Eric Knowles v Will Axon - Foreign Antiques Market Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


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Eric Knowles v Will Axon - Foreign Antiques Market

Antiques expert Eric Knowles goes head to head with Will Axon at a Parisian market. They must find the best antiques at rock-bottom prices so they can sell it all for a profit.


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This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is, the show

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that pitches TV's best-loved antiques experts against each other

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in an all-out battle for profit...

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Yee-haw!

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..and gives you the insider's

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view of the trade.

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Who's there?

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Each week, one pair of duelling dealers

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will face a different daily challenge...

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The Axeman! Grr!

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..putting their reputations on the line...

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Ready for the ball.

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..and giving you their top tips

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and savvy secrets on how to make the most money from buying and selling.

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Get in there!

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Today, the antiques master Eric Knowles takes on new boy

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and ace auctioneer Will Axon at a flea market in France.

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Coming up... Will tries his luck.

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Would you do those two for 50?

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HE LAUGHS

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This guy is kidding, isn't he? Come on!

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Eric's pottery pottiness hits new heights.

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I'm going to take it home with me and just love it for a while.

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And then I'm going to have to sell it.

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And the excitement gets a bit too much for Will.

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HE SNORES

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Hm. This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

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Welcome, antiques lovers.

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The Put Your Money express has steamed across the Channel

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for a buying bonanza in Paris.

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But no time to stroll down the Champs-Elysees.

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No trips up the Eiffel Tower.

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And certainly no "ooh, la, la" at the Moulin Rouge.

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Oh, no, we've got two intrepid expert explorers

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with one sole focus -

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finding French finery that'll make a profit back home.

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So, let's meet our continental contenders.

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On the Right Bank...

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He may be the new boy in town, but he's no amateur, not a bit of it.

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He's an ace auctioneer who's raring to rummage for rarities.

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And he's determined to prove himself by landing a knockout blow.

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All the way from Suffolk, it's...

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It's going to have to be crunch time.

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But there is stiff competition on the Left Bank -

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a man who's a living legend.

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He's the Veteran of Value,

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the Prince of Porcelain,

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the creme de la creme of the curio.

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It's Lancashire's likeliest lad...

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He doesn't stand a chance.

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Hm, fighting talk from Eric.

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Our prize pair are going head-to-head at the Porte de Vanves

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flea market in the south of the city.

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They've each converted £750 of their own money into euros

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for this Parisian pas de deux.

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And once they've sold all their wares,

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any profits will go to their chosen charities.

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But don't be fooled into thinking this is all about the money.

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Here in France, they need eagle eyes, excellent expertise

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and bags of British charm.

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And with these two, that should be no problem.

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So, euros at the ready,

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Eric 'Knocker' Knowles and Will 'The Axeman' Axon,

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it's time to Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

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-THEY SIGH

-Le Marteau, how are you?

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Le Marteau, what's this?

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-French for Knocker.

-Is it?!

-It is.

-Le Marteau, I quite like that.

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-I don't know what The Axeman is, though.

-No, but I know he cometh.

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He's now cometh to Porte de Vanves. It's a nice market, this -

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I've been here a few times -

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because it's doable, it's a nice size. Good.

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-And we've got, what, £750 in euros to spend?

-That's a fair wad of cash.

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-What are you looking to spend it on?

-Well, I tend to play it safe here.

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I'll go for Deco, Nouveau or whatever.

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But to be honest with you, anything where I get the sniff of a profit.

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So...

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Well, I think my tactic today is going to be - if I see it, buy it.

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Because, you know, we've got a time limit, haven't we?

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So let's get the business done before the French

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totter off for their long lunch.

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-Listen, remember, you are batting for Britain, OK?

-Wave that flag!

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-Good luck.

-Au revoir!

-Au revoir! Au revoir, monsieur!

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Ah, could you want two more delectable dealers banging

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the drum for Blighty?

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Not a chance!

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It's early in the morning

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and the stall holders are still laying out their wares.

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Our two conquering heroes are straight into battle to see

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what's on offer.

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But have they refined their cross-Channel strategies

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in the hunt for their objets d'art?

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If you see it, forget about coming back for it,

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you've got to buy it there and then because you can bet your life,

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when you do come back looking for it, it's long gone.

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So I'm trying to be business-like today.

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Well, good luck with that

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because Will has a secret weapon up his sleeve.

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Yes, The Axeman is half Spanish,

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so he's au fait with European languages.

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And that includes French.

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Eric's got the upper hand, he's been here before.

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But I think I might have him on the old lingo.

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So hopefully, he'll get his numbers mixed up and pay 90 instead of 20.

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Oh, let's hope so, mainly because it will be funny for the rest of us.

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Both our boys have begun their browse,

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but it is Will who leaps in first, checking out some bookends.

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They are quite smart, aren't they? I mean, classic Art Deco, isn't it?

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That whole pelican, very stylised...

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Hm, lost eyes and so on.

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They would have to be very cheap. I'm going to leave them.

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I might come back to them.

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So, he has already abandoned his see-it-buy-it plan.

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And so early as well.

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Mind you, Eric is not going great guns either.

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In fact, he is stalled.

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I've seen a few good objects,

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but, you know, they're at really good prices.

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Not good for me, but good for the dealers.

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Yes, everywhere Eric looks, he is finding budget-busting prices.

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Merci beaucoup. Yep.

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So... They want £1,000 for it.

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I'd love to buy it,

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but it is 3,000 euro.

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And a little out of my budget.

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-The price is...deux mille euro.

-2,000.

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But after a lot of searching,

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Eric spots something with a certain je ne sais quoi.

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It's ceramic, obviously, but will it be affordable?

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-What sort of price can we do?

-Oh.

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What would be your best price?

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Quarante.

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-40, because he loves London...

-I love London!

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..and he loves English people.

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He is a very nice man.

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All right, 40, 40 euro. OK, OK, I take it.

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-OK, fine.

-Thank you.

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The Frenchman's flattery works.

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Convert that into sterling,

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and Eric pays £33.33.

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It's Japanese. It is around about maybe 1910.

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Normally, it is the sort of thing you expect in cloisonne.

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In other words, with little wires enclosing it.

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But this is cloisonne-free enamel.

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And it is quite rare.

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Mm! Sounds promising.

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So, Eric has got that all-important first buy under his belt,

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a hurdle Will is still waiting to jump.

