Manchester 35 Flog It!


Manchester 35

Antiques series. Flog It! comes from the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. Finds include an Inuit carving and a French book of butterflies.


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Transcript


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This is the site of the first passenger railway line in history.

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It was opened in 1830 and it allowed the working man to travel

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from Manchester to Liverpool in half the time and at half the cost.

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Just one of the reasons why Manchester has an esteemed legacy as

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the world's first industrial city.

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And the men in the mural over there, that's another story.

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We'll be finding out more from Manchester's Museum of Science

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and Industry later on in the programme.

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Welcome to "Flog It!"

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The Industrial Revolution in Manchester led to enormous wealth

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for some, but extreme poverty for others.

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The city's population quadrupled in just 50 years,

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at the turn of the 19th century.

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And as Friedrich Engels commented,

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living conditions for some were wretched, damp and filthy.

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But as Manchester City grew, so did the people's fight.

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And it's probably

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the relatives of some of these people here, in today's crowd,

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that played a major part in Manchester's working-class

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campaign for the right to vote,

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free trade and also better working conditions.

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But thankfully, our battle is a little less serious today,

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as our experts hunt out the best antiques and collectibles

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to take off to auction.

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And it could be you going home with a small fortune.

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We'll find out later on in the show.

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Fingers crossed and good luck, everyone.

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What a fabulous queue we have here today!

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Let's get the doors open and get on with it!

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ALL: Hooray!

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As our massive queue enters the MOSI,

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they are first struck by the impressive digital sculpture

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that shows some of Manchester's most important people and places.

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But today it has been hijacked by our very own experts,

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who couldn't resist appearing on another TV screen.

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Pretty in pink and legend in the sale room, it is Anita Manning.

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And the man with an encyclopaedic knowledge of silver -

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Mr Michael Baggott.

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And today, they've found items from around the globe

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and throughout the decades.

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Anita has got a ship that sailed the China seas.

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And the seas were a wild, wild place.

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Michael has got his hands on an Inuit carving

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from a far flung polar region.

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And I chance upon one of the most beautiful books I've ever seen.

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And the bidders love it, too.

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Well, everybody is now safely seated inside the venue.

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We have our experts in place. They've found their first items.

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So let's now catch up with Michael Baggott,

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who is first at the "Flog It!" tables.

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We'll take a closer look at what he's spotted.

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Jeff, I better not upset you with you my valuation today,

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cos you've brought this in.

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Where has this lethal weapon come from?

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Well, recently, in my bedside cupboard.

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It goes there at night?

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-Yeah. Just lying in a drawer.

-Have you had cause to use it?

-No.

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-That's good.

-We are very law-abiding people in Manchester.

-Marvellous.

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But where did it come from originally?

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-It belonged originally to my great-great-grandfather.

-Good grief!

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-His father kept a pub in Lancaster.

-Yeah.

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At the age of 19, he left to seek his fortune.

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Went down to London, married a London girl, didn't work out for him there.

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-This is in the 1840s.

-Yeah.

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Came back, finally settled in Manchester,

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joined the police force at Ashton.

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Was then moved to a place called Farnworth,

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where he was promoted to police inspector.

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And it was there, I believe, that he was given that particular truncheon.

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Well, we are dealing with a very early period

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in sort of police history.

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And this is sort of a crossover.

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Cos people will think of a truncheon

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as a grip with a slender tapering for service.

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-This is far more decorative.

-Yeah.

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-And this falls into what we call a tipstaff.

-Hm-mm.

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And they are what is carried much earlier. They had a functional use.

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I mean, you could, you know, whack someone over the head with that

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-if you really had to, but it is more your badge of office.

-Yeah.

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-You've got VR - Victoria Regina.

-Obviously.

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You've got the crown, the warrant.

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On the other side, we've got

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a little shield with a coat of arms on it.

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That would be for the district that employed his service.

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-And we've got these initials here.

-Yeah.

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Sometimes they will be the initials of an officer, but very rarely.

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Often these initials will actually refer to a place.

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-So like, if we were MC, we might be Manchester city.

-Yeah.

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-I don't know what the arms are for or what the initials are.

-No.

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But I can guess there is a tipstaff collector out there that

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-probably does.

-Yeah.

-It's turned out of mahogany.

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And it has got all this decorative ring turning.

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And then it has been varnished.

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And, I mean, look at the colour of it.

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-Yeah, beautiful, isn't it?

-Lovely.

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And just wear, you know...

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A couple of hundred years of fingers have been around that.

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I mean, I have to ask the question, why have you decided to sell it?

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It's in my bedside cabinet. It's not on display.

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Absolutely. Let's say...

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£150 to £250.

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-If you are happy with that.

-Yeah.

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-And a fixed reserve of 150.

-Yeah, I'd like a fixed reserve.

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You know, it is a wonderful bit of social history.

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And I am delighted you brought it in today.

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Just as long as things don't go badly at the auction

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and I get the back of it on my head, but I don't think we will.

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-Thanks very much for bringing it in.

-You are quite welcome. Thank you.

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That's a real collector's item,

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but will the tipstaff fans be at the auction or bidding online?

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Wait and see. Next, Anita has found some old junk.

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Jackie, an interesting item you have brought along today,

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this little silver Chinese junk.

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Can you tell me, where did you get it?

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Well, my friend, Terry, bought it 20 years ago

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from a car boot in Cheshire.

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Did he tell you what drew him to it?

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He is very fond of ships and boats.

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Having been an engineer and designer,

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he likes anything interesting. Yeah.

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Oh, right, right. It was probably made in the 1920s.

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It would have been made of silver,

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but it would be a low grade silver, it wouldn't be

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a sterling silver, and it would have been made for the tourist market.

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But don't let that put you off at all, you know,

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these are quite positive things.

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When I look at that,

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I'm thinking about the South China Seas,

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around Hong Kong,

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and what was happening in the late 19th, early 20th century,

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and the South China Seas were a wild, wild place.

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When we look at the little boat,

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we can see the little cannons on the boat.

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And I find that fascinating.

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When you think of the traffic and the pirates,

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they would need some sort of protection here.

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And we have these marvellous sails.

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Oars if they were a bit calmed.

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I mean, it's not a finely made thing. It's quite crudely done.

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But it is a lot of fun.

