Charlie Ross vs Paul Hayes: Showdown Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


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Charlie Ross vs Paul Hayes: Showdown

Antiques challenge. Experts Paul Hayes and Charlie Ross have a 48-hour face-off at a Nottinghamshire antiques fair, trying to make the most profit from running an antiques stall.


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This is the Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is showdown,

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the toughest challenge our experts have faced yet.

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Roll up, roll up.

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In just 48 frantic hours, our duelling dealers will have to source, buy

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and then sell an entire stall's worth of antiques, testing their knowledge, stamina and nerve!

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-May the best man win.

-Yes, I probably will.

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Coming up - a good dealer is always considering his options...

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I could sell them to my wife, but I'm not allowed to. She'd love those.

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..sometimes even the best salesman meets his match...

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Come on, I like a good deal.

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Like a deal where I've been hit hard in the stomach and winded!

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..and how antiques dealing can benefit the special relationship.

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-Here's to Georgia. Here's to Georgia.

-You'll have to come see us now!

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It's the final battle between...

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They have been battling it out over a week of challenges...

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-I want to go over there.

-I want to go over there, too.

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..to see who can make the most profit from buying and selling antiques.

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That's typical getting carried away in an auction.

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It made 380 hammer.

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Fantastic!

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Both Charlie and Paul know we're coming but they have no idea where the next 48 hours will take them.

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It's time for us to find out the details of our two heroes' most dastardly dealing challenge yet.

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It's all happening here today. It's breakfast time, it's party time in the Hayes' household -

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we're getting ready for a big party, somebody's birthday this week.

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More importantly, I have been waiting for this envelope to arrive.

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"Paul Hayes, this is your showdown. The challenge is simple.

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"You have today to buy antiques and collectibles from wherever you like."

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Excuse me while I get a bit of breakfast.

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"Tomorrow, you must sell your items off a stall

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"at the Newark International Antique and Collectors Fair

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"in direct competition with your opponent, Paul Hayes.

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"The winner will be the dealer who makes the most profit."

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"You will find suggestions for places where you can buy your items

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"together with details of tomorrow's market in your information pack."

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"Good luck." I think I'll go to an auction. I like auctions, I'm an auctioneer, that's the place to be.

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Charlie and Paul each have up to £1,000 of their own money to spend.

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Today, they must buy an entire stall's worth of antiques.

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Tomorrow, they'll be selling the whole lot in direct competition

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at one of the country's most established antiques fairs in Newark in Nottinghamshire.

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This internationally-renowned fair has literally hundreds of specialist stalls,

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loaded with some of the best antiques and collectibles available anywhere in Europe.

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The boys will be selling to both members of the public and to other professional dealers.

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For The Charmer and The Man From Morecambe,

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the secret to winning this epic 48-hour challenge lies in knowing their market.

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Not a problem, it seems, for our blue-eyed boy.

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There you are. No time for breakfast.

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I'm delighted I'm going to Newark.

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I've spent a lot of time there, I've done the antiques stall lots of times.

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Charlie Ross, I know you're going to be all flamboyant, all show,

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lots of interesting props and a very pretty stall.

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But a little secret - that doesn't work at Newark.

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Paul sounds seriously confident and he's got one thing spot-on.

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Charlie and he have very different ideas of what you need to pack for a day of dealing at Newark.

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Plants, which I've been allowed to take out of the conservatory, make the stall look good.

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A big cloth or a table cloth or a form of carpet...

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Candelabra stolen from the dining room with new candles to make it look good.

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I need a bum-bag, these are really important things.

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Most importantly, I have some confit du canard.

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In case I get a French buyer. And I need to bribe him.

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What I need is the bare bones.

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For years, I just put things on the floor, not so much scruffy, but good quality items all placed.

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It looks approachable, people can go down and pick items up

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and see what they've got and can interact with them.

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Once they've got it in their hand, we sell them the idea.

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Unbelievable! It's like our boys are going to two completely different places.

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Only time will tell whether Paul's steady old-school approach

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or Charlie's desire to look good will win the day.

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-Can you help me load up?

-Yes. OK.

-Come on, then.

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Charlie and Paul must stop shopping by 5pm.

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They will then be driven to a hotel in Nottinghamshire where they will get a few hours' shut-eye

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before stalling out at the Newark International Antiques Fair early tomorrow morning.

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I've got my props, my bum-bag, my tickets, a kiss?

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Wish me luck.

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All right, see you later. Got to beat that Charlie Ross.

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Our first point of call, just head towards the promenade, please.

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A strong buying strategy will be crucial.

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Paul is planning to stay local for his first buys. His initial port of call is just up the road.

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I want to buy as many items as I can to make a really impressive stall.

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We'll start at the nearest place to me, which is an antiques place on the promenade. On the right.

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But The Charmer is thundering towards Leamington Spa,

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where his first auction is due to start any minute.

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Strategy number one, hit the saleroom and buy as many lots as possible, as cheaply as possible.

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And then we will worry about the quality later.

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But as Paul is pulling up at his first buying location...

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Let's have a look at this place.

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..Charlie's razor-sharp brain is already planning what to do if his auction strategy fails.

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Shops.

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Ah-ha.

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My old mate Nigel Townsend.

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Sorry, I'm breaking up, where are you today? Hello?

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Oh, bother.

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Oh, he's cut off.

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I hate this blooming mobile phone.

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Anyway, Nigel Townsend sells things in an antiques centre which is closing in a month.