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And he's also finding the Parisian prices a bit rich

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for his blood, despite his ability to negotiate en francais.

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I think the fair is still warming up a little bit,

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so no-one is really prepared to slash prices yet

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because there are people still arriving and stock still coming out.

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But before he gets too disillusioned, Will clocks

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something the French are particularly famous for.

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A quel prix, le vin?

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Will then chats away in French,

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which isn't much good for most of us.

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Pour les deux?

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The gentleman wants 80 euros for the two bottles,

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but Will gets him down to 60 and shakes on it, his first deal.

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-Six, yeah? 60.

-Thank you.

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Sir, it has been a pleasure. Good luck today. Cheers.

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After converting the currency,

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Will pays £50 for the vintage wine.

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Chills.

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I spotted these bottles of wine. And Pauillac jumped out at me.

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That is my favourite grape. Delicious.

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The other interesting thing as well, of course,

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is you're selling alcohol on the street. How do you get round that?

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Well, you sell me the bottle, you give me the contents for free.

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Ah-ha! But maybe it is poor old Eric who could do with a warm tipple.

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He is not having much fun.

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I've still got an awful lot of leg work to do.

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I'd just like to buy a couple more

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and then I'll be getting more into my comfort zone.

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Hm... Mr Knowles really is struggling to find his feet.

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Young Axon, however, is into his stride.

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He is off and running!

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But the next thing to catch his attention is rather macabre.

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C'est quoi, ca?

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DEALER SPEAKS FRENCH

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Ah, so it is the throat.

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-Et le prix?

-Cinquante euro.

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50 euros.

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-Donne-le-moi pour trente.

-Trente-cinq.

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-Trente-cinq?

-Trente-cinq.

-Bon, bien, trente-cinq.

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Merci, monsieur.

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There he goes again, being all French.

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He agrees 35 euros for the anatomical model, which,

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let's be honest, is fairly gruesome.

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That translates to £29.17.

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Well, what I've bought here, apparently,

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is a medical model of a throat or oesophagus.

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Not everyone's cup of tea, I know. This one dates...

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Early 20th century? I like it. Hopefully, someone else will.

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And it'll be saleable. Fingers crossed. Or...

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I don't know, oesophagus crossed?

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Hm, that sounds painful!

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Eric might find that deal hard to swallow.

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But his own luck could be about to change.

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Well, I've just come across a moulded dish on a sort of a chrome stand.

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He wants 120 euro for this and...

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I don't know, I'm tempted.

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Monsieur, can I ask you the...? Donne le prix.

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-Cent.

-Oui, oui. 100. Yeah.

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Zut alors, Eric's done it!

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The seller comes down to 100 euros.

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That's £83.33,

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and Eric is looking pleased.

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It's period. It's 1920s.

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It's perfectly OK.

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You'd never buy anything like this with a hint of damage about it.

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This opalescent effect, this milky blue, is

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achieved by putting into the glass mix certain fluorites.

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A chemical reaction takes place

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within the glass as it begins to cool.

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I think, you know, at 100 euro, it represents value for money.

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Whether it represents a profit remains to be seen.

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Indeed it does.

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Our two antiques entrepreneurs have each bought twice

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and seem to be in the swing of things.

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But with top-end prices on lots of stalls,

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they don't want to be caught napping.

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And wide awake Will is quick off the mark,

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buying an African head rest for 110 euros.

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That's £91.67.

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I've bought this carved African head rest, probably Ethiopian.

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Date wise...

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I think probably into the 20th century, maybe '20s,

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'30s, that sort of period.

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It's comfortable and it keeps the bugs out of your ears.

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Sounds like an important feature.

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It's midway through the morning

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and our competitors are anxious to compare notes.

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Let's do the same and see how the figures stack up.

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Eric and Will each arrived in Paris

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with £750-worth of euros to spend.

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Jittery about prices,

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Eric 'Knocker' Knowles has so far only

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bought twice, spending £116.66,

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leaving £633.34 in his kitty.

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Will 'The Axeman' Axon has gone

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further - three purchases

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for £170.84, meaning he's still got

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£579 burning a hole in his pocket.

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So, they've both still got masses of cash to splash

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and a lot of work to boot.

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-How's it going?

-Well, it's...

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It was a slow start, I don't mind admitting.

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You know, I've bought a couple of bits of glass...

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-Breakables?

-Oh, yes.

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-A bit of porcelain? A pot? I bet you bought a pot.

-I bought a pot, yeah.

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What have you gone for? Come on.

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I've got medical, ethnographic and alcoholic.

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OK. Well, anyway, listen, time is of the essence.

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You should know that they are going to start closing down within

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the next hour or so.

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-Don't say that.

-They will do, trust me.

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-Good luck, Eric.

-And you too.

-All right then.

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-See you at the end.

-See you later.

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Well, both our boys need to pick up the pace.

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And our apprentice is relieved the guv'nor is feeling the heat, too.

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Well, Eric seems to be a bit in the same boat as I am.

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He is sort of struggling a little bit with the prices.

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But he's bought a few objects, breakables.

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So I think we are pretty much neck and neck at the moment,

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halfway stage.

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Eric, however, is suddenly much more relaxed about the whole business.

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Somehow. And he's taking photos for tourists.

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Are you ready? Are you all in?

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I want you to be the centre of attraction. Oh, you are.

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Here we go. One, two, three...

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But before you can say fromage, Eric's got his eye on another -

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you guessed it - breakable.

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I quite like this.

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It's nicely enamelled.

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Can I ask for the best price, as they say in English?

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-I can do 30.

-30?

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That's fine. For 30, I'm having it.

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Knocker's back on a roll, back in business and going for a job lot.

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-How much are the chairs?

-80.

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80, 80 each. Who made it, do you know?

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Matteo Grassi.

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If I took the two, how much would they be?

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-140.

-I'll take them.

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Sacre bleu! Eric more than doubles

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his spend in one fell swoop.

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£25 for the enamelled glass dish

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and £116.67

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for the two designer chairs, and

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he's pretty pleased with himself.

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Well, I'm very happy with this enamelled glass dish.

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Date wise, it's probably around about 1925.

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It's got a few nicks, but at 30 euros,

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I was never going to say no to that. It's a great thing.

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And as for my chairs,

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well, they are after a design by Marcel Breuer.

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I think the originals date to around about 1930.

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Were they the real thing, I would not have bought the pair for 140 euros.

