Knighthayes Flog It!


Knighthayes

A compilation episode that navigates the nation, taking in some of the most spectacular venues from the series. Paul Martin visits Knightshayes in Devon.


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Transcript


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Today on "Flog It!", we have a special show that navigates the nation,

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revisiting some of the incredible locations we've seen in the series.

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And as always,

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we're on the hunt for your special items to take off to auction.

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And I'll be exploring Knightshayes, here in the heart of Devon.

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On the outside, it looks like a grand Victorian mansion but, on the inside,

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we'll reveal the hidden layers that make it both a fascinating family

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home and one of the real treasures of our design heritage.

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Welcome to "Flog It!".

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Here at Knightshayes, the grand Victorian house was commissioned in

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1869 by Sir John Heathcoat-Amory.

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It was his family home until it was taken over by the National Trust in 1974.

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Knightshayes was designed by William Burges,

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one of the most fashionable architects of the day.

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The house is in the Gothic revival style, which took its inspiration

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from the forms and patterns of the Middle Ages.

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The elaborate design may look impressive to us but, in its day,

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it did nothing but cause controversy and upset.

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We're going to find out about that a little later on but, right now,

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let's see what's coming up on today's show.

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Today, we are on a tour of the country and our journey takes us to

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some stunning locations.

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We'll be at Althorp House in Northamptonshire,

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where Christina has found a collection given from the heart.

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-Oh, my goodness!

-So there were...

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-A husband that listens?!

-That's right.

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You want to bottle him. You'd make a fortune!

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At Greenwich Royal Naval College,

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some unusual items reveal another tale of love and marriage.

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I was 18, he was 41.

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-Really?

-I fell in love and I told him I was going to marry him.

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And the most romantic of castles, Herstmonceux, in Sussex,

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where the 700-year-old stone castle provided the perfect backdrop for

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our valuations.

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It's wonderful just to see one of these turn up on "Flog It!",

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but to actually see a collection, that's really something else.

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We start our tour at Reading Town Hall, in Berkshire,

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where the crowds have taken up every seat in the concert hall,

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and sitting with David Harper is a very special guest indeed.

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Now, Queen, I've got to tell you, I love this object but, more than that,

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I love your name.

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-Oh, thank you.

-What a lovely name!

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Where does that come from?

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I'm originally from Nigeria.

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And my family, we are coming from a royal family and...

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How fascinating is that!

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-Yeah.

-So, are you really a queen from some exotic land?

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Yes. In my own land. In my own country.

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No, that is amazing!

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OK, well, we're supposed to be talking about objects.

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-OK.

-So here we have an object.

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Everybody at home can see it's an ink stand.

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Tell me about it. How did you come to get your hands on it?

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OK. That was ten years ago, when I nearly move into Reading.

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And I was kind of bored because then I wasn't working.

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And I said to myself, oh, I was watching, like,

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-Antiques Roadshow on TV...

-Yes.

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How do they collect all the silver?

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So I started going to car-boot sales.

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So I went to the one in Oxford.

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And that caught my eye.

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-I bet.

-I was like, "Wow, that's so beautiful!"

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I went to the lady, I said,

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"That looks like ink table or something, like, display."

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And she said, "Yes." And I said, "How much is that?"

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-You want me to tell you?

-Yes, I do.

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-I'm going to be very interested.

-I say, "Is that real silver?"

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She said, "Yes, it is real silver." And I said, "OK, how much is that?"

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She said, "How much do I reckon?" I said, "I don't know."

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Because I'm just... I just love the silver, you know?

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And I made an offer, like...

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"Could you take, like, 70?"

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She looked at me...

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"Are you seriously? Or are you joking?"

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I was like, "No, I'm joking."

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And she was like, "OK, give me £60."

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I said, "No. Can I give you 57?"

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-So we go a little bit...

-OK.

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-Fine, OK.

-So, 57 was the purchase price.

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-Yes.

-OK. So you take it home, looked at all the markings,

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-tell me what you know.

-Actually, I didn't.

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I didn't check the markings.

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No? Well, it's a good job you brought it in today, isn't it?

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-Yeah.

-Well, I can tell you that this little object here tells a really

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interesting story. If we spin it round, first of all,

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we can see it's dated 1893.

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Have you not seen that?

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-Queen?!

-1893! I never checked it. That's a long time ago.

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Exactly. This is where this story begins.

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-OK.

-Look, spin it round to the front, here, and you've obviously

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-read this...

-Yeah.

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It's inscribed here to CB Ottaway Esquire.

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14th of December 1954.

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From Customs and Excise colleagues.

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-So it must be a present to somebody...

-Yes.

-..who worked for Customs, then?

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-Yes.

-Ah!

-Later, in 1954.

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So there's the first part of the story.

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-Wow!

-Now we need to know whether, in fact, it's silver.

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-Is it?

-I think it is silver.

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OK. Have you looked for the hallmarks?

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-No.

-You're very, very naughty.

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I've got to say that. You're very naughty.

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OK. So, in the little wells, here, we have a hallmark, here...

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-Oh!

-..for Sheffield, Henry Atkins is the maker.

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-OK.

-And the date mark for 1892.

-1892.

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This is solid British hallmarked sterling silver...

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-Wow!

-Dated beautifully, one year later it was given as a gift.

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And then we have the ink wells themselves, with silver tops.

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They're hallmarked in Birmingham.

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But we have the same maker and these are dated 1891.

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Yeah. Beautiful objects actually.

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And how long have you owned it for?

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-Ten years.

-Ten years.

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Right, ten years ago, paid £57.

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How much would £57 have made you in the bank? Just about nothing.

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-Yeah.

-What's it worth today?

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I would like to see it in auction, 100-150, as a guide estimate.

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How would you feel about that?

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Actually, 120 would be nice.

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OK. Right.

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All right. OK. That's why you're a queen and I'm not a king.

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-Yes.

-You know what you're doing.

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-That's why we are queen.

-OK, so that means I have to put it in,

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then, at 120-150, with a fixed reserve at 120.

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-Yes.

-Are we going to do it?

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-We are going to do it.

-Queen...

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Nice of you, thank you.

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Made my day.

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You're royalty to us, Harper.

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The next stop on the journey is 75 miles north to another noble household,

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Althorp, once home to Princess Diana,

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where we were privileged to hold a valuation day in its elegant surroundings.

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And "Flog It!" queen, Christina,

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found a charming collection built over a lifetime of love.

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Tell me about this wonderful little collection that I've got before me here.

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About 30 years ago, when I had a glass cabinet and nothing in it,

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I told my husband I was quite interested in collecting small boxes.

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Because they're varied. You get different materials...

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-Yeah, you do.

-Different sizes.

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But I was actually interested myself in going out and hunting them down.

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But he obviously took the hint and every time it was my birthday or

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Christmas, up would come another box.