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So he says, "I've got some fantastic deals for you."

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I wish I'd phoned him first because he is in Winslow.

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Which is in exactly the opposite direction to the one we're travelling.

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I could get him to put some things in his car and meet us halfway. We will cross that bridge when we come to it.

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The Charmer is trying to cover as many buying bases as he can,

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but The Man from Morecambe has already started shopping

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and he is focusing on pieces that he is hoping will go down well with Newark's international clientele.

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Here we are, nice coffee pot - exactly the sort of thing the Italians go for at the market.

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Nice gravy boat. Starting to accumulate already.

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For 20 quid, I've got a nice little selection.

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Little tip. You can see how yellow that's gone. Look at the colour of this and the colour of that -

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that is the nickel coming through, you can see that yellow tinge,

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so that needs to be replated, but it's quite a good style, isn't it?

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That's 24, is there a profit on 24? No, I don't think so.

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Paul has already found plenty to tickle his interest.

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We have got two gravy boats and a nice coffee pot or water jug.

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Nice, clean silver or silver plate, it doesn't have to be re-silvered in any way, it's ready to go.

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And to be honest, the international market, they don't really understand the hallmarks,

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so it looks fantastic, it's very visual and it's honest - it is what it is.

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I like things like this - a nice coffee grinder.

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He's like a little lad in a sweet shop, snaffling up silver,

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gobbling up ceramics and gorging himself on glass.

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He sees potential profit in every nook and cranny.

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There's a toast rack there as well.

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But he's not the only one in his element...

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What good time! We're here before it starts. Saleroom number one.

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..because for the clientele of this Leamington Spa auction house,

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the competition has just got a little stiffer. The Charmer is in the house.

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You have got to be on your toes here. I walked through the door and no sooner had I come through the door

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than I bought this rather splendid chimney. Isn't that magnificent? Good garden fodder.

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I've also bought a little Arts and Crafts wall bracket, very cheap, £10.

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I then bought four colour prints.

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Which I have to say I really, really like.

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I could sell them to my wife but I'm not allowed to. She'd love those.

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But I think at £40 for the four, I think I'll get £20 each for them.

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Those auction lots cost The Charmer just under £85 with bits -

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that's the term dealers use for auction taxes and fees.

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And it's Charlie who records the first buys of this extraordinary 48-hour dealing challenge,

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and he's not finished with this auction house yet.

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A Victorian walnut-framed mirror.

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45, 55?

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60?

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At 55, is there 60? 60. Five?

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At 65. One more will do it. At £65, are we all done?

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£70 on that.

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Yours.

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Over-mantle mirror.

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£70. I think it's worth a bit more.

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That's lucky, Charlie, because with bits, this mirror set you back just over £82.

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But Charlie's auction house haul pales into insignificance

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next to The Man from Morecambe's antiques centre stash.

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If this was a supermarket sweep, Paul would already be at home

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with his feet up and polishing the winner's trophy.

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Now, Joanne... That goes on forever, doesn't it?

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You've picked a few bargains, there.

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-I've tried to pick things that are pretty perfect, in nice condition.

-A lot of silver plate.

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A lot of silver plate - I'm going to a big antiques fair. A few ceramics as well.

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We've got one, two, three, four, five, six pieces of Indian tree.

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I noticed on a couple of them... That one's been priced at £20, then reduced to a fiver. What's happened?

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He's had it in for a while and he just wants to clear it,

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he keeps his turnover quite fresh so he just wants to clear.

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Right, so you've got six pieces, which would have cost me pretty well over £100. What can you do?

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For the six? He'd let it go for £40.

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That's a real bargain, there's a chance of a profit on it. OK, that's great.

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Paul has chosen 17 separate items from the antiques centre.

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As well as six Arthur Wood pottery pieces, he has picked up a selection of silver-plated items,

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an oriental blue and white tea set, a cruet set and, finally, this colourful jug.

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This is a Royal Doulton character jug.

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A character jug is just purely the head and shoulders, not a Toby jug, which is the full seated figure.

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It's of a character called Sarah Gamp. And this is very popular, it dates from 1940, 1950.

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And it was £28 on the price tag, so that's a bargain.

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I'm sure it catalogues at more and will be a winner when it comes to selling.

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It reminds me of Charlie Ross, don't you think?

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Excuse me, can we have our blue-eyed boy back, please?

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Suddenly the nicest man in antiques has come over all catty.

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Well, sort of.

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Down south, Charlie is more interested in his latest purchase than he is in making fun of Paul.

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He will get to that later.

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So, Victorian walnut over-mantle.

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Decent condition mirror.

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Basically walnut.

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Inlaid with amboyna here and strung with satinwood and with ebony.

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Nicely carved. Carved top, carved mounts,

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costs £70. See what we can do.

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Charlie seems reasonably pleased with his opening deals,

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but The Man from Morecambe will have to be tied down if he gets any more excited about today's challenge.

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And he doesn't care who knows it.

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Ah, Hayes, my little angel, how are you?

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I'm fine, thank you very much, delighted when I opened my envelope.

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Wonderful, off to Newark, have you been to Newark?

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I've never been to Newark in my life, so you'll know all the people there.

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-Have you spent any money?

-Yes, I've bought a few bits.

-Have you?

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What about yourself, have you bought something good?

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No, I didn't see anything good. I went to an auction room where the most expensive thing was about £4.60.

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But I did buy eight lots.