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I think I'd be paying more in the region of £2,000 to £3,000 each.

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I mean, 140 euro for two classic chairs...

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Thank you, thank you, thank you.

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Well done, Knocker. And that double purchase puts him out in front.

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You know, this is great.

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And while Mr Axon considers a rather funky lamp,

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Knocker knocks another one out of the park.

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He pays 80 euros for a piece of French pottery.

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That works out at £66.67.

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So tell us what you've got, Knowlesy.

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Well, I've bought myself a piece of French faience.

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In England, we would call it a monteith.

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But the idea is that you put crushed ice in here

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and you take your wine glass bowls and you stick them

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in the crushed ice, so when you then want to pour your chilled

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white wine, you had a chilled wine glass ready to go.

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The thing is, I really like it.

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I'm going to take it home with me

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and just love it for a while, then I'm going to have to sell it.

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Hm, I wonder if Mrs Knowles likes ceramics.

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Their house must be full of the stuff!

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Anyway, after a cautious start, Eric is now well on his way.

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Five items to Will's three.

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And our Axeman has lost his laissez faire attitude

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and he's worrying about prices again.

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Another one of these industrial lights, which I really like,

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but they're pricing them out of my market.

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Look at that, the way the cogs are working.

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What were they originally,

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lathe working for when they're working on the metal turning tools?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah. How much are you asking for that, then?

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Yeah, it's too much for me.

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At 200 euros, the lamp looks like a no go.

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But then he catches site of a pair of wooden duck decoys.

0:15:480:15:52

Would you do those two for 50?

0:15:520:15:53

HE LAUGHS

0:15:530:15:56

This guy is kidding, isn't he?

0:15:560:15:57

Come on! It's 80 each.

0:15:570:16:00

Give me 100 for both.

0:16:000:16:01

-So, if we can say 80 the two...

-No, no.

-..we've got a deal.

0:16:010:16:04

-Meet me in the middle, 90.

-100.

0:16:040:16:06

Give me 100.

0:16:060:16:08

-You are a nice guy...

-Thank you, sir.

-100, thank you very much.

0:16:080:16:10

-Oh, you got me!

-We make a deal.

-I was too slow.

0:16:100:16:13

Love a duck! The friendly Frenchman cheekily gets what he wants.

0:16:130:16:17

But Will was holding out his hand. Silly boy!

0:16:170:16:20

But things suddenly get better. Out of nowhere,

0:16:200:16:23

the man offers Will a price that he can't refuse for the lamp.

0:16:230:16:26

-Let's shake at that 120.

-120. Will, you got it.

0:16:270:16:31

It is a double deal -

0:16:310:16:33

an engineered industrial light

0:16:330:16:35

for bang on £100 and a pair

0:16:350:16:37

of quackers for £83.33.

0:16:370:16:40

They are not going to be used as duck decoys nowadays,

0:16:400:16:43

they are going to be used for their sculptural quality.

0:16:430:16:45

You know, they are hand-carved, solid wood, original paint.

0:16:450:16:49

A bit of folk art.

0:16:490:16:51

Date wise...

0:16:510:16:52

Could be turn-of-the-century, maybe 1920s, '30s.

0:16:520:16:55

They are certainly not reproduction, they are the real McCoy.

0:16:550:16:59

Yes, Will is lit up with his latest purchases. But what about Eric?

0:16:590:17:03

Well, he still needs to get all his ducks in a row.

0:17:030:17:06

I feel a sense of urgency, which is bordering on,

0:17:080:17:12

but I am not allowing it to be, pure panic.

0:17:120:17:15

Yes, our Knocker is never one to give up easily.

0:17:180:17:20

A last-minute scurry around the stalls,

0:17:200:17:22

and he finds a particularly illuminating piece.

0:17:220:17:25

THEY NEGOTIATE IN FRENCH

0:17:270:17:31

Right. Yeah, we'll give it a go.

0:17:310:17:33

The brass candelabrum costs

0:17:330:17:35

100 euros, that is £83.33.

0:17:350:17:39

Well, I was hoping, you know, when I looked at the base,

0:17:390:17:41

it might have had a bit of age.

0:17:410:17:43

I think we are probably looking at maybe 1950s.

0:17:430:17:47

I bought what, to all intents and purposes, is a decorative

0:17:470:17:51

but useful object

0:17:510:17:53

that takes no less than 17 candles.

0:17:530:17:58

And at that point, Eric decides to call it a day.

0:17:580:18:01

Will, however, is under mounting pressure.

0:18:010:18:04

Well, I'd really like to get another item under my belt,

0:18:040:18:06

but we really are in the last throes of this fair now.

0:18:060:18:09

People are packing up, going home, tables are getting cleared.

0:18:090:18:13

So I'm really going to have to keep my eyes peeled just to make sure

0:18:130:18:16

I don't miss that one thing that I may have walked past.

0:18:160:18:18

But he then remembers the first stall he visited this morning,

0:18:180:18:22

the place with the pelican bookends. You know, the ones with dodgy eyes.

0:18:220:18:26

80.

0:18:340:18:35

Thankfully, the pelicans are still there.

0:18:350:18:37

But the store holder is about to leave,

0:18:370:18:39

so Will is just in the nick of time.

0:18:390:18:41

Is there a deal to be done?

0:18:410:18:43

I want one more item, so let's throw caution to the wind.

0:18:540:18:57

Yes!

0:19:000:19:01

Bon. Merci.

0:19:040:19:06

Bravo, Will. He feathers his nest with one final flutter.

0:19:060:19:10

The book ends up costs £58.33.

0:19:100:19:13

They are basically Art Deco bookends

0:19:130:19:16

formed as pelicans, which is a very iconic sort of Deco theme.

0:19:160:19:20

They are made of spelter rather than bronze.

0:19:200:19:23

We know that the eyes are lacking

0:19:230:19:25

and we know that they are signed - Franjou.

0:19:250:19:28

I think Franjou is pretty mass-made Art Deco, French maker.

0:19:280:19:32

But even so, they are genuine French Art Deco, what more do you want?

0:19:320:19:37

Well, a profit would be good. And that fun is about to start.

0:19:370:19:41

For now, the frantic fight at the French flea market is finished.

0:19:410:19:46

Both our experts arrived in Paris

0:19:460:19:48

with £750-worth of euros.

0:19:480:19:50

Eric had a sluggish start,

0:19:500:19:52

but eventually found his feet.