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-What do think it is worth?

-Um...

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-£60 to £70?

-You are quite good, are you looking for a job?

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So, we will put it into auction, £50 to £70.

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Will you be happy to sell it on at that?

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Oh, yes, that's fine, thank you.

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Let's hope that it sails beautifully into the sunset

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-and makes a lot of money.

-Yes!

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# When my ship When my ship, when my ship... #

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It may not be of the highest quality, but this ship has stacks

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of character and keeps a moment in history alive.

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And the MOSI itself is full of exhibits that chronicle

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Manchester's industrial achievements over the last 200 years.

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Just look at this. Where I'm standing right now

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is the railway shed, and its full of iconic locomotives everywhere.

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You can really learn so much here.

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On September 15, in 1830, a line opened between Manchester

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and Liverpool, and it left right from here.

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Look, the Liverpool Road Station. The tracks are just outside.

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It was a journey of 35 miles.

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It transported cotton for the industries here, but also people.

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It was the first passenger line to open in the world.

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Now that is history in the making for Manchester.

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And now it is back to the present day and Mr Michael Baggott.

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Jeff, where has this magnificent decanter stand come from?

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It came from my father, actually, he was in the antique trade years ago.

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Oh, he was a dealer? Was he dealing in silver or everything?

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No, just generally, everything. Furniture, all sorts of things.

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When he retired, he had quite a number of items, you know,

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and this was just one of them.

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And when he died, my mother took everything over.

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And when she died, my sister and I split everything between us.

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-But you decided to keep this.

-Yeah, I decided to keep that, really,

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cos it was such an ornamental thing and it looked nice on the...

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I had it on a bureau and it looked quite nice.

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So it has not been up to here with sherry, whiskey and brandy.

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I never actually used it for that, actually.

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Just lately it has been put away in a cupboard because of the cleaning.

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It got a little bit tarnished.

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So the polishing has sort of put paid to it in your house.

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-Well, it has really, yeah.

-I mean, it is typical Victorian.

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-Is it? Yeah.

-You know,

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if you wanted a picture of what high Victorian was,

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-this would suit it perfectly.

-Right.

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-The decoration is all over the place.

-Right.

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I mean, we've got scrolls, anthemion shells.

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-There are little dolphins, stylized dolphins on the feet.

-Right, yeah.

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-And these immensely fussy stoppers.

-Right.

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This one is a bit low and this one is a bit high.

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I never noticed that, I thought they were all the same.

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I just wonder if they are not the original stoppers.

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We've got the electroplate labels.

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-And the whole frame is electroplated.

-Right.

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-Sadly, not solid silver.

-No.

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And we've got the electroplater's mark of Padley and Parkin Limited.

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And they were working in about 1849 to about 1855.

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-Right.

-Which is slap bang

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-when you'd expect this sort of thing to be made.

-I see.

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I think it was probably a more popular thing

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when your father had it than it is today.

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So I think it would have to be

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put into an auction at an attractive figure to another trade buyer.

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-Right.

-I think...let's say, £100 to £200.

-Right.

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-Put a fixed reserve of £100 on it.

-That's OK, yeah.

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I think two people might just fall in love with it,

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want the stoppers or not,

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and it might go on and make a great sum at the auction.

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-So thanks very much for bringing it in.

-Right.

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Jeff, you'll never have to polish it again.

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Wave goodbye to it now.

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You get a lot for your money with those decanters, but the

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market for elaborate Victorian ware is not what it used to be.

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How will it fare when it goes under the hammer?

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We'll find out in just a moment.

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Fingers crossed, everybody.

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Good luck later on in the programme, because it could be you,

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you or you going through to the auction.

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That's exactly where we're going right now

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for our very first visit. Our experts have worked flat out.

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They have been industrious.

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We're going to put those values to the test.

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And here's what we are taking with us.

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Hello, hello, hello. What have we here?

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It is a tipstaff from the 19th century,

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and is up for grabs today.

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The Chinese junk would make a great gift for a sailing buff.

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It might a storm in the sale room.

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And Jeff's grandiose decanters won't match many modern interiors.

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Will this deter the bidders?

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There's only one way to find out - it's off to auction, which is held

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in an old school hall 15 miles from Manchester,

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in the town of Knutsford.

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Frank Marshall Saleroom was established in 1947

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and sells everything from bronze beasts to chubby cherubs.

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Nick Hall and Peter Ashburner are in charge of the sale today.

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And it is their duty to get as much money as possible for every item.

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The sale is online, so bidders from around the world will be

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logging on right now for our first "Flog It!" lot.

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Now, not only is this little truncheon in fabulous

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condition, from the Queen Victoria era, but we also have

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the gentleman who owned it, the policeman who owned it,

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and all of his career record!

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This is what you can't find out.

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This is what is not written on the tipstaff.

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So this is probably one in, what,

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200 or 300 that we'll see that still has it.

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-It makes a big difference.

-Yeah.

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Let's find out what the bidders think right now.

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It's going under the hammer. Here we go.

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The Queen Victorian mahogany turned wood tipstaff.

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What are we going to say for this?

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Who's going to open the bidding for me?

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I'll ask 150.

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150 anywhere?

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£100 and away, surely.

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Bidding, 100. At £100, on bid.

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-And ten. 120.

-Right, we are off.

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-We are in.

-That was short and sweet.

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At £120.

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Anybody got 30 now? At £120.

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-You're out on the right, make no mistake.

-I can't believe this.

-120.

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Anybody got more? Anybody online?

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At 120, then. Any advance now on 120?

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I'm sorry, we're not quite there with that one.

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Well, do you know something?

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I'm absolutely pleased, really. Because...

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Now you've brought this along,

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I think this makes the complete package.

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Get this photo copied and... Or when you do offer it up to the

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ext sale room, offered it up as a complete package. Yeah.

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Because that did arrive a little bit too late.

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We just found out about that while the auctioneer covered the rostrum.

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-Yeah.

-I think it was not meant to go.

-Yeah, so do I.

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-I think he probably had something to say about it.

-Yeah.

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Now here's a tip.

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If you've got some provenance that goes with an item,

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make sure you get them both to the auction house in time

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so they can be catalogued together.

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It might mean the difference between a sale and a no sale.

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And talking of sale...

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Our next lot is that Chinese junk, belonging to Jackie.