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-Really?

-Yes.

-Oh, my goodness!

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-A husband that listens?!

-That's right.

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You want to bottle him. You'd make a fortune!

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Most of these items are little presents from my husband, but I

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haven't got anywhere to display them any longer.

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-What happened to the cabinet?

-We moved and they were sold.

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-Oh.

-They just live in a drawer.

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Oh, we can't have them living in a drawer, can we?

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Can I pick out my favourites?

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-Yes, please do.

-And then you can tell me about them and when you got them.

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So this one, I think, has got to be the sort of

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creme de la creme of the collection.

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Yes. That was for a special birthday.

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-Yes.

-Wonderful. I think this is particularly beautiful.

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It's set throughout with wonderful banded agate material.

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Now, hugely and very highly prized because of this wonderful banding.

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All these different layers here, this strata. Look at those colours.

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I mean, they are just beautiful, aren't they?

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-Yeah, he's got a good eye, hasn't he?

-He really has, yeah.

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I mean, this is a 19th-century piece.

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It's as old as that?

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-Wow!

-And it's set in gilt metal.

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I don't think it's gold.

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I think it could potentially be silver-gilt.

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But it certainly is a very nice quality piece and a very nice

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example of its type. So often you find these but they have cracked.

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-Right.

-Because they are incredibly brittle.

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-OK.

-But this is in perfect condition.

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I really can't fault it,

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even the base, here, has got this wonderful agate material.

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So this was a really beautiful piece in its time and still is now.

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So very nice birthday present.

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-You must have been very good that year.

-I'm always good.

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A twinkle in your eye there, Mary.

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My second favourite piece,

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I think, has got to be this wonderful vesta case here.

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-Yes, that's cute, isn't it?

-It's really, really sweet.

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Now, tell me about that.

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This, again, was a Christmas present.

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Going back about 30 years now, when he bought it for me.

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Well, this is quite a specific box because what would this have held?

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-Matches.

-Exactly.

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So, this is a vesta case.

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Now, we know that because, on the bottom, you've got the striker.

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Now, vesta cases were introduced in about 1830.

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And produced extensively between about 1890 and 1920.

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I think this might be of that sort of era.

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-Wow!

-And obviously, if you think of that time, you didn't have...

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You couldn't just flick a switch, could you?

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You had to carry matches around with you to light all your everyday items.

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All your sort of lanterns and stoves,

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so it was an essential part of your daily attire.

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Now, this one is advertising Moet Chandon, Dry Imperial here.

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You've got these wonderful bottles and it's sort of stamped all

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throughout. It's wonderful.

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And for a vesta collector, that would be a really,

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really nice addition to their collection.

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-Yes, I quite like that one.

-So, a lovely thing.

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Now, the rest of your collection,

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those really are the two for me that shine...

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-Yes.

-Those are going to be the most valuable items.

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You've also got an incredibly sweet little stamp box...

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-Yes, that's cute, isn't it?

-..which I think has got a stamp in it.

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-Yes, it has.

-But really the thing, for me, that is quite exciting

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is the top of it, there, is by Charles Horner.

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-Right.

-Now, Charles Horner was very much an Art Nouveau silversmith

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and produced a lot of examples.

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So, again, there are Charles Horner collectors as well.

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So you are covering a lot of different bases with this

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-collection, Mary, you really are.

-Right.

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Personally, it seems a shame to split the collection.

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Bearing in mind it's been so lovingly put together.

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What would I put on it at auction?

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Adding up all these little component parts, I think we're probably

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looking somewhere in the region of maybe £150-£250.

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-How do you feel about that?

-That's fine, yeah.

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How many years' birthdays and Christmases have we got here?

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Well, it stretches back to about 30 years, but I did tell him to stop

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-buying me boxes...

-Really?

-Yes.

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Well, I tell you what, let's put 150-250 and let's look forward to the auction.

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Yes, I'm looking forward to it already.

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Thank you very much.

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We'll see how the collection gets on at auction in just a minute.

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But first, it's back to Knightshayes in Devon,

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which is not only extraordinary on the inside but the outside is rather

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special too.

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It boasts one of the largest Victorian kitchen gardens in the country.

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And I went to find out more.

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The kitchen garden was once the mainstay of any grand country house,

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producing not only food for the family and their guests,

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but also for the staff in the house and on the estate.

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But not only that, it was a statement of wealth and, at over

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four acres, this statement was bold.

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When this kitchen garden was in full swing, it employed a team of

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12 full-time gardeners and it contained 17 greenhouses.

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But the First and the Second World Wars claimed vital manpower.

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The gardens gradually fell into decline,

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eventually being made redundant and turned into a car park.

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Thankfully, it's now been restored to its former glory and it embraces

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the spirit of the Victorians to keep our vegetable growing history alive

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and just like the house, Knightshayes,

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it is a living, breathing, work of art.

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The next port of call on our voyage is Greenwich Royal Naval College.

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And it provides another sensational setting.

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-Michelle, how are you?

-Well, I'm very happy to be here today.

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It's good to see you. You've got a sort of interesting collection here.

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I kind of understand these. I'm not sure I understand those.

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These are what I would call almost like Grand Tour intaglios.

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-Yeah.

-The sort of things that would've been produced in Italy

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round about 1800, 1820.

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You went on your Grand Tour and these were equivalent of the

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-stick of rock for the tourists, aren't they?

-Ah, I see, OK.

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But what's the story behind these, here?

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Well, my late husband, Brian Taylor, was a sculptor...

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-Right.

-..at the British School at Rome.

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And when he came to Italy, he'd never been abroad before.

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He came from a very poor background.

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-Yes.

-So he loved it so much, he stayed for five years.

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-Right.

-But he will have taken these wax images from art that was around

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-in Italy at the time.

-Right.

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And these images are Greek.

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But I think these little friezes remind me a lot of what's in the

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British Museum, the Elgin marbles.

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What was his purpose for doing this?

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These are all impressions he took, I think,

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with the intention of making bronzes, because they're all wax.

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And that is one of the stages of making a bronze piece.

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They're very delicate, they've survived a long time.

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So have I. I'm delicate.

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What's interesting is, if you just pick that one up,

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it's basically the wax relief underneath, isn't it?

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-Yes. Yes.

-Was he prolific? Did he produce lots and lots...?

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Yes, he was prolific. There are quite a lot that were made before I

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-met him.

-How did you meet him?

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Well, I was his student at Camberwell College of Art.

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-You were his student?

-Yes.

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I was 18. He was 41.

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-Really?

-I fell in love. And I told him I was going to marry him.

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At which point did you tell him you were going to marry him?

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The first day of our tutorial.

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LAUGHTER

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Your tutor is sat there thinking he is discussing some form of art and

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you come in and say, "I'm going to marry you."