0:19:520:19:54

He leaves with six items,

0:19:540:19:55

having paid £480.33.

0:19:550:19:58

Will, on the other hand, bought more early on,

0:19:580:20:01

but struggled in the later stages.

0:20:010:20:03

He also heads home with six purchases

0:20:030:20:05

and has a spent almost exactly

0:20:050:20:06

the same - £412.50.

0:20:060:20:09

So, with just four pounds in it,

0:20:110:20:12

what do our boys make of their French fare?

0:20:120:20:15

What a difference a few hours make!

0:20:150:20:17

And I tell you what,

0:20:170:20:19

what a difference in what you've bought and what I've bought.

0:20:190:20:22

It just goes to show that there is literally

0:20:220:20:24

something for everyone at the same fair.

0:20:240:20:26

Talk me through your lots, Eric.

0:20:260:20:28

Well, first of all, the little Japanese vase. It is enamelled.

0:20:280:20:32

Very nice.

0:20:320:20:33

And I'm looking for somebody who is about to become 17,

0:20:330:20:38

because that is how many candles you can stick on that.

0:20:380:20:40

-That's a big 'un.

-It is a big 'un, isn't it?

0:20:400:20:42

-Tell me about yours, because out for a duck, not quite.

-My duck decoys!

0:20:420:20:47

Bought as sculptural pieces rather than decoys.

0:20:470:20:50

And what do you think to this?

0:20:500:20:51

Well, first question, what is it?

0:20:510:20:54

It is an African head rest.

0:20:540:20:56

-Is it now?

-It is. So a bit of ethnographic.

0:20:560:20:59

-I'm pretty sure that has got a bit of age to it.

-OK.

0:20:590:21:01

So, it is a case of all's well that ends well.

0:21:010:21:04

But there again, all's well when we sell well.

0:21:040:21:07

Ah! That is the key.

0:21:070:21:08

Good luck to you.

0:21:080:21:10

So, our bargain hunters head back to Blighty.

0:21:130:21:16

Now they must forget about what has gone before and summon up

0:21:160:21:19

all their courage, because this is where things get really tough -

0:21:190:21:23

finding buyers for all those items.

0:21:230:21:26

Once they've got people interested,

0:21:260:21:27

they must eke out every possible penny,

0:21:270:21:30

pounce on every pound and focus on the fight for finance.

0:21:300:21:34

All their profits will go to charities they have chosen,

0:21:340:21:37

so this is where they really earn their money.

0:21:370:21:39

Eric is back at Knocker HQ, and he is feeling confident.

0:21:400:21:45

Well, I do love that little Japanese vase.

0:21:450:21:50

I know somebody who deals in Japanese works of art,

0:21:500:21:54

and I think that might be right up his street.

0:21:540:21:56

Then, a little bit of Nancy.

0:21:560:21:58

Beautifully decorated French faience, entirely hand-painted.

0:21:580:22:02

I've never come across a 17-light table candelabrum in brass.

0:22:020:22:07

My little glass dish decorated with roses

0:22:070:22:11

that most people would say are Mackintosh roses.

0:22:110:22:15

But if you are in France, they are Paul Follot roses.

0:22:150:22:18

And then a classic piece of French opalescent glass there

0:22:180:22:22

by a firm called Julien.

0:22:220:22:24

And finally, one of a pair of chairs that you find me

0:22:240:22:28

sitting in, designed in around about 1928.

0:22:280:22:31

I think I've got something to smile about

0:22:310:22:34

and something for Will Axon to worry about.

0:22:340:22:38

But Will is not concerned at all.

0:22:380:22:41

He is now back home in Newmarket.

0:22:410:22:43

Here is my hoard of treasure.

0:22:430:22:46

The pelicans, pleased with those.

0:22:460:22:48

Typical French Art Deco. Really stylish art metal.

0:22:480:22:52

Behind them, the two bottles of Chateau Collapso.

0:22:520:22:54

I'm going to have to find someone who appreciates a nice

0:22:540:22:57

drop of red, aren't I? The throat figure.

0:22:570:22:59

As an auctioneer, we use our throats a lot. Made sense.

0:22:590:23:03

Next to that, the African head rest.

0:23:030:23:05

I'm going to have to find

0:23:050:23:06

a specialist dealer, I think, for that.

0:23:060:23:08

And then the decoy ducks, which I really love.

0:23:080:23:11

Good decorator's pieces, really. Sculptural quality about those.

0:23:110:23:14

I love my up-cycled industrial lamp, which I think I'm going to

0:23:140:23:18

sell really well, because it is really on trend.

0:23:180:23:21

But fashions change so quickly, who knows?

0:23:210:23:23

It might just be out rather than in.

0:23:230:23:26

Well, only time will tell, Will.

0:23:260:23:28

Our dealing duo must now dig deep into their contacts books

0:23:280:23:32

and phone everyone they know to line up the ideal list of buyers.

0:23:320:23:36

This requires rapid research and non-stop networking.

0:23:360:23:39

And remember, until they shake on it

0:23:390:23:42

and the money has changed hands, no deal is ever sealed.

0:23:420:23:45

Eric's mission begins with one of his favourite pieces -

0:23:470:23:49

the Japanese enamelled vase.

0:23:490:23:51

He has come to Kensington, in London, to see Howard,

0:23:510:23:54

the son of a dealer he has known for years.

0:23:540:23:57

They specialise in Oriental antiques,

0:23:570:23:59

so will Knocker kick off his campaign with a solid profit?

0:23:590:24:03

The vase cost him around £33.

0:24:030:24:05

-Howard.

-Hi, Eric, how are you doing?

-Good to see you.

-Likewise.

0:24:070:24:10

I feel that I have brought quite a humble little piece to show

0:24:100:24:13

-you today.

-Let's take a look at it.

-Have a look, tell me...

0:24:130:24:16

I would welcome your opinion.

0:24:160:24:18

Under a powerful torch, you can see that there is no bruising, no faint

0:24:180:24:23

hairlines that one can easily miss, but, yeah, that is all positive.

0:24:230:24:27

It is a very nice what one would normally call a great

0:24:270:24:31

commercial piece of Japanese cloisonne.

0:24:310:24:33

I'm opening it at a couple of hundred pounds, so...

0:24:330:24:36

I'd like to pretty much make it at £100 to keep, you know...

