Charlie Ross vs Paul Hayes: UK Antiques Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


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Charlie Ross vs Paul Hayes: UK Antiques

Antiques challenge where experts go head-to-head. Paul Hayes and Charlie Ross look to score the best bargains and make the most profit at a Lincolnshire antiques fair.


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This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is,

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the show that pitches TV's best loved antiques experts against each other

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in an all-out battle for profit and gives you the inside view on the secrets of the trade.

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Coming up, our experts show you how tenacity wins through in the end.

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65 quid and that's yours.

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-I'll give you 60 quid.

-Done.

-Yeah!

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They reveal the secrets to successful selling.

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Number one, try and find someone directly related to the item you're buying.

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And how one phone call can make all the difference.

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It's just now to see whether I've made a profit on it.

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MOBILE PHONE RINGS And here we go!

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Today's epic clash of the dealers

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sees 'The Man From Morecambe', Paul Hayes,

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take on Charlie 'The Charmer' Ross to see who can make

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the biggest profit from buying and selling antiques.

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It's the beaming blue-eyed boy from the North...

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I don't want to blow my own trumpet, though!

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..versus that wily old smoothie from Oxfordshire.

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Oh, yeah, you're always saying to the young ladies!

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Both are risking their reputations and their hard earned cash

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in a contest that will test their dealing know-how to the absolute limit.

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Today's dealers have up to £750 of their own money to spend.

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Their mission, over a week of challenges, to make the most profit, which will go to charity.

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Their battleground is a massive antiques sale on a disused airfield in Lincolnshire.

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Now, The Man From Morecambe has done business here before,

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but seasoned auctioneer Charlie is a Swinderby first-timer.

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But it's the one who bags the most profitable bargains who will come out on top.

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Charlie Ross and Paul Hayes, it's time to Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

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-It's so beautifully quiet here, so rural.

-The green, green grass of home, Charlie.

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Lincolnshire. Lovely, isn't it?

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-Well, do you know what Lincolnshire is famous for?

-What?

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Some of the biggest antiques fairs in the country. Look at this place!

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-Good Lord!

-I cannot wait to make a start here.

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What's your strategy, mate?

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Well, I can see furniture here.

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I can see a lot of heavy brown stuff, yes.

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-That's my strategy for today, buy furniture.

-Knock yourself out, mate.

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-I pretend to know something about furniture.

-Well, do you know what?

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I actually have stood this very antique fair myself.

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-I slept in the van for a couple of days, I know exactly what these guys are going through.

-Yeah?

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So my strategy is to have a good old chat to them

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and try and find some bargains that they're willing to knock out at a fraction of the original cost.

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-How much money have you got?

-£750. How much have you got?

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-So have I.

-All right.

-See you later.

-Good luck.

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This old airfield is a veritable antiques treasure chest just waiting

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for our duelling duo to pour over, ponder and plunder it for profit.

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But with temptations at every turn, will they stick to their strategies?

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Who will buy the best booty?

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With £750, it means I can't buy that many items if they're

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the sort of items I would like, but there's enough of it for me to get my teeth into today.

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The only thing is, I'm not really used to these fairs.

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Old Hayes, well, he's an old master at these fairs.

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He is indeed, Charlie. The Man From Morecambe has camped out here before

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in his lifelong quest for profit and today he's bursting with confidence.

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So, here we are, back on home turf!

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I love this antique fair. It's fantastic. What a great invention!

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Somebody has got an empty runway here, filled it full of stallholders and it's a great, exciting day out.

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And there is literally something here for everybody.

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There's all this heavy brown stuff, but there's lots and lots of interesting items as well.

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The Charmer is moving at speed, buying up potentially profitable furniture at a rate of knots.

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Victorian stool...

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in walnut.

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Good, generous cabriole legs.

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Always turn up a piece of furniture like this, have a look at the bottom,

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see how much of it is original, see if anything's been replaced.

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It's got the original brackets here and, really, this is about as original as a stool could be.

