from, Richard?

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Handed down, I think, from my father.

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Do you ever remember him with it, taking a stroll, perhaps?

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No, he never did, I don't think.

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He probably got it in an auction cos he was an auctioneer as well at one time.

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When I first saw it in the queue I thought, what we've got here

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is a typical Malacca cane with this white metal top, I thought possibly silver.

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Now, bog-standard swordsticks,

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we see a lot of them in the sale rooms but what interested me

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on this one is if I draw it somewhat dramatically...

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-Steady!

-..That's what I like about it.

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Look, we've got this crossguard here, spring-loaded,

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that opens up as you draw the sword.

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Now, that's a really nice touch

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-and I haven't seen that before on a swordstick.

-Haven't you?

-No.

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This is just a little bit, shall we say, a cut above the rest?

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Now I've had a closer look at the blade.

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-Have you ever noticed this before? A little inscription, "Toledo."

-No, I didn't notice that.

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So there's a Spanish connection there, so I'm thinking this could

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possibly be a souvenir piece, late 19th century, that sort of period.

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I just like it. It's good quality, unusual.

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I think the sort of standard swordstick with a white metal top,

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you're looking at £50 to £80, maybe up to £100, that sort of level.

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But I think because of the crossguard, this is going to be a little bit more unusual,

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so I would like to use that £100 as a starting figure

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and hope that it would make more than that.

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So I'm thinking perhaps an estimate of £100 to £200,

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-would you be happy with that?

-I think so, yes.

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Well, I'll tell you what. Someone out there, a collector of swordsticks,

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they're going to find it as interesting as I have

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and I'm sure on the day we won't have any trouble selling it.

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£100 to £200, let's reserve it at £100 with a bit of discretion

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just in case, but I don't think we're going to need it,

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and I think Elizabeth is going to be pleased to have this in her

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sale and I think the bidders are going to respond positively.

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Well, Will, it's time to find out if you're right.

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We've certainly had a busy morning so far.

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Our experts have been working flat-out

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and they've found their first items to take off to auction.

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This is where it gets exciting, anything can happen,

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but right now let's find out what the bidders think.

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They can determine what it's worth.

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While we make our way over to the sale room, here's a quick

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recap of all the items that are going under the hammer.

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There's Sheila's mixed 19th century lot.

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Will it raise enough for a leg for a cow?

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With this metamorphic table, there's a chance for someone to own

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a piece of great 20th century design.

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And will Richard's unusual swordstick have the edge

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over in the sale room?

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We've headed northeast to Diss for today's auction,

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to be in the capable hands of a regular "Flog It!" Expert,

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auctioneer Elizabeth Talbot.

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And the first lot going before the bidders is Sheila's three items.

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Are these the sort of things that have been left to you over the years

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-and they've been stuffed away in the attic?

-Yeah, they're Auntie Bessie's.

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I think this could be a trade lot.

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-By keeping it together, hopefully it will attract some more.

-Makes it more buy-able, yeah.

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Here we go, we're going to find out what it's worth.

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We have three 19th century items.

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For those lovely items, all in the lot together, start me at £50.

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£50, surely. Some good, collectable pieces there at £50.

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40 bid, 40 I have with the lady, now I'll take two.

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£40 only, I'm looking for two now.

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42... 45... 48... 55... 60...

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60 with the lady to my left.

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I'm looking for five elsewhere. 65 now, where's 70? Any advance?

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-70, back again. I'm looking for five.

-This is good..

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I think we hit the nail on the head. A dealer will buy that.

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As you say, somebody that part-time trades will buy that

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and split it and sell it in the fair later on. We're happy, you're happy.

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-I'm happy.

-And I hope you're happy as well.

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It's a good start. Now, who'll be strolling off with Richard's lot?

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I really like this swordstick, which is

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-disguised as a bamboo walking cane.

-Well, you better buy it then!

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I'd love to, we're not allowed to buy.

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-I'd like to see it do around £200.

-I'll be happy.

-Oh, I would.

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It's going under the hammer now. You've heard what we have to say about it,

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you've probably got your own opinions,

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but let's find out what this lot think in the sale room, shall we?

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The late 19th century bamboo-encased swordstick, there it is...

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-It's all gone quiet.

-.. Fine piece, marked "Toledo".

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I have interest on the sheet shown and I'll start here at £100.

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-£100 I have.

-Straight in.

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110... 120... 130... 140... 150... 160...

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170... 180... 190... 210... 220...

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I have 220, looking for 30.

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230... 240... 250... 260...

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-I think we're in the room, now.

-This is good, 260.

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260, I'm looking for 70.

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260, the phone is out. Any advance?

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-Fantastic.

-Good price, very good price.

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-It was unusual. Well done.

-Thank you.

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And if you've got anything like that, we would love to see it.

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Bring it along to one of our valuation days.

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Right, now it's my turn to be the expert in this jam-packed sale room.

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Going under the hammer we've got that wonderful metamorphic

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table that I valued, belonging to Tracey.

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Unfortunately, he's not very well, so he can't make it today. Fingers crossed you get well soon.

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I hope you enjoy watching this because Elizabeth

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is on the rostrum and, fingers crossed, she's going to sell it.