0:24:360:24:41

to keep me to be able to make a profit.

0:24:410:24:43

Throw in a tenner and we've got ourselves a deal.

0:24:430:24:47

-All right.

-Is that a deal?

-Done.

-Put it there.

-£110.

0:24:470:24:50

Thank you very much. Firm handshake, just like his dad.

0:24:500:24:53

Firm handshake.

0:24:530:24:55

Well, I hope he has got a safe pair of hands, too.

0:24:550:24:57

And it is a good start for the professor of porcelain.

0:24:570:25:00

The vase makes a profit of £76.67.

0:25:000:25:04

I actually managed to more than treble my money there.

0:25:040:25:08

And if you are watching, Will Axon, that is what it is all about.

0:25:080:25:12

So, if you are not trebling your money, what are you doing wrong?

0:25:120:25:17

Oh, that is what you call throwing down the gauntlet!

0:25:170:25:20

But The Axeman is not one to duck out of a challenge.

0:25:200:25:23

He kicks off his selling spree by staying local.

0:25:230:25:26

He has brought his two ducks to

0:25:260:25:28

a gallery at Thurston, near Bury St Edmunds.

0:25:280:25:30

He paid just over £83 in Paris.

0:25:300:25:33

So, will he profit here?

0:25:330:25:34

Denzil, the gallery is looking wonderful, I might say.

0:25:360:25:40

And I am hoping that my two little duck decoys

0:25:400:25:44

will fit in beautifully, too.

0:25:440:25:46

They are very nicely carved and I think they are the same hand.

0:25:460:25:49

On the green one here, you have got a repair on the neck there.

0:25:490:25:52

-So he has been decapitated at some point...

-Oh, dear!

0:25:520:25:54

-..and his head has been put back on.

-Yeah.

0:25:540:25:57

-The paint on this one is good.

-Yeah.

-This one doesn't drive me quackers.

0:25:570:26:01

Ho-ho-ho!

0:26:010:26:02

I accept what you say about the green paint on that.

0:26:020:26:04

How would 200 for the two sound?

0:26:040:26:07

I'll spit at 180.

0:26:070:26:09

High-five. Spit. Go.

0:26:090:26:12

Done.

0:26:120:26:14

Sealed with saliva! That's one way to do it.

0:26:140:26:17

Our new boy takes to the selling business like a duck to water.

0:26:170:26:21

He makes £96.67

0:26:210:26:23

and gets off to a quacking good start.

0:26:230:26:25

And that is the last duck gag, I promise.

0:26:250:26:29

Well, I think that went really well.

0:26:290:26:31

Those ducks are going to fit in perfectly with Denzil's stock,

0:26:310:26:33

so I think he is pleased and I am pleased.

0:26:330:26:36

Knowlesy, you are going down!

0:26:360:26:39

Oh, he is getting feisty!

0:26:390:26:40

But our Knocker is prepared to go to any length to win.

0:26:400:26:43

Or depths, actually.

0:26:430:26:46

And although he regards an antiques challenge as heaven,

0:26:460:26:48

he is now heading to

0:26:480:26:49

-SPOOKY VOICE:

-'the other place.'

0:26:490:26:51

I am at the entrance to the Hellfire Caves in West Wickham.

0:26:520:26:57

I am here to hopefully do a sale on my 17-light table candelabrum.

0:26:570:27:03

As you can see, it is looking even more splendid now

0:27:030:27:07

I've kitted it out with all the right type of candles.

0:27:070:27:10

The man-made caves date from the 1700s, and they are a bit spooky!

0:27:100:27:15

Eric is here to meet the assistant manager, Jen.

0:27:150:27:18

Boo!

0:27:210:27:22

Sorry.

0:27:240:27:25

HE LAUGHS

0:27:250:27:28

-I hope you are Jen.

-I am indeed. Lovely seeing you.

0:27:280:27:31

Why Hellfire Caves?

0:27:310:27:34

It was Lord Dashwood, the leader of the debaucherous, notorious

0:27:340:27:39

Hellfire Club, who was determined to have his own sort of nightclub.

0:27:390:27:42

So this was the rock'n'roll central of the 18th century.

0:27:420:27:46

Are we in haunted caves?

0:27:460:27:48

This is, apparently, one of the most haunted sites in all of England.

0:27:490:27:53

HE LAUGHS SPOOKILY

0:27:530:27:57

Well, Jen, you very kindly agreed to meet me because you're doing

0:27:580:28:02

the negotiation on my 17-light brass table candelabrum.

0:28:020:28:08

First impressions?

0:28:080:28:10

Gorgeous. And very fitting for this place.

0:28:100:28:13

I'm looking for somewhere in the region of £180.

0:28:130:28:18

I would say...150?

0:28:180:28:21

Yes.

0:28:210:28:22

-Wonderful.

-Put your 18th-century hand there, my dear.

-Thank you.

0:28:220:28:27

Well, nothing ghoulish about that deal.

0:28:270:28:30

Take off the £12 he spent on the candles,

0:28:300:28:32

and Knocker makes a profit

0:28:320:28:34

of £54.67.

0:28:340:28:36

-It does look the part, doesn't it?

-Glorious.

0:28:360:28:38

Let's put it to good use, shall we?

0:28:380:28:40

Because there's a fair bit of cave between us and that entrance.

0:28:400:28:45

-So, shall I lead the way?

-Yes, please do.

0:28:450:28:48

Try not to get us lost.

0:28:480:28:50

Ooh!

0:28:500:28:52

Mm, Will might be hoping they don't find their way back.

0:28:520:28:55

But he's found his way to Bury St Edmunds BMI Hospital.

0:28:550:28:59

Don't worry, no emergencies.

0:28:590:29:00

He's meeting ear, nose and throat specialist, Mr Fahmy.

0:29:000:29:04

And you've guessed it, he's brought his medical model

0:29:040:29:07

of the oesophagus that cost just over £29.

0:29:070:29:09

Mr Fahmy is in theatre, so Will's got to get into scrubs.

0:29:090:29:13

Blimey, let's hope no-one mistakes him for an actual doctor!

0:29:150:29:18

-Mr Fahmy.

-Hello.

-It's a pleasure to meet you at last.

-My pleasure.

0:29:180:29:22

I see you've laid out some up-to-date,

0:29:220:29:25

technologically correct models here.

0:29:250:29:28

Let me show you what I've got.