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-That's about it really.

-What did he say to that?

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He said, "Don't be silly, my dear." And I said, "We'll see about that."

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-A lady... You were on a mission, weren't you?

-Well...

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We didn't marry until ten years later.

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But he was a very special man.

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Does your husband's work still sell today?

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-Yes. Yes.

-And what price range does it command?

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Well, from about £8,000 to 200,000.

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The big animals he sculpted are obviously worth quite a lot.

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Right, you haven't got one of those...? No, no, we won't go there.

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-I haven't got one in the bag, no.

-Well, we need to split this into...

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The reason why I say split these into two lots is because this is

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predominantly his work.

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And, to be truthful with you, I don't really know what to put on those.

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These things are a little bit easier.

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There is roughly 30 of them.

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I think they are going to make between

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probably £50 and £80 for these.

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-OK.

-All right? Now, how do you feel about that?

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Well, it's a bit lower than I was hoping, but it's not the end of the world.

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-They always say this, don't they? What were you hoping for?

-100?

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Let's perhaps think in terms of 80-120, then.

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-OK. OK.

-With a reserve of 80 on these.

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-OK.

-Now, as a second lot, we've got your husband's waxes.

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What are you going to be happy with?

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Well, I would say...

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-A minimum £100 would be good.

-You're happy with that?

-Yeah.

-Good.

0:15:320:15:37

What an unusual item, but will it peak the bidders' interest?

0:15:370:15:41

Let's find out, as all three items go under the hammer.

0:15:410:15:44

And here's a reminder of what's up for sale.

0:15:440:15:46

The silver ink stand bought for £57 by a queen,

0:15:500:15:53

but will it reign supreme at the auction house?

0:15:530:15:56

Will the bidders be thinking outside the box for this collection?

0:15:590:16:02

And we all know that provenance is key,

0:16:050:16:07

but will that be enough to sell the late sculptor's wax moulds?

0:16:070:16:11

Our first lot is up for sale in Wokingham, at Martin and Pole saleroom.

0:16:130:16:17

Like all auction houses, there's commission and VAT to pay.

0:16:170:16:21

So factor that in if you're buying or selling.

0:16:210:16:24

Time to see if Queen's silver ink stand makes the 120 reserve she insists on.

0:16:240:16:31

-I like this. This is quality.

-Yeah.

-And you've got good eyes.

0:16:310:16:34

You spotted that in a car boot, didn't you?

0:16:340:16:36

-Yes, I did.

-You're going to make a profit.

0:16:360:16:38

-OK.

-You're going to make a big profit.

-Yeah.

0:16:380:16:40

-And that's what it's all about.

-Yeah.

0:16:400:16:41

You can reinvest that profit into something else and keep turning

0:16:410:16:44

-it over.

-Exactly.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-That's kind of like what we like to do.

0:16:440:16:47

Be a millionaire in a year.

0:16:470:16:49

Just like him.

0:16:490:16:51

LAUGHTER

0:16:510:16:53

Right, let's find out what the bidders think.

0:16:530:16:55

The Victorian silver desk stand.

0:16:550:16:58

I have absentee bids on this one. I can start it with £120.

0:16:580:17:01

-Brilliant.

-130 anywhere?

-That's a good, good in.

0:17:010:17:03

So, £120. 130. 140. 150.

0:17:030:17:05

-Yes!

-At £150.

0:17:060:17:08

-Any more?

-There's 100 quid profit.

0:17:080:17:10

-Yeah.

-160. At 160 now.

-Yes!

0:17:100:17:13

£160.

0:17:130:17:15

At 160, are we all done now at 160?

0:17:150:17:18

All finished at 160, then.

0:17:180:17:20

-Yes. 160.

-Yes!

-You know, that was a nice thing.

0:17:200:17:23

I can see it on a desk. That won't go to melt.

0:17:230:17:25

-Someone is going to enjoy that.

-Yes.

-And you made a big profit on it.

0:17:250:17:28

-I'm happy.

-I bet you are.

0:17:280:17:30

-I know.

-I wasn't expecting it to reach that.

0:17:300:17:33

-It's good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:17:330:17:34

So you now know what to do, go out and look for more silver.

0:17:340:17:37

Yes. I will. I will see you again.

0:17:370:17:40

-Well done. Well done.

-We'll see you next year, Queenie.

0:17:400:17:43

Next, we're heading back down south to Chiswick auctions in West London,

0:17:430:17:47

where that rare set of wax moulds are up for grabs.

0:17:470:17:50

Going under the hammer right now, one of my favourite lots in the sale.

0:17:520:17:55

The intaglios. Yes, it sums up the Grand Tour.

0:17:550:17:58

They belong to Michelle. And it is Michelle, isn't it?

0:17:580:18:00

-Yes.

-I was chasing you around the valuation day,

0:18:000:18:02

you had all these in a box.

0:18:020:18:04

I was going, "The Grand Tour, the Grand Tour..."

0:18:040:18:06

-I got there first.

-Yes. She went over to you.

0:18:060:18:08

I know you valued them as two lots.

0:18:080:18:09

-Yes.

-The auctioneer now has put them all together.

0:18:090:18:12

-Yes, OK.

-He thinks it's easier for them to sell.

0:18:120:18:14

Hasn't really changed the value. Just joined the two values together.

0:18:140:18:17

-OK.

-He's now put them together for £100.

0:18:170:18:19

They're on now.

0:18:190:18:20

We've got this collection of intaglios and the resin

0:18:200:18:24

moulds by Brian Taylor.

0:18:240:18:25

Interesting little lot. Start me, £100 to start me?

0:18:250:18:29

The little lot of intaglios for £100.

0:18:290:18:30

£80, then? Let's get things going.

0:18:300:18:32

For £80.

0:18:320:18:34

Any interest for £80?

0:18:340:18:37

Nobody wants them for £80?

0:18:370:18:38

-That's bonkers.

-I'm going to have to pass the lot, then.

0:18:380:18:40

No interest.

0:18:400:18:42

-That's crazy.

-Gosh. Look, it just wasn't the day.

0:18:420:18:44

Just wasn't the day. It's as simple as that.

0:18:440:18:46

It wasn't the day. It's nothing to do with the intaglios.

0:18:460:18:49

-Yeah. OK.

-I honestly think, on another day,

0:18:490:18:51

they'll make that money.

0:18:510:18:52

Our next auction is 100 miles north,

0:18:530:18:56

in the Leicestershire town of Market Harborough,

0:18:560:19:00

once a thriving market town.

0:19:000:19:01

We're hoping business is booming at Gildings saleroom,

0:19:010:19:05

as Mary's collection of small boxes goes under the hammer.

0:19:050:19:07

Good luck with this. There's lots of memories there. Have you saved one?

0:19:090:19:12

Have you got a couple left still?