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We're looking for round about £40. Here we go, this is it.

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And now I'm feeling nervous!

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The early to mid-20th Century oak metamorphic table converting

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to an easel. Very clever piece of furniture.

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-This is a good piece.

-I do hope you're right.

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I have interest on the sheet shown here

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and I start at lower end of estimate at £40. 40, I'll take two...

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Straight in at 40!

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This is lovely at 40, now I'm looking for 2.

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42... 45... 48...

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50... 5 and 60...

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Oh, great! Tracey will be pleased.

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I'm just taking the gentleman further behind, sir. 65 and 70...

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5 and 80.

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They love it!

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85, new bidder. 90... 5, 100... 110... 120...

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130... 140... 150.

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I'm now out. It's in the room at 150, I'm looking for 60.

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It's by the door at 150, any advance?

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£150 and that hammer's gone down!

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That's a great sale and I hope you enjoyed that moment watching this at home, Tracey.

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That's a good result,

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especially when you remember you only paid £20 for this table!

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A great find.

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Earlier on in the show we saw Ickworth House,

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our magnificent venue for our valuation day.

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That was one man's vision to create that house.

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Not far from here in Suffolk, one man's vision created a whole

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village as I had the pleasure in finding out.

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In 1908, a Scottish barrister called Glencairn Stuart Ogilvie

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inherited the village of Thorpeness on the Suffolk coast.

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Originally a small fishing hamlet,

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Ogilvie decided to carry out an extraordinary experiment -

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to transform Thorpeness into a fantasy holiday destination.

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His vision was to create a place of dreams with whimsical architecture,

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fairy tale features and unique elements I'll be exploring later.

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Here, people could enjoy a traditional English

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holiday in surroundings that would stimulate the adults

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and fire the imagination of the children.

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Ogilvie had holiday homes built in the Jacobean

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and Tudor revival styles,

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and they're all furnished with everything a holiday-maker

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would require for the perfect wholesome break.

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Tennis courts, a golf club,

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a church and even a pub were all centred around the boating lake.

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Today, the Ogilvies still have a strong presence in the village

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and Glencairn's great grandson, the current Glen Ogilvie,

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is a font of knowledge about this enchanting place.

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His idea was to have a village where there was something for everybody,

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and he's famously quoted as having said, "If children are happy, parents

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have a holiday," and I think that's as true today as it was back in 1910.

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It certainly was with our children

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and indeed with our grandchildren now.

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At the heart of the village, the Meare is an enormous boating lake covering over 60 acres.

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But this is not a natural lake. It's completely man-made

0:18:070:18:11

and was designed by the creative Ogilvie to be full of make-believe

0:18:110:18:15

features inspired by Charles Dickens

0:18:150:18:18

and a friend of the family, JM Barrie of Peter Pan fame.

0:18:180:18:23

The construction of the lake started in 1911

0:18:230:18:26

and was completed two years later in 1913.

0:18:260:18:30

It was dug out all by hand by local men, some of them local fishermen

0:18:300:18:34

when they couldn't get off to sea,

0:18:340:18:36

but it's nowhere more than three feet deep so it's safe for children,

0:18:360:18:40

although we've had hundreds of wet muddy children,

0:18:400:18:44

including me, my children, my grandchildren...

0:18:440:18:47

In August 1912, the very first regatta took place on the Meare

0:18:480:18:53

and continues to this day as an annual tradition in the same

0:18:530:18:57

way that many of the families who come here for their holidays

0:18:570:19:00

have been doing so for generations.

0:19:000:19:03

But there's one particular tourist attraction in the village

0:19:030:19:07

that I've come to take a closer look at today, and you can't miss it.

0:19:070:19:11

You can spot it a mile off.

0:19:110:19:12

Seemingly floating over the rest of Thorpeness,

0:19:150:19:18

one can see what appears to be a cottage lodged in the trees.

0:19:180:19:22

But all is not quite as it seems.

0:19:220:19:25

Back in 1923, Ogilvie built a steel water tower to provide

0:19:250:19:30

a basic water supply to the Thorpeness village.

0:19:300:19:32

The result was, well, a great big blot on the landscape, something

0:19:320:19:36

horrible on the horizon that you could literally see for miles away.

0:19:360:19:40

He didn't know what to do with it but there was a solution.

0:19:400:19:42

A friend of his, Mrs Mason, actually said, "If you turn

0:19:420:19:46

it into a house, I will live in it." and that's exactly what happened.

0:19:460:19:51

There is the end result.

0:19:510:19:53

With the help from an architect,

0:19:560:19:58

Ogilvie carried out an ingenious disguise.

0:19:580:20:01

The tank was clad in wood

0:20:010:20:03

and even fitted with windows to make it look like a small house.

0:20:030:20:07

And the supporting steel structure was boarded in to provide

0:20:070:20:11

unique living accommodation below the tank.

0:20:110:20:13

It really is The House In The Clouds.

0:20:150:20:18

Hi, are you Sylvia?

0:20:180:20:19

-Yes, I am.

-Oh, pleased to meet you.

-Hello.

0:20:190:20:21

-Hello Paul, do come in.

-Thank you.