0:29:280:29:30

You'll have to excuse the chips and so on,

0:29:300:29:32

but it is... It is about circa 1920.

0:29:320:29:34

It's actually quite a good model because it shows the anatomy.

0:29:340:29:37

What would you do with it?

0:29:370:29:39

I will probably put it in my office, and it will be a nice

0:29:390:29:44

demonstration that complements what we show our patients as well.

0:29:440:29:48

Yeah. So I was thinking of a figure, say, around the £50, £60 mark?

0:29:480:29:54

That seems reasonable.

0:29:540:29:55

Which one of the two? Shall I try and push you for the 60?

0:29:550:29:59

It's your call.

0:29:590:30:00

I'm going to take advantage of your kindness and say £60.

0:30:000:30:04

-Do we have a deal?

-Deal.

0:30:040:30:06

He's doubled his money, and the prognosis is good.

0:30:060:30:09

A healthy profit of £30.83.

0:30:090:30:12

Come on, Eric, you're playing catch-up.

0:30:120:30:14

Actually, he's not, so don't get cocky, mister.

0:30:160:30:19

Knocker is actually leading by a few pounds at this point.

0:30:190:30:22

And he is pretty hopeful he'll make a few bob

0:30:220:30:25

on his opalescent glass dish.

0:30:250:30:26

He paid just over £83.

0:30:260:30:28

And is going to meet John, who owns a gallery in Westerham, in Kent.

0:30:280:30:32

-Hello, hello, hello. How are you?

-Great to see you.

-And you too.

0:30:330:30:37

Well, I can see that you've got Deco glass, iridescent, opalescent.

0:30:370:30:42

-That's right.

-And I've brought along my bit of opalescent.

0:30:420:30:46

There is not a lot of scratches going on inside,

0:30:460:30:48

-which quite often you get that.

-Yeah.

0:30:480:30:51

No chips on the rims.

0:30:510:30:52

HE PINGS THE GLASS John, you always ping glass.

0:30:520:30:55

Yeah, I think anything that is ping-able is worth it,

0:30:550:30:58

cos you know straightaway if there's a fault.

0:30:580:31:00

-So, big question is, what are you looking for?

-Yeah, well...

0:31:000:31:03

I was starting around about the £140 mark.

0:31:030:31:06

I'm happy to go to 120 on that.

0:31:060:31:09

I'm not going to argue at 120. It does see me with a profit.

0:31:090:31:13

Well, that was quick and easy.

0:31:130:31:15

The glass dish makes £36.67.

0:31:150:31:18

Well, I came, I saw,

0:31:180:31:20

I sold and I made a respectable profit

0:31:200:31:23

to a respectable buyer from a respectable seller.

0:31:230:31:27

I don't know about that, Eric.

0:31:290:31:30

And as he walks away with a few more pounds in his pocket,

0:31:300:31:33

Will has rocked up on the beautiful Suffolk coast.

0:31:330:31:36

He's on the pier in Southwold to meet his old pal, Peter,

0:31:360:31:39

who's dotty about Deco.

0:31:390:31:41

He's hoping he'll take a shine to his last ditch buy,

0:31:410:31:45

the pelican bookends.

0:31:450:31:47

-Peter!

-Will, how are you?

0:31:470:31:49

What did you think, I was going to arrive by boat?

0:31:490:31:51

Anyway, look what I bought in Paris. Feel the quality.

0:31:510:31:55

-Look, you've spotted that they're signed.

-Signed as well.

0:31:550:31:58

Bearing in mind the little nicks and so on here, I mean,

0:31:580:32:01

-what's your feeling? Do you like them?

-Love them. Absolutely.

0:32:010:32:04

They are right up my street.

0:32:040:32:06

If you went to a saleroom and you saw these at 200 to 300,

0:32:060:32:09

would you leave a cheeky bid at, say, the bottom figure or...?

0:32:090:32:12

Yeah, I think I'd go in at the bottom end.

0:32:120:32:14

-Shall we shake on 200 quid?

-Great.

-That was nice and easy!

0:32:140:32:17

Go on, let's go and work the slot machines.

0:32:170:32:20

Wait, no gambling with the profits, Will.

0:32:200:32:22

But he's every reason to celebrate - his pelican bookends have

0:32:220:32:25

flown out of his hands for a very handsome profit

0:32:250:32:28

of £141.67.

0:32:280:32:31

Wish you were here, Eric, wish you were here.

0:32:310:32:34

Well, Eric is near the seaside, just a little farther south.

0:32:340:32:37

Well, I'm in Bournemouth and I'm here to meet Amber.

0:32:370:32:41

And I've got my two very modernist chairs for her perusal.

0:32:410:32:45

She has expressed an interest.

0:32:450:32:47

I'm hoping to turn that interest into a firm sale.

0:32:470:32:51

Amber specialises in mid-20th century furniture,

0:32:510:32:55

but will she like the design classics that cost Eric nearly £117?

0:32:550:32:59

-They've got embossed on the back there... "Matteo Grassi."

-Yep.

0:33:010:33:05

Who were a recognised Italian maker. It would be nice if they were period.

0:33:050:33:10

-And if they were period, they'd be, what, 1928?

-Yeah.

0:33:100:33:13

Something like that.

0:33:130:33:14

I was thinking around about

0:33:140:33:18

-£320 for the pair.

-Right.

0:33:180:33:21

I would probably want to pay £60 each for them.

0:33:210:33:24

Maybe if I went to 150 for the two.

0:33:240:33:27

I'd be happy with 140.

0:33:270:33:29

-Shall we do 145?

-OK, yeah.

-145.

-Yeah.

-Put it there.

0:33:290:33:34

-Thank you.

-OK. Pleasure.

0:33:340:33:36

Oh, dear, Eric!

0:33:360:33:38

He settles on less than half of what

0:33:380:33:40

he wanted and makes just £28.33.

0:33:400:33:43

But Knocker puts on a brave face.

0:33:430:33:46

Well, that was more of a wrangle than a haggle, wasn't it?

0:33:460:33:49

I'm going in high, Amber comes in low.

0:33:490:33:52

And at the price we've agreed, I've worked it out,

0:33:520:33:55

it gives me about a 25% margin.

0:33:550:33:58

So, when you look at it from that angle,

0:33:580:34:00

it's not as bad as you really think.

0:34:000:34:03

Yes, it's still a lot less than you wanted, though, isn't it?