0:19:120:19:13

-This is not...

-I've got some odds and ends but I haven't got any

0:19:130:19:17

little boxes left, no.

0:19:170:19:18

I'm thinking of collecting antique glass, maybe 18th century...

0:19:180:19:22

Oh, with the twisted stems, yeah.

0:19:220:19:24

-That's what I really like.

-Anyway, look,

0:19:240:19:26

your lot is going under the hammer.

0:19:260:19:27

We're selling the little boxes now. Here we go.

0:19:270:19:30

The agate and gilt metal casket, shell-faced purses, agate box.

0:19:300:19:35

There really is something for everybody in this lot.

0:19:350:19:37

Bidding opens here at £85.

0:19:370:19:38

85, I am bid only.

0:19:380:19:40

At 85. 95. 100. 110. 120. 130. 140.

0:19:400:19:46

Your turn. 150. 160.

0:19:460:19:48

-We've got to the reserve.

-Yes.

-And now we're over.

0:19:480:19:50

-Well done, Mary.

-180. This side, then, at 180.

0:19:500:19:52

180 in the seats.

0:19:520:19:54

At £180. 190, do I see?

0:19:540:19:56

180. We are down here on the...

0:19:560:19:59

-Go on! A couple more.

-Fair warning.

0:19:590:20:00

-Come on!

-Selling at 180.

0:20:000:20:03

Yes. The hammer has gone down. 180, as they say in the darts!

0:20:030:20:07

-Well done.

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

-That's perfect.

0:20:070:20:09

-A lovely little collection.

-Yes.

0:20:090:20:10

A lovely little collection and now I want it to transform into an

0:20:100:20:13

18th-century wineglass.

0:20:130:20:14

-Thank you.

-Yeah, actually you're right.

0:20:140:20:17

That's a great result for Mary and we'll be back later in the programme

0:20:170:20:20

for more auction action.

0:20:200:20:21

Back at Knightshayes in Devon, I went to find out more about the

0:20:300:20:34

incredible design you see today and find out how it was nearly lost forever.

0:20:340:20:39

Now, I'm here in the great hall.

0:20:410:20:43

You can just imagine yourself back in the Middle Ages with this

0:20:430:20:46

wonderful minstrels gallery, this barrel-vaulted ceiling,

0:20:460:20:49

stencils and armorials everywhere.

0:20:490:20:52

And these gorgeous corbels looking down on you.

0:20:520:20:54

It's a hall fit for a medieval banquet.

0:20:540:20:57

But you may be surprised to know this is no more than 150 years old.

0:20:570:21:01

It wasn't designed for a medieval baron.

0:21:010:21:04

It was designed for a Victorian baronet.

0:21:040:21:06

Knightshayes was commissioned by Sir John Heathcoat-Amory,

0:21:080:21:11

a Devon man, who inherited his father's successful lace factory.

0:21:110:21:15

Sir John wasn't interested in the business, but he enjoyed the wealth

0:21:150:21:19

that came with it. He aspired to be a typical country gentleman.

0:21:190:21:23

And what says that better than a very big house in the country?

0:21:230:21:27

To build his house, Sir John would only have the best, so he chose

0:21:310:21:35

William Burges, one of the most prominent,

0:21:350:21:37

if not peculiar figures of Victorian architecture.

0:21:370:21:41

Burges was the most fashionable designer of the moment,

0:21:410:21:43

well known for working with some of the wealthiest men in the country.

0:21:430:21:48

So, naturally, a perfect fit for Sir John.

0:21:480:21:51

Burges was obsessed by the Middle Ages and even dressed up in costume.

0:21:530:21:58

And he was partial to opium,

0:21:580:21:59

which may have influenced his more out-there designs.

0:21:590:22:03

He tried to conjure up the romance and fantasy of the medieval period

0:22:030:22:08

and was at the forefront of the Victorian Gothic movement.

0:22:080:22:12

And Burges didn't let the small question of money get in the way of his vision.

0:22:120:22:17

His vision had no limits.

0:22:170:22:18

Work began on the house in 1869 and the exterior was built more as

0:22:220:22:27

Burges intended and was relatively restrained.

0:22:270:22:30

But progress was slow and Sir John soon realised that costs were

0:22:300:22:34

spiralling out of control.

0:22:340:22:36

When he saw the plans for the inside of the house, enough was enough.

0:22:360:22:40

They were too lavish, too ambitious and too expensive.

0:22:420:22:45

And here is the original book of designs and just have a look at this.

0:22:470:22:51

It's a beautifully executed book of watercolours and it was given by

0:22:510:22:55

Burges to the Heathcoat-Amory family in 1873.

0:22:550:22:59

And it really is quite an honour to be looking at something like this.

0:22:590:23:03

And this is the drawing room.

0:23:030:23:05

This would've been the climax of the interior design scheme.

0:23:050:23:09

It's got that play on the medieval theme, knights and chivalry.

0:23:090:23:14

And over there, look at the frieze above the fireplace,

0:23:140:23:16

great big medieval solid fireplace.

0:23:160:23:19

And there's a viewing gallery above for the ladies to look down upon the

0:23:190:23:24

gentlemen below. It really is quite astonishing.

0:23:240:23:27

But whilst it may look great on paper, it was not Sir John's taste.

0:23:300:23:34

So he took the tough decision to fire Burges and replace him with

0:23:340:23:37

another fashionable designer, John Dibblee Crace.

0:23:370:23:40

Crace was from a prestigious family of interior decorators,

0:23:420:23:46

so they thought he would be a safe pair of hands.

0:23:460:23:48

But, in fact, Crace largely followed Burges' designs and the result was

0:23:480:23:52

still far too lavish for the family.

0:23:520:23:55

And what happened next meant this unique work

0:23:550:23:58

nearly disappeared for good.

0:23:580:24:00

All over the house, over the next 80 years,

0:24:030:24:06

they slowly removed any trace of Burges' medieval dream.

0:24:060:24:10

The ornate ceilings were covered over,

0:24:120:24:14

furniture rearranged and fireplaces removed.

0:24:140:24:17

The Heathcoat-Amorys redecorated to create rooms that felt more Georgian

0:24:170:24:21

than Victorian.

0:24:210:24:22

The next generations were more interested in running the family

0:24:260:24:30

business and the house was overlooked.

0:24:300:24:32

Victorian Gothic was far out of fashion and the designs

0:24:320:24:35

of William Burges were long forgotten.

0:24:350:24:37

But it was thanks to one lady that Knightshayes once again caught the

0:24:370:24:41

world's attention.

0:24:410:24:42

And that lady wasn't just anyone, she was Joyce Wethered,

0:24:430:24:46

the most famous female golfer in the world.

0:24:460:24:48

In 1936, Joyce met Sir John at a golf match

0:24:490:24:53

and it was love at first sight.

