Will Axon v Paul Hayes - UK Antiques Fair Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


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Will Axon v Paul Hayes - UK Antiques Fair

Storms descend as experts Paul Hayes and Will Axon go to battle at an antiques fair in West Sussex. Torrential rain closes Will's usual outdoor stomping ground.


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This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is,

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the show that pitches TV's best-loved antiques experts

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against each other in an all-out battle for profit...

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Elementary, my dear dealers.

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..and gives YOU the insider's view of the trade!

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PHIL LAUGHS

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PHIL GROWLS

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Each week, one pair of duelling dealers

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will face a different daily challenge...

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Catch me if you can.

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The Axeman cometh.

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..putting their reputations on the line...

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Grr!

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Ready for battle.

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..and giving YOU their top tips and savvy secrets

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on how to make the most money from buying and selling.

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Get in there.

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THUNDERCLAP AND DAVID LAUGHS

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Today, Purchasing powerhouse Paul Hayes

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takes on Axeman auctioneer extraordinaire, Will Axon.

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Coming up, Will gets his animals mixed up...

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I've gone and bought a leg of a cow.

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Do they race cows?

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..Paul plays hardball at the haggling...

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It couldn't be £100, could it?

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THEY LAUGH

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..and Will struggles in the selling.

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I'm not getting good vibes here.

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I mean, would it help to tell you that it's not very expensive at all?

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This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is!

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Welcome to a wet and windy West Sussex,

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where two weather systems of antiques knowledge

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are about to collide in a perfect storm

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of high-pressured competitive buying and selling.

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And today, the heavens will be opening

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over Goodwood Antique and Collectors Fair.

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First up, a thundering colossus of collectibles

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capable of moving at lightning speed whenever there's gold to be struck.

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His cheery smile and sunny disposition belie a steely resolve.

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-It's Paul "Mr Morecambe" Hayes.

-DISTANT CHEERING

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Look out, Will, I'm coming for you, mate.

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He's up against a man willing to brave any weather

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in pursuit of a profit.

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An auctioneer of torrential talent

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who's always ready to storm off with a bargain,

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hacking down a price and slicing off a healthy profit.

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-It's Will "The Axeman" Axon.

-DISTANT CHEERING

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I think I might just have found it.

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Both our experts have brought £750 of their own money.

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Once they've purchased their pieces, they must sell the lot

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in order to silver-line their pockets with profit,

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all of which will go to their chosen charities.

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So, Paul Hayes and Will Axon,

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it's time to put your money where your mouth is.

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-Hey-hey!

-Here he is.

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-How are you?

-Yes, good, thank you.

-We must be mad.

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-You must be used to this from where you are.

-I love the way they've recreated Morecambe here,

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-complete with weather! Isn't it marvellous?

-Brought it with you.

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There were supposed to be outdoor stalls, that's going to be a problem.

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I know, that's kind of my stomping ground, really,

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the outside stalls, so I'm going to have to rethink my strategy

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to breakables, which is not my forte.

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-Oh, well, that is my forte. Small is beautiful.

-Thank you very much.

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-My dad said, if it doesn't go in your pocket, don't buy it.

-He's a very wise man.

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So, we're allowed to spend £750.

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Excellent news, that's a lot of money, yes.

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-Good luck to you. It's always good, isn't it?

-And to you, sir.

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You know, let's hope this weather clears up.

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-Oh, hang on!

-What...

-Gust!

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A gust carries our experts off to the fair,

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but what treasures will blow them away

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enough to make them part with their hard-earned cash?

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As both lads head indoors,

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where many of the stall holders have taken shelter,

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Paul Hayes is brimming, nay overflowing, with confidence.

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Well, look out, Will, I think I've got the upper hand here today,

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I'm so used to being at antiques fairs,

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I've practically grown up under the trestle table.

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They're fantastic places, you can find bargains if you know where to look.

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Yes, Mr Hayes is full of confidence

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but Will's game plan has been thrown into disarray by the weather.

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Well, I'm somewhere they call indoors

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and I'm not terribly comfortable. I'm more used to being outside,

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having a rummage in the back of a van and seeing what's what,

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but in here it's all very laid out, very displayed and priced up.

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I'm going to have to work my magic in here.

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Onwards and upwards.

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Onwards, upwards, forwards, backwards,

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round and round the market,

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both Paul and Will now begin to scour the stalls

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for items of interest.

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Paul is clearly feeling confident today

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and it's not long before he's spotted

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a Belgian slate clock that appeals.

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So, is the clock working?

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-Yeah, yeah.

-Can I have a look at it?

-Yes.

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I've often thought, these are underrated, aren't they?

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It don't chime.

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-It doesn't chime, purely a timepiece?

-Purely a timepiece.

-OK, there we go.

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-So, what's the best you can do on that then?

-25?

-25.

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-You can't say £20?

-Yeah, go on, it's you.

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How's that? Thank you very much, I'll have that. God bless you.

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These items have always been affordable.

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I think they're the most underrated items you can find.

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It's a beautiful 19th-century clock,

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it's known as a Belgian slate, cos that's where it comes from.

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It's in great working order, there's no chips, no cracks,

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no cracks in the dial, got its pendulum, got its key,

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it was 20 quid, what an absolute bargain.

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Paul's pleased to be up and running,

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but Will is closing in on a stall with a few potential items.

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Having said he prefers to buy big, he has indeed changed tack

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and is looking at something small.

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Very small.

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-I like your Sampson Mordan...

-Yeah, nice piece, yeah.

-..toothpick.

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Where'd you buy that, auction?

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-No, private buy.

-Private?

-Mm.

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Sampson Mordan, nicely marked. And stamped nine carat?

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-The stone's...

-like a little bloodstone?

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Yes, I think it is a bloodstone, isn't it?

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I see you've got it marked up at 130.

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I mean, if it could be anywhere near a "oner", I might be tempted.

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110 would suit me better.

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Shall we split the difference and say 105?

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Let's do a deal, let's get, let's get a buy out of the way.

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At £105, Will has spent a big chunk on his little gold item,

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but why did he pick the toothpick?

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It's sold as a nine carat gold propelling toothpick.

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By Sampson Mordan.

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Sampson Mordan, better known for their propelling pencils, retracting pencils,

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it's a great name as far as small silver and gold pieces go.

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And I'm thinking there are toothpick collectors out there

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and from talking to the stallholder,

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this has come from a private collection itself,

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never been on the Yorkshire market,

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bought privately and this is the first time out at the fair.

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Mm, it isn't Paul Hayes' first time at the fair, though.

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And like a moth to a flame,

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Paul is drawn to a stall selling musical instruments

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that have been converted into lamps.

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However, it's a saxophone in its original state that he goes for.

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OK, I'll have that.

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Paul pays £80 for the sax. So, was that music to his ears?

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That, I think, is quite a good price, these things are very expensive to buy new

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and I think there's a bit of leeway left in it.

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And having bought the saxophone,

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Paul nips outside to show off his musical prowess.

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MUSIC: Baker Street by Gerry Rafferty

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PAUL TOOTS WEAKLY

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Or maybe not.

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Don't call us, Paul, and we probably won't call you.

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While Paul's been blowing his sax,

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Will has spotted a vase that he hopes won't blow his budget.

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How much is your, sort of smoky vase?

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Er, that one, I've got...

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45 on that, but it can be,

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it can be 35 today.

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I like a nice round number, that's my trouble.

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Yes, well, I like odd ones, that's a problem, isn't it?

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Well, I'm a bit odd.