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And it is really sculptural, isn't it?

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I remember it from the valuation day.

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You can't forget this lot, can you?

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-And you zoomed in on this, you loved it.

-I love it.

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I was in Hong Kong at Christmas time, and I saw lots of these

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fabulous boats in the harbour, the South China Seas.

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-And they really just sparked my imagination.

-Right.

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Well, let's hope we can do the same to the bidders in the sale room.

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Let's hope they have got a great imagination.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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Fine Chinese white metal model of a junk in glazed case.

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Rather stylish, isn't it? Right, where were going to go over this?

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Who's going to start me at £50?

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Yes? 50. 50 bid. At 50.

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Seated bid at 50. I'll take five.

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At £50. Anybody else want a go?

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-There is a bid in now.

-Is there a five? Anybody online?

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-Come on.

-Anybody else in the room?

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It is £50, seated in the centre of the room,

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and I'm going to sell it.

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Selling it, Jackie. £50, hammer has gone down.

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-£50, just made it.

-Fine.

-It just made it.

-Right.

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-Brilliant.

-Are you happy enough at that?

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-Very happy.

-I'm sure Terry will be as well.

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-Oh, yes.

-Over the moon, in fact.

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£50 seems a bargain to me.

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Let's hope this next lot lifts the spirits in the sale room.

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Right now we've got a bit of Victorian electroplate for you -

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Jeff's decanter and stand.

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Why are you selling this, Jeff?

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It has been in the family for such a long time

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and it's never had anything in it, any spirits or anything.

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It would add to the value right now.

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-What are we looking at, about 100, 150?

-100 to 200.

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I remember ten years ago these at auction making £500, £600.

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-Really?

-Because of the high Victorian taste. It's gone.

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It was all about showing off for entertaining,

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-but now it is all about minimalism.

-Yeah.

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Right, we're going to find out exactly what this packed

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auction house thinks of the electroplate.

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It is going under the hammer now.

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Ready to go for gin, brandy and whiskey, whatever's your flavour.

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Where are we going to go? I've got commission interest.

0:16:320:16:34

I'm coming straight in on the book now at £100, firm.

0:16:340:16:38

We're now at 100.

0:16:380:16:39

110. 120. 130.

0:16:390:16:41

140. 150. 160.

0:16:410:16:43

Must have a couple of heavy drinkers in Knutsford.

0:16:430:16:46

Yeah, it has made its money straightaway.

0:16:460:16:48

It has literally made its money.

0:16:480:16:49

190. 200.

0:16:490:16:51

And ten. 210 now. It is against you online, it is against the room.

0:16:510:16:55

It is all on commission.

0:16:550:16:56

At £210, bids are with me.

0:16:560:16:59

At 210, I sell.

0:16:590:17:00

Last chance, all sure?

0:17:000:17:02

-Well, that was a great result.

-Brilliant.

0:17:020:17:05

I think that was a brilliant result, £210, Jeff.

0:17:050:17:08

-Very pleased with that.

-Yeah!

0:17:080:17:09

-I think we are in the right area.

-Nostalgia.

0:17:090:17:12

-Big Victorian houses with Victorian interiors.

-Yeah, nostalgia.

0:17:120:17:15

We've hit the right place with the right object.

0:17:150:17:18

That is a great result.

0:17:180:17:19

Maybe decanters are coming back into fashion.

0:17:190:17:22

Manchester has had many famous sons

0:17:220:17:25

and daughters throughout history, from Emmeline Pankhurst to LS Lowry.

0:17:250:17:30

But one of the most extraordinary men from this city charted

0:17:300:17:34

the history of 20th century America

0:17:340:17:36

and created a social record of unparalleled distinction.

0:17:360:17:40

Broadcasting House, in the heart of London, is the most famous

0:17:450:17:49

of all the BBC's buildings and its original home,

0:17:490:17:52

so it is a fitting place to talk about the work of one

0:17:520:17:56

of the BBC's most legendary radio broadcasters, Alistair Cooke,

0:17:560:18:01

born in Salford, near Manchester, in 1908.

0:18:010:18:06

For 58 years, Alistair Cooke presented Letter From America,

0:18:060:18:09

the world's longest-running speech radio programme,

0:18:090:18:12

from the BBC studios in New York.

0:18:120:18:14

Now, at the time of his death in 2004,

0:18:140:18:17

the then acting Director General of the BBC described him

0:18:170:18:21

as the outstanding commentator of the 20th century.

0:18:210:18:25

The Letter, which started on March the 24th, 1946,

0:18:300:18:35

was originally devised as a 13-week series.

0:18:350:18:39

What follows is part of the very first episode that Cooke

0:18:390:18:43

re-recorded in 1996.

0:18:430:18:46

In it, he describes his trip over the Atlantic on a ship packed

0:18:460:18:51

with GI brides, leaving a war weary Britain for their new lives

0:18:510:18:55

in the United States.

0:18:550:18:57

'I sailed back on the Queen Mary with a couple of thousand GI brides.

0:18:570:19:03

'And I recall now the great liner thundering its great horn

0:19:030:19:07

'as we slipped away from the dock at Southampton.

0:19:070:19:11

'All the mothers were clinging to the rail

0:19:110:19:14

'and all the babies were clinging to their mothers.

0:19:140:19:17

'Along the entire curving length of the ship's main deck,

0:19:170:19:21

'the handkerchiefs fluttered in an unbroken line,

0:19:210:19:26

'like washing day in Manchester.'

0:19:260:19:28

The formula for The Letter never really changed that much.

0:19:310:19:35

It broke all broadcasting records by reaching 2,869 episodes.

0:19:350:19:41

And remarkably, Cooke himself only missed three of the weekly

0:19:410:19:46

broadcasts throughout that entire epic run.

0:19:460:19:50

And the letters themselves acted like a secular sermon,

0:19:500:19:53

charting the history of the 20th century through the daily

0:19:530:19:57

life of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

0:19:570:20:00

Over almost 60 years, his 15-minute reflections

0:20:020:20:06

touched on everything from the assassinations of the Kennedys,

0:20:060:20:10

the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal

0:20:100:20:14

and the terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers

0:20:140:20:17

on the 11th of September.