0:20:210:20:23

The Ogilvie family sold the property to Sylvia Le Comber

0:20:230:20:27

and today it's a private residence.

0:20:270:20:29

And as a special treat, I've been invited in to have a look around.

0:20:290:20:33

-It's nice and warm.

-It is nice and warm. And the kitchen's...

0:20:330:20:36

So, this is the first room we come to, really, which makes sense,

0:20:360:20:40

doesn't it, the kitchen and the dining room, because,

0:20:400:20:43

let's face it, you wouldn't want the kitchen on the top floor,

0:20:430:20:46

-carrying all your shopping upstairs, would you?

-No.

0:20:460:20:48

-So, Mrs Mason was the first person to live here.

-She was.

0:20:480:20:52

Yeah, how long ago was that?

0:20:520:20:55

She moved in in 1923 and I think it was '39,

0:20:550:20:59

might have been '40 when she moved out. The war caused it.

0:20:590:21:03

-Yeah, and when did you move in?

-Erm, '77.

0:21:030:21:06

-And you've had lots of happy years here?

-We certainly have.

0:21:060:21:09

Can I have a guided tour, can we start climbing some stairs?

0:21:090:21:12

-Please, go ahead.

-OK, I'll follow you.

-OK.

0:21:120:21:15

The House In The Clouds's first incumbent, Mrs Mason,

0:21:160:21:20

was an interesting character.

0:21:200:21:22

A published children's author,

0:21:220:21:24

Mrs Mason lived here with her four children.

0:21:240:21:27

Come in, Paul, to the drawing-room, here.

0:21:270:21:29

-And...

-This is a nice room.

-Mm.

-It's very arty and bohemian.

0:21:310:21:35

First impressions, anyway.

0:21:350:21:37

This is some of Mrs Mason's work, there is

0:21:380:21:41

The House In The Clouds poem, number one.

0:21:410:21:44

"The fairies really own the House, Or so the Children say".

0:21:440:21:47

Do you think this is a real, sort of, family house,

0:21:470:21:50

where lots of children can have fun?

0:21:500:21:52

Oh, yes, oh, it is like magic to children,

0:21:520:21:54

it's quite amazing how it has that effect.

0:21:540:21:57

Well, this was obviously built for Mrs Mason, you know,

0:21:570:22:00

designed for her to live in, that's why it has that fairytale quality.

0:22:000:22:05

Mr Ogilvie, when he built it, he built it for her

0:22:050:22:09

and he called her his lady of stairs and starlight, now isn't that lovely?

0:22:090:22:14

Yeah. And there's plenty of stairs here, I would imagine.

0:22:140:22:18

And starlight.

0:22:180:22:19

Was it always called The House In The Clouds?

0:22:190:22:21

Oh, no, it was the intention to be called The Gazebo,

0:22:210:22:27

but she said that was a hideous name, she said,

0:22:270:22:30

-"This is my House In The Clouds".

-It's a much better title, isn't it?

0:22:300:22:33

-Let's face it.

-Fits it perfectly.

0:22:330:22:36

-Well, this is the first floor explored, can we go higher?

-Yeah.

0:22:360:22:40

Right, you've got your walking boots on.

0:22:400:22:42

There are five bedrooms in the house all leading off the main staircase

0:22:430:22:47

but it's what's above them that I'm interested in.

0:22:470:22:50

Here we are. I always run up these stairs.

0:22:520:22:55

Oh, I love this.

0:22:550:22:58

Absolutely love this.

0:22:580:23:00

So, are we now standing inside what would have been the water tank?

0:23:000:23:04

-We are. 50,000 gallons of water, when I moved in.

-That's a lot of water.

0:23:040:23:09

-Yes.

-You wouldn't want a leak, would you?

0:23:090:23:11

You wouldn't, but it was very, very solidly built.

0:23:110:23:14

It was in four-foot steel panels, bolted together,

0:23:140:23:17

but it didn't stop Hitler from getting at it.

0:23:170:23:20

It was during World War II that disaster struck.

0:23:220:23:25

In June, 1944, Germany launched its latest weapon against Britain.

0:23:250:23:30

The V1 flying bomb, which delivered a ton of high explosive

0:23:300:23:34

each time one hurtled to the ground.

0:23:340:23:37

Anti-aircraft guns were redeployed to East Anglia to intercept them.

0:23:370:23:42

Enemy aircraft over the Channel.

0:23:420:23:44

One was sighted over Thorpeness by the Royal Artillery

0:23:440:23:47

and the anti-aircraft gun fired. It missed the bomb

0:23:470:23:51

and hit the water tower.

0:23:510:23:54

The shell entered the house on the south-east corner

0:23:540:23:58

and punctured the tank.

0:23:580:23:59

-It went in one side and out the other side.

-It missed its target but got the tower.

0:23:590:24:03

Presumably, a big flood. Was somebody living below at the time?

0:24:030:24:07

Oh, yes. There were three Miss Humphreys living in the house.

0:24:070:24:10

One of the Miss Humphreys was terribly sick

0:24:100:24:13

and the other two Miss Humphreys had to get her down and out.

0:24:130:24:18

Anyway, the ladies actually did get their sister down...

0:24:180:24:21

-And out of the house?

-..and out of the house safely.