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We'll see if the price is as good as a price we'll get. Oh, crumbs!

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It's £400, which is £100 a leg.

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I think for me to buy and try and make a profit out of, it's going to have to go back on the floor.

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-Nice thing, though.

-No time for boggling at the shock horror prices, Charlie.

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You need to keep moving on.

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Your rival is hot on the scent of his first bargain, and he's going for jewellery.

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Now, I've spotted one little thing here. This is a shell cameo.

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Now, it's been mounted horribly.

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That is actually really good quality, so I'm going to ask the lady how much that is.

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A tenner. That's her best?

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-Yeah, she's told you her best on it, yeah.

-OK. Well, do you know what?

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I think I'm going to buy that, because I suspect

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that this actually is...

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..a genuine cameo. And the way the cameo would work, this is a shell

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which has multicolours obviously running through it as the shell grows, and then the carver,

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or the craftsman, would actually carve through this particular design

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revealing this colour underneath. So what you get is this wonderful contrast in colour.

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It looks almost like a sunset with the beige sort of background.

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And that to me does looks like a genuine item.

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I don't think that is a plastic one, and I think what's happened is that it's been remounted at some point.

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So, I think for £10 I'm going to remove this mount and start again.

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-Yeah, I'm going to have that, I think.

-As it is an antique, Paul's shell brooch is not subject

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to any legislation, so does not need certification, and, smooth as you like, Paul has lift off!

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But behind him down the runway, The Charmer can only follow in his slipstream.

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May I have a look at your letter opener?

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-Thank you.

-Well, that's not furniture, though, is it, Charlie? What is it again?

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-A little letter opener.

-Oh!

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Thank you.

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Isn't that sweet?

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It's got a very ornate silver handle.

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I can see the hallmark.

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It's Birmingham. It doesn't have a Victoria head on it.

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I suspect it may be just into the Edwardian period.

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Having said that, it is very ornate and looks very Victorian.

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And the other part of it I particularly love

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is the mother of pearl blade, frankly, in perfect condition.

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Would £40 by it for cash?

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No. 50 would.

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-50 would. Would 45 do it?

-48.

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-I love your speed of delivery!

-It has to be done.

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-45 no good?

-Go on, then.

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-You're robbing me.

-Oh, no, no, no!

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That is fabulous. I think it's, you know, it's enough money, but it's

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as good a condition as I've ever seen anything like that in.

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So now The Charmer is flying high, too,

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even though his original gameplan has been jettisoned in the process.

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I've slipped away from the strategy just a little bit, but I'm allowed.

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If I see something that isn't furniture with a profit in it, frankly, I've got to buy it.

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Yes, profit's the name of this game and, with one buy apiece, this dealer dogfight is in full swing.

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The Man From Morecambe swoops on a piece of pre-war pottery.

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Do you know what? This is exactly what I'm looking for here.

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This is one of the most iconic designs of the 1930s.

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It's a lady called Charlotte Rhead. And if have you have a look at the

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back here, she worked for Crown Ducal, which is there, and that's her signature there, CH Rhead.

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And she developed a method of tube lining, which sounds very posh, but it's almost like icing a cake.

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And what would happen, she would actually draw the outline in very thick slip, in real pottery,

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do the outline of the design and then paint the interior,

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so what you end up with is almost a three dimensional effect.

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Now this fantastic design, this sort of blues,

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you get bright oranges, very Byzantine and Persian sort of designs.

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Her inspiration actually were from Persian carpets and that sort of thing.

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The only snag is, as the lady said, she brought it perfect,

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but this has a little bit of a chip and I'm wondering...

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She's asked me £30 for the plate, that isn't obviously the end deal yet, we'll come to that in a minute,

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but if I can get this a little bit cheaper it might actually be worth paying £20 or £30,

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or a little bit more, to have that restored and then we have a plate maybe at 100 or 120 quid.

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So there's a margin for profit here, actually.