0:20:170:20:19

'I found myself, by one casual chance in a thousand,

0:20:190:20:23

'on hand,

0:20:230:20:25

'in a small, narrow serving pantry

0:20:250:20:27

'of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

0:20:270:20:30

'There was suddenly a banging repetition of a sound

0:20:300:20:35

'that I don't know how to describe, not at all like shots,

0:20:350:20:38

'like somebody dropping a rack of trays.

0:20:380:20:41

'There were flashlights by now,

0:20:410:20:42

'and the button eyes of Ethel Kennedy turned to cinders.

0:20:420:20:45

'And down on the greasy floor was a huddle of clothes,

0:20:450:20:48

'and staring out of it, the face of Bobby Kennedy,

0:20:480:20:51

'like the stone face of a child lying on a cathedral tomb.'

0:20:510:20:55

His proud assertion was that

0:21:020:21:04

until he sat down at his portable typewriter on Thursday morning,

0:21:040:21:08

he didn't actually know what he was going to write about.

0:21:080:21:11

This is his very typewriter here, at Broadcasting House.

0:21:110:21:15

So what you got was the texture of daily life, conversations with

0:21:150:21:19

cabdrivers and shopkeepers and store holders that he bumped into and met.

0:21:190:21:24

His last letter was written four weeks before his death,

0:21:240:21:27

at the age of 95.

0:21:270:21:29

A reporter at heart,

0:21:290:21:31

Cooke not only wrote Letter From America for the BBC,

0:21:310:21:34

he worked as a foreign correspondent for The Guardian newspaper

0:21:340:21:37

for 25 years and he made memorable television programmes

0:21:370:21:41

in both the US and the UK,

0:21:410:21:43

including the monumental BBC series Alistair Cooke's America.

0:21:430:21:47

But he followed a strict regime - work always stopped at cocktail hour

0:21:470:21:51

and the evenings were kept for pleasure.

0:21:510:21:54

Letter From America is older than Radio 4 itself.

0:21:550:21:59

It started out life on the home service

0:21:590:22:02

and then moved over to the new station when it was created in 1967.

0:22:020:22:07

And now the programme has taken another remarkable turn.

0:22:070:22:11

The dusty old reels have been given a 21st century makeover.

0:22:110:22:14

It is now available on the BBC's website.

0:22:140:22:18

But many of the early episodes were not recorded by the BBC,

0:22:180:22:22

and these unique reflections could have been lost forever.

0:22:220:22:26

But thanks to 90-year-old Roy Whitaker, that's not the case.

0:22:260:22:31

Roy, can you explain how you helped the BBC with their archive?

0:22:310:22:34

Well, the BBC put out a request

0:22:340:22:37

for anyone who had any early

0:22:370:22:41

recordings of Alistair Cooke's Letter From America.

0:22:410:22:44

I got in touch with the BBC and, to cut a long story short,

0:22:440:22:47

two reps from the BBC came down to our home address to view

0:22:470:22:53

the quantity of tapes that I had.

0:22:530:22:55

And in all, there were over 200 cassettes.

0:22:550:23:00

And it worked out to well over 1,000 recordings altogether.

0:23:000:23:04

And when did these recordings start from?

0:23:040:23:06

Well, my recordings started from 1978. And almost without fail,

0:23:060:23:12

I didn't miss a recording until the day he retired.

0:23:120:23:15

What was it about Alistair Cooke? I mean, why were you such a big fan?

0:23:150:23:19

Because he is such a wonderful speaker.

0:23:190:23:22

He had such a wonderful way of putting things over.

0:23:220:23:24

And he had such quips that he dropped in.

0:23:240:23:28

I was just fascinated by his command of the English language.

0:23:280:23:33

His talks,

0:23:330:23:36

only 15 minutes every Friday,

0:23:360:23:39

and Sunday morning it was repeated again,

0:23:390:23:41

I could listen to them forever. Yeah.

0:23:410:23:43

Unfortunately, I've not got round to doing that.

0:23:430:23:46

But they are there.

0:23:480:23:49

If I live long enough, I'll do some of them, that's for sure.

0:23:490:23:52

'In no time at all, a new profession was born, that of marketing research.

0:23:520:23:56

'And the marketing researcher became to industry in this country

0:23:560:24:00

'what the oracles were to the Greeks.'

0:24:000:24:03

I ought to give credit to another gentleman, David Henderson.

0:24:030:24:07

He contacted the BBC, too.

0:24:070:24:09

-And he is responsible for a lot before the 1970s.

-Yeah.

0:24:090:24:12

The BBC, from the two contributions,

0:24:120:24:17

they were able to resurrect

0:24:170:24:20

620-odd recordings.

0:24:200:24:24

Well, it sounds like we are really in debt to both of you.

0:24:240:24:27

Thank you so much, Roy, it has been a pleasure to talk to you.

0:24:270:24:29

My pleasure. Absolutely.

0:24:290:24:31

Roy's recordings prove that antiques don't have to be silver or gold

0:24:310:24:35

to be valuable.

0:24:350:24:37

Maybe you've got something in the attic that is

0:24:370:24:39

precious beyond pounds and pence,

0:24:390:24:41

like Alistair Cooke's unique, historical records,

0:24:410:24:44

which can now be accessed by everyone.

0:24:440:24:48

The question is, what is that worth?

0:24:480:24:49

Well, the answer is obvious - priceless, of course.

0:24:490:24:52

Back at our valuation day,

0:25:000:25:01

the engines of industry are still running, and the fuel

0:25:010:25:04

for Michael's fire is a stunning carving from an indigenous people.

0:25:040:25:10

Bruce, thank you for coming along with this very intriguing figure.

0:25:100:25:14

Before I say anything about it, where did it come from?

0:25:140:25:18

I bought him at an auction in Dorset.

0:25:180:25:20

There was no bids on him,

0:25:200:25:22

-so I went and made an offer to the people in the office.

-Really?

0:25:220:25:25

How cheeky was the offer you made?

0:25:250:25:28

I started off at five pounds and went up by 50p's.

0:25:280:25:31

Did it take a long time to buy it at that rate?

0:25:310:25:33

They gave up at £7.50 and told me to take it.

0:25:330:25:36

-They told me I could have it.

-I'm going to remember that technique.

0:25:360:25:39

You wore them down.

0:25:390:25:40

I should've offered them 20p, I made a big mistake.