0:24:530:24:55

After a whirlwind romance,

0:24:550:24:56

they married and Joyce became the new Lady of Knightshayes.

0:24:560:25:00

When Joyce first stepped through the door,

0:25:040:25:06

she felt some alarm at the prospect of living in such a big, imposing

0:25:060:25:10

house. She was drawn outside,

0:25:100:25:12

where she and John soon discovered a passion they would share together

0:25:120:25:16

for the rest of their lives.

0:25:160:25:18

When World War II broke out,

0:25:180:25:19

John promised her, if they got through it,

0:25:190:25:22

they would make a garden together,

0:25:220:25:23

and the garden they created would make Knightshayes world-famous.

0:25:230:25:27

In the '50s and '60s, Sir John and Joyce created a magnificent garden.

0:25:300:25:34

It became so important that, when Sir John died in 1972,

0:25:340:25:38

the estate was left to the National Trust

0:25:380:25:40

to preserve the topiary,

0:25:400:25:42

shrubs and trees.

0:25:420:25:43

The Trust had no plans to open the house to visitors,

0:25:430:25:46

but when they scratched the surface of the interior,

0:25:460:25:49

they realised what they had on their hands -

0:25:490:25:52

a rare example of forgotten work by William Burgess,

0:25:520:25:55

one of the most celebrated artists of the Victorian period.

0:25:550:25:59

Work began in the 1980s to restore Knightshayes to its former glory.

0:26:020:26:07

Joyce, still living on the estate at the time, gave the plan her full

0:26:070:26:10

support, allowing her comfortable family home to be transformed

0:26:100:26:15

into the vision of its creators.

0:26:150:26:16

Now, this library had been turned into a sitting room but, thankfully,

0:26:200:26:24

many of the original features had been found in the cellar and the

0:26:240:26:27

conservators were able to use these as a guide to recreate and restore

0:26:270:26:31

this room back to its former glory.

0:26:310:26:34

And they have done a fantastic job, and this important work is going on

0:26:340:26:37

all over the house today.

0:26:370:26:39

It's a remarkable work in progress.

0:26:390:26:42

And as for Joyce, she stayed on living here in Knightshayes

0:26:420:26:44

and died in 1997, the day after her 96th birthday.

0:26:440:26:49

The garden remained her favourite place to be until the very end.

0:26:490:26:55

The house today would be unrecognisable

0:26:550:26:57

to the one she first came to as a young bride.

0:26:570:27:00

But over the years,

0:27:000:27:01

Joyce learned to love Knightshayes both on the outside and in.

0:27:010:27:04

Back on our journey around the UK,

0:27:100:27:12

we are flying over to Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex,

0:27:120:27:15

complete with turrets and a moat.

0:27:150:27:17

This has to be the most quintessential castle in the UK.

0:27:170:27:20

So you may find it hard to believe it's now a university campus.

0:27:220:27:26

And scholar Catherine Southon is keen to share her wisdom with Mary.

0:27:260:27:31

This is a lovely collection of Okimono figures

0:27:310:27:34

that you've got here.

0:27:340:27:35

And the word Okimono is a Japanese name,

0:27:350:27:38

just really meaning an object for display,

0:27:380:27:41

so an ornament. It's wonderful just to see one of these turn up

0:27:410:27:45

at "Flog It!", but to actually see a collection like this, well,

0:27:450:27:49

that's really something else.

0:27:490:27:50

Where did you get them from?

0:27:500:27:51

My mother. Her father was a missionary,

0:27:510:27:54

and sent to China.

0:27:540:27:55

And you say they are Japanese, so that's a bit of a mystery.

0:27:560:27:59

But I always thought they came from China.

0:27:590:28:01

Right, because these are Japanese figures,

0:28:010:28:04

from the Meiji period.

0:28:040:28:06

And they really date from around 1900.

0:28:060:28:08

Does that shed any more light on how they have come to be in your

0:28:080:28:12

-possession?

-No, my mother always had them...

0:28:120:28:14

So when your mother had them,

0:28:140:28:15

did she sort of have them around the house...?

0:28:150:28:18

-Just in a cabinet.

-In a cabinet.

0:28:180:28:19

On display.

0:28:190:28:20

And what do you think of these figures?

0:28:200:28:22

I've always loved them. But I've decided to give all my ornaments and

0:28:220:28:26

things to my daughters. I've got three.

0:28:260:28:29

And we've all decided we should sell them.

0:28:290:28:31

We do have to be very careful selling ivory items at auction.

0:28:310:28:35

But these are well before the 1947 rule,

0:28:350:28:39

so it's absolutely fine to sell these at auction.

0:28:390:28:42

The thing is about these is the quality,

0:28:420:28:44

because as you look at each one of these, the detail is exceptional.

0:28:440:28:49

This one, first of all,

0:28:490:28:50

a little shell group with these monkeys sort of climbing

0:28:500:28:54

all over the shells.

0:28:540:28:56

And then we've got the crabs here and then some more shells,

0:28:560:28:59

all around the sides.

0:28:590:29:01

This one as well is jolly nice.

0:29:010:29:03

It would be interesting to know the significance of the monkey

0:29:030:29:06

on the side and the toad climbing over the head.

0:29:060:29:10

OK, let's have a look at this one.

0:29:100:29:12

You can see there the difference in the colour of ivory,

0:29:120:29:14

more yellowed at the back.

0:29:140:29:16

And then the front of it is whiter.

0:29:160:29:18

-Yes.

-You can see the light has slightly bleached it.

0:29:180:29:21

Now, underneath there, there's a signature.

0:29:210:29:23

-Did you know that?

-Oh!

0:29:230:29:25

So it will be interesting to find out who this is by.

0:29:250:29:28

Because that's going to make a massive difference

0:29:280:29:31

to the actual price of this.

0:29:310:29:33

But nevertheless, you have a lovely selection here.

0:29:330:29:36

I think we should put them all in the auction individually.

0:29:360:29:40

Are you happy to sell them now?

0:29:400:29:42

-Yes, please.

-Do you have any idea of value on them?

0:29:420:29:44

Oh, some, yes.

0:29:440:29:46

Oh, do tell me. What do you think, Mary?

0:29:460:29:48

Well, for instance, I took that one to a church talk.

0:29:480:29:53

-Right.

-And the auctioneer said 500-600.

0:29:530:29:56

Oh, gosh. I think...

0:29:560:29:57

It wouldn't surprise me if it did make that at auction, but I wouldn't

0:29:570:30:00

suggest probably putting that on it to put it into auction.

0:30:000:30:04

-Right.

-This is actually one of my favourite ones.

0:30:040:30:06

I think that's a really interesting group.

0:30:060:30:08

I would suggest putting 250-350 on that one.

0:30:080:30:11

-Oh, right.

-200-300 on this one.