0:24:210:24:25

-Happy ending.

-Thank goodness.

0:24:250:24:26

So how did they get the tank out,

0:24:260:24:28

did they have to chop it up in bits up here?

0:24:280:24:31

Oh, no, no, it had been very, very well maintained

0:24:310:24:35

and so we unbolted it, we took them down on the pulley.

0:24:350:24:40

-I'll tell you something, that's some height. You've got to have a head for heights.

-Yes, you have, yes.

0:24:400:24:44

It's making me feel a bit dizzy, looking down there.

0:24:440:24:47

-Especially when it moves.

-Yeah, I can feel it wobbling now.

0:24:470:24:50

And, of course, you can hear the wind, can't you?

0:24:500:24:53

-It just really does give this building a battering.

-Yeah.

0:24:530:24:56

-So what's it like a thunderstorm?

-Oh, it's magic.

-Is it?

0:24:560:25:00

-It's electrifying, I mean, quite literally.

-I'll bet it is!

0:25:000:25:03

Yes, you see it out to sea and sometimes it's not even raining,

0:25:030:25:06

it's just a whole body of light comes around you.

0:25:060:25:09

-It is wonderful.

-Wow.

0:25:090:25:12

Thank you so much, Sylvia, for showing me round your house.

0:25:120:25:14

It's been a great pleasure.

0:25:140:25:16

It's not just a House In The Clouds, I think it's a house of dreams,

0:25:160:25:19

-as well.

-A house of dreams and fun, yes.

0:25:190:25:21

Welcome back to our valuation day here at Ickworth House.

0:25:310:25:34

As you can see, hundreds of people are still waiting

0:25:340:25:37

here for a valuation, so, let's now catch up with our experts

0:25:370:25:40

and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:25:400:25:43

And we're going to head outside, first, to the Italianate gardens,

0:25:470:25:50

where Will Axon is talking to Sean and Becky.

0:25:500:25:53

What can you tell me about it? Where is it from?

0:25:530:25:56

-Well, two, three years ago we went to Fordham car-boot sale...

-I know it well.

0:25:560:26:00

-..which is near Newmarket and I paid £1 for it.

-Oh!

0:26:000:26:07

I think they were just trying to clear the stall, but obviously without the clock.

0:26:070:26:11

It was towards the end, as well?

0:26:110:26:12

-Yeah.

-Well, good for you. What drew you to it, Becky, did you...

0:26:120:26:16

Well, I just like grandfather clocks and a miniature one,

0:26:160:26:18

-with the flowers and things on it.

-Yes.

0:26:180:26:21

-So it just drew my attention to it.

-It is striking, isn't it?

0:26:210:26:24

It is very striking, yes, it's beautiful.

0:26:240:26:26

We tried to find a clock to go with it but we had no luck.

0:26:260:26:30

It would have been lovely, wouldn't it, to have it complete with the timepiece movement,

0:26:300:26:34

but I think you've got the main part of the piece,

0:26:340:26:38

the piece that's going to really attract the bidders at the auction.

0:26:380:26:44

We've got The Foley, which was produced for Wileman and Co,

0:26:440:26:47

designed by Frederick Rhead.

0:26:470:26:50

We've got this nice registration number here,

0:26:500:26:52

which gets us to the date of 1899.

0:26:520:26:54

So, if you think about that, at the end of the 19th century,

0:26:540:26:58

fairly modern for its time, isn't it? Fairly, sort of, on trend.

0:26:580:27:02

Funnily enough, the house we're standing in front of, again,

0:27:020:27:05

at the time, was very much on trend.

0:27:050:27:07

It shows you how fashions change, doesn't it?

0:27:070:27:10

I'm really attracted to it

0:27:110:27:13

because of this wonderful hand painting, here,

0:27:130:27:15

these bright colours, this very, sort of, natural,

0:27:150:27:19

organic feel about it. And you've got this lovely little quote here,

0:27:190:27:23

it's actually a Shakespearian quote, "Prithee, what's o'clock?"

0:27:230:27:27

I mean, I'm going to be, sort of, picking hairs, here,

0:27:270:27:30

but we do have just a little bit of damage, here and there.

0:27:300:27:34

Not major, I mean, for the hardcore collector it is an issue,

0:27:340:27:37

condition is everything, we do keep telling people that.

0:27:370:27:40

But, I tell you, for £1, I think you've done pretty well.

0:27:400:27:43

It's got real potential, but I think, let's not be greedy.

0:27:430:27:47

-It doesn't stand you in at a lot of money...

-No, no.

0:27:470:27:50

..you only paid £1 for it, we don't have the timepiece,

0:27:500:27:54

we've got a little bit of damage.

0:27:540:27:55

You know, I'm going to be mean and say,

0:27:550:27:57

let's stick it in at, sort of, £100-£150 and let the market decide.

0:27:570:28:02

-You happy with that?

-That sounds, that sounds good, yeah.

0:28:020:28:05

As I say, it's a good profit.

0:28:050:28:07

It's a good profit, I mean, it's got everything going for it,

0:28:070:28:10

bar the little chips here and there.

0:28:100:28:12

-So, we're agreed at an estimate of 100 to 150?

-Yeah, OK.