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-I haven't stopped buying yet and I've bought 17 things.

-17 things?

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-And I've spent £17.50.

-Oh, dear. I am trying to do auction rooms, but it's not easy.

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I'm sure you will work it out.

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-All the best.

-Thank you, caller. Bye.

-You're welcome. Bye.

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He is obviously going round the trade, buying things.

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I wonder if I've got the right tactic here, going to salerooms?

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Only time will tell.

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Driver, put your foot on it!

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And as Charlie prepares to step his buying day up a gear,

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it's time to find out what both our fine dealers have spent so far.

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Our dealing duo both started the day with up to £1,000 of their own money to spend.

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Paul has spent a confident £377 on a stall-busting 17 items,

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but he still has £623 to play with.

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The Charmer isn't far behind and has invested just under £320

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on eight showdown items, leaving just over £680 still to spend.

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It's nip and tuck as we head into the business end of buying for our hardcore weekender of dealing.

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And Charlie The Charmer Ross is looking to squeeze one last auction into his day.

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-Have you finished, sir?

-No, 30 lots to go. Don't worry.

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About 30 lots left.

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Thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen, that concludes our sale.

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Charlie has spent £122.51 including fees and picked up six more pieces.

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One Clarice Cliff jug. It's not the best pattern

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but it's Clarice Cliff and it's not a repro, which is good news.

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I bought these two little cottages because they are reasonably collectible, Anne Hathaway's cottage.

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I would have loved them to be Goss china, but they aren't.

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Willow china and the whole lot for £8.

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But a very nice little piece of art glass. And I think that's probably 19th century.

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And if it isn't, it's early 20th century.

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And that was a bonus because I didn't even see that lot.

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For £8, to include a nice little art deco scent bottle.

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So I'm quite happy with that.

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Charlie's plan to bulk up his stall with cheap and cheerful auction lots has certainly worked.

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But now The Charmer has had his fill of auctions.

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No more auctions today, just shops.

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And I'll try and up the quality a bit because I need to.

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Paul is fresh from his buying blitz in Morecambe and has now arrived in Lancaster.

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It's now quarter to three. I've come to Lancaster,

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to quite a famous antique centre, to buy some nice quality items.

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You may be wondering why there's a bull on the roof, have you heard the story about a bull in a china shop?

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It actually happened here.

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Next door there was a livestock market, one of the bulls got out,

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went into here, caused a right old mess.

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MOOING

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Moo! Straight away, our boy gets back to what he does best. And his interest is piqued by this piece.

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What we've got here is called a tantalus.

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The idea was it would go on your sideboard or your dining table.

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And it would tantalise you.

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In other words, you can see it, but you couldn't get in there unless you had the key.

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This little hole here would have had a lock

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and only you or the butler would have had the key.

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So when it was in place, the decanters are impossible to remove.

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So what we've got are three matching bottles, which is good.

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They're moulded glass, not cut crystal, and there is some damage -

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I can feel a couple of nicks around the rim of this one. Maybe the stopper has been damaged as well.

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So this is a restorer's lot.

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It needs a new lock, a good polish and some restoration on the bottle.

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A good quality tantalus is worth well over £100, if not a bit more.

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The best ones have what we call a piano type

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and they have a place for your cribbage board or cigars.

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Let's have a look. This is out for sale at £25.

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I think that's a bit of a bargain, bearing in mind, perfect, you'd be looking at over £100.

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I'll have a go with that, I'll tantalise somebody at Newark.

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Oh, and the lad was doing so well!

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It sounds like Paul is feeling confident about his tantalus.

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In Northamptonshire, Charlie is calling in a favour to try and squeeze one last buying location.

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Here in record time.

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He's convinced a contact, Nigel, who's having a closing-down sale in his antique shop in Oxfordshire,

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to drive to Northamptonshire and leave a selection of pieces for view at the shop of a mutual friend.

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-I'm fine, how are you?

-Very well!

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But he's not the only one racing against the clock.

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Customer announcement.

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Paul Hayes to the checkout, please.

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-Right, OK, Hayley?

-OK, it comes to £162, please.

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OK. I think I have stopped buying and I've still got 25 minutes left.

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I can relax a little bit, now. And I may have a cup of tea.

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Well done, Paul.

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The Man from Morecambe wraps up his buying with 20 minutes to spare.

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In Northamptonshire, Charlie is about to find out if his contact, Nigel,

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has left him anything worth buying.

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Talk me through them. How much is that?

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-That's French, I think.

-It's really sweet.

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It's quite delicate. That's £75.

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I don't think that's too bad.

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-I like that.

-That's a kettle stand.

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That's 75 again.

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And some small things.

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That's rare, isn't it? How much is it?

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That's £140.

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-But they're usually pigs.

-They ARE usually pigs.

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-I'm not sure I've seen an elephant one.

-And that's dated 1906.

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Isn't that fabulous?

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Bit of a scary price.

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The blue vase is a lovely colour.

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-I suppose this is a lamp base, has it got a holder? It's a lamp base.

-£20.

-I can't resist that.

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Shall I try and ring him very quickly? See if he'd do something.

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If I said I quite like the lamp base, kettle stand, the oak table and the elephant,

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what could you do those four for?

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That comes to, er...£315.

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Your maths is unbelievable.

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Can you do them for 275 cash?

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I know you did. But you know what a hard what's-it I am.

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£290?

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You are an absolute master.