0:25:400:25:43

And you'd have got it for six quid.

0:25:430:25:45

We've basically got, as you know, a soapstone carving of an Eskimo,

0:25:450:25:51

-or more correctly, an Inuit.

-An Inuit.

0:25:510:25:53

And it falls into this very interesting group of Inuit

0:25:530:25:57

carvings that were done, but done to be given as gifts,

0:25:570:26:01

mainly due to the Western influence.

0:26:010:26:04

Before probably about 1870, 1860,

0:26:040:26:09

the carvings that they made were purely within their own culture.

0:26:090:26:14

And they can be in soapstone or the more desirable

0:26:140:26:18

ones can be in a species of slate called argillite.

0:26:180:26:21

And that is very telling, when you see something in this material.

0:26:210:26:24

-Does that give it a date, then?

-It can be earlier but it can be later.

0:26:240:26:28

Dating is a problem. It is a thorny issue.

0:26:280:26:32

I would imagine this to date from the first quarter

0:26:320:26:37

of the 20th century. It has got a lot of wear to it.

0:26:370:26:41

We've got the bone used. And we've got little bits of damage.

0:26:410:26:45

-The base is cracked. And that has happened over time.

-Yeah.

0:26:450:26:48

Now, this has got the sense of being handled, and soapstone does wear.

0:26:480:26:52

It is quite a soft material.

0:26:520:26:54

A value...

0:26:540:26:56

when we are uncertain of date is an even bigger problem.

0:26:560:26:59

Is it more than £7.50, Bruce?

0:26:590:27:01

I think that's more than £7.50.

0:27:010:27:03

Let's put it in at £100 to £200.

0:27:030:27:07

And it is going to be photographed, it is going to

0:27:070:27:09

be put on the Internet.

0:27:090:27:11

And it is going to be described as an Inuit carving.

0:27:110:27:14

So basically, anybody in the world looks on the Internet catalogues,

0:27:140:27:17

and believe me, there are many,

0:27:170:27:19

many people that type in "Inuit carvings" once a week,

0:27:190:27:22

will see this, and they will probably know better than you

0:27:220:27:25

and I when it was made, who made it and what it is worth.

0:27:250:27:29

But I think for the moment,

0:27:290:27:30

-if you are happy to risk your £7.50 figure...

-I will risk my £7.50.

0:27:300:27:34

It is as much a learning experience for me

0:27:340:27:37

as it probably will be for you on the day, Bruce,

0:27:370:27:39

but thank you so much for bringing in such an interesting item.

0:27:390:27:42

Thank you very much.

0:27:420:27:44

Art and sculpture has always played a big part in Inuit society,

0:27:440:27:48

and this carving represents that ancient tradition.

0:27:480:27:51

I hope someone in the sale room recognizes it's worth.

0:27:510:27:55

Thank you so much, everyone, for coming in today,

0:27:550:27:58

because without you, we would not have a show.

0:27:580:28:00

Hold up what you've got, let's see!

0:28:000:28:02

That me take my pick, let me beat the experts to all the goodies.

0:28:020:28:05

Well, I'm going for the nearest thing, actually.

0:28:050:28:08

Wow, look at this!

0:28:080:28:10

Look at that!

0:28:110:28:13

Chis-chis. Chis-chis.

0:28:130:28:15

That looks like a very early pair of secateurs,

0:28:150:28:18

something for Alan Titchmarsh.

0:28:180:28:21

-1920s or 30s?

-19...13.

0:28:210:28:25

1913, pair of English secateurs.

0:28:250:28:28

Look at that, still working, oiled up and cleaned.

0:28:280:28:31

-Do you use them?

-Occasionally.

0:28:310:28:34

-Put your finger in.

-Yeah. Chis. Oh!

0:28:340:28:36

Prune the privet heads.

0:28:360:28:38

Well, good luck with that. Well, what have you got here? Oh!

0:28:380:28:40

-I've got a very old...

-Papillon, butterflies!

-Papillons.

0:28:400:28:44

-And they're all hand-painted.

-Oooh!

0:28:440:28:46

Can I have a look at these? What is your name?

0:28:460:28:49

-My name is Kath Dawson.

-Kath, how did you come by these?

0:28:490:28:53

Well, originally, in the 1960s, my first job was as an art designer,

0:28:530:28:59

-a textile designer, at a mill up in the Rossendale Valley.

-OK.

0:28:590:29:03

And when I was made redundant, which was only after a couple of years,

0:29:030:29:08

I was asked, would I like to pick a book,

0:29:080:29:10

and this is what I picked.

0:29:100:29:13

I think the condition is superb, absolutely superb.

0:29:140:29:16

This is how it was as I was given it, you know, so...

0:29:160:29:20

This man, Seguy, was quite influential, you know,

0:29:200:29:25

-with the colours and the designs.

-It is very good.

0:29:250:29:27

I did take it to somebody about three years ago who was prepared to

0:29:270:29:31

-buy it from me.

-And how much were they prepared to offer you?

0:29:310:29:34

They were offering £1,000 three years ago.

0:29:340:29:37

-Are they still about?

-Yes.

0:29:370:29:40

I haven't contacted them, though.

0:29:400:29:42

-And is it something you're hoping to sell in one of our auctions?

-Yes.

0:29:430:29:47

It just seems such a shame that it's wrapped up

0:29:470:29:51

in brown paper in my wardrobe.

0:29:510:29:53

My gut feeling is there is a value here instantly of a round about

0:29:530:29:57

£500, if you add up the individual sheets.

0:29:570:30:00

There is around about 15 or 20 really good plates here,

0:30:000:30:04

all in great condition.

0:30:040:30:05

And if you think every plate might be worth

0:30:050:30:07

-round about £30 to £40, you've already got £500, haven't you?

-Yes.

0:30:070:30:11

I mean, I am quite happy to go with your valuation on that.

0:30:110:30:15

-I do personally think it is a bit punchy.

-Right.

0:30:150:30:19

I think what we should do is we should look online,

0:30:190:30:22

look on the Internet,

0:30:220:30:23

-find out exactly if any of these copies have sold before.

-Yeah.

0:30:230:30:27

Look after you, put you in our best interests.

0:30:270:30:29

And then I'll go and do the rounds with our off-screen experts.