0:34:030:34:06

So, has that ruined everything? Let's tot up their tallies.

0:34:060:34:09

At the midway point in their selling session,

0:34:090:34:12

Eric's done four deals

0:34:120:34:13

and pocketed a profit of £196.34.

0:34:130:34:17

But Will is ahead.

0:34:170:34:19

He's sold fewer items, just three so far,

0:34:190:34:21

but he's out in front

0:34:210:34:23

with a profit of £269.17.

0:34:230:34:26

So, it's all to play for and anything could happen.

0:34:260:34:29

The Axeman's next port of call is in London's leafy Notting Hill.

0:34:290:34:33

He's here to meet Brian, who's an expert in African carvings.

0:34:330:34:38

-Brian, nice to finally meet you.

-Nice to meet you, too.

0:34:380:34:41

-Yeah, what a great shop you have here.

-Thank you.

0:34:410:34:43

Really stylish and sort of, if I say sculptural,

0:34:430:34:45

you'll know what I mean, with these African works of art,

0:34:450:34:48

because that's what drew me to my head rest which I bought.

0:34:480:34:52

It's Ethiopian. It's probably mid to late 1800s.

0:34:520:34:56

-Wow.

-So it's got a good age.

0:34:560:34:58

Have you seen these in action?

0:34:580:35:00

Probably up until about the middle part of last century,

0:35:000:35:03

they were still using them.

0:35:030:35:05

Is there any chance I could try and tuck you up for £150?

0:35:050:35:08

I would say, at a push, maybe 100.

0:35:080:35:10

OK, I like it. It's a little bit unusual, this rim at the bottom.

0:35:100:35:13

Could you stretch to £120?

0:35:130:35:17

I always like how they split the difference, right? 110.

0:35:170:35:20

Listen, Brian, let's shake on that.

0:35:200:35:22

Only a small profit - £18.33

0:35:220:35:25

That will be a relief to Eric.

0:35:250:35:27

All this selling has worn Will out.

0:35:270:35:30

HE SNORES

0:35:300:35:32

Yeah, don't fall asleep on the job, Will. Will?

0:35:320:35:35

Well, you snooze, you lose.

0:35:350:35:37

And Eric takes advantage.

0:35:370:35:39

He starts his final push by doubling his money on the enamel glass

0:35:390:35:43

dish with pink roses.

0:35:430:35:45

He sells it to a lady in Tunbridge Wells for £50,

0:35:450:35:48

and walks away £25 better off.

0:35:480:35:50

Will has woken up and is back in business.

0:35:520:35:55

He's taken his industrial lamp to Peter, who's an electrician

0:35:550:35:58

he knows, to get it re-wired and tested to make sure it's safe.

0:35:580:36:01

The work costs him £20,

0:36:010:36:03

so he's looking for a high-voltage sale here.

0:36:030:36:06

He's back in London at the antiques market at Old Spitalfields,

0:36:060:36:09

and he's meeting dealer Aiden.

0:36:090:36:12

Here it is. And looking at your stock behind us, I think it's going

0:36:120:36:15

to fit in beautifully, isn't it?

0:36:150:36:17

Cos you've already got a few industrial pieces.

0:36:170:36:19

I can see it in there, yeah.

0:36:190:36:20

The lamp itself is vintage. And I think you pronounce it Gilda.

0:36:200:36:24

-Gilda, that's it.

-Which is a sort of lathe and machine lamps.

-Factory.

0:36:240:36:30

That's right, factory lamps.

0:36:300:36:31

And what someone's done is they've mounted it onto this cog base.

0:36:310:36:35

-I love the way that moves.

-It's a differential, yeah.

0:36:350:36:37

It is a differential. You know your mechanics.

0:36:370:36:40

I think I'm going to be looking at around £200 mark.

0:36:400:36:44

I was thinking more around the 130, 140 mark.

0:36:440:36:48

I've got the certificate which says it has been fully tested

0:36:480:36:50

and meets all the required standards.

0:36:500:36:53

Can we say 160, Aiden?

0:36:530:36:55

-I think we have a deal.

-You're a gentleman.

-Thank you.

0:36:550:36:58

Take out the cost of the electrical work,

0:36:580:37:00

and that's a £40 profit on the lamp.

0:37:000:37:03

Will is wired!

0:37:030:37:05

The Axeman! Grr!

0:37:060:37:08

Goodness! We can confirm he's had nothing to drink,

0:37:090:37:12

but the vintage wine is still to come.

0:37:120:37:15

But Eric gets in first with his last item - the French monteith.

0:37:150:37:18

He's in Weymouth, in Dorset,

0:37:180:37:20

to meet Colin, who loves pottery.

0:37:200:37:22

So, they're kindred spirits.

0:37:220:37:24

I could tell you now that this man has got a very good eye.

0:37:240:37:28

So I'm hoping that he's going to be all eyes

0:37:280:37:30

when he sees my Saint-Clement faience-monteith.

0:37:300:37:36

Eric paid nearly £67 for the item, but hasn't told Colin much about it.

0:37:360:37:42

Risky strategy, Eric.

0:37:420:37:44

So, Colin, you've always been a ceramics man.

0:37:440:37:46

-We've always had that common bond, haven't we?

-Yes, very much so.

0:37:460:37:49

There's always a right time to buy and a right time to sell.

0:37:490:37:53

-Very much so.

-And the good news is

0:37:530:37:55

-that it's the right time to buy.

-Yes, it is.

0:37:550:37:58

-..a Saint-Clement...

-Yeah.

0:37:580:38:00

-..French faience-monteith.

-Oh, my goodness, that's nice.

0:38:000:38:03

You've not handled this before, I've been hiding it from you.

0:38:030:38:08

I think that's going to be about 1888, 1890.

0:38:080:38:10

Yeah, I would have thought so, too.

0:38:100:38:12

And you'll find...you'll see little insects, look.

0:38:120:38:15

-Yeah, they cover up a blemish, I suppose.

-That's right.

0:38:150:38:18

I'm interested in that.

0:38:180:38:19

I was hoping for around about £120.

0:38:190:38:23

I would've thought around more like 80.

0:38:230:38:25

If we could go at £95...

0:38:250:38:29

90.

0:38:290:38:31

-£90, come on.

-OK.

-Put it there, mate.

0:38:310:38:33

It's a nice thing. Thank you very much.

0:38:330:38:35

That's a nice profit - £23.33.