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I will leave £290 with Jackie and I'll give Jackie a kiss on your behalf.

0:21:090:21:14

Right. That is all my buying done for the day. Take me to Newark.

0:21:140:21:22

And that is a fantastic bit of last-minute dealing from The Charmer

0:21:220:21:25

and the hammer comes down on the buying part of our 48-hour dealing marathon.

0:21:250:21:30

Unfortunately, when he was at the antique shop, Charlie didn't quite hear the final whistle,

0:21:300:21:35

and these three items purchased at 5:20pm won't be included in the challenge.

0:21:350:21:41

Sorry, Charlie.

0:21:410:21:42

Both Paul and Charlie started out today with up to

0:21:450:21:48

£1,000 of their own money.

0:21:480:21:50

The man from Morecambe spent £539 on 21 purchases for his Newark stall,

0:21:500:21:57

while Charlie upped the ante by spending just over £733

0:21:570:22:01

buying the 16 items and two job lots

0:22:010:22:04

that he hopes will see him crowned the showdown king.

0:22:040:22:08

And as the sun sets over Morecambe and Oxfordshire,

0:22:080:22:11

both our duelling dealers are heading for a hotel in Newark,

0:22:110:22:14

where they will be resting their weary heads for the night.

0:22:140:22:18

Their vans are chock-a-block with the items they think will turn a profit at Newark tomorrow.

0:22:220:22:27

But only time will tell who's chosen the winning strategy.

0:22:270:22:31

As Paul predicted, the Charmer is first to arrive at the hotel. But in the past,

0:22:330:22:37

the man from Morecambe used to sleep in his van when he was stalling out at Newark.

0:22:370:22:42

So even though he's turned up a bit later, he's still a chirpy chappy.

0:22:420:22:46

Oh, standards are slipping!

0:22:460:22:48

-Hey!

-They're letting anybody in nowadays!

0:22:480:22:50

-How are you?

-Hello, how are you?

-Good to see you.

-You too.

0:22:500:22:54

-You've even brought a clean shirt for tomorrow!

-Do we get a room each?

-No, we're sharing a room.

0:22:540:22:59

Come off to the bar with me...

0:22:590:23:01

With their buying done, our two heroes call a temporary truce

0:23:010:23:04

and head for some well-earned refreshment.

0:23:040:23:07

But relations won't be quite so cordial tomorrow,

0:23:070:23:09

when they need to sell everything they bought today at the antiques fair in Newark.

0:23:090:23:15

May the best man win.

0:23:150:23:18

You must be joking!

0:23:180:23:20

Because I think that can't be true, because I suspect that you'll win!

0:23:200:23:24

Coming up - Paul gets back to dealing basics.

0:23:240:23:28

The first thing I'll do, Charlie, is get rid of this table.

0:23:280:23:31

And Charlie discovers it's not so easy.

0:23:310:23:34

I can't get people in here, that's the main problem.

0:23:340:23:37

They tend to walk past.

0:23:370:23:39

It's first thing in the morning here at Newark antiques market,

0:23:430:23:46

and the traders are preparing for one of the biggest days in the UK antiques calendar.

0:23:460:23:50

Our brave boys know that over the next eight hours, they face their biggest challenge yet -

0:23:530:23:58

trying to sell to Newark's legion of private buyers and profit-hungry dealers.

0:23:580:24:02

I don't know whether to put my table out or leave it in here.

0:24:040:24:07

The first thing to do, Charlie, is get rid of this table.

0:24:070:24:10

-You can't sell without a table!

-There's method in my madness.

0:24:100:24:12

-Where are you going to put it?

-I've got a unique method of selling.

-Have you got a magic carpet?

-Yep.

0:24:120:24:18

Oh, you're reducing the quality of the area.

0:24:180:24:20

-That's my shop front, so let's see what happens.

-Oh, dear!

0:24:200:24:24

I need to get my nice silk damask tablecloth into action.

0:24:240:24:29

Already, our boys are taking totally different approaches to the way they're setting out their wares,

0:24:310:24:37

but which one of them has judged this market and its clientele most accurately?

0:24:370:24:43

-The decorative award goes to C Ross.

-Charlie's got a good strategy there,

0:24:430:24:47

he's gone for the very posh look. I've gone for the dealer's market -

0:24:470:24:50

that's what this place is full of, dealers.

0:24:500:24:52

Gentlemen, it's time to reveal your stalls.

0:24:550:24:58

Newark old hand Paul is convinced that his informal, ground-level display will lure in the buyers.

0:25:040:25:10

Just as his rival predicted, the Charmer has gone for

0:25:100:25:14

the upmarket look, displaying his pieces in a classic table top array.

0:25:140:25:19

It all comes down to this - Oxfordshire's finest gent against

0:25:190:25:23

Morecambe's man of the people in their final showdown.

0:25:230:25:27

-I like your stall there, Charlie, looking good.

-May the best man win.

-Yes, I probably will. Ha!

0:25:270:25:32

And guess what? It's the Newark new boy who's first to get some interest - in his 12 colour prints.

0:25:330:25:40

-80, is that for the whole lot, sir? What do you think?

-85.

0:25:400:25:43

There's 80. Have you got a fiver?

0:25:430:25:46

If you've only got pound coins, I'll take 84.

0:25:460:25:50

Oh, that's 84! You're an absolute...

0:25:500:25:53

Thank you very much, madam. Thank you, sir.