0:28:120:28:15

We'll fix the reserve at £100 and, to be honest, I think we could have

0:28:150:28:19

a little flyer, here, so it's going to make well over 100, I'm sure.

0:28:190:28:22

-Good.

-OK, good.

-Next time you're at the Fordham, leave all the good stuff.

0:28:220:28:26

-I'll give you some tips.

-Yeah, cheers, mate.

0:28:260:28:30

And Sean and Becky aren't the only ones picking up a bargain,

0:28:300:28:33

as Phil's finding out from Barry.

0:28:330:28:35

So, tell me, are you a bookworm?

0:28:380:28:41

No, it's a thing I've just recently been getting into.

0:28:410:28:44

I'm going to start my own bookshop up, just books like these,

0:28:440:28:47

second-hand, cheap, so people can afford them,

0:28:470:28:50

then travel around Europe.

0:28:500:28:52

Buying or selling?

0:28:520:28:54

Selling, I've got 2,500 that I've managed to buy to date.

0:28:540:28:57

You've got what?

0:28:570:28:59

-I've got 2,500 I've managed to buy to date.

-2,500 books?

0:28:590:29:02

-Yeah, in the space of the last year.

-In a year?

0:29:020:29:04

-Yeah, I've been going to auctions.

-And how much they cost you?

0:29:040:29:07

They're working out at 14p each and these,

0:29:070:29:10

I was lucky enough to find some gems.

0:29:100:29:12

-So you've got a good 42p worth here, haven't you?

-Oh, yeah.

0:29:120:29:16

What are you going to shift them around Europe in?

0:29:160:29:19

I've got a big Mercedes van I've nearly finished doing up, now.

0:29:190:29:23

I should still be able to make some money,

0:29:230:29:25

maybe buy some antiques as I go along.

0:29:250:29:27

-So it's going to be a real voyage of discovery, this, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:29:270:29:30

-It should be good.

-It's quite exciting, isn't it?

-It is.

0:29:300:29:32

-I'm looking forward to it.

-Yeah, good man.

0:29:320:29:35

In my eyes, I think I can discount this one,

0:29:350:29:38

The Voyages Of Captain Francis Drake,

0:29:380:29:40

because I just think it's a very interesting cover,

0:29:400:29:43

it's, sort of, quite Art Nouveau in the way that it looks,

0:29:430:29:46

-but for me, I can be a bit dismissive of that one.

-Yeah.

0:29:460:29:49

I like this because I'm a bit of a fan of George Orwell. I loved...

0:29:490:29:52

I did Animal Farm for my O-levels at school, a long, long, long time ago.

0:29:520:29:57

I just really enjoy George Orwell, I think he's a good author.

0:29:570:30:00

-This is a second impression...

-Yeah.

-..from 1941.

0:30:000:30:05

I think this one's probably, I don't know,

0:30:050:30:08

perhaps between £5 and £15, something like that,

0:30:080:30:11

but I love this one here, this is a Beatrix Potter, Frederick Warner and Co publishers.

0:30:110:30:15

Published in 1909, so it's a first edition, isn't it?

0:30:180:30:20

-First edition.

-Published in 1909, but again, not hugely valuable.

-No.

0:30:200:30:24

-Perhaps, £20 to £30, something like that?

-Yeah.

0:30:240:30:27

So, you might have £20 to £40 worth, in broad terms.

0:30:270:30:32

-Would you agree with that?

-I would agree with that.

0:30:320:30:34

Because you've done your homework, haven't you?

0:30:340:30:37

14p a go, I'll need to come and see you.

0:30:370:30:40

So, we've got perhaps £20 to £40 in auction value.

0:30:400:30:43

In terms of reserve, I'm tempted to tell you to put 50p on them,

0:30:430:30:47

That'll still sell you a 2p profit.

0:30:470:30:49

I'd probably put...

0:30:510:30:52

-£10 on them, to be truthful with you.

-Yeah.

0:30:520:30:55

-And they should sell then.

-Yeah, they should do.

0:30:550:30:58

But, you know, the book trade's interesting and I wish you all the best.

0:30:580:31:01

I've got a feeling, as time progresses,

0:31:010:31:03

you might increase your spend-level from 14p.

0:31:030:31:07

Yeah.

0:31:070:31:08

I'd say that's a fairly admirable spend-level.

0:31:100:31:14

Let's see how much profit he makes at the auction.

0:31:140:31:16

Now, today's valuations are taking place in the west wing.

0:31:160:31:20

But that's just one part of Ickworth House,

0:31:200:31:22

which was home to the earls and the marquises of Bristol for nearly 200 years.

0:31:220:31:27

Now owned by the National Trust, inside Ickworth's splendid Rotunda,

0:31:270:31:32

you can find a renowned collection of paintings.

0:31:320:31:35

Now, here in the dining room,

0:31:380:31:39

there's a rather charming group of family portraits.

0:31:390:31:42

In the centre is Theodora, a Victorian heiress who later

0:31:420:31:47

went on to marry the fourth marquis in 1896.

0:31:470:31:52

Either side of her are two portraits of their daughters.

0:31:520:31:55

On the left is the eldest daughter, Marjorie

0:31:550:31:58

and on the right, the younger daughter, Phyllis.