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So the secret is to try and buy perfect,

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but if you can't buy perfect, buy the best you can, and she really is one of the best designers.

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Paul gets the chipped plate for £25, but only time will tell whether

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restoring it will net him the profit he's hoping for.

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Furniture is slipping ever further off The Charmer's radar.

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I'm not certain,

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but I think this is what's called a pantograph.

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It's called a what?

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Pantograph.

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It's a...

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drawing instrument, brass,

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stamped with a London maker, in its, by the look of it, original box.

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And I think it's for copying a plan on to another piece of parchment or paper.

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And old architectural instruments are highly collectable, especially if they're good quality.

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You want to look for a London maker and brass as opposed to any other alloy.

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So you've got most of the ingredients there.

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-It's a nice thing. Would £150 cash by it?

-It wouldn't, I'm afraid, no.

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Would it not? It would get pretty close, wouldn't it?

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I think the best on it would be 225.

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200 cash, sir.

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Cash! Real crispy notes!

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I've gone from 150. Well, that's actually meeting you halfway, isn't it, really?

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-Go on.

-200 cash, I'll have a deal with you.

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I wonder if there's a profit in it.

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Too late to find out!

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£200 for a pantograph?!

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Well, Charlie, you're the expert.

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The Charmer is offloading some serious cash,

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and now he's got another off-strategy buy in his sights.

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Ah ha! There are a set of four very ornate dishes, which I love.

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Let's see if I can do a little deal, so run away with the camera and I'll come back to you later.

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The blue-eyed boy is blissfully unaware of Charlie's drastic change in strategy.

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This is the sort of thing I'm sure Charlie will be looking at.

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Isn't that beautiful? It's called a Wellington chest and it was named

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after the Duke of Wellington who carried one on his campaign.

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And the idea was that with these little side pieces here you can lock

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the drawers so that you know exactly who has been in and out of them.

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But in here you'd have your private papers.

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But I do love the fact that it has this drop front. I'm going to ask him the price.

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-Hello, sir.

-Hello.

-How much is this fella?

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The Wellington with the secretaries, 1,500.

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£1,500. There we are.

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Well, at these prices it's no wonder The Charmer's not buying furniture,

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but he has netted his dishes.

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-How much, Charlie?

-£220 for a set of four solid silver bon-bon dishes.

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Originally cased, but only half cased now.

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But they're good and I like them.

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Wow! Charlie's blown over half his budget on his last two buys alone,

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whilst Paul's push for profit has taken a patriotic turn.

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Now then, this is exactly the sort of thing I'm looking for.

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This is commemorative ware. These are very, very collectable items.

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This is to do with the Royal family and this one is the Duchess of York, so that's Fergie and Andy,

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that's their wedding in 1986 and it's a limited edition of 510.

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I quite like that, actually. Good, good quality.

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It's made by Wedgwood. Hello, sir.

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How much is your mug?

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-35.

-£35. Can I make you an offer? I do like it.

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There is actually another one somewhere.

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Well, they're not that rare, then, you've got another one here!

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Oh, it's there. So how much is the pair?

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What's that one? That's 541.

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-541 of 1,000.

-1,000, yeah.

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There's only 2,000 in the world.

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Can you see anywhere near £20, or is that being too cheeky?

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No. 25 each I could do, that's all.

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25 each. That's 50 quid for the pair, actually.

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-Can you see 40 the pair? I'll take them off you.

-Yeah, go on, then.

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Is that all right with you? All right, OK.

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Good work, Paul. All you need to do now is find a right raving royalist

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and you're limited edition mugs could turn a nice little profit.

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The Charmer is homing in on a limited edition piece of a very different kind,

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a commemorative rudder priced up at £120.

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I'm fascinated by rowing history, Oxford, Cambridge.

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This is something to do with Cambridge.

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Not Cambridge University, I'll warrant.

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Old Cantabrigians 1st School Boat.