0:25:530:25:56

£84, that's a profit of just under £37, and a cracking start for the Charmer.

0:25:580:26:04

And he increases his early lead when he sells a watch from one of his job lots for £15.

0:26:040:26:10

£15, sir, done.

0:26:100:26:12

But then, the man from Morecambe bursts into the selling action.

0:26:120:26:17

First to go is his silver-plated claret jug for £25.

0:26:190:26:23

That will be 25 if you want it. That's lovely, thank you very much.

0:26:230:26:26

And just as the interest starts to dry up for Charlie, Paul gets on a selling roll.

0:26:260:26:31

First to be snapped up, his Poole pottery barrel.

0:26:310:26:34

Erm, that one can be...30 quid.

0:26:340:26:38

OK, that's good.

0:26:380:26:39

Then, his Derby jug more than doubles its money when he sells it for £20.

0:26:390:26:44

-What's the best price you can do me?

-How about 20 quid?

0:26:440:26:48

That's a little memory of today, and meeting me.

0:26:480:26:50

-Yeah, take care.

-All the best. Cheers, mate, bye now.

0:26:500:26:53

Another silver piece goes next.

0:26:530:26:56

£24 just for you. 50% discount, just because you've got a green jacket on.

0:26:560:27:01

That's an absolute bargain.

0:27:010:27:03

You won't go no lower?

0:27:030:27:04

Erm, how low do you want me to go?

0:27:040:27:07

-Ha-ha! We'll say 20.

-OK, that's lovely, thank you very much.

0:27:070:27:12

Paul certainly seems to speak this market's language.

0:27:120:27:15

The buyers love him!

0:27:150:27:17

I couldn't imagine me putting a posh thing out like that...

0:27:170:27:21

I would be disappointed if I came to your house and you didn't.

0:27:210:27:25

He's like a sort of selling machine!

0:27:250:27:27

£15 and we'll have a deal.

0:27:270:27:29

I will let you into a little secret here, it's cost me 16, so I can't work on losses.

0:27:290:27:33

18 quid and we'll have a deal.

0:27:330:27:35

-Go on, then.

-We'll shake on that, shall we?

0:27:350:27:38

The man from Morecambe has slammed down the gauntlet, and Roscoe is starting to feel the pressure.

0:27:380:27:44

He's selling all his stuff, I'm a bit worried about Morecambe.

0:27:440:27:47

Morecambe is taking the dosh, he keeps going into his little pouch and pulling out change for people.

0:27:470:27:52

I can't get people in here, that's the main problem, they tend to walk past.

0:27:520:27:57

Perhaps that says something about the quality of my stock.

0:27:570:28:00

Well, it's a bit late to be worrying about that, Charlie old boy, because Paul is about to realise

0:28:000:28:06

his international sales strategy by targeting this Dutch couple with his silver-plated teapot.

0:28:060:28:11

That's really nice, lovely condition.

0:28:110:28:14

-I only ever buy things which are in really nice condition.

-Yeah.

0:28:140:28:17

And that dates maybe 1910, 1920?

0:28:170:28:21

-That is so neat.

-Yes, we buy it.

-It's a bargain. Thank you very much.

0:28:210:28:24

-How do you say thank you in Holland?

-Dank u wel.

0:28:240:28:28

It looks like Paul has pinched his rival's charm, and our Charlie is struggling to get a bite.

0:28:280:28:34

Can I tempt you to anything on my stall?

0:28:340:28:37

Any of the ladies? Come round my stall and have a look.

0:28:370:28:40

If you don't look, you can't spend anything.

0:28:400:28:42

But a man of Charlie's character never gives up, and he finally gets some interest in his scent bottle.

0:28:420:28:49

It looks so typically Art Deco.

0:28:490:28:51

-For five quid, it's neither here nor there.

-I'll have it.

-Well done.

0:28:510:28:55

His orange toilet jug and bowl are up next.

0:28:550:28:58

10 quid, if you want it.

0:28:580:29:00

-Can I have the lot?

-You certainly can.

0:29:000:29:02

I've just offered it to a lady and a gentleman.

0:29:020:29:05

It's Edwardian, I should think it's 1910.

0:29:050:29:09

-Done.

-Done. 10 quid, sold to the lady in the corner.

0:29:090:29:13

£10, keep them coming, Charlie, strike while the interest is there!

0:29:130:29:17

-How much do you want for the whole lot?

-Oh, my goodness me.

0:29:170:29:20

I'll take £40 for the lot.

0:29:200:29:24

-OK.

-Well done. Thank you, my dear.

0:29:240:29:27

Now, things are really spicing up.

0:29:270:29:29

Paul is lining up another sale.

0:29:290:29:31

-Isn't that lovely?

-I'll give you £40 for it.

0:29:310:29:34

Come on, I like a good deal.

0:29:340:29:37

I like a deal, but I don't like being hit hard in the stomach, and winded.

0:29:380:29:43

-Lovely.

-Can't do 45.

0:29:430:29:45

45? £42.50.

0:29:450:29:49

All right, shall we have that for £42.50?

0:29:490:29:52

The buyers love our blue-eyed boy, but Charlie's back on top selling form,

0:29:520:29:58

charming some interest in his table from these ladies, all the way from the US of A.

0:29:580:30:02

-I would sell it to you for 100 quid, special offer.

-It's nice. I like it.

0:30:020:30:07

I mean, it can't be expensive for that.

0:30:070:30:09

It's in jolly good order, it's definitely got age, it's not a repro or anything like that.