0:30:290:30:32

This is where it could get quite interesting.

0:30:320:30:34

If you wait here, OK? I'll be five minutes, and we'll do a quick recce

0:30:340:30:38

-and we we'll come back with some kind of figure.

-Right.

0:30:380:30:41

It will be interesting to know if any of them have heard of him.

0:30:410:30:45

-I will let you know in a minute.

-OK.

0:30:450:30:47

Right, so follow me. This is where it all happens here.

0:30:490:30:52

These are the filming tables.

0:30:520:30:54

But we've got some off-screen experts over there.

0:30:540:30:57

Allison, Nick, you wouldn't mind just having a look at that,

0:30:580:31:01

would you? It is complete.

0:31:010:31:03

And just doing a little bit of research,

0:31:030:31:06

-find out if any have been sold before.

-Yep.

0:31:060:31:08

-And what they've made.

-Very colourful.

0:31:080:31:10

-The condition is very good. I'll be back in a couple of minutes.

-Sure.

0:31:100:31:14

Stay with us to find out what the research reveals.

0:31:140:31:18

Jim, when I saw this in the queue this morning,

0:31:190:31:23

I thought, "That is a beauty."

0:31:230:31:25

Is this the family silver, Jim?

0:31:250:31:28

No, no, this is the charity shop silver.

0:31:280:31:31

-You bought this in a charity shop?

-Yes.

0:31:310:31:33

Do you go round to charity shops or was it just a chance buy?

0:31:330:31:37

I go down and have a look all the time, but it was a chance buy,

0:31:370:31:40

it was just dumped in, black.

0:31:400:31:42

Maybe it looked like pewter, so I thought, I'll have a look anyway.

0:31:420:31:45

-How much did it cost you?

-About a fiver.

-About a fiver.

0:31:450:31:50

-Did you find out anything about it?

-No.

0:31:500:31:52

But because there are no hallmarks, I wondered if it was silver or tin.

0:31:520:31:55

I didn't really know, so I thought, "I'll bring it."

0:31:550:31:58

Well, it is silver.

0:31:580:32:00

Now, there are various aspects of the teapot that

0:32:000:32:03

I look at just to make sure and to be reassure myself.

0:32:030:32:08

The feel of it first of all. The feel of it is right.

0:32:080:32:12

If feels like silver.

0:32:120:32:14

If we look at the lid here,

0:32:140:32:17

we can see this beautiful,

0:32:170:32:20

well-finished little nut inside.

0:32:200:32:23

That's denoting quality.

0:32:230:32:25

They wouldn't do that if it was plate.

0:32:250:32:28

We look at the shape of it.

0:32:280:32:31

Now, this is what we call a drum teapot.

0:32:310:32:34

And the date of this is about 1780.

0:32:340:32:38

So it is an 18th-century piece of silver.

0:32:380:32:41

I know the date of it because of the style.

0:32:410:32:45

And the quality.

0:32:450:32:48

And when we look at this engraving round here,

0:32:480:32:52

this is bright-well engraving.

0:32:520:32:54

And this is telling us that there is, again, quality to it.

0:32:540:32:58

And in its time,

0:32:580:33:00

it would have glittered like diamonds.

0:33:000:33:04

And we look at the spout here.

0:33:040:33:06

Again, it is very low in the teapot,

0:33:060:33:09

and this is another indication of age.

0:33:090:33:12

So all these little things are giving me hints,

0:33:120:33:16

which will build up the whole picture.

0:33:160:33:19

Now, why do you want to sell it now?

0:33:190:33:23

We're thinking about emigrating in the near future,

0:33:230:33:26

-so we need funds just to get us there.

-Oh, right.

0:33:260:33:28

And you think we are going to get more than a fiver on it?

0:33:280:33:31

-If you get a tenner, I've doubled my money.

-All right.

0:33:310:33:35

Well, you are going to get more than a tenner for that.

0:33:350:33:37

-Estimate, 100 to 150. Would you be happy to sell it at that?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:33:370:33:43

100 to 150, a reserve of £100.

0:33:430:33:46

And maybe give the auctioneer

0:33:460:33:51

-just a little bit of discretion.

-Yep.

0:33:510:33:53

But I don't think you'll need it. I think this will do very well.

0:33:530:33:56

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you for bringing it along.

-My pleasure.

0:33:560:33:59

Right, done a bit of research.

0:34:050:34:07

It happens that one complete set, a set of 20, sold recently,

0:34:070:34:12

in London, in auction,

0:34:120:34:14

catalogued at £700 to £900,

0:34:140:34:17

-and they made £600.

-Right.

0:34:170:34:19

-So, are you happy with £500?

-Yeah.

0:34:190:34:22

If I can get more, that would be better.

0:34:220:34:24

Do you know what? Well, look,

0:34:240:34:26

we'll put it in at £500 to £800,

0:34:260:34:28

with an estimate of £500 to £800,

0:34:280:34:30

a fixed reserve at £500, not a penny less,

0:34:300:34:33

because we know one made £600 recently.

0:34:330:34:36

But the technique used for painting these butterflies

0:34:360:34:40

-and textiles, we said they were all hand-painted...

-That's right.

0:34:400:34:43

..is known as pochoir.

0:34:430:34:45

-And it is basically paint going through stencils.

-Pochoir.

0:34:450:34:49

-I'm excited, aren't you excited?

-I really am.

-Good.

0:34:490:34:52

And I hope they go to a good home.

0:34:520:34:53

And I hope you get the top end as well. You see, you can learn

0:34:530:34:56

so much on "Flog It!" I have learned something today. Pochoir.

0:34:560:34:59

-Never heard about before.

-No. Thank you very much.

0:34:590:35:01

And that's a great example.

0:35:010:35:03

Well, I have to say, everybody has thoroughly enjoyed themselves

0:35:050:35:08

here in the Museum of Science and Industry.

0:35:080:35:10

We've found some real gems.

0:35:100:35:11

Sadly, it is time to say goodbye as we head over to the auction

0:35:110:35:14

room in Knutsford, and put those last set of valuations to the test.

0:35:140:35:18

Here is what is coming with us.

0:35:180:35:19

Robert bought this Inuit carving directly from an auction house

0:35:190:35:23

when no-one else wanted it.