0:31:580:32:01

Now, Marjorie found sitting for her portrait rather irksome,

0:32:010:32:04

so the artist, William Edwards Miller,

0:32:040:32:07

decided to use young Phyllis as the subject matter for both models,

0:32:070:32:10

then returning to Marjorie for the finer details,

0:32:100:32:13

the facial expressions, the skin tones, the hair and the hands.

0:32:130:32:18

While Phyllis was sitting for both portraits,

0:32:180:32:22

she chatted to the artist about her naughty dolls.

0:32:220:32:25

So, as a reward for being so patient and obliging,

0:32:250:32:29

the artist made her - and I can't believe in going to say this -

0:32:290:32:33

a dolls' spanking machine.

0:32:330:32:36

-And I believe this is it here, with Chloe, hello Chloe.

-Hello.

0:32:360:32:41

-A dolls' spanking machine.

-It's a little bit unusual.

-Very unusual.

0:32:410:32:45

-So, how does it work?

-Shall I show you?

-Yes.

0:32:450:32:48

I've got my doll here, so, if I put it under,

0:32:480:32:51

just like that, the poor thing.

0:32:520:32:54

So there's our naughty doll being told off.

0:32:540:32:58

Do you know, that's a bit of fun, really, isn't it?

0:32:580:33:00

I mean, looking at it like that,

0:33:000:33:02

it's kind of like a naive piece of folk art, really.

0:33:020:33:05

-It is, yes.

-Do you like it?

0:33:050:33:08

-I do, yeah, why not?

-So do I.

-It's a bit of fun.

0:33:080:33:10

What do the visitors think? I mean, are they aware of this?

0:33:100:33:13

It's not something we usually get out of the collection, but I'd imagine they'd love it.

0:33:130:33:16

I'm sure, I'm sure when they're watching this, they'll all

0:33:160:33:19

ask for you to get it out and show them and have a demonstration.

0:33:190:33:22

-Well, I'd be quite happy to.

-Well, I've seen it all, now.

0:33:220:33:25

And can I just say, kids, the BBC doesn't condone doll spanking,

0:33:260:33:31

even if they've been very naughty.

0:33:310:33:33

Now, also inside the glorious Rotunda,

0:33:360:33:38

on his best behaviour, is Will Axon, although his next

0:33:380:33:42

item has been on the receiving end of some rough play.

0:33:420:33:46

Tell me you didn't drop this

0:33:460:33:47

and smash it into 100 pieces, did you?

0:33:470:33:49

This was, when I bought it, 40-odd years, 41 years ago,

0:33:490:33:54

-it was already being repaired.

-Had it?

-Not very well.

0:33:540:33:58

I'm sure people at home are looking at it and have shouted

0:33:580:34:01

at the telly what they think it is, we'll put them

0:34:010:34:03

out of their misery, it is, of course, a piece of Martinware.

0:34:030:34:06

Now, you've got a pretty long-standing affiliation

0:34:060:34:08

with the Martin Brothers, haven't you?

0:34:080:34:10

Yes, my father had lent some money to an antique dealer that was

0:34:100:34:14

-a friend and he couldn't repay the debt.

-Yes.

0:34:140:34:18

And he said, "Well, take all this Martinware", which at that time

0:34:180:34:23

-wasn't worth hardly a song.

-Yes.

0:34:230:34:26

It was about 30-odd pieces.

0:34:260:34:28

Unbelievable.

0:34:280:34:30

After my father died, they were still there,

0:34:300:34:32

but regretfully my mother decided to sell the lot,

0:34:320:34:36

so I went one day and no Martinware in the house.

0:34:360:34:40

-Without even telling you?

-Oh, yes.

-Oh, no.

0:34:400:34:43

So we had to start our collection from scratch.

0:34:430:34:46

What a shame, because, how long ago was that?

0:34:460:34:48

-It must be 40-odd years ago.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:34:480:34:52

-So, even then, they were probably making good prices?

-Oh, yes,

0:34:520:34:56

but nothing like now.

0:34:560:34:57

-If you still had them now, well, we'd be in serious money...

-That's right.

0:34:570:35:01

..because that's quite a collection.

0:35:010:35:02

For those of you who don't know,

0:35:020:35:04

the Martin Brothers were pottery manufacturers based in London,

0:35:040:35:07

who produced a distinctive type of stoneware from the 1870s

0:35:070:35:12

through to the First World War.

0:35:120:35:14

They became famous for their eccentric,

0:35:140:35:16

grotesquely modelled Wally Birds and sculpted face jugs,

0:35:160:35:20

which today can fetch thousands of pounds in auction.

0:35:200:35:23

-It's the grotesque part that I like.

-Is it?

0:35:260:35:29

Every morning, I used to get up past them and one was looking at me

0:35:290:35:33

and smiling and then the next time,

0:35:330:35:35

it was a miserable old face on the other side.

0:35:350:35:37

Let's look back at the vase, because I love it, I think it's great,

0:35:390:35:43

you know, the decoration, this whole finish that salt glazing gives you,

0:35:430:35:47

-because that's what they concentrated on, this salt glaze finish.

-That's right.