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What I would really like to do is buy this lot if I can,

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and see if we could find old Barker or Shadbolt or Hawkes and see if one of them would like to buy it.

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-Hello.

-Hi. Charlie is the name.

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-Hiya. How do you do?

-I'm intrigued by this.

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-Do you know anything about it at all?

-No. No, I've just bought it.

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Can you take 50 quid for it?

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-No.

-You can't?

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No, the very best price on that would be £100.

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Really?

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-Could you do it for 80 for me?

-No, honestly, I can't.

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-You can't.

-It's got to be £100.

-It's got to be £100.

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Yeah. If you can't sell it I'll buy it back off you.

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What about that! Did you hear that?

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-How can I possibly not buy it with a money back guarantee? You're a gentleman, sir.

-OK.

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It's Charlie's fourth buy of the day and the great hope of the South

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is feeling confident as he bumps into the champion of the North.

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So, have you stuck to your strategy, stuck to your guns?

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-What do you think?

-I don't know, actually.

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I can't see you lifting any big lumps of furniture.

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The fact is, I have spent some money. Have I bought any furniture?

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Not a bit.

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And you were so keen, as well! Come on.

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-Oh, dear.

-Let's keep looking, eh? There's lots of heavy stuff here.

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There are plenty of things round the corner, there. I like it here.

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So, in the great battle of Swinderby who is flying high and who is flying by the seat of his pants?

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Charlie and Paul started with a budget of up to £750 of their own money.

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Charlie's four buys have cost him an extravagant £565,

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leaving him £185 in his kitty.

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Paul has made three buys so far, spending just £75,

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and he's got a healthy £675

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still to spend.

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But there's plenty of profit hunting

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left in our boys yet.

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Time is ticking on and The Charmer still craves the profit potential of a great big hunk of furniture,

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but everything he's seen is beyond his budget and now he's spent most of his cash on other items.

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I'm determined to buy one piece of furniture,

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but I've only got £185 left.

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That is a bit of a problem.

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What sort of furniture am I going to find that I like for less than £185?

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I'll be very lucky.

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Opponent Paul is now under pressure.

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He's spent only a tenth of his £750 budget and he's weighing up the profit in everything he sees.

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Next on his radar is a stained glass window.

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Now, this is a genuine item from the 19th century and the way you can tell

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is that they will make the whole design from one piece of coloured glass, so it's all done by machine,

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and then they would actually add the lead afterwards to give it that three-dimensional effect.

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The real McCoy uses individual pieces of glass to build up the entire picture.

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What you've got to watch is to make sure that nothing's been cracked or damaged. I really like it.

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It's not, like, damaged in any way is it, or anything?

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Oh, a little bit here, look.

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Have you translated it?

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Do you know anything about who it is?

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-Nothing at all. You just bought it blind.

-I can't speak Welsh.

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-Is it Welsh?

-Yeah.

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It looks more Latin, doesn't it? It says here Henry David Tudor.

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Oh, yeah, Henry David Tudor, there we are, MBE.

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Well, I like it. Can you see 150 in it?

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-That's realistic how I see it.

-No. I can't do it.

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-You really can't.

-No, 230.

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230. Isn't that an appointment with a dentist, tooth hurty?

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Oh, Paul!

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-180 and I'll take it away before it gets broken.

-No. There's the profit.

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200 quid, that's the death.

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Is that the absolute death?

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200 quid.

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-£200.

-It's a good looker for 200 quid.

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Do you know what? I think I'm going to shake your hand on that, all right?

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Paul splashes out a mighty spend at last.

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He gets a whopping 15% off the original asking price

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and adds a stained glass Welshman to his treasure chest.

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There's furniture galore at this place.

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Hefty sideboards, wall cabinets, grandfather clocks, more wooden chests than a pirate ship,

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so guess what stops The Charmer in his tracks?

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A Victorian cast iron pub table, but it's been coated with so much

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black paint we've lost a lot of the definition here.

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These rosettes are much crisper than they would appear behind the black paint.