0:30:090:30:15

And it's got this super frieze to it.

0:30:150:30:18

It cost me £75, my dear.

0:30:180:30:20

Make it 25 quid.

0:30:200:30:22

IN AMERICAN ACCENT: I love you the way you say "25 quid"!

0:30:220:30:26

Oh, Charlie, you say all the right things, you old charmer!

0:30:260:30:31

-Done.

-Madam, mwah! Here's to Georgia.

0:30:310:30:35

-You'll have to come and see us.

-I would love to.

-We've got a lovely antique shop.

0:30:350:30:39

-There's a lovely song, Georgia On My Mind.

-Yes, that's right.

0:30:390:30:43

Ah, it seems these Georgia ladies just can't get enough.

0:30:430:30:46

# Georgia, Georgia... #

0:30:460:30:53

-I love the chimney.

-You can have it for 35 quid.

0:30:550:30:58

It would look great with plants in it.

0:30:580:31:00

How about 30?

0:31:000:31:02

-30, sold.

-All right, we'll have that, too.

0:31:020:31:05

Good, that's the way to do business.

0:31:050:31:07

Charlie Ross, ladies and gentlemen - charmer, heartbreaker, deal-doer.

0:31:070:31:12

Paul is furiously trying to line up a sale of his own.

0:31:150:31:18

I'll do them for 40 quid the pair,

0:31:200:31:22

-and that's a fiver - how does that sound?

-It's a deal.

0:31:220:31:25

-OK.

-Sounds good to me. I think they're wonderful,

0:31:250:31:27

I've never seen anything like them. I wish you all the best.

0:31:270:31:31

£45 to Paul, but Charlie is matching him every step of the way.

0:31:310:31:35

He's just sold his Victorian walnut-framed mirror for £90.

0:31:350:31:39

No, that's fine. OK, thank you very much indeed, bye-bye.

0:31:390:31:44

Onwards and upwards.

0:31:440:31:46

And I have got...

0:31:460:31:48

le veritable stack of cash here.

0:31:480:31:52

But I still haven't broken even.

0:31:520:31:54

More sales needed.

0:31:540:31:56

That's the spirit, Charlie!

0:31:560:31:58

This showdown is turning into a titanic tussle.

0:31:580:32:02

The man from Morecambe came hurtling off the blocks.

0:32:020:32:04

So far he's sold 10 items, and he's made £225.50.

0:32:040:32:09

But he's got another £313.50 to make before he breaks into profit.

0:32:090:32:15

With steely determination,

0:32:150:32:17

the Charmer has been making up for a desperately slow start.

0:32:170:32:20

He's sold 14 items and made £369.

0:32:200:32:24

So he's got to make another £364.45 before he breaks into profit.

0:32:240:32:30

Our brave boys know they need to pull out all the stops,

0:32:330:32:36

as they enter the final phase of this epic challenge, and the Charmer is making his presence felt.

0:32:360:32:42

Roll up, roll up, roll up for Roscoe's snips.

0:32:420:32:45

I thought that might work. But actually it probably drives people away.

0:32:450:32:51

Well, Charlie's certainly doing something right, because he's lined up the sale of his silver elephant.

0:32:510:32:57

-140 quid, sir?

-Yeah, that's fine.

0:32:570:32:59

There we go, you have my elephant, I'll have your money.

0:32:590:33:02

Well, again, it's a tiny profit, but it's such a lovely thing,

0:33:050:33:08

and I'm losing the confidence in things at this time of day.

0:33:080:33:12

Oh, stay strong, Charlie - believe, and the buyers will come.

0:33:120:33:17

-Right, chaps, we've got that, that and that.

-Yep.

0:33:170:33:21

-And those.

-Yep.

0:33:210:33:23

-40 quid the whole lot, because that's all you've got, isn't it?

-It is!

0:33:230:33:27

THEY LAUGH

0:33:270:33:29

I think you've cemented me into a substantial loss there.

0:33:290:33:33

But you've been my best customer today.

0:33:330:33:35

Yes, good work, Charlie, eight pieces sold for £40.

0:33:350:33:39

Watch out, Mr Morecambe.

0:33:390:33:41

Sometimes you have to think outside the box.

0:33:410:33:44

I've got a bit of a lull in traffic at the minute,

0:33:440:33:46

so I'm going to take my lovely silver cruet and my pistol-grip silver handles

0:33:460:33:51

and see if I can sell them on the move.

0:33:510:33:53

Do you want to come?

0:33:530:33:55

Oh, we surely do, Paul, go for it.

0:33:550:33:57

-How are you doing? Good to see you.

-Thank you very much.

0:33:570:34:00

Are they the sort of thing that you'd be interested in?

0:34:000:34:03

-Erm, it depends on the money.

-Well, about 110 for the lot.

0:34:030:34:06

-No, thank you.

-Not even for these?

0:34:060:34:08

No, thank you.

0:34:080:34:09

Paul's got his work cut out here - this dealer is only interested in this set of knives.

0:34:090:34:14

I'll buy them off you for £30.

0:34:140:34:16

£30... That's a fiver a handle, isn't it? Can't you go 35?

0:34:160:34:19

-If they were silver-plated, I would give you a bit more.

-32, then?

0:34:190:34:23

-All right.

-Good man.

0:34:230:34:26

£32 is a loss for Paul of £5.