0:35:230:35:25

Now, will it set the auction room alight this time or will it

0:35:250:35:28

be left out in the cold again?

0:35:280:35:31

The English teapot is a classic design and, bought for just a fiver,

0:35:310:35:35

what return do you think Jim will make on his charity shop bargain?

0:35:350:35:40

And I can't wait to see

0:35:420:35:43

if the 1924 butterfly book metamorphoses into big money.

0:35:430:35:48

I chatted to auctioneer Nick Hall about the stunning pochoir album.

0:35:490:35:54

-Well, my favourite lot of the sale.

-Are they, really?

-Yes.

0:35:540:35:59

-They're beautiful.

-Kath's hand-coloured prints.

0:35:590:36:03

-I mean, she was in the textiles industry.

-Was she?

0:36:030:36:05

When she left, she was given this. And if you look through the book,

0:36:050:36:08

you can see, it's not about butterflies.

0:36:080:36:10

-The inspiration was the colour of the butterfly.

-Absolutely, yeah.

0:36:100:36:14

-How it makes these wonderful patterns.

-It's incredible.

0:36:140:36:17

Now, she was offered £1,000 for these not so long ago.

0:36:170:36:20

-That was a fair offer.

-I would've taken it.

0:36:200:36:22

-Yeah, I think I would, actually.

-The people that have offered that

0:36:220:36:26

-sort of money are coming to the sale tomorrow.

-Yeah.

0:36:260:36:28

Obviously, we've marketed this online.

0:36:280:36:30

So hopefully, we'll have the right bidders here.

0:36:300:36:32

-There'll be some competition.

-There'll be competition.

0:36:320:36:35

Whether we get that £1,000 she was offered, I don't know.

0:36:350:36:38

Hopefully, we'll get around about £600 to £800.

0:36:380:36:41

I feel confident we'll get that.

0:36:410:36:43

-If everything is right in the world, Paul, they should do.

-Good luck.

0:36:430:36:46

-Thank you.

-But the world of the auction can be a cruel one.

0:36:460:36:49

Let's see whether the bidders are kind to our Inuit hunter.

0:36:490:36:53

Michael and I have just been joined by Robert,

0:36:530:36:56

who purchased this for £7.50 in an auction room in Dorset.

0:36:560:37:00

We're hoping to get around £150 to £200 for this Inuit carving.

0:37:000:37:04

It is a wonderful little fishermen, fishing away.

0:37:040:37:06

I absolutely love it.

0:37:060:37:08

I totally agree with Michael, it is

0:37:080:37:09

a really hard thing to put a date on.

0:37:090:37:12

Look for a bit of wear, but being stone, it's not that obvious.

0:37:120:37:15

-It doesn't acquire a pattern.

-No.

-As to value, I haven't got a clue.

-No.

0:37:150:37:19

But what it does have is wonderful shape and form.

0:37:190:37:23

It has got a lot to it and I can see why you were attracted to that.

0:37:230:37:26

-If it doesn't sell, I'm quite happy to take it home.

-I don't blame you.

0:37:260:37:29

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:37:290:37:30

They might have a different idea. We could be making a lot of money.

0:37:300:37:34

It is going into the hammer now.

0:37:340:37:35

Lot 495.

0:37:350:37:37

It's a mid-20th century Inuit figure.

0:37:370:37:41

Rare things, these Inuit carvings. Where are we going to go?

0:37:410:37:43

Have we got the buyers here today? I wonder.

0:37:430:37:45

Start me, where, at £100? £100 for it somewhere, surely.

0:37:450:37:49

Bring me the 100. 80. 50.

0:37:490:37:50

Get the ball rolling at £50.

0:37:500:37:52

Who's in at 50?

0:37:520:37:53

Who's bidding on this lot? 50 online, thank you. 50 on bid.

0:37:530:37:56

Any of the phones coming in?

0:37:560:37:57

Someone's having a nibble on the lot.

0:37:570:37:59

Any of the phones coming in, yes or no? At 50.

0:37:590:38:02

Five with you, thank you. Back on the phone now. At £55.

0:38:020:38:06

-Would you have a phone bid if you were only going to bid £55?

-No.

0:38:060:38:09

Quiet online. 60 against you. Five.

0:38:090:38:12

70. That's 70 here, at 70.

0:38:120:38:14

75. 80.

0:38:140:38:16

80 now. 80 on bid. At 80.

0:38:160:38:18

85 on the phone.

0:38:180:38:20

95 with me. I'll take 100.

0:38:200:38:22

That is 95 against you, phone bidder.

0:38:220:38:24

It is yours at £100. The book's out.

0:38:240:38:26

It's on the phone at £100.

0:38:260:38:28

Any advance on £100?

0:38:280:38:30

With you then, on the phones, at £100, and selling...

0:38:300:38:34

-All sure and done? Last chance.

-Hammer's gone down, £100.

0:38:340:38:38

That's not a bad return, is it?

0:38:380:38:39

We didn't get the top end, but for £7.50,

0:38:390:38:41

we turned that into £100.

0:38:410:38:43

I'm glad our fisherman caught a new owner.

0:38:450:38:47

Now, high-calibre English silver.

0:38:470:38:50

Well, I've just been joined by Jim.

0:38:500:38:52

And going under the hammer right now, we've got a silver drum teapot

0:38:520:38:55

with a value of £150 to £200, a reserve of £100.

0:38:550:38:59

And all the money is going towards a trip, a trip of a lifetime.

0:38:590:39:03

-In fact, you're emigrating, aren't you?

-I am indeed.

0:39:030:39:05

Well, look, good luck with that.

0:39:050:39:06

-I hope so.

-He's off to South Africa. Why South Africa?

0:39:060:39:09

-That's where my partner comes from.

-Oh, right!

0:39:090:39:11

-We're going back to her roots.

-So you've been there?

-Oh, yeah,

0:39:110:39:14

-I've been there a few times.

-You'll be in safe hands,

0:39:140:39:17

-you'll be looked after.

-I hope so.

0:39:170:39:18

-Are you selling everything you own in this country?

-Everything.

0:39:180:39:21

Everything's got to go, and this is a start.

0:39:210:39:23

A silver drum teapot. Let's see what we can do.

0:39:230:39:25

Let's see if we can get a couple of hundred pounds.

0:39:250:39:27

It is going under the hammer now.