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HE LAUGHS

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A bit "cepuliar", perhaps?

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-Can we say £30?

-We can say 32, thank you.

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-Go on, then.

-Good!

-Well done.

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No, it's not a telescope but it is glass,

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and what an iconic piece of glass it is.

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By Otto Brauer for Holmegaard, it's a Gulvase.

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All very much back in fashion,

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so I'm going to go and find some young trendy,

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who's going to fall in love with it like I did.

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I'm pleased with what I paid, but as it's breakable,

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I'm going to go and pop it somewhere safe.

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Paul is also looking through the breakables.

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He's spotted a Doulton figure he likes the look of.

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Having now got the taste for a haggle,

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he's trying to get the price down.

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-What's your best on her, then?

-What have we got on it?

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-You've got £30 on.

-30, I'll do 24.

-Brilliant.

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-I'm going to be cheeky.

-Well, that is the best.

-That is the best?

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You can't make it £20?

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-Give me 22, you've got it.

-22.

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I don't think I've got £2. You can't make it a round 20, just make it...

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-All right...

-Is that all right?

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OK, well, I'll have that, thank you very much.

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Thank you, there you are, you see.

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Paul uses his cheeky charm and gets the figurine.

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So why did he pick her up?

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Bit of a blast from the past here.

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I used to buy these religiously in the 1990s, early 2000s.

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It's a Royal Doulton figurine.

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If you turn them upside down, they all have a HN number,

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and that's named after a guy called Harry Nixon, the original designer.

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And you can actually look that up

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and you can find out how long it was made for and when it was made

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and more importantly, what the current catalogue value is.

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But she's lovely, called Top Of The Hill, and do you know what?

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It's a bit of a windy day today, it's quite fitting, isn't it? I know how she feels.

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Ah, she's obviously feeling all blustered.

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Meanwhile, Will is feeling flustered.

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He just can't get used to being indoors.

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Struggling a bit here, to be honest.

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I've got, er, a couple of items under my belt, but even so,

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more to buy and...

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..I feel like I am going round and round in circles. I've got to get with it!

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I've got to get my money out of my pocket and make some decisions.

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Ah! Will fears that his hopes of victory are sinking fast,

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which may explain why he's drawn

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to a piece of 19th-century diving equipment.

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-What sort of money have you got on them?

-75.

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-It doesn't seem dear.

-It's not a lot, actually.

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But you know I'm on a budget, a very tight budget.

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-I thought you were going to say that.

-What would be your very,

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I mean, is there any chance we could be nearer the 50 quid mark?

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No. Um... 60?

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Are we not being very cheeky by saying 55?

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That's a lucky number in China.

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WOMAN LAUGHS

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Well, as it's heavy and I was going to have to take it home,

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-yes, I'll do it for 55.

-Yes, I'll save you a fiver by...

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-Well, shall we say £55?

-55, that's fine.

-Excellent.

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So, Will takes the plunge and spends £55 on the diving bellows.

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When I first saw these 19th-century bellows,

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I thought, Inglenook fireplace,

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but it turns out that they're actually diving bellows,

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basically, to pump air into the helmet.

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I think I'm going to have to do some research into these pioneers

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of 19th-century underwater exploration.

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Our heroic hagglers now need to refuel.

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While they do, let's look at the numbers.

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Each of our excellent experts

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arrived at the fair with £750 of their own money.

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Paul Hayes has bought three items

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and spent £120.

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That means he's got £630 to play with.

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Will Axon has matched his opponent

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with three items

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but spent £192,

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so he's got £558 left in his kitty.

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-Ah, hello.

-How are you doing?

-Halfway points.

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-Feels it, doesn't it?

-Well, do you know what?

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I've bought some great things, actually. I'm pleased with what I bought this morning. What about you?

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Yes, I think I am, I think they're growing on me.

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You know, because, like I say,

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this isn't my comfort zone being under cover,

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but you've got to make the best of what you've got.

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What I like about this fair is they've brought all the outside pitches inside...

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-No!

-..and put them in a secret room. Have you found them?

-You're winding me up.

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I tell you, it's full of gear you'd buy,

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-you'd love it. Have you not seen it?

-Where is it? Come on!

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-It's over that way.

-Oh!

-See you in a bit.

-Yeah...

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Mm! Paul there well and truly shaking off his nice-guy persona

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as he uses every trick in the book to flummox his opponent.

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Will is trying to put a brave face on things,

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but it definitely feels like Mr Morcambe's got the upper hand today

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and he's dealing from the top deck

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when he spots an antique writing slope

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and yet again chips away at the asking price.

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-What are you asking for this?

-Er...

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Make it £50?

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I've got to try. No?

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-Tell you what, the best I can do is 65.

-65.

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I do like it, I noticed that split across the top,

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but it's coromandel and it's unusual, isn't it? Got a nice...

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Make it £60 and I will buy it now.

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-Go on, then.

-There you go.

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All right? We'll shake on that. You see, I tried. Thank you very much.

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I bought something of real quality here. I love this writing slope.

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What's unusual about it is the material it's been made from.

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This is called coromandel wood.

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It's known in the trade as zebrawood and it's quite rare.

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It was used since the 18th century into the 19th century,

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very popular, very unusual, for the more discerning customer.

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Open it out, it's got a beautiful fitted leather interior,

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which performs as your slope,

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which is used to write your letters upon

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and then right in the bottom here

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is a little secret compartment.

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That's to keep your travelling sovereigns

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and things like that, stamps, letters, you know,

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all the things you don't want anyone to find. This is really ready to go.

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With the writing slope, Paul has edged into the lead again.

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And it seems we're seeing a new side to Mr Morecambe today

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as he uses his cheeky charm to chip away at those prices,

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although it doesn't always work.

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-I'm going to be cheeky now, you couldn't do £60 for the pair?

-No.

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-No. That's me being cheeky.

-Worth asking!

-It works for other people.

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It couldn't be £100, could it?

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THEY LAUGH

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See? This is what happens!

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This is, that's exactly the reaction I get.

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There we are, I've tried to be mean, to hammer the stallholder,

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just like that Will does.

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What happens? I get blown out, you know?

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Ah, yes, it's a lot harder than it looks!

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But he's not quite ready to give up

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and when he spots a pair of silver bonbon dishes,

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he's not taking any prisoners.

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These are nice, aren't they? How much are these?

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I was looking for, the pair, for 110.

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-110. They are quite pretty, aren't they?

-Bonbon and that.

-Yes.

-Aren't they?

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Was that a starting price, or is that what you're looking to get?

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Ah, isn't he a charmer!?

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-110 for the pair?

-Yes.

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But that's obviously what you charge the public, not me. THEY LAUGH

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So what would be your very best price on those?

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-105?

-105.

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Is that any good to you?

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Could they be £80?

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Could they be £95?

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It's getting better, you're warming up a little bit there.

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-So, 95.

-95 is your best?

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-90.

-Why don't we make it 85 and we'll go halfway?

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SHE LAUGHS

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Pound notes.

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-OK, 85.

-Shall we do that?

-Yes.

-Yay! Thank you very much.

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That's very, very nice of you, I'll have those.

0:14:170:14:19

Paul buys the pair of bonbon dishes for a "tres bon" £85,

0:14:190:14:23

so he should be feeling pretty pleased with himself, right?

0:14:230:14:27

I feel really bad, I was arguing over £5 with that lady for ages.