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Britannia is much crisper and you can probably just about see

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the Union Jack here.

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If you really wanted to be ultra pedantic about this,

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you could take all the paint off, repaint the Union Jack with the colours.

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I think that would be a little flash.

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I can't see any reason why you couldn't get 120, 150,

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in which case it needs to be bought for...80.

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-The death on it is 95.

-The death on it is 95.

0:17:480:17:51

If I crept up to 90 could we do that?

0:17:510:17:54

-Would you do that for me?

-Yes, that will do.

-You're an angel.

0:17:540:17:57

Send out the Red Arrows, The Charmer has at last brought something with legs on!

0:17:570:18:03

I've done it. I have bought a piece of furniture.

0:18:030:18:07

Well, garden furniture. Conservatory furniture.

0:18:070:18:11

But furniture nevertheless!

0:18:110:18:13

It hasn't got much wood in it.

0:18:130:18:15

I said I'd be buying wood, wood, and I've bought a lump of iron!

0:18:150:18:20

Now, Paul has got some serious catching up to do.

0:18:220:18:25

He still has just under £500 burning a hole in his pocket

0:18:250:18:29

and our North Country boy is calling in all his local knowledge

0:18:290:18:32

to root out last minute bargains before the traders pack up.

0:18:320:18:36

Good to see you. How are you doing, mate? Are you all right?

0:18:380:18:41

Hello, mate. How are you doing? How do, mate, all right?

0:18:410:18:45

-I'm all right.

-Good lad. That's what you find.

0:18:450:18:47

You see a lot of old friends that you haven't seen for a long time. Hello, are you all right?

0:18:470:18:51

-Well, you've been in my house enough times.

-Nice to see you, mate.

0:18:510:18:54

-Anything antique on here, that's what I'm looking for.

-Me!

0:18:540:18:57

-And what an exotic bargain our boy lays his hands on.

-Do you know what?

0:19:020:19:06

I took a complete gamble there.

0:19:060:19:08

Sometimes you have to trust your instincts. I've never seen one on the market before.

0:19:080:19:12

It's obviously an Indian sitar, very popular in the 1960s.

0:19:120:19:15

You know, George Harrison, that sort of thing. What's it worth? I don't know.

0:19:150:19:19

It's a bit damaged, but as a decorative piece, for 25 quid, it must be worth that!

0:19:190:19:23

I bet you haven't bought one of these today, Charlie?

0:19:230:19:25

Now, wouldn't it be extraordinary if... No, no, he hasn't.

0:19:250:19:29

But, late in the day, The Charmer might have just had a real stroke of luck. He's bumped into an old chum.

0:19:290:19:36

Mickey Smith! Cor blimey.

0:19:360:19:38

-Well, trawl my memory!

-Yeah.

0:19:380:19:40

-Are you just packing up?

-Yeah.

0:19:400:19:42

In one fell swoop, Charlie grabs an Edwardian tray for £60

0:19:420:19:47

and trumps his rival's local connections whilst he's at it.

0:19:470:19:51

So, Mr Hayes, you are not the only person here that knows everybody.

0:19:510:19:57

I know one or two people and...

0:19:570:20:00

they've done me a bargain.

0:20:000:20:03

A real snip for 60 quid.

0:20:030:20:06

I think there's a substantial profit in it.

0:20:060:20:09

And now the final dash in this dealing ding dong is underway.

0:20:110:20:15

At this stage, anything that smells a profit is fair game for whoever gets there first.

0:20:150:20:22

Art lover Paul lightens his wallet and broadens his portfolio and his he's very excited indeed

0:20:220:20:27

by this striking painting of a mother and child ice skating.

0:20:270:20:31

It starts off at £200.

0:20:310:20:33

I managed to get it for 170, which I think is a really good price.

0:20:330:20:37

What's it worth at the end? I don't know, but

0:20:370:20:39

it's perfect to put into an auction, or someone that deals in Russian paintings.