0:35:470:35:51

The kiln would come to a high temperature

0:35:510:35:53

and salt would literally be thrown into the kiln

0:35:530:35:56

and that would fuse with the clay and that would give you this...

0:35:560:36:01

-Sort of burnt look.

-Exactly,

0:36:010:36:02

you've got some matte, you've got some lustre,

0:36:020:36:05

what's super as well about their pieces is if I turn this piece up,

0:36:050:36:09

we can actually have a look underneath.

0:36:090:36:11

We've got a full set of marks, there.

0:36:110:36:14

RW, is that Robert Wallace?

0:36:140:36:15

-Yes.

-Yes, Robert Wallace Martin.

0:36:150:36:17

And then we've got Southall and we've got a date here, 1893.

0:36:170:36:22

So, really, it's a nice, well-marked decorative piece,

0:36:220:36:29

-which unfortunately at some stage, someone's dropped.

-That's right.

0:36:290:36:32

But at least made the effort of putting it back together.

0:36:320:36:35

-That's right.

-Now, I'm going to say to you,

0:36:350:36:37

let me put it in the sale with an estimate of £200 to £300.

0:36:370:36:41

-I think what that will do, it'll generate some interest.

-Yeah.

0:36:410:36:44

Let's fix the reserve at £200.

0:36:440:36:46

Yes, I don't want it to go for less than that.

0:36:460:36:49

No, you know, to be honest with you, I'm confident that it is going to do well.

0:36:490:36:53

Let's hope Will's prediction comes to fruition,

0:36:530:36:56

as we wrap up today's valuations.

0:36:560:36:59

Ickworth House, full of history and heritage

0:37:030:37:05

and I think we've made a little bit of history, ourselves, here today.

0:37:050:37:08

Hundreds of people have turned up

0:37:080:37:10

and we've found some marvellous little treasures,

0:37:100:37:13

our experts have now made their final choices of items to

0:37:130:37:15

take off to auction, so it's time to say goodbye to this magnificent host location.

0:37:150:37:20

It doesn't get much better than this, does it?

0:37:200:37:22

But right now, we have to make our way over to Diss,

0:37:220:37:24

to the auction room, and here's what we're taking with us.

0:37:240:37:27

Sean and Becky couldn't find a timepiece for this miniature

0:37:290:37:32

long case clock.

0:37:320:37:33

Will one of the bidders be able to complete this piece?

0:37:330:37:36

Bought for around 14p each,

0:37:370:37:40

Barry's books are sure to realise a profit, the question is how much?

0:37:400:37:44

And finally, will the tempting estimate on this piece

0:37:440:37:47

of restored Martinware from 1893 catch the eye of the collectors?

0:37:470:37:53

Welcome back to TW Gaze in Diss, where there's a packed

0:37:550:37:59

auction house, all under the command of auctioneer Elizabeth Talbot.

0:37:590:38:04

Now, in perfect condition, this Martinware vase could fetch over £1,000.

0:38:040:38:09

Let's see what it will make in its current state.

0:38:090:38:14

Well, you can't go wrong with a bit of Martinware, I had to say that,

0:38:140:38:16

being a Martin, it's quality throughout.

0:38:160:38:19

Quality always sells!

0:38:190:38:21

Gerald, it's great to see you,

0:38:210:38:22

thank you so much for bringing in a bit of Robert Martinware.

0:38:220:38:25

Now, I know this lovely vase has a crack running right around it.

0:38:250:38:29

-It has lots.

-A big one.

-It's been in two to three bits and re-glued.

0:38:290:38:33

Good luck, both of you, good luck.

0:38:330:38:35

I'm going to enjoy this moment, here we go.

0:38:350:38:37

The Martin Brothers stoneware vase...

0:38:380:38:42

..there it is, decorated with the fighting dragons and serpent.

0:38:430:38:47

Start with £200.

0:38:490:38:50

-Martin Brothers, there, £200, surely.

-Come on.

0:38:520:38:56

£200 is bid, thank you, £200 I have, I'll take ten.

0:38:560:38:59

Bids are in at £200, by the door, I'll take the ten.

0:38:590:39:02

it's a maiden bid at £200,

0:39:020:39:04

it will sell at £200...

0:39:040:39:06

Just in front?

0:39:060:39:07

220... 230... 240...

0:39:070:39:09

250... 260... 270... 280...

0:39:090:39:13

290... 300... 320...

0:39:130:39:15

Oh, creeping up!

0:39:150:39:16

340... 360...

0:39:160:39:17

380... 400... 420...

0:39:190:39:21

Any advance on £420? The phone is out.

0:39:230:39:26

At 420 on the vase, at 420, now, any advance on for 420?

0:39:260:39:30

-That was marvellous.

-Yeah?

-Very good indeed.

0:39:320:39:35

I was absolutely delighted.

0:39:350:39:36

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you. It's nice to see a bit of history.

0:39:360:39:39

Well done. I appreciated you bringing it in.

0:39:390:39:41

It was a pleasure.

0:39:410:39:43

What a great result for Gerald.

0:39:430:39:45

But for our next lot, there's been a last-minute change of plan.

0:39:450:39:49

Barry has upped the reserve.

0:39:490:39:51

-Phil, you don't know this yet, do you?