0:14:280:14:31

And I'm glad, I'm delighted to buy them, of course,

0:14:310:14:34

they're great things,

0:14:340:14:35

these are beautiful quality and they are a pair, nicely hallmarked,

0:14:350:14:39

we've got a Birmingham hallmark, 1905

0:14:390:14:41

and in good condition. What you've got to watch with these items,

0:14:410:14:44

that none of the pierced work is damaged

0:14:440:14:47

and that the feet haven't been broken off.

0:14:470:14:49

But, do you know what? For 85 quid, that was a good price.

0:14:490:14:52

They're still a good price at £90, I don't know why I argued, really.

0:14:520:14:55

I feel bad now.

0:14:550:14:56

Mm! So much so, a guilt-wracked Paul

0:14:560:14:58

buys a cup of coffee for the stall owner.

0:14:580:15:00

Ah, how generous!

0:15:000:15:02

However, the £1.50 for his drink

0:15:020:15:04

takes his total price for the purchase to £86.50.

0:15:040:15:08

Will is lagging behind in the buying stakes

0:15:080:15:11

but begins to catch up when he picks up...

0:15:110:15:13

a cow's leg?

0:15:130:15:14

Well, coming from Newmarket,

0:15:140:15:15

you hear a lot about people buying legs of horses.

0:15:150:15:18

I've gone and bought the leg of a cow. Do they race cows?

0:15:180:15:22

-Come on, Will! it's Newmarket, not moo-market.

-COW MOOS

0:15:230:15:27

Mm. Of course, coming from a town famous for horse racing,

0:15:270:15:30

Will is always on the lookout for anything with equestrian appeal,

0:15:300:15:34

and he thinks he's found something with a novelty corkscrew.

0:15:340:15:37

Now, my eye was drawn to your leg pull corkscrew.

0:15:370:15:41

It's rather an odd one.

0:15:410:15:42

It's got novelty value, exactly right.

0:15:420:15:45

-I know it's not antique.

-Yes.

0:15:450:15:47

But I'm reliably informed on the packaging

0:15:470:15:50

-that it is an antique of the future.

-Oh, right.

0:15:500:15:52

Which, yes, so we're thinking ahead. Um...

0:15:520:15:55

But your price, £22...

0:15:550:15:58

I mean, I was thinking more legs 11.

0:15:580:16:01

-WILL LAUGHS

-No.

0:16:010:16:03

-What's your very best?

-15, I think.

0:16:030:16:06

-It's got to be worth it.

-Well, listen, I think 15 is a fair price,

0:16:060:16:09

-so if I may, I'll shake your hand on that. £15.

-Thank you very much. OK.

0:16:090:16:14

Now, I know they're not strictly an antique,

0:16:140:16:16

but I was really drawn to the novelty value of this corkscrew.

0:16:160:16:20

It is based on an antique design, make no mistake,

0:16:200:16:22

Victorian corkscrews, often with ladies' legs, stocking-clad,

0:16:220:16:26

but in this instance we have a pair of jockey's legs.

0:16:260:16:30

Well, Newmarket boy,

0:16:300:16:31

I've got to have a go at anything jockey-related, haven't I?

0:16:310:16:34

And I'm pretty sure that there are plenty of establishments

0:16:340:16:37

that would be pleased to have these behind the bar.

0:16:370:16:39

Odds-on, I make a profit.

0:16:390:16:42

And from horse racing to horsepower.

0:16:420:16:44

Will has found some Grand Prix posters

0:16:440:16:46

being sold by a French stall holder.

0:16:460:16:48

Are these reprints of the original?

0:16:490:16:52

-It's vintage.

-Yes, but that's OK.

-Monaco.

0:16:520:16:55

Well, the originals would be very expensive.

0:16:550:16:58

And what sort of money are you selling these for today?

0:16:580:17:01

-75.

-Each?

-Yes.

-What have we got?

0:17:010:17:04

Monaco '75, look at that, that is great, isn't it?

0:17:040:17:07

Monaco '77.

0:17:090:17:11

So, what would be your very best, best, best price on the two?

0:17:120:17:16

Could we say £100?

0:17:160:17:19

Donnez-mois le main.

0:17:190:17:20

-OK.

-£100 for two?

-OK.

-It's a deal. Now I've got to choose.

0:17:200:17:25

So while Will's shelled out for some modern posters,

0:17:250:17:28

Paul has spotted some old shell he likes the look of

0:17:280:17:31

in the form of a mother-of-pearl pocket case.

0:17:310:17:34

-Lovely. That needs a bit of repair, I thought you might have repaired this. Have you had a go?

-Yeah.

0:17:340:17:38

A bit of the old Gorilla glue in there would probably do it.

0:17:380:17:40

-You've got 28 on it, how much can you do that for?

-20.

-20 quid.

0:17:400:17:44

Right, I'm going to try something, please don't be offended,

0:17:460:17:49

-can it be a tenner?

-No.

0:17:490:17:50

PAUL LAUGHS

0:17:500:17:52

15?

0:17:520:17:53

£20. OK.

0:17:550:17:57

You know what? I think that's a fair price, that's all right.

0:17:570:17:59

-Can I have it for £20?

-Yeah.

-All right, let's shake on that.

0:17:590:18:02

Thank you very much. Here we are.

0:18:020:18:03

One last bit of cheeky haggling

0:18:030:18:05

and Paul knocks off £8 from the asking price

0:18:050:18:07

and pays just £20 for the item.

0:18:070:18:10

Well, I must admit the Victorian era must have been the most elegant.

0:18:100:18:13

A gentleman would've had this wonderful calling card case,

0:18:130:18:17

it's all in mother-of-pearl, beautifully decorated

0:18:170:18:19

and the sole purpose of it was

0:18:190:18:21

to take it from your pocket and take out your calling card

0:18:210:18:24

to give to the butler when you arrived at somebody's house.

0:18:240:18:27

Fantastic thing to have. £20, I think, is a good price.

0:18:270:18:31

That's reflected, the fact that it has a bit of damage around the top.

0:18:310:18:34

I think with a bit of restoration, bit of TLC, that's £60, £70 easily.

0:18:340:18:38

All right? A nice calling card, and you know what?

0:18:380:18:41

If you're going to up-cycle, put your credit cards in it.

0:18:410:18:43

Hey-hey! Fantastic.

0:18:430:18:45

And Paul's calling card holder calls an end to this buying battle.

0:18:450:18:49

It's been a wild whirlwind so far

0:18:490:18:51

and they haven't even started selling yet,

0:18:510:18:53

so just how much have they spent?

0:18:530:18:56

Both our experts arrived at the antiques fair

0:18:570:19:00

with a budget of £750.

0:19:000:19:02

Paul Hayes haggled hard for his six purchases, spending £286.50.

0:19:020:19:06

Will Axon was out of his comfort zone,

0:19:080:19:11

so his six buys cost him £337.

0:19:110:19:15

They both like what they've bought,

0:19:150:19:18

but what about each other's?

0:19:180:19:20

-There you are. Did you enjoy yourself today?

-I really did, actually.

0:19:210:19:24

I was a bit out of my comfort zone being indoors,

0:19:240:19:26

but everyone was very friendly

0:19:260:19:28

and I think I managed to squeeze a few unusual lots out of them.

0:19:280:19:32

You know what? I think I was in my prime here today.

0:19:320:19:34

-Really?

-I loved it, it was great rummaging around, at an antiques fair, that's what I do best.

0:19:340:19:38

There's one thing, I know you're a bit of a leg man, Will, but what is that?

0:19:380:19:41

Well, I was hoping I was investing in a leg of a horse,

0:19:410:19:44

-but unfortunately it turns out it's a cow.

-Right.