0:30:110:30:15

-Right.

-And then perhaps on all of these ones, around 100-150 on those.

0:30:150:30:20

-Ah.

-But I can see them all doing really well.

0:30:200:30:24

And I think, to put them all in the sale together,

0:30:240:30:26

but as individual lots,

0:30:260:30:28

one after the other,

0:30:280:30:29

you will attract a lot of interest, and I think we'll do very well.

0:30:290:30:33

-How does that sound?

-Great.

0:30:330:30:34

You're saying, "Well done." We haven't done it yet!

0:30:340:30:37

No, but you're the expert.

0:30:370:30:38

You know what to do.

0:30:380:30:40

Next, we are travelling from Sussex to Reading,

0:30:400:30:43

where Nick Davies is making himself comfortable amongst the crowd.

0:30:430:30:46

Well, Anna, thanks very much for coming along.

0:30:480:30:50

You've brought three interesting bits of silver.

0:30:500:30:52

Where did these come from?

0:30:520:30:54

It's from my late husband.

0:30:540:30:55

From your late husband. Did he collect or did he inherit these?

0:30:550:30:59

-Collect.

-He collected them.

0:30:590:31:01

-Yes.

-Well, he had a good eye.

0:31:010:31:03

-Yes.

-We start off with this one...

0:31:030:31:05

-Yes.

-Well, this one's a little silver porringer.

0:31:050:31:07

And what has it been used for?

0:31:070:31:09

It would have been for stew or gruel.

0:31:090:31:12

It's really sweet. And how old do you think that is?

0:31:120:31:14

-No idea.

-Well, that's dated...

0:31:140:31:17

It was made in London in 17...

0:31:170:31:20

-Ooh!

-..53. That's a long time ago, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:31:200:31:24

I reckon it was very plain when it was made originally.

0:31:240:31:28

And I reckon these little details here have been put on later.

0:31:280:31:32

-Ah, yes.

-It's a little bit tired, but goodness me, at that age,

0:31:320:31:35

-I'm not surprised.

-Yes.

-I would say that's probably worth around £120-

0:31:350:31:39

-£150.

-Uh-huh.

0:31:390:31:41

Somewhere in that region.

0:31:410:31:42

-Yeah, yeah.

-So, that's the oldest item.

0:31:420:31:44

-You've brought three items.

-Yes.

0:31:440:31:46

That's the oldest one. That's the next oldest one.

0:31:460:31:48

And this was made in London, again,

0:31:480:31:51

-and this is 1902.

-1902...

-This is just 114 years...

0:31:510:31:55

-A mere 114 years old.

-Yes.

-You know what this is for, don't you?

0:31:550:31:59

-Sugar.

-Yes.

0:31:590:32:01

-Yes.

-It's really nice, though, isn't it?

0:32:010:32:03

-Yes.

-All this embossing.

0:32:030:32:05

It's pretty. It's in good condition.

0:32:050:32:07

-Yeah.

-Your husband had a good eye, didn't he?

0:32:070:32:08

-Good.

-That one, it's a good size.

0:32:100:32:12

I reckon you should get about £100 for that.

0:32:120:32:15

-Yeah.

-Yeah?

-Yes.

-Somewhere in that region.

-Good. Yeah.

0:32:150:32:18

And finally, we are going all over the place.

0:32:180:32:20

-Do you know where this was made, we think?

-No.

0:32:200:32:23

And this was your husband's as well? Was it full when he bought it?

0:32:230:32:26

-Did he drink...? Did he like it, did he...?

-No, never.

-Never?

-No.

0:32:260:32:29

-Is that what he told you?

-No smoking, no drinking, yeah.

0:32:290:32:31

No smoking, no drinking.

0:32:310:32:33

-I know that.

-This is a hip flask, and it is actually a hip flask.

0:32:330:32:36

I know it's big. It's my kind of size hip flask, this is.

0:32:360:32:38

This is sterling silver, this is an American one.

0:32:380:32:41

-Oh, yes.

-But it's nice that it's got no engraving, no initials.

0:32:410:32:45

Very plain, isn't it?

0:32:450:32:46

-Yes.

-That's probably £80, £100, somewhere in that region.

0:32:460:32:50

So there's a nice little group there, isn't there?

0:32:500:32:52

-Yeah, yeah.

-Shall we put them together as one lot in the sale?

0:32:520:32:55

-What do you think?

-I don't know.

0:32:550:32:56

You don't know? I think what we might do is put the earlier one

0:32:560:33:00

-on its own...

-Yes.

-And then put those two together.

0:33:000:33:03

-Yes. OK.

-All right? What do you think?

-That's fine.

0:33:030:33:05

So we'll put the earlier one on its own,

0:33:050:33:07

and what shall we put a reserve on that one?

0:33:070:33:09

-Shall we put a reserve at 120 on that one?

-I'll leave it to you.

-Would you be happy with that?

0:33:090:33:12

-Yes.

-And shall we put a reserve of 150 on that one?

0:33:120:33:16

So you've got around about £300 in total.

0:33:160:33:18

-Yeah, yeah, that's all right.

-We'll put a fixed reserve on them.

0:33:180:33:21

-Yes.

-Now, I will see you at auction and we will have a cup of coffee

0:33:210:33:23

and, you never know, we might have a little...

0:33:230:33:25

-You don't drink, though, do you?

-No.

-I'll have your bit.

-Yes!

0:33:250:33:29

That's a bit cheeky, Nick.

0:33:310:33:32

Next, it's back to Phil

0:33:320:33:34

at the Royal Naval College at Greenwich.

0:33:340:33:37

Linda, how are you? Are you all right?

0:33:370:33:38

-I'm fine, thank you.

-Have you been waiting long?

0:33:380:33:40

-Quite some time.

-No better place to wait, though, is there?

0:33:400:33:43

-I know.

-Glorious.

-It's beautiful.

0:33:430:33:44

Now, you've brought along a really good box... Ah!

0:33:440:33:48

Now, it's an interesting watch.

0:33:480:33:49

-Yes.

-And we'll talk about that in a moment.

0:33:490:33:51

But how long have you had it?

0:33:510:33:53

Probably about ten, 15 years.

0:33:530:33:55

It was given to me by my grandfather.

0:33:550:33:57

So he just gave me it as a present.

0:33:570:33:59

-As a present?

-Yeah.

-Good old grandad.

0:33:590:34:00

-Yeah, nice grandad.

-Top grandad, I'd say.

0:34:000:34:03

And you've never worn it?

0:34:030:34:04

I can't wear it because it's huge on my wrist.

0:34:040:34:07

I've got tiny wrists.

0:34:070:34:09

And it's quite a glamorous watch.

0:34:090:34:11

So I don't tend to go to very glamorous places.

0:34:110:34:14

So I've never worn it.

0:34:140:34:16

-It's a shame.