0:38:350:38:38

So, Knocker's knocked out all his items,

0:38:380:38:40

which means it's The Axeman's game to lose.

0:38:400:38:43

And it all comes down to the vintage wine.

0:38:430:38:46

It cost £50 and it's a grape that young William likes,

0:38:460:38:49

so that might bode well.

0:38:490:38:51

He's meeting David, who's a Master of Wine, in South London.

0:38:510:38:55

I spoke to you briefly about the two bottles of wine I bought.

0:38:550:38:59

Now, what can you tell me about them?

0:38:590:39:01

I can see what attracted you -

0:39:010:39:03

Bordeaux wines have the ability to age for 30, 40 years and beyond.

0:39:030:39:08

It's got Baron Philippe, who owns Mouton Rothschild.

0:39:080:39:11

So, again, you know, you're building up.

0:39:110:39:12

I've got a feeling there's a but.

0:39:120:39:14

There is a little bit of a but, I'm afraid. The thing is...

0:39:140:39:18

The most important thing is you want to have a chateau.

0:39:180:39:21

And here, there's sadly no chateau name.

0:39:210:39:24

And because Baron Philippe owned, at that time, two great vineyards,

0:39:240:39:30

they would have used fruit from both those estates...

0:39:300:39:33

-Right.

-..that possibly wasn't quite good enough to go into the first

0:39:330:39:36

-wine, the Gran Vin.

-The Premier Cru.

-Exactly.

0:39:360:39:39

And on top of that, 1971,

0:39:390:39:43

-sadly, was not the strongest of vintages.

-Oh, dear!

0:39:430:39:48

But I tell you what, Will, I'm dying to taste it, so why don't I just

0:39:480:39:52

say, I'll give you £5 for it and we pull the cork and try it?

0:39:520:39:55

I'll tell you what, that sounds like a deal. £5 corkage.

0:39:550:39:59

-But if it's any good, let's make it a tenner.

-OK.

0:39:590:40:02

Bottom's up.

0:40:070:40:08

HE GAGS

0:40:110:40:14

Sadly, it's £5.

0:40:160:40:18

-It's gone, hasn't it?

-Yeah!

0:40:180:40:19

A fiver it is, I agree.

0:40:190:40:21

Oh, no, Will's plonk makes him look a plonker.

0:40:220:40:25

And he chalks up a full-bodied loss -

0:40:250:40:28

£45 just disappears.

0:40:280:40:31

Well, I'd like to say that didn't leave a nasty taste in my mouth,

0:40:320:40:36

but... Ugh! It did!

0:40:360:40:38

So that vintage error has left the match much closer than

0:40:390:40:42

we might have thought.

0:40:420:40:44

So, who'll be sipping fine champagne

0:40:440:40:46

and who'll be forced to open Will's second bottle of wine?

0:40:460:40:49

All will be revealed in just a moment.

0:40:490:40:51

Both our experts started off in Paris with the euro

0:40:530:40:55

equivalent of £750 of their own money.

0:40:550:40:59

Eric Knocker Knowles made six purchases,

0:40:590:41:01

and including the cost of those candles,

0:41:010:41:03

he spent £420.33.

0:41:030:41:06

Will The Axeman Axon also bought six times.

0:41:070:41:11

And taking the re-wiring of the lamp into account,

0:41:110:41:13

he spent a tiny bit more - £432.50.

0:41:130:41:17

But now it all comes down to profit and who sold well.

0:41:180:41:22

All of the money that Eric and Will have made from today's

0:41:220:41:25

challenge will go straight to the charities of their choice.

0:41:250:41:27

So without further ado, let's find out who is today's

0:41:270:41:30

Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion.

0:41:300:41:33

-Monsieur Knowles, how are you?

-Very well, very well indeed.

-Bonjour.

0:41:340:41:38

Do you know what? I really enjoyed myself in Paris.

0:41:380:41:40

-How about you, were you pleased?

-Yes, I was.

0:41:400:41:42

I mean, I've always enjoyed buying in la belle France. So best sale?

0:41:420:41:47

Oh, yes, my pelican bookends.

0:41:470:41:50

I found a private collector, who just happens to be a friend.

0:41:500:41:53

He was really pleased with them and gave me a decent profit for them.

0:41:530:41:56

-And I suppose my worst was the two bottles of wine I bought.

-Oh, yes.

0:41:560:42:00

No good, Eric. Should have been drunk 20 years ago,

0:42:000:42:03

when you were scouring the fairs in Paris.

0:42:030:42:06

What about yourself? Your favourite buy?

0:42:060:42:08

Well, I did like that very nice Japanese enamelled vase.

0:42:080:42:12

-It was in perfect condition.

-Super quality.

0:42:120:42:14

And on top of that,

0:42:140:42:15

I did buy that rather weird sort of

0:42:150:42:18

17-sconce brass table candelabrum.

0:42:180:42:22

-Oh, yes!

-I settled for somebody who had a really big cave.

0:42:220:42:26

-Can I do the honours, as in...?

-Are you going to count this down?

0:42:260:42:30

-To three, in French.

-Oh!

-Un, deux, trois.

0:42:300:42:34

Ta-dah!

0:42:340:42:36

-Oh!

-Oh! Very close!

-Hey, the boy did well.

0:42:360:42:41

Listen, let's call it beginner's luck on my part because, you know...

0:42:410:42:45

Yeah, let's. Let's call it beginner's luck.

0:42:450:42:47

I'm all for you on that one.

0:42:470:42:48

Yes, Will walks away the winner with less than £40 between them.

0:42:480:42:53

The big profit on the pelican bookends helped him pull it off.

0:42:530:42:56

Well, who'd have thought it?

0:42:560:42:58

The new boy topples the giant, the legend, Eric 'The Knocker' Knowles.

0:42:580:43:03

And on his own stomping ground in Paris. I'm pleased with that.

0:43:030:43:08

So I've just got to settle for that well-worn French

0:43:080:43:11

phrase of c'est la vie.

0:43:110:43:13

But Knocker mustn't fret -

0:43:150:43:16

he gets another chance to take down The Axeman tomorrow.

0:43:160:43:19

And it's all to play for in an auction at Market Harborough.

0:43:190:43:23

Eric Knowles goes head to head with Will Axon at a Parisian market. They must find the best antiques at rock-bottom prices so they can sell it all on to make as much profit as possible.