0:19:440:19:47

-So...

-I don't think that's something I would've bought.

0:19:470:19:49

-Well, that's kind of you to say so.

-Good luck. I did see these.

0:19:490:19:52

Right, you saw those, and why didn't you buy these?

0:19:520:19:54

I don't know, I haven't got anybody that has an Inglenook fireplace...

0:19:540:19:58

Well, that's the way I see them but apparently they're diver's bellows.

0:19:580:20:01

-OK.

-Keep you alive.

-See, I knew that all along.

-Yeah, of course, exactly.

0:20:010:20:04

And you say traditional, I think I'd go with that,

0:20:040:20:07

-got your coromandel writing slope...

-Yes.

0:20:070:20:09

..very traditional with your, what, bonbon dishes? Sweetmeats? That sort of thing?

0:20:090:20:13

Silver bonbon dishes, yes, and Doulton figure,

0:20:130:20:15

this is like going back to the business 20 years ago.

0:20:150:20:18

Well, listen, we need people like you to help revive these pieces.

0:20:180:20:21

-Bring them back to the fore of fashion.

-That's it. One thing I loved, do you like the saxophone?

0:20:210:20:25

I love the saxophone, I used to play the saxophone.

0:20:250:20:28

I know, you can just do everything! WILL LAUGHS

0:20:280:20:30

-Can you honestly play that?

-Well, I can play one tune badly.

-Oh, come on!

0:20:300:20:33

At the moment, it's an inanimate object, I had a go, but I didn't make much...

0:20:330:20:37

Let's see if I can't make a few quid. Get your,

0:20:370:20:39

-I've forgotten how....

-There must be something.

-Hang on.

0:20:390:20:41

WILL PLAYS JAZZ MUSIC

0:20:410:20:44

Do you know what? You're just good at everything, you.

0:20:470:20:50

Now, these two tussling towers of purchasing power

0:20:520:20:56

must switch their dials from buy to sell.

0:20:560:20:59

As the name of the game

0:20:590:21:00

is to shift their carefully considered collection

0:21:000:21:03

by whatever means necessary,

0:21:030:21:05

hoping to stack up a total profit that will make them the victor!

0:21:050:21:08

But before they return to the conflict zone,

0:21:080:21:10

our selling soldiers retreat to base camp

0:21:100:21:13

to assess their wares. And over in Morcambe,

0:21:130:21:15

how is Mr Hayes feeling about the battle ahead?

0:21:150:21:18

I'm quite pleased with what I bought, actually.

0:21:180:21:20

Most of the items seemed to start me at £20,

0:21:200:21:23

which is a complete bargain, really.

0:21:230:21:25

So I've got a nice old black slate clock,

0:21:250:21:27

I've got a Royal Doulton figurine and this beautiful card case,

0:21:270:21:31

which I've actually repaired, this was broken here.

0:21:310:21:33

Look at that. You see? Bit of glue I found lying around in a drawer.

0:21:330:21:36

The rest of the items were a bit more expensive.

0:21:360:21:39

I've had one snag -

0:21:390:21:40

the Doulton figure is actually quite a common one.

0:21:400:21:43

Most of these figures tend to be collected for the rarer examples.

0:21:430:21:46

So I might struggle with that one slightly,

0:21:460:21:49

but the saxophone has to be the best buy, I think that's fantastic, that's ready to go.

0:21:490:21:53

I'm dying to hear it played well.

0:21:530:21:55

I know Will can play it. What a swine, didn't realise he had that talent.

0:21:550:21:58

I must admit, the only genuine antique items really here has to be

0:21:580:22:02

this beautiful coromandel box which dates from the 19th century

0:22:020:22:05

and these early 20th-century solid silver dishes.

0:22:050:22:08

These are more traditional, you'd think that would be easier to sell.

0:22:080:22:11

But if anything, they've gone off the boil slightly,

0:22:110:22:14

so it's not all plain sailing, this one.

0:22:140:22:17

There are undoubtedly some stormy waters ahead,

0:22:170:22:20

so how does Will feel about his chances

0:22:200:22:22

of weathering a perfect storm?

0:22:220:22:25

Well, here I am, back at home with the items I bought, more or less dried out.

0:22:250:22:29

The one that posed me the most conundrum on the day was the bellows.

0:22:290:22:33

Were they for divers, were they for a smoke helmet?

0:22:330:22:36

I've done a little bit of research,

0:22:360:22:38

they are actually fire helmet bellows.

0:22:380:22:40

They were used to pump air into the helmets of firefighters

0:22:400:22:43

who were entering smoke-filled houses.

0:22:430:22:46

Apparently back in Victorian times,

0:22:460:22:48

even then they were mechanically-driven,

0:22:480:22:50

so these foot bellows are in fact for that.

0:22:500:22:53

The corkscrew, well, they were just a bit of fun, not expensive,

0:22:530:22:56

I tried to pay legs 11 for them but got pushed up a little bit.

0:22:560:22:59

The gold vase, a piece of classic Scandinavian glass,

0:22:590:23:03

designed for Holmegaard, of course.

0:23:030:23:06

I'm hoping that might appeal to, perhaps, a younger dealer.

0:23:060:23:09

And down in the front here, the nine carat gold Sampson Mordan toothpick.

0:23:090:23:14

I loved that piece when I saw it, my most expensive buy,

0:23:140:23:17

but I had to go for it, the quality just shone through on that.

0:23:170:23:21

And my cow's, er, mounted leg bones,

0:23:210:23:24

well, I'm not really sure why I bought this.

0:23:240:23:27

Perhaps it appealed to my macabre sense of humour.

0:23:270:23:30

I'm hoping there's a butcher out there

0:23:300:23:32

who would love it in his window

0:23:320:23:33

or perhaps someone who's at vet school

0:23:330:23:35

might like it as a desk piece.

0:23:350:23:37

And then I come to the posters.

0:23:370:23:39

Well, I loved these as well, good, strong images,

0:23:390:23:42

so I think these are good value for someone who is either

0:23:420:23:46

perhaps involved in car racing itself, or is a bit of a petrol head

0:23:460:23:50

and would love to have those hanging in his garage.

0:23:500:23:53

And talking of petrol heads,

0:23:530:23:54

it's time for both our experts to rev up their engines

0:23:540:23:57

and get this selling race underway.

0:23:570:24:00

They now begin the arduous task of searching the land

0:24:000:24:03

for the perfect buyer for each item they've acquired,

0:24:030:24:06

both understanding that no deal is sealed

0:24:060:24:08

until the shake of a hand and the exchange of cash.

0:24:080:24:11

And first to tune in on a potential profit is Paul,

0:24:120:24:15

as he travels to Wallasey near Liverpool

0:24:150:24:18

with a mind to selling his saxophone

0:24:180:24:20

to Brian "Saxophone" Jones,

0:24:200:24:22

who plays with a Merseybeat group, The Undertakers, on saxophone,

0:24:220:24:26

and teaches music -

0:24:260:24:27

specifically, the saxophone(!)

0:24:270:24:29

Is that something that you encourage, then,

0:24:300:24:32

-kids to get involved with music and playing the saxophone?

-Yeah.

0:24:320:24:35

-And do you think you can bring it to life, then?

-Well, I hope so.

0:24:350:24:38

That depends if there's any leaks on it, you know. It could be...

0:24:380:24:41

There could be leaks on it, or there could be, you know...

0:24:410:24:44

It looks like it's been unplayed.

0:24:440:24:45

-It's probably sat in its box since it's been bought.

-That's right.