0:34:260:34:30

And Paul's not the only one who's abandoning his stall in the hunt for profit.

0:34:300:34:35

There's a gentleman along here who had been looking at this, wanting to know a bit more about it.

0:34:350:34:41

And frankly, if he's not coming to me, I will go to him.

0:34:410:34:45

I've got to the stage of this time of day, where I've got to start getting rid of everything.

0:34:450:34:50

-I'm nearly sold out, I've got a couple of things left.

-You've done very well, haven't you?

0:34:500:34:54

I have. I'll sell it to you for 90 quid if you want.

0:34:540:34:57

I'd rather give you 75 for it.

0:34:570:34:59

-That's what I paid.

-Is it?

-Give me a tenner on it, give me 85 quid.

-OK.

0:34:590:35:03

Well done, Charlie, a £10 profit could make all the difference.

0:35:030:35:08

Paul is back on the move, and this time it's his tantalus that he wants to offload.

0:35:080:35:12

Now, this morning, your good lady wife was looking at this tantalus.

0:35:120:35:17

One of the bottles is damaged, but it's not worth anything to you as a frame or...?

0:35:170:35:22

Not for me, but thank you for the offer.

0:35:220:35:24

-Not even at a fabulous price?

-It would have to be so fabulous that you'd have to be paying me.

0:35:240:35:29

That dealer might not be interested in the tantalus, but someone else is,

0:35:290:35:33

and a mystery lady snapped it up out of Paul's hands for £20 before disappearing into the crowd.

0:35:330:35:40

There we go, a lady has just given me £20. See what's happened there?

0:35:400:35:44

I wandered over to the stall, asked the gentleman for £20, the lady overheard and came over,

0:35:440:35:49

she's a bit shy, she's given me £20. Thank you very much!

0:35:490:35:52

Next, our Morecambe boy gets some interest in some pieces from his blue-and-white tea set.

0:35:520:35:58

20 quid. Lovely, thank you very much. Have a look at the other bits, while you get your money ready.

0:35:580:36:05

Ah, clever. Paul uses the old dealer's tactic of leaving your buyer to ponder your pieces.

0:36:050:36:11

-Two saucers...

-Two saucers...

0:36:110:36:15

The breakfast cup...

0:36:150:36:17

And it's paid off, as Paul nets £30.

0:36:170:36:19

Is that all right with you? Smashing, thank you.

0:36:190:36:22

With the market starting to wind down, Charlie is desperate to offload his last remaining pieces.

0:36:220:36:28

Well, here it is. If I'd said at the beginning of the day,

0:36:280:36:32

"What are the last two things I'll have left in the world?",

0:36:320:36:35

it would be that damn wall bracket thing, which I'm frankly going to put in a bin, and my menus.

0:36:350:36:41

There's always something you regret.

0:36:410:36:43

And of course, my costume jewellery.

0:36:430:36:45

But, at a pound an hour, in another three weeks, I'd have sold the lot, so it's not too bad.

0:36:450:36:50

I'm going to go walk about with these three things, and then I'm nearly there.

0:36:500:36:55

And it's not long before he finds a buyer for his chain...

0:36:550:36:58

-I'll give you £8 for it, I've got to leave myself something.

-Eight quid. Sold.

-OK, done.

0:36:580:37:02

To the man in the corner.

0:37:020:37:04

And then a buyer for his lamp base...

0:37:040:37:07

35 quid, yours for 20 quid, now.

0:37:070:37:10

20, come on.

0:37:100:37:13

20 quid.

0:37:130:37:15

Yeah! 20 quid's all right.

0:37:150:37:17

He's getting there, but Paul is hot on his heels, and he's found another

0:37:170:37:21

pair of international buyers, this time from Oz.

0:37:210:37:24

What happened to all the sunshine?

0:37:240:37:26

I think you must have kept it in Australia.

0:37:260:37:28

How about 65 quid and the cake stand?

0:37:280:37:31

That is an absolute bargain.

0:37:310:37:32

-Actually, yeah, OK.

-Fantastic.

0:37:320:37:36

I'll tell you what, come into my office, and I'll find you some paper.

0:37:360:37:39

That's another £65 to Mr Hayes for his cake stand and cruet sets.

0:37:390:37:45

All the best now. Thank you. Don't get too wet now.

0:37:450:37:48

As this market hurtles towards its conclusion, our boys are now focused on offloading whatever they can.

0:37:480:37:55

Paul sells his Indian tree-design pot.

0:37:550:37:58

-I can do you that for 15.

-Take a tenner?

0:37:580:38:01

Well, there's a saying, one bid is worth a thousand lookers-on.

0:38:010:38:05

Charlie has sold his wooden wall shelf for just £2, and he's got some interest in his Clarice Cliff jug.

0:38:050:38:12

Hiya, do you want to take 15 for that?

0:38:120:38:14

-Do I want to take 15 for it?

-Yeah.

0:38:140:38:17

It cost 35 quid.

0:38:170:38:19

I'll have it for 15.

0:38:190:38:21

It's 1:50pm, everybody's going home.

0:38:210:38:24

-15, then?

-Sold, sir.

0:38:240:38:26

Cheered by his success, Charlie goes on to sell his costume jewellery for £20.

0:38:260:38:31

You've been my absolute godsend today, my dear.

0:38:320:38:36

-Godsend!

-You have.

-Don't know about that.

-£20.

0:38:360:38:39

And he homes in on a buyer for his menus and programmes.