0:39:270:39:29

Argyle-shaped teapot, classic Georgian design about it.

0:39:290:39:33

Unmarked, but we think almost certainly will be silver.

0:39:330:39:37

Where are we going to go? Start me at 150 for it.

0:39:370:39:40

-Thanks, at 150.

-Yes!

0:39:400:39:42

-Silver dealers are there, you see?

-Any advance from 150?

0:39:420:39:45

At £150, the bids are in.

0:39:450:39:47

On my left at 150. Any advance? 160 online. 170.

0:39:470:39:52

170 now. Gent in the room at 170.

0:39:520:39:54

170. It is against you online, come on, give me another.

0:39:540:39:57

It is 170, yes or no? Is that it? Short and sweet.

0:39:570:40:00

The bid is on my left, in the room, at £170.

0:40:000:40:04

And selling...

0:40:040:40:06

-Yes! £170. That's OK, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-Every penny helps.

0:40:060:40:11

Must be a nice feeling, actually, thinking everything in your life,

0:40:110:40:14

you'll sell, you want as much money for everything - the house, the car,

0:40:140:40:17

the possessions. Get on a plane with just a suitcase full of clothes

0:40:170:40:21

-and start a new life.

-And a big suitcase full of money.

0:40:210:40:23

And a big suitcase full of money, yeah.

0:40:230:40:26

That is a huge profit for a five-pound purchase.

0:40:260:40:29

And finally, the French designer book of butterflies.

0:40:290:40:33

You told me at the valuation day you were offered £1,000 for

0:40:330:40:36

-this a few years ago.

-Yes.

0:40:360:40:38

Now, I've talked you into putting it into the sale, you know,

0:40:380:40:41

at a lot less than that, but I think...

0:40:410:40:43

I just think, you know, opening it up to the market,

0:40:430:40:46

letting the whole world know this is available, I think

0:40:460:40:50

we could get some better offers.

0:40:500:40:52

-Hopefully.

-Hopefully. So, any regrets?

0:40:520:40:55

Do you want to go through and sell this now?

0:40:550:40:57

No, I just hope somebody can appreciate it instead of it being

0:40:570:41:00

-wrapped up in brown paper in my wardrobe.

-OK.

0:41:000:41:02

So let's get on with the sale and see what this lot think. Good luck.

0:41:020:41:05

Fantastic album of illustrations, papillons,

0:41:070:41:11

the butterflies, by Eugene Alain Seguy.

0:41:110:41:13

I've got commission bids. We've got phone bids.

0:41:130:41:16

-I'm going to start straight in on reserve at 500 now.

-Yes.

0:41:160:41:19

At 500, on bid with me at five.

0:41:190:41:21

At five. I've got 20 where? Who's in next?

0:41:210:41:23

I've got five. I've got bids coming online.

0:41:230:41:26

At five... 20, 40, 60, 80. Six.

0:41:260:41:28

20, 40, 60, 80. Seven.

0:41:280:41:30

20, 40, 60, 80. Eight.

0:41:300:41:31

820, 840, 860, 880. Nine.

0:41:310:41:34

20, 40, 960, 980.

0:41:340:41:36

-1,000.

-We've done it.

0:41:360:41:38

-1,100.

-You're off 1,000.

0:41:380:41:40

-1,250.

-1,250.

-It's going online.

0:41:400:41:42

13. 1,350. 14. 15. 1500.

0:41:420:41:45

-These butterflies are flying away!

-And 50. 1,700.

0:41:450:41:49

At £1,700, the bid is online at 1,700.

0:41:490:41:52

The phones haven't had a look in yet.

0:41:520:41:53

-We did the right thing putting it into auction.

-At 1,750.

0:41:530:41:56

-Still bidding on the phone?

-I'm going hot and cold.

0:41:560:41:58

At 1,850.

0:41:580:41:59

These butterflies are flying online at £1,850.

0:41:590:42:03

1,900. Still going.

0:42:030:42:05

-Don't stop there.

-I've got butterflies.

0:42:050:42:07

1950. Let's round it up, make it two.

0:42:070:42:10

£2,000. The bid's online.

0:42:100:42:11

At £2,000.

0:42:110:42:13

Any advance on two?

0:42:130:42:14

At 2,050. 2,050.

0:42:140:42:17

2,100. At £2,100.

0:42:170:42:20

The bid is online still at 2,100. Commissions are out.

0:42:200:42:23

-The phones are out. It's online.

-Breathe.

0:42:230:42:26

2,150. 2,200.

0:42:260:42:28

At £2,200.

0:42:280:42:30

The bid is online. At £2,200.

0:42:300:42:33

Anyone in the room waiting to come in, now is your chance to shine.

0:42:330:42:36

It's 2,200 here. Who's in the room? Who's to bid? 2,250.

0:42:360:42:40

Anyone coming in against it?

0:42:400:42:42

-At 2,250. Online at 2,250.

-£2,250.

0:42:420:42:47

Any further bids? Last call, last chance.

0:42:470:42:49

Selling away now at £2,250...

0:42:490:42:52

All sure and done?

0:42:520:42:54

£2,250!

0:42:540:42:58

-And it is all yours!

-Yes!

-Obviously, there's commission to pay on that,

0:42:580:43:01

but, wow, what a result!

0:43:010:43:04

-What's going through your mind right now?

-I don't know.

0:43:040:43:07

-I'm blank.

-I bet you are. You are speechless!

-Yes, I am.

0:43:070:43:10

Oh, but you know what?

0:43:100:43:12

-We did do the right thing putting it into auction.

-Absolutely.

0:43:120:43:15

Well done. There is tears in your eyes.

0:43:150:43:16

What a way to end the show here.

0:43:160:43:18

I told you there'd be one or two surprises.

0:43:180:43:20

If you've got anything like that, we want to see it.

0:43:200:43:22

But until then, from Knutsford, it is goodbye

0:43:220:43:24

from one very happy Kath and myself.

0:43:240:43:27

Bye!

0:43:270:43:29

Flog It! comes from the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. The show is packed with items from around the world, including an Inuit carving, a French book of butterflies and a ship that sailed the China seas. The experts are Anita Manning and Micheal Baggott.

Paul Martin chances upon a rare and beautiful art book that is hugely contested in the saleroom.


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