0:24:450:24:48

How old do you reckon it is?

0:24:480:24:50

It's not that old, really.

0:24:500:24:52

I'd say in the last five years, probably.

0:24:520:24:55

Really? So, it's that new?

0:24:550:24:57

It is that new, yeah.

0:24:570:24:58

Right, go on, then.

0:24:580:25:00

HE PLAYS JAZZ

0:25:000:25:01

Is it something that you can use for one of your students,

0:25:110:25:13

-or for something that you can pass on...?

-Yeah.

0:25:130:25:16

-Yeah, I think I could use that, yeah.

-Fantastic.

0:25:160:25:18

It's in mint condition, looks like it's never been used.

0:25:180:25:20

Yeah, no, it hasn't. It's very good.

0:25:200:25:22

If I was to ask you, say 150,

0:25:220:25:24

am I being cheeky or...?

0:25:240:25:25

I'd probably offer you £100 for it.

0:25:250:25:28

You couldn't see, sort of, 120 in it?

0:25:280:25:30

I'll throw the case in and...

0:25:300:25:31

-Well, they come with cases anyway.

-And it is delivered!

0:25:310:25:34

It has been delivered, hasn't it?

0:25:340:25:35

Yeah, yeah. Erm, 120...

0:25:350:25:38

-OK, all right, then.

-Shall we do that?

-All right.

0:25:380:25:40

Well, I think it's been worth it to hear you play it

0:25:400:25:42

and to bring it alive, and I'm sure you'll have great use for it.

0:25:420:25:45

-Shall we shake on that?

-Yes, certainly, yeah.

-Fantastic.

0:25:450:25:47

-Thank you, Brian.

-That's all right, it's OK.

0:25:470:25:49

Can you play Bubbles In The Bathtub by Ivor Windy-Bottom?

0:25:490:25:53

-No.

-No? THEY LAUGH

0:25:530:25:54

So, Paul kicks off his selling

0:25:540:25:56

with a melodious profit

0:25:560:25:57

of £40 for the saxophone.

0:25:570:25:59

But this isn't a one-horse race

0:25:590:26:01

and our other jockey also has plans

0:26:010:26:03

to get his selling underway.

0:26:030:26:05

Well, here I am at The Jockey Club Rooms,

0:26:050:26:08

home not only to The Jockey Club,

0:26:080:26:10

but also an exclusive members-only club.

0:26:100:26:13

And I'm here to try and sell them this.

0:26:130:26:16

Wish me luck.

0:26:160:26:18

Yes, he'll certainly need it,

0:26:180:26:19

since he's planning on selling his novelty corkscrew

0:26:190:26:22

at the prestigious Jockey Club Rooms,

0:26:220:26:25

which houses one of the finest collections

0:26:250:26:28

of equestrian artwork in the world.

0:26:280:26:30

He's meeting Alan Medlock, the Head Steward.

0:26:300:26:34

Do you want me to reveal to you what treasure I've brought along today?

0:26:340:26:37

Oh, I'm sort of standing here in trepidation...

0:26:370:26:41

Listen, what drew me to this, before I show you,

0:26:410:26:43

is the novelty factor.

0:26:430:26:45

-Hm, novelty.

-Novelty factor...

0:26:450:26:46

That's another worrying term.

0:26:460:26:48

It's no rare antique,

0:26:480:26:50

but I just thought it was a bit of fun.

0:26:500:26:53

What have we got? The Leg Pull...

0:26:530:26:55

BOTH: "The corkscrew with character."

0:26:550:26:56

For us to put this on display,

0:26:560:26:58

you may have to donate it and pay a site visit fee as well.

0:26:580:27:02

But, erm, it's very kind of you to show it to us.

0:27:020:27:05

I dread to think what the Senior Steward would say,

0:27:050:27:07

-if we showed it to him.

-I'm not getting good vibes here.

0:27:070:27:10

I mean, would it help to tell you that it's not very expensive at all?

0:27:100:27:14

It would have to be less than very expensive. Erm...

0:27:140:27:17

What sort of figure are you looking at?

0:27:170:27:19

I'm prepared to take a small profit

0:27:190:27:21

and sell that to you for 20 quid.

0:27:210:27:24

If I bought it for £20...

0:27:240:27:25

-Yeah.

-..I would buy it personally and donate it to the club,

0:27:250:27:30

rather than it save you the embarrassment

0:27:300:27:32

of having to put your name to it.

0:27:320:27:34

But then again, it's quite all right with me.

0:27:340:27:36

Will gallops off with a modest £5 profit on the corkscrew

0:27:360:27:39

and makes it one-all.

0:27:390:27:41

But he'll need to do better if he wants to win this race.

0:27:410:27:44

Paul's back in Morecambe and heading to specialist dealer John,

0:27:440:27:47

with his Belgian slate clock underarm.

0:27:470:27:50

It stands him at £20.

0:27:500:27:52

What was the idea behind these clocks, then?

0:27:520:27:54

When do they sort of date from?

0:27:540:27:55

-Right, well, really, they're Victorian.

-Yeah.

0:27:550:27:57

And when Albert died,

0:27:570:27:59

-the fashion became black.

-Oh.

0:27:590:28:01

She wore black,

0:28:010:28:03

-everybody wore black.

-OK.

0:28:030:28:04

They started making black clocks.

0:28:040:28:07

-Right.

-And this is where they're from.

0:28:070:28:09

So, a lot of people call them mourning clocks...

0:28:090:28:11

-Oh, right, OK.

-..because of Albert.

0:28:110:28:14

Well, I was very pleased with this one...

0:28:140:28:15

It comes with a key and it is working.

0:28:150:28:18

A lot of the time when you see these things, they need some restoration.

0:28:180:28:21

-I think you're trying to sell me this clock.

-Well, I am, yes.

0:28:210:28:24

I mean, is it a case of bringing snow to the Eskimos,

0:28:240:28:26

or is this something that you could genuinely think you could use?

0:28:260:28:29

Oh, no, we... I'm sure we could sell it IF the price is right.

0:28:290:28:32

-Well, there we are.

-And, as I say,

0:28:320:28:34

I've never bought anything from you that we haven't succeeded with.

0:28:340:28:37

-Excellent.

-But there's always a first time...

0:28:370:28:39

There's always a first time. Well, you know how I work.

0:28:390:28:41

I mean, if I was to ask you £45 for that,

0:28:410:28:43

does that sound about right or does that sound cheap?

0:28:430:28:46

-We can shake hands on that, Paul.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:28:460:28:48

Hm, sounds like he could have gone in a bit higher there,

0:28:480:28:50

but the sale earns him a respectable profit of £25.

0:28:500:28:54

Ah, so there we are, that lovely old Victorian slate clock,

0:28:550:28:58

that was fully working, was a great selling item,

0:28:580:29:01

and I made myself £25.

0:29:010:29:03

That's one in the eye for you there, Will.

0:29:030:29:05

Indeed.

0:29:050:29:06

Paul is on a selling spree

0:29:060:29:08

and he's wasting no time either,

0:29:080:29:10

going on to sell his writing slope to Jane from Carnforth,

0:29:100:29:14

adding a further £15 to the pot.

0:29:140:29:17

So, Will needs to get a move on.

0:29:190:29:21

His next sale has led him to Runfold,

0:29:210:29:23

where he's located antiques shop owner Hilary,

0:29:230:29:26

who he's hoping will help him pick out a profit

0:29:260:29:28

with the Sampson and Mordan toothpick that cost him £105.

0:29:280:29:32

-Well, this is actually for the gentleman who has everything.