-Well, it isn't what it first appears to be.

0:34:160:34:19

-Yeah.

-Because you've got a very well-known brand on the box.

0:34:190:34:22

-Yeah.

-And you've got the Rolex mark here...

0:34:220:34:26

-Yeah.

-And again on the winder.

0:34:260:34:28

But it's actually a Tudor watch.

0:34:280:34:29

-Yeah.

-Which the Rolex founder...

0:34:290:34:32

He introduced the Tudor range I think in the '40s

0:34:320:34:34

because he was really fond of the Tudor period.

0:34:340:34:37

-Yeah.

-And so you've got this almost like a subsidiary brand.

0:34:370:34:41

Rolex is like the premier brand.

0:34:410:34:45

And Tudor is just perhaps one step below.

0:34:450:34:47

Doesn't carry quite the same cachet.

0:34:470:34:49

-Mm.

-And the net result of that means it's probably not quite that

0:34:490:34:53

-valuable.

-Yeah.

0:34:530:34:54

I would think that it probably is late 20th century.

0:34:550:34:58

-I'm guessing.

-Yeah.

-Something like that. It's an interesting watch.

0:34:580:35:01

If you look in there, your eyesight is better than mine,

0:35:010:35:04

can you see what that says?

0:35:040:35:07

-No.

-My eyesight is not that good!

0:35:070:35:09

That's the wrong answer, Linda.

0:35:090:35:11

That's really the wrong answer.

0:35:110:35:13

Let's just have a look.

0:35:130:35:14

It's 9-375.

0:35:160:35:19

-Nine-carat white gold.

-All right.

0:35:190:35:21

So this is a nine-carat white gold strap.

0:35:210:35:23

These look suspiciously like small chipped diamonds round there.

0:35:230:35:27

They are almost illusion set, to make them look bigger than they are.

0:35:270:35:30

-Yeah.

-But it doesn't quite have that premier Rolex brand.

0:35:300:35:34

One of the problems with it is, in a way, it's not just a watch,

0:35:340:35:38

-it's a piece of jewellery.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:35:380:35:40

And as fashions change,

0:35:400:35:42

people don't wear things...

0:35:420:35:44

I mean, you will know far more about jewellery than ever I will.

0:35:440:35:47

But it's sort of a little bit gone out of fashion, hasn't it?

0:35:470:35:49

Yeah, I think that's why I don't tend to wear it myself

0:35:490:35:53

because it's just on the cusp of that...

0:35:530:35:54

Looks a little bit old-fashioned, for me personally,

0:35:540:35:57

and that's why I don't particularly like it.

0:35:570:35:59

See, for me, that's quite modern.

0:35:590:36:01

-But you want to sell it.

-I do.

0:36:010:36:03

Let's put a £200 fixed reserve on it.

0:36:030:36:05

-OK.

-And let's put 250-350 on it as an estimate.

0:36:050:36:10

-OK.

-And if it does well, and that Tudor name will help it,

0:36:100:36:14

it might just go through the top estimate.

0:36:140:36:16

-So, fingers crossed.

-That would be good.

-But 250, 350,

0:36:160:36:19

firm estimate, £200 reserve. You happy with that?

0:36:190:36:22

-That's lovely, thank you.

-Right.

0:36:220:36:24

That's three items from three locations

0:36:240:36:26

ready to go off to auction.

0:36:260:36:28

And here's a quick reminder of what we found.

0:36:280:36:30

The quality Okimono figures are being sold as separate lots,

0:36:320:36:35

but together,

0:36:350:36:37

they could earn Mary a lot of money.

0:36:370:36:40

The collection of silver has got both age and beauty,

0:36:400:36:44

but will it be popular with the bidders?

0:36:440:36:47

And time is up for the Rolex watch,

0:36:480:36:50

but will its Tudor brand hold it back?

0:36:500:36:52

We are heading east to the picturesque village of Rye,

0:36:550:36:58

where Rye Auction Galleries is our host.

0:36:580:37:00

And it's time for Mary's Okimono figures to be sold

0:37:000:37:03

as five separate lots.

0:37:030:37:05

I tell you what, you certainly filled Catherine's table up

0:37:070:37:09

with your collection of Japanese Okimono.

0:37:090:37:11

Let's get on with the first lot.

0:37:110:37:13

Here we go. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:37:130:37:15

The 19th-century Japanese carved ivory, depicting an immortal.

0:37:150:37:19

200 with you, sir.

0:37:190:37:20

At the moment. At 200.

0:37:200:37:21

Do I see 210? 220.

0:37:210:37:23

-230.

-Bidding on the internet.

0:37:230:37:26

-Which is great.

-240.

0:37:260:37:28

250. 260. 260! 270.

0:37:280:37:31

270, they've come back. On the internet now.

0:37:310:37:33

280, sir? 290.

0:37:330:37:35

-300.

-Oh, 300!

0:37:350:37:37

At £300, are we all done now?

0:37:370:37:40

300 buys it, sir.

0:37:400:37:41

And here's our next lot,

0:37:410:37:42

the exquisitely carved monkeys catching the crabs.

0:37:420:37:45

190. 200. 210.

0:37:450:37:47

-Yeah, yeah. Come on.

-Yeah, yeah, more, more.

0:37:470:37:50

210. 220. 230. 240.

0:37:500:37:53

That's not sold, I'm afraid.

0:37:530:37:55

Right, better luck with our third one.

0:37:550:37:57

It's the musician with the drum.

0:37:570:37:59

At 70, five, 80.

0:37:590:38:01

-80, they've come back.

-Just!

-At 80 now.

0:38:010:38:04

At £80...

0:38:040:38:06

-We got it away.

-We just got it away.

-That's the main thing.

0:38:060:38:08

Here's the fourth one going under the hammer.

0:38:080:38:10

It's the musician with the monkey.

0:38:100:38:12

110. 120.

0:38:120:38:14

We've sold it, but we need a lot more.

0:38:140:38:15

140 now.

0:38:150:38:17

150, is it? Are we all done at £150?

0:38:170:38:21

The hammer's gone down. Top end of the estimate.

0:38:220:38:24

-That's good.

-£150.

0:38:240:38:26

One more to go. It's the man with the child in his basket.

0:38:260:38:28

90. Five.

0:38:280:38:30

100. 110. 120.

0:38:310:38:34

Thank you, sir. On the net and selling...

0:38:340:38:37

Yes! £110. That's a good result.

0:38:370:38:40

-Good.

-That's a good result, Mary.

0:38:400:38:41

I think it's time for a grand total, don't you?

0:38:410:38:44

It's £640.

0:38:440:38:46

-Right, good.

-640.

0:38:460:38:48

-Happy?

-Yes.

-There's one that didn't sell, and hopefully the auctioneer

0:38:480:38:52

will get hold of the underbidder and sell that one as well.