0:20:390:20:43

But it's a bit like skating on thin ice. Hopefully, I'll come out on top.

0:20:430:20:46

Time will tell if Paul's instinct will prove profitable.

0:20:460:20:50

The Charmer risks a modest £15 on his last buy of the day.

0:20:500:20:54

A copper tray. You can just about still see the Johnnie,

0:20:540:20:57

you can just about still see the Walker.

0:20:570:21:00

And The Man From Morecambe makes next one last ditch pitch for profit

0:21:000:21:05

when he pays £110 for this solid copper shield from, wait for it, the Plymouth Rock Chicken Club.

0:21:050:21:11

It's a challenge trophy, and I think I've set myself a challenge now.

0:21:110:21:16

I've got to find a chicken fancier with a penchant for Art Nouveau copper. Do you know anybody? No?

0:21:160:21:22

Either do I!

0:21:220:21:24

And with that, the great booty buying battle of Lincolnshire is over.

0:21:240:21:28

So, how much have each of our antiques aces spent?

0:21:280:21:32

Well, they started the day with £750 in their pockets.

0:21:320:21:37

Charlie shelled out an impressive £730 on his seven buys.

0:21:370:21:42

Paul also bought seven items and spent just £580, but it's

0:21:420:21:48

the profit that our duelling duo make that decides the victor.

0:21:480:21:52

Before they go their separate ways to sell,

0:21:520:21:55

Paul and Charlie take the chance to nose through each other's wares.

0:21:550:21:58

-Have you had a good day?

-I really enjoyed myself.

0:21:590:22:02

-I've seen lots of old friends and it's been a great day, yes.

-You bought a sitar! What did it cost?

0:22:020:22:07

That's for me to know, you to find out, Charlie, I think.

0:22:070:22:10

-You creep! You absolute creep!

-What's been your favourite?

0:22:100:22:12

You did buy a dreadful painting, didn't you?

0:22:120:22:15

If that was more than a fiver they saw you coming.

0:22:150:22:18

-It was.

-Was it really?

-Yes, they saw me coming.

0:22:180:22:20

-The frame's worth four quid.

-Thank you(!) That's nice of you.

0:22:200:22:23

-I was going to be very nice.

-Yeah?

0:22:230:22:25

-You've bought a lump of old brass in a box there.

-Yes, it's a pantograph.

-A what?

0:22:250:22:29

A pantograph. I said, "How much is this pantograph?" He said, "What?"

0:22:290:22:34

It's a 19th century, London-made, brass drawing instrument, but I paid a huge amount of money for it, so...

0:22:340:22:40

-Well...

-Well, all we've got to do is sell it.

0:22:400:22:42

That's right, mate, and good luck to you.

0:22:420:22:44

Now, Charlie and Paul must make as much profit as they possibly can

0:22:440:22:48

on the items they bought at today's antiques fair.

0:22:480:22:52

As well as his pantograph, Charlie must also sell...

0:22:520:22:56

a Victorian letter opener, four silver dishes,

0:22:560:23:00

an Edwardian kidney-shaped tray, this commemorative rudder,

0:23:000:23:05

a Victorian table and the brass advertising tray.

0:23:050:23:09

In addition to his sitar and painting, Paul must sell this cameo brooch,

0:23:090:23:16

a Charlotte Rhead plate, two limited edition royal wedding mugs,

0:23:160:23:19

a stained glass window and a copper plaque.

0:23:190:23:24

For our expert dealers Charlie and Paul, buying their items at

0:23:280:23:32

the antiques fair was just the start of today's epic challenge.

0:23:320:23:36

Now they must sell them for the best possible price

0:23:360:23:40

All the profit they make will be going to their chosen charities.

0:23:400:23:43

The Man From Morecambe is a second generation dealer and believes that

0:23:430:23:48

when it comes to selling you have to think long term.

0:23:480:23:52

So many people out there want to take the fastest profit without worrying

0:23:520:23:57

about the consequences, where I'm always in for the long game.