-Yes.

0:29:320:29:35

This is not the original box...

0:29:350:29:37

-Oh, that's lovely, isn't it?

-But look at that.

0:29:370:29:39

-Very nice.

-Little Sampson Mordan gold toothpick.

0:29:390:29:43

-Isn't that sweet?

-Pick it up, have a feel.

0:29:430:29:45

-Love the little bloodstone inset finial there...

-That's very nice.

0:29:450:29:48

-..which I think just lifts it.

-Lovely.

0:29:480:29:50

The chaste decoration as well.

0:29:500:29:53

-Of its type, it's a very nice one.

-Very nice.

0:29:530:29:56

-Comes out...

-Does it push up?

-It does,

0:29:560:29:57

it pushes up on the collar there.

0:29:570:29:59

-Oh, yeah, push up like...

-Similar to the...

-Like a pencil.

0:29:590:30:02

Exactly right. Exactly right,

0:30:020:30:03

which they are also known for making.

0:30:030:30:05

I would like to be able to ask you for £200 for this toothpick...

0:30:050:30:10

-Would you?

-..and I think that leaves a little bit in it for you.

0:30:100:30:13

I'm thinking more like... 140?

0:30:130:30:16

HE PUFFS Or is that...?

0:30:160:30:18

140, it's a fair bid.

0:30:180:30:19

-Yes.

-It's a fair bid. 140...

0:30:190:30:22

I was looking at 2... Well, look, I think maybe if we could settle on

0:30:220:30:26

180?

0:30:260:30:27

I mean, I'll come down 10% on my...

0:30:270:30:29

I think that's still too high.

0:30:290:30:31

I'll come down

0:30:310:30:33

to 170.

0:30:330:30:35

You wouldn't do 150?

0:30:350:30:36

I can see where this is going.

0:30:380:30:40

SHE CHUCKLES

0:30:400:30:41

Let's have a deal at 160

0:30:410:30:42

-and I'll be glad that it's with you, amongst friends.

-OK, deal.

0:30:420:30:46

Will makes £55 on the toothpick

0:30:460:30:49

and he's so bolstered up by the sale,

0:30:490:30:51

that he swings straight into another.

0:30:510:30:53

Will has targeted Wimbledon dealer Mark,

0:30:530:30:55

who specialises in late 20th-century designer objects.

0:30:550:30:59

The vase cost him £32 at Goodwood.

0:31:000:31:03

What a great space you've got here.

0:31:030:31:05

I love the way the sort of whole industrial warehouse space

0:31:050:31:09

-works so well with your stock.

-It's fabulous, isn't it? Yes.

0:31:090:31:12

And look what you've got out for me, your very own Gulvase.

0:31:120:31:14

Yes, surprise, surprise.

0:31:140:31:15

This is the 30cm version.

0:31:150:31:17

OK, well, I've got the smaller brother, haven't I?

0:31:170:31:20

-The 25cm.

-25.

0:31:200:31:22

They come in five different sizes,

0:31:220:31:24

the largest being 50cm...

0:31:240:31:26

-Oh, that'd be a nice piece.

-It's beautiful.

0:31:260:31:28

I've only had one before, but they're quite rare, actually.

0:31:280:31:30

-Very rare but very desirable.

-Hm.

0:31:300:31:32

-More of a sort of substantial statement?

-Very much so.

0:31:320:31:35

But on the other hand, I quite like the sort of understated elegance

0:31:350:31:38

-of the smaller ones.

-Yes, they're beautiful, aren't they?

0:31:380:31:41

-There's, erm... They come in five different colours.

-Yes.

0:31:410:31:43

Basically, the brown, clear, blue, green and olive,

0:31:430:31:47

this being the olive, yours being the brown.

0:31:470:31:49

Well, listen, I think they look rather smart together like that,

0:31:490:31:52

don't they? I'm thinking around the sort of £60 mark.

0:31:520:31:55

£60...

0:31:550:31:57

OK, I was thinking probably around the £40 mark?

0:31:570:32:01

£40 mark...

0:32:010:32:03

40 and 60,

0:32:030:32:04

-can we meet maybe in the middle and shake on 50?

-50?

0:32:040:32:07

-Sounds good, Will.

-It's a nice round number.

-That's great.

0:32:070:32:10

-Excellent.

-Mark, it's been great fun, excellent.

0:32:100:32:12

So, Will makes a profit of £18 on the vase,

0:32:120:32:15

which brings us to the halfway point.

0:32:150:32:17

So, let's take a moment to consider the scores on the board.

0:32:170:32:21

Paul has sold a solid three items

0:32:210:32:23

and totalled a profit of £80 so far.

0:32:230:32:26

Will has matched Paul sale for sale

0:32:280:32:30

and also done three deals,

0:32:300:32:31

and has made £78.

0:32:310:32:34

With the selling shenanigans now in full swing,

0:32:360:32:39

the scores couldn't be any closer.

0:32:390:32:41

Paul is only £2 ahead,

0:32:410:32:42

but he's hoping to increase that lead

0:32:420:32:44

as he arrives in Southend-on-Sea

0:32:440:32:46

in search of his next profit.

0:32:460:32:49

Do you remember these bonbon dishes,

0:32:490:32:50

which date from the turn of the century?

0:32:500:32:52

Well, I've brought them to an antique sweet shop

0:32:520:32:54

and I'll hopefully get a bit of information

0:32:540:32:57

about what type of sweets would have been in here,

0:32:570:32:59

and see if they want them for their collection.

0:32:590:33:01

You never know.

0:33:010:33:02

# The Candy Man

0:33:020:33:04

# The Candy Man

0:33:040:33:05

# Oh, the Candy Man can

0:33:050:33:07

# The Candy Man can

0:33:070:33:09

# The Candy Man can. #

0:33:090:33:11

So, here we are, Kayleigh, these dishes date from about 1900,

0:33:110:33:13

-they're solid silver...

-Right, OK.

0:33:130:33:15

..and they would have belonged to somebody quite wealthy at the time.

0:33:150:33:18

-Yeah.

-But what type of sweets would have gone in these, at the time?

0:33:180:33:21

I would say,

0:33:210:33:22

the popular ones in that era were pear drops.

0:33:220:33:25

They're very popular. Yeah, they've always been popular, those.

0:33:250:33:28

-Always popular.

-And then a lot of wrapped ones,

0:33:280:33:30

acid drops, cough candy, winter mixture,

0:33:300:33:35

they're all ones that are still made now to the same recipe.

0:33:350:33:38

OK. And would they have been traditional boiled sweets?

0:33:380:33:40

-Would that be the type that went in them?

-Yeah, definitely.

0:33:400:33:43

So, yeah, like the rhubarb and custard, it wouldn't have been...

0:33:430:33:46

-Very rarely to have chocolate.

-Are they the sort...

0:33:460:33:48

I can see these wouldn't be something that you'd sell here,

0:33:480:33:51

but would these be something you might be interested in purchasing?

0:33:510:33:54

-They are... They would be nice for home.

-Right, OK.

0:33:540:33:56

And would that be full of sweets or as they would be?

0:33:560:33:59

-Full of sweets, obviously, yeah.

-Full of sweets. OK, well,

0:33:590:34:01

if I said £120 full of sweets...

0:34:010:34:04

-..and I'll pay for the sweets, how does that sound?

-Sounds good.

0:34:050:34:08

-Is that all right?

-Yeah.

-Shall we do that?

-Yeah, lovely.