0:38:520:38:54

Well, look, thank you for being

0:38:540:38:56

-a big star of our show.

-Fantastic result.

0:38:560:38:57

It's been a real pleasure meeting you as well.

0:38:570:39:00

160. 170.

0:39:000:39:02

Next, we are hopping over to Wokingham, to Martin and Poles,

0:39:040:39:07

and it's time to test Nick's valuation of the silver.

0:39:070:39:11

We've got a lovely porridger

0:39:110:39:12

and a hip flask and a sugar sifter belonging to Anna.

0:39:120:39:14

Now, sadly, Anna cannot be with us.

0:39:140:39:16

But we do have the items and we have our lovely expert here,

0:39:160:39:18

Mr Nick Davies, who put the valuation on.

0:39:180:39:21

You split these up. We've got the two items put together.

0:39:210:39:24

That's right. We've got the caster and that very big hip flask.

0:39:240:39:27

We need... What? About 150?

0:39:270:39:29

-Yeah.

-Here we go.

0:39:290:39:30

The Edwardian sugar sifter

0:39:300:39:32

and the hip flask.

0:39:320:39:34

Absentee bids on this one.

0:39:340:39:35

I'll have to start it with me at £160.

0:39:350:39:38

That's a good in, isn't it?

0:39:380:39:39

£160. 170 with you now.

0:39:390:39:42

Any more? 170. 180. At 180 now.

0:39:420:39:45

-Come on. A little bit more.

-Are we all done?

0:39:450:39:47

At 180...

0:39:470:39:49

-Sold. £180.

-Good. Great. She'll be delighted.

-I think she will be.

0:39:490:39:53

We'll wait for the next lot. We've got the porridger by itself...

0:39:530:39:56

-Here it is.

-..as one lot.

-130 anywhere?

0:39:560:39:58

130. 140. 150.

0:39:580:40:01

OK, we are looking for 150?

0:40:010:40:02

-160.

-Yeah.

-170. 180. 190 with you now. Any more?

0:40:020:40:05

-190. 200.

-£200.

-210.

0:40:050:40:07

-220.

-This is good.

0:40:070:40:09

240. 250. 260.

0:40:090:40:12

270. 280. 290. 300.

0:40:120:40:16

-This is very good.

-This is very good.

-350.

0:40:160:40:20

Any more at £350?

0:40:200:40:22

-Are we all done now?

-That's an excellent result for that.

0:40:220:40:24

Gosh, Anna will be so pleased, we'll have to tell her.

0:40:240:40:27

Yeah, she'll be delighted.

0:40:270:40:28

I make that a grand total of...

0:40:280:40:30

..£530, which Anna will be very, very pleased with. And I think,

0:40:300:40:33

because you met her at the valuation day...

0:40:330:40:35

-Yeah, she'll be delighted.

-..she'll recognise your voice.

0:40:350:40:37

-Tell her, ring her up.

-I'll give her a call.

-"I've got some good news."

0:40:370:40:40

Yeah. I'm sure she'll be delighted.

0:40:400:40:41

And finally, we are nipping down

0:40:410:40:43

the road to Chiswick Auctions in West London.

0:40:430:40:45

Sounds like the perfect place to sell a Rolex watch.

0:40:450:40:48

Fingers crossed, Linda, good luck,

0:40:500:40:52

we get Philip's top end on this.

0:40:520:40:53

I know you find this a little bit too old-fashioned.

0:40:530:40:56

-It is a bit, isn't it?

-It is a bit for me.

0:40:560:40:57

A little bit, yeah. But what I like about it is that it's nine carat.

0:40:570:41:00

It's a kind of white gold. I like the silver on it.

0:41:000:41:03

-I think there will be some demand for this.

-250-350?

0:41:030:41:06

It is a "come and buy me"? Yes.

0:41:060:41:07

We've seen other watches...

0:41:070:41:09

-We have.

-Fingers crossed.

0:41:090:41:11

Well, its quality, and as we say on the show,

0:41:110:41:12

quality always sells and hopefully we don't get proved wrong.

0:41:120:41:15

Right now we're putting the Rolex under the hammer.

0:41:150:41:17

A ladies' Rolex Gold Tudor watch, with its original box.

0:41:170:41:22

And three commission bids, straight in. I'm bid 250.

0:41:220:41:26

260. 270. 280.

0:41:260:41:29

£280 for the little Rolex.

0:41:290:41:32

290, I'll take it in the room.

0:41:320:41:33

-Hopefully they will push each other.

-300 on the internet.

0:41:330:41:36

320 on the internet.

0:41:360:41:37

340. 360. 380.

0:41:370:41:40

400. 420.

0:41:400:41:43

440. 460.

0:41:430:41:45

480. 500.

0:41:450:41:47

550.

0:41:480:41:50

-600.

-600!

0:41:510:41:53

-600.

-Hey, you're going shopping, aren't you?

0:41:530:41:56

I'm definitely going shopping.

0:41:560:41:58

We might be coming with you!

0:41:580:41:59

650 on the internet.

0:41:590:42:01

650 it is, then.

0:42:010:42:03

I'm going to sell it. Make no mistake.

0:42:030:42:05

700.

0:42:050:42:07

Room bid now of 700.

0:42:070:42:09

-It's going in the room.

-At £700,

0:42:090:42:11

gentleman in the room. Anybody else, then?

0:42:110:42:13

700, it goes...

0:42:130:42:15

-£700!

-I can't believe it!

0:42:150:42:17

-That's amazing. Thank you.

-£700!

0:42:170:42:19

-I think that's top dollar for it.

-Yes, it was.

0:42:190:42:21

-No, definitely.

-It was.

0:42:210:42:22

Somebody really wanted that.

0:42:220:42:24

Really wanted that.

0:42:240:42:25

-I just can't believe it.

-You can go shopping now, can't you?

0:42:250:42:28

And that's the beauty of auctions -

0:42:280:42:29

you never know what's going to happen -

0:42:290:42:31

and we certainly had some happy customers today.

0:42:310:42:34

Well, that's it. We've come to the end of another show.

0:42:350:42:38

I hope you've enjoyed Knightshayes as much as I have.

0:42:380:42:41

What an incredible combination of designs and styles.

0:42:410:42:45

Every room tells a story.

0:42:450:42:47

And what a great result for Linda in the auction room with her Rolex

0:42:470:42:51

watch. I hope she converts some of that cash into something that stands

0:42:510:42:56

the test of time just as well.

0:42:560:42:58

Well, sadly, we now have run out of time, so it's goodbye.

0:42:580:43:02

A special compilation programme that navigates the nation, taking in some of the most spectacular venues from the series. The experts are on the hunt for precious items to sell at auction, and Paul Martin visits Knightshayes in Devon to hear about its unique design history.


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