0:38:390:38:43

Thank you very much, my dear. Bye-bye.

0:38:430:38:46

Well, there we are. We have finished two solid days' work

0:38:460:38:51

with taking a pound, but I've got nothing left to sell.

0:38:510:38:55

Well done, the Charmer.

0:38:550:38:56

Your opponent will surely be delighted.

0:38:560:39:00

-I've got nothing left. I've sold the lot.

-You've got nothing? Nothing?!

0:39:000:39:04

But I've got one problem. Go on.

0:39:040:39:06

I've got so much money in my back pocket, walking is incredibly difficult.

0:39:060:39:11

Don't feel guilty for me now, will you?

0:39:110:39:13

Oh, dear.

0:39:130:39:15

With the market emptying around him, Paul is sitting in the last-chance saloon.

0:39:150:39:20

# All by myself

0:39:200:39:27

# Don't want to be all by myself... #

0:39:270:39:33

Ah, but perhaps all is not lost.

0:39:330:39:36

I'll make it a tenner, and I'll throw you in two cups to go with it, just for you two.

0:39:360:39:41

-With the saucers?

-What you've got is a ready-made coffee set. Shall we shake on that?

0:39:410:39:45

-Goodbye.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:39:450:39:47

I'm delighted with my performance today.

0:39:470:39:51

Most of all, I've proved that I can still do it, my strategy has worked to a tee,

0:39:510:39:55

I've sold loads and loads of items,

0:39:550:39:57

I made a good profit, and hopefully I've beaten that Charlie Ross.

0:39:570:40:01

Well, it has been a steep learning curve.

0:40:010:40:04

The buying was hard, the selling of course started really easily and got harder and harder as the day went on,

0:40:040:40:10

and I took some losses at the end.

0:40:100:40:12

But I've made an overall profit, and I've got nothing to take home with me, except a load of cash.

0:40:120:40:18

And with that, it's time to tot up the totals and find out exactly how much our dynamic duo have made.

0:40:180:40:25

The man from Morecambe spent £539 on 21 purchases.

0:40:280:40:33

While Charlie forked out just over £733,

0:40:340:40:38

buying 16 items and two job lots.

0:40:380:40:41

So, at last, it's time to reveal just how much profit our boys have made in today's showdown.

0:40:410:40:48

It's over! It's all over!

0:40:480:40:51

-Have you recovered?

-Only just!

0:40:510:40:52

Do you know what? Over the course of the day, I ended up selling things for a little bit of a loss.

0:40:520:40:57

A LITTLE bit of a loss?! I went running round the fair, selling things to anybody!

0:40:570:41:02

Yeah, but you sold the whole lot.

0:41:020:41:03

At any price I did, but my final coup de grace was selling something for a pound that had cost 18.

0:41:030:41:08

-OK, so, this could be quite close, then?

-It wasn't all roses.

0:41:080:41:12

All right, shall we see how we got on?

0:41:120:41:14

-Yeah, go on, count it down.

-Three, two, one...

0:41:140:41:18

You swine!

0:41:200:41:22

So, it's victory for Charlie today.

0:41:220:41:25

Over a week of challenges, our boys have been battling against each other in the quest for profit.

0:41:250:41:32

It's now time to find out who is this week's overall champion.

0:41:320:41:34

-Go on, count it down again.

-Three, two, one...

0:41:340:41:38

Oh! Well done! That's amazing.

0:41:400:41:42

-Mr Morecambe, how close is that?

-Congratulations, mate, that's fantastic.

-Absolutely amazing.

0:41:420:41:48

And our charities have done pretty well.

0:41:480:41:50

Brilliant. Well done, mate.

0:41:500:41:52

Put it here.

0:41:520:41:53

-You're a good man.

-So are you, Charlie. Can you give me any tips?

0:41:530:41:57

So, it's an overall victory for the Charmer.

0:41:570:42:00

Both our boys have made good profits, and every penny they've made

0:42:000:42:04

will be going to their chosen charities.

0:42:040:42:07

I've managed over the entire week to make almost £900 for the Derian House Children's Hospice.

0:42:070:42:12

I'm delighted with that, and they're the real winners.

0:42:120:42:15

My charity, the National Society For Epilepsy, and I'm going to be giving them well over £1,000.

0:42:150:42:21

And who knows, with a little more help and tuition

0:42:210:42:25

from my good friend Mr Morecambe, one day I might just make a dealer.

0:42:250:42:30

Well, after a week of no-holds-barred combat,

0:42:310:42:35

both our experts have put their money where their mouths are,

0:42:350:42:39

and proved that they've got what it takes to make a profit from antiques,

0:42:390:42:42

when their own money is on the line.

0:42:420:42:44

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:050:43:08

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:080:43:11

Two well-known experts from the world of antiques go head-to-head over a week of challenges to find out who can make the most profit buying and selling collectables, all of which will be donated to a charity of their choice. Our dealers are in a different buying location each day: an auction house, a car boot sale, a foreign antiques market and a UK antiques fair; they then sell their purchases for as much profit as possible. On Friday, the duelling experts compete to make the most profit in the ultimate dealers' showdown - a 48-hour buying and selling challenge. Once the deals are done, one expert will be crowned the Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is overall weekly champion.

Push comes to shove in this lively 48-hour face-off between antiques experts Paul Hayes and Charlie Ross when they go head-to-head at a Nottinghamshire antiques fair to discover who can make the most profit from running an antiques stall.