0:34:080:34:10

Yes, Paul fills his dishes with sweets and gets a delicious

0:34:100:34:13

profit of just over £31

0:34:130:34:15

for the bonbon dishes.

0:34:150:34:17

Will isn't going to take that lying down.

0:34:170:34:19

No, he's taken his bellows

0:34:190:34:20

and he's hoping a FELLOW

0:34:200:34:22

will help him say HELLO to a profit,

0:34:220:34:24

if he can SELL-O them...

0:34:240:34:26

Well, here I am at The Cross Keys pub in Chatteris

0:34:270:34:29

and I'm here to see Rich.

0:34:290:34:31

He's a man with a pub and a man with a fireplace,

0:34:310:34:33

so I reckon he's an ideal customer...

0:34:330:34:36

-HE GROANS

-..for my smoke bellows.

0:34:360:34:38

OK, what is it?

0:34:400:34:41

Well, when I saw them,

0:34:410:34:43

I originally thought they might have been diver's bellows, you know,

0:34:430:34:46

to pump the air down into the old diving bell or the helmet

0:34:460:34:49

-that a diver...?

-Yes, yes.

0:34:490:34:50

I've contacted a man who's a specialist in vintage diving

0:34:500:34:54

equipment and he tells me that actually,

0:34:540:34:56

even Victorian diving bellows were mechanical.

0:34:560:35:00

-Right.

-So, this, he's told me,

0:35:000:35:02

is probably more likely to be for the fire service,

0:35:020:35:05

pumping air into the helmets

0:35:050:35:07

as they enter smoke-filled buildings.

0:35:070:35:10

-Really?

-They're good, though, aren't they?

-Absolutely fantastic.

0:35:100:35:13

OK, so what are you actually... How much are you looking for?

0:35:130:35:16

Cos I have got no idea what they're worth.

0:35:160:35:18

Well, I reckon they should be worth about 100 quid.

0:35:180:35:21

Your silence speaks volumes, Rich.

0:35:240:35:27

-100 quid.

-Well, I've done a little bit of buying and selling...

0:35:270:35:30

Yeah, I know you have, yeah.

0:35:300:35:32

-I start at 50.

-Oh, 50...

0:35:320:35:34

Well, I know how this game works.

0:35:340:35:36

How about I come back...

0:35:360:35:37

How do you want to do it, 10s or 20s?

0:35:370:35:39

What about I say...

0:35:390:35:40

Well, if I say 80,

0:35:400:35:43

what are you going to say?

0:35:430:35:44

I'm going to say 60.

0:35:440:35:46

Oh, you're a tough man.

0:35:460:35:47

So, that puts me at £70?

0:35:470:35:51

-Deal.

-£70. That's a result.

0:35:510:35:53

Oh, that was a tough haggle!

0:35:530:35:55

Will makes just £15 on the Victorian bellows.

0:35:550:35:58

Well, I was hoping for a little bit more on those bellows,

0:35:580:36:01

but Rich is a canny buyer.

0:36:010:36:03

I'm sure he had the heating turned up in there.

0:36:030:36:05

I got all hot, flustered and bothered. Oh, well.

0:36:050:36:07

A deal's a deal, onto the next one.

0:36:070:36:10

And next, Will hops back to Newmarket with his cow's leg,

0:36:100:36:14

which he's hoping will give him a leg up

0:36:140:36:16

after receiving a little bit of TLU,

0:36:160:36:18

that's Tender Loving Upcycling.

0:36:180:36:20

Well, my creative juices have been flowing

0:36:200:36:23

and I have created what can only be called

0:36:230:36:25

an item of beauty.

0:36:250:36:27

Yes, I've turned it into a lamp!

0:36:270:36:29

Clever thinking from Will.

0:36:290:36:31

The leg cost £30

0:36:310:36:33

and conversion and safety testing adds another 30,

0:36:330:36:36

standing him at £60.

0:36:360:36:38

He's meeting Patrick, the owner of the shop.

0:36:380:36:41

Well, Will, I have to say,

0:36:410:36:43

it certainly is a unique creation(!)

0:36:430:36:46

It's very nice, I do like it.

0:36:460:36:48

Might be something that appeals to, erm...

0:36:480:36:50

-Various buyers. I mean, I've got maybe vets in mind...

-OK.

0:36:500:36:54

I've got maybe some landlords in mind

0:36:540:36:56

-who like quirky taxidermy ideas.

-Yes.

0:36:560:36:58

I reckon that this is the only one in the world.

0:36:580:37:01

-Is it really?

-Well, if you think about it,

0:37:010:37:02

-there can only be three others.

-Yes.

0:37:020:37:05

THEY LAUGH That's true. Very true,

0:37:050:37:08

Yeah, I can see... I mean, I've traded myself in, you know,

0:37:080:37:11

-riding boots that have been turned into lamps...

-That's right.

0:37:110:37:14

-..so I know there's a buzz for this kind of unique lamp.

-Yeah.

0:37:140:37:17

I guess it comes down to, as always, Will,

0:37:170:37:19

what are you after for it?

0:37:190:37:21

I'm looking, for this lamp, and I think a fair price would be, what...

0:37:210:37:25

100 quid? Something like that? £100 for a one-off piece.

0:37:250:37:28

You know, I'm a man who doesn't always go for the first price,

0:37:280:37:31

so I'm going to maybe beat you down a little bit, Will,

0:37:310:37:33

punch you down and say £70.

0:37:330:37:35

-Oh...

-Come on.

-Well, I know...

0:37:350:37:37

You know, I understand where you're coming from.

0:37:370:37:40

Well, listen, I'm going to be even meaner and say 90.

0:37:400:37:43

Oh! Well, look,

0:37:430:37:45

let's just do the classic and meet in the middle,

0:37:450:37:47

call it £80 and you've got yourself a deal.

0:37:470:37:49

Come on, Axeman!

0:37:500:37:52

I'll make it £80

0:37:520:37:53

if we can bump and wave.

0:37:530:37:56

BOTH: Bump and wave!

0:37:560:37:58

Yes, I'm not sure that'll catch on.

0:37:580:38:00

Anyway, Will adds another £20 to his profit sheet

0:38:000:38:03

and has just one item left to sell.

0:38:030:38:06

Paul, however, has two,

0:38:060:38:08

but he's hit a bump in the road

0:38:080:38:09

after discovering that his Doulton figurine

0:38:090:38:11

isn't worth as much as he hoped.

0:38:110:38:13

If I didn't have that one,

0:38:140:38:16

I might buy it, I suppose. But...

0:38:160:38:17

-Yeah, you've already got one like this?

-We've already got one.

0:38:170:38:20

But he manages to recover his costs

0:38:200:38:22

when he sells it to Margaret from Carnforth

0:38:220:38:24

for the same price that he paid for it.

0:38:240:38:26

So, at least it's not a loss.

0:38:260:38:28

Now, his last item is the calling card holder.

0:38:280:38:31

With the clock ticking, Paul teleports back to a time

0:38:310:38:34

when no gentleman would be seen without one.

0:38:340:38:36

He's in Bolton-by-Bowery to meet Richie,

0:38:360:38:39

who runs a Victorian carriage business. Yes.

0:38:390:38:42

So, Richie, how old is the carriage?

0:38:420:38:44

1895.

0:38:440:38:45

-It used to belong to German royalty at one time...

-Never?

0:38:450:38:48

-Yes, it did, yes.

-Wow, fantastic.

0:38:480:38:50

And what's the purpose, then? Is it like a classic vehicle

0:38:500:38:53

that you just enjoy, or have you turned it into a business?