-No.

0:39:540:39:56

-But the reserve has been upped.

-Just a little bit.

0:39:560:39:58

Just a little bit

0:39:580:40:00

to £100.

0:40:000:40:01

-Yeah.

-So, why did you change your mind?

0:40:010:40:03

I was just talking with a couple of other people outside,

0:40:030:40:06

-that the Beatrix Potter might be worth more because of the condition it's in.

-Sure, OK.

0:40:060:40:10

I think the proof of the pudding will be it either will or won't

0:40:100:40:13

and I think it might be a bit optimistic, but I hope you get it.

0:40:130:40:16

The three books,

0:40:170:40:18

including the first edition Beatrix Potter, Ginger and Pickles.

0:40:180:40:22

I do have interest on it, I start, here, at just £38.

0:40:220:40:27

40 bid... 42...

0:40:280:40:30

45... 48...

0:40:300:40:31

50... 55...

0:40:310:40:33

55 with me, at 55 now, 55... 60... 65...

0:40:330:40:37

70... 75... 80... 85...

0:40:370:40:39

-This is good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:40:390:40:40

90... 95...

0:40:400:40:42

one more.

0:40:420:40:43

Come on. Come on, please.

0:40:430:40:45

£100, in the room at 100, at £100, now, with the lady at £100,

0:40:460:40:52

any advance on £100?

0:40:520:40:53

Well done, Barry. Well done.

0:40:570:40:58

It does make good reading, doesn't it?

0:40:580:41:00

It does, and good watching, I hope you enjoyed that.

0:41:000:41:03

And we wish Barry all the best with his new book-buying business.

0:41:030:41:07

He's clearly got a great eye for it.

0:41:070:41:09

Now, prithee, what's o'clock?

0:41:110:41:12

Yes, it's time for our last lot of the day.

0:41:120:41:14

Well, hopefully, we're going to turn £1, yes £1,

0:41:170:41:19

into maybe £200, right here, right now, with Sean and Becky.

0:41:190:41:23

-It's great to see you again and who is this?

-This is Ollie, my son.

0:41:230:41:26

Ollie, pleased to meet you. Do you like what Mum and Dad are selling?

0:41:260:41:30

-No.

-This pottery, the pottery long case clock?

0:41:300:41:33

It's an acquired taste, isn't it? It really is.

0:41:330:41:35

There will be someone out there who's got the clock part,

0:41:350:41:37

thinking "I just need the long case part."

0:41:370:41:39

It's there to run, isn't it, really?

0:41:390:41:41

It's all in Elizabeth's hands, enjoy this, won't you? Think of the money.

0:41:410:41:45

Here we go.

0:41:450:41:46

The Art Nouveau clock case, which is a clock case, no movement or

0:41:470:41:52

face, it's a lovely piece, stylish piece and typical of the period.

0:41:520:41:56

And I start here at £55.

0:41:570:42:00

-£55, 55...

-She's teasing us.

0:42:000:42:02

60... 65... 70... 75...

0:42:020:42:04

can't see you.

0:42:050:42:07

80... 85... 90... 95...

0:42:070:42:09

100 is now in the gallery, 110 downstairs.

0:42:090:42:11

I hope we haven't over-talked it.

0:42:110:42:13

120... 130... 140...

0:42:130:42:16

150... 160...

0:42:160:42:17

170... 180...

0:42:170:42:19

190... 200...

0:42:190:42:21

220... 240... 260...

0:42:210:42:23

This is more like it, we're going up in £20, now.

0:42:230:42:26

280... 300... 320... gallery is now at 320.

0:42:260:42:29

At 320, the clock face, at 320.

0:42:290:42:31

At 320, the phone is out.

0:42:310:42:33

At 320 in the gallery, any advance on 320?

0:42:330:42:37

Not bad, not bad profit from £1, is it?

0:42:380:42:42

From my local car-boot, as well.

0:42:420:42:44

Time to get you lot to stay away.

0:42:440:42:46

And that's what it's all about, folks.

0:42:480:42:50

I hope you've been as inspired as I am.

0:42:500:42:53

Well, that's it, it's all over, the hammer

0:42:540:42:56

has gone down on our last lot and I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:42:560:43:00

And hopefully it's inspired you to take part in the show.

0:43:000:43:04

If you'd like to sell your antiques, we would love to see you.

0:43:040:43:07

Details of up-and-coming dates and venues you can find on our website.

0:43:070:43:10

Just log on to bbc.co.uk/flogit, follow the links, all the information will be there.

0:43:100:43:16

If you don't have a computer, check the details in your local press.

0:43:160:43:18

Come on, dust them down and bring them in.

0:43:180:43:21

But until then, from Diss, it's goodbye.

0:43:210:43:23

Flog It! comes from Ickworth House, a Georgian mansion in Suffolk built for the Earls of Bristol.

Paul Martin is joined by experts Will Axon and Philip Serrell. Together the team pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at a local auction. Will casts an appreciative eye over a piece of Martinware but will a miniature long case clock bought at the car boot for £1 prove to be the star find?

Paul also heads to the Suffolk coast to explore the magical House in the Clouds in Thorpeness, a fantasy holiday village built in the early years of the 20th century.


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