0:38:530:38:56

-What do you do with it?

-No, it's a Victoria carriage...

0:38:560:38:58

-Where ladies in the olden days had very big dresses...

-OK.

0:38:580:39:02

And, you know, we do weddings

0:39:020:39:04

and they can get in with the big dresses, of course.

0:39:040:39:07

Well, there is a reason why I'm here.

0:39:070:39:08

In the Victorian times, if you were advertising your business,

0:39:080:39:11

you would need a calling card case.

0:39:110:39:13

-Have you seen one of these before?

-No, I haven't.

0:39:130:39:15

Ah, this is a beautiful thing. It dates exactly about the same time,

0:39:150:39:18

so late 19th century.

0:39:180:39:20

And the idea is, in here would be your calling cards,

0:39:200:39:23

and you would make your announcement.

0:39:230:39:24

-Isn't that a beautiful thing?

-Very nice thing.

0:39:240:39:26

I mean, if I was to say £30, would that be...?

0:39:260:39:29

-No, no, I wouldn't give that.

-You wouldn't(!) 20...

0:39:290:39:31

No, no, 20 would be...

0:39:310:39:33

-OK, that would be the maximum...?

-Yes.

0:39:330:39:35

Do you know what? If it's genuinely something you would like,

0:39:350:39:38

-I would accept your £20. Does that sound...?

-That sounds OK.

0:39:380:39:41

Paul seems to be stuck in a temporal loop,

0:39:410:39:44

selling the card holder for the same price

0:39:440:39:46

that he bought it for, again!

0:39:460:39:48

And with that, his time travelling

0:39:480:39:49

and selling adventure is over.

0:39:490:39:51

ZAP!

0:39:510:39:53

Will still has his last item to sell,

0:39:530:39:56

the Grand Prix posters, which he's taken to Suffolk-based

0:39:560:39:59

father and son racing enthusiasts,

0:39:590:40:01

Martin and Tim.

0:40:010:40:03

The posters cost him £100,

0:40:030:40:04

so will they give him the last-minute fuel injection

0:40:040:40:07

that will let him pip his opponent at the winning post?

0:40:070:40:10

-Now, what do you think of that one?

-I think they're gorgeous.

0:40:100:40:14

-They're good, aren't they?

-And it's, by the look of it,

0:40:140:40:16

an authentic reproduction of the actual one.

0:40:160:40:21

Exactly, because the originals of these are thousands of pounds.

0:40:210:40:25

-Yes, I've seen them change hands.

-Yeah.

0:40:250:40:27

But who knows from a distance, once they're on the wall, eh?

0:40:270:40:30

Well, exactly. But I'll show you the other one as well,

0:40:300:40:32

-which I liked...

-Whoa!

0:40:320:40:34

..because I thought it was different enough...

0:40:340:40:36

A lovely bit of Art Deco.

0:40:360:40:37

Exactly, look at that, 1931...

0:40:370:40:39

-Bugatti type of things there, yeah.

-What are they? Sort of Bugatti...?

0:40:390:40:42

Well, that must be very close to the first race there,

0:40:420:40:44

-I would have thought.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:40:440:40:46

-Well, listen, you like all things vintage...

-Yes.

0:40:460:40:48

..you like all things racing,

0:40:480:40:49

and I think my two posters tick both boxes.

0:40:490:40:52

I'm looking at £100 each for them.

0:40:520:40:54

-£200.

-£200 for the two, sir.

0:40:540:40:58

I don't know whether I like them that much.

0:40:580:40:59

Will wants to double his money

0:40:590:41:01

and secure a win in this competition,

0:41:010:41:04

but will Tim and Martin go for it?

0:41:040:41:06

You'll have to wait and see,

0:41:060:41:07

as it's almost time for the chequered flag.

0:41:070:41:09

But before we find out which of our battling barterers

0:41:090:41:12

has won today,

0:41:120:41:13

let's remind ourselves of how much they spent.

0:41:130:41:16

Both our brave boys had a budget of £750

0:41:160:41:19

to spend at the antiques fair.

0:41:190:41:22

Paul Hayes picked up his six purchases

0:41:220:41:24

and spent £286.50.

0:41:240:41:26

Will matched Paul's six buys,

0:41:270:41:29

but spent a total £337 on his items.

0:41:290:41:33

But the winner is the person

0:41:330:41:35

who makes the most profit.

0:41:350:41:37

All of the money that Paul and Will have made from today's challenge

0:41:370:41:40

will go to charities of their choice.

0:41:400:41:42

So, let's find out who is today's

0:41:420:41:44

Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is Champion.

0:41:440:41:46

-Morning, sir!

-How are you? I'm all right, thank you.

0:41:470:41:50

-The antiques fair, wasn't that great?

-Oh, yes,

0:41:500:41:52

-at Goodwood and not a horse in sight.

-Nope.

0:41:520:41:54

-But there was a cow, or at least part of a cow.

-Yeah.

0:41:540:41:56

-Remember my cow's leg?

-Yeah, what happened with that?

0:41:560:41:58

-I got creative and turned it into a lamp.

-Right. Did you MOO-ve it on?

0:41:580:42:01

Oh, that's a shocker.

0:42:010:42:03

-Very a-MOO-zing!

-Oh, there we go.

0:42:030:42:04

-You've done that already.

-Touche. What about you? Your highlight?

0:42:040:42:07

-I met Brian "Saxophone" Jones.

-Really?

-A real gent.

0:42:070:42:10

He told me all about it as well.

0:42:100:42:12

Wonderful, yeah, I really enjoyed that. And I made a profit as well.

0:42:120:42:14

Excellent. Well, I don't think I made a loss,

0:42:140:42:16

so I'm hoping that this might well be in the black today.

0:42:160:42:20

Well, do you know what, I don't think I made a loss.

0:42:200:42:22

-But let's see how we got on.

-Come on, then.

0:42:220:42:24

-It could be close, this one, mate.

-One, two, three?

0:42:240:42:26

OK, one, two, three.

0:42:260:42:28

-Wahey!

-Hey! Well done!

0:42:280:42:30

-Damn!

-The Axeman!

0:42:300:42:31

I've got another three legs off a cow.

0:42:310:42:33

-Do you want to do something with that?

-Yeah, I've got an idea...

0:42:330:42:36

Yes, Will leaves his opponent for dust

0:42:360:42:38

after selling the racing posters for the biggest profit of the day.

0:42:380:42:41

-Go on, then, Will.

-Put it there.

-We've got a deal.

0:42:410:42:44

He sells them for an impressive £180,

0:42:440:42:47

making £80 profit.

0:42:470:42:48

Which means he gets the grand prize

0:42:480:42:50

of calling himself today's winner!

0:42:500:42:52

Well, it was a wet day at Goodwood but after a win,

0:42:520:42:56

it's all sunshine and smiles with the Axeman.

0:42:560:42:59

Well, do you know what,

0:42:590:43:00

I thought I'd done really well at the antiques market.

0:43:000:43:02

I made some great profit but just pipped at the post there by Will.

0:43:020:43:06

Well done, Will.

0:43:060:43:07

But tomorrow, it's the grand finale, as our boys must muster

0:43:070:43:10

the energy to go at it one more time in the ultimate challenge,

0:43:100:43:14

the Showdown!

0:43:140:43:15

Storms descend as experts Paul Hayes and Will Axon go to battle at an antiques fair in West Sussex.

There is a tricky start for Will, as torrential rain closes his usual outdoor stomping ground. Paul has mixed results when he decides to haggle hard for a bargain.