0:23:570:24:00

I will always try and look after my clients or someone who's buying something off me.

0:24:000:24:04

I want to feel I can go back there again some time in the future.

0:24:040:24:07

Yes, he's a man of honour, our Paul, but will his upfront and honest

0:24:070:24:11

reputation help him seal the deals he needs to win today's battle?

0:24:110:24:16

In Oxfordshire, the sweet scents of a summer morning fill the air.

0:24:160:24:21

Now, our boys will be putting together deals on the phone and by internet, but they both know

0:24:210:24:25

that until cash changes hands no deal is truly sealed.

0:24:250:24:31

Try and find someone directly related to the item you're buying,

0:24:310:24:37

so I'm thinking that Messrs Shadbolt, Hewett, Hawkes, etc,

0:24:370:24:41

are members of the old Cantabrigians Society, if there is such a thing.

0:24:410:24:45

So I'm simply going to go on to the internet here, type in

0:24:450:24:49

Old Cantabrigians and if nothing comes up, end of story, frankly!

0:24:490:24:54

Sounds like a corking plan, Charlie, and straightaway our man gets a lead.

0:24:540:24:58

Ah! There's a telephone number.

0:24:580:25:02

But the trail goes cold when no-one answers.

0:25:030:25:07

No, it's rung for so long it's rung off.

0:25:090:25:11

-But then, just as it seems all hope is lost...

-Oh, not Shadbolt.

0:25:150:25:20

Does the name ring a bell?

0:25:200:25:24

LAUGHS: So you know them all! Thank you so much. All the best. Thank you, goodbye.

0:25:240:25:28

How amazing was that? He actually knows most of the people on there.

0:25:310:25:36

I think Impey and Shadbolt have probably rowed their last race, but the others...

0:25:360:25:43

And I said which one would be most approachable.

0:25:430:25:45

"I think they would all be most approachable and I think they'd be fascinated

0:25:450:25:49

"to be contacted and I can't believe that one of them wouldn't love to have it on their wall".

0:25:490:25:54

Charlie's detective work gets him off to a very promising start,

0:25:540:25:59

but if the rudder is The Charmer's prime purchase,

0:25:590:26:02

then for The Man From Morecambe it's got to be his oil painting.

0:26:020:26:06

Because if this signature is legitimate, Paul's chances

0:26:060:26:10

of winning today's competition are looking very rosy indeed.

0:26:100:26:14

Why? Well, let's just say that so far the top price paid for an Alexei Jawlensky painting

0:26:140:26:19

stands at just over 18 million and even that mighty handsome rudder

0:26:190:26:25

of Charlie's won't match up to that!

0:26:250:26:28

Paul has hotfooted it down to London

0:26:280:26:30

where he's hoping a renowned art specialist can give him some answers.

0:26:300:26:36

Having had a quick chance to look at it, I wouldn't mind doing a bit

0:26:360:26:40

of closer analysis of it, partly the back always tells me something.

0:26:400:26:44

You're looking for signs that the painting hasn't been tampered with,

0:26:440:26:47

but this looks like it's been in here for quite a long time.

0:26:470:26:50

Back to the front of the painting, I'd like to have a look at this under ultraviolet light,

0:26:500:26:55

because that way I can see disturbances on the surface of the paint, where there's any over

0:26:550:27:01

painting, particularly in this area here, which, my hunch is that something has happened here.

0:27:010:27:05

-Right.

-We should have a closer look.

0:27:050:27:07

Do we need like a lab suits and...?

0:27:070:27:08

No, it's not as advanced as that! But, if you could close the doors,

0:27:080:27:12

I'll switch off the big lights and we can have a look at it under ultraviolet.

0:27:120:27:15

Great. Sounds fantastic.

0:27:150:27:17

The truth is out there about our blue-eyed boy's painting.

0:27:170:27:22

OK, Paul, one of the things I can see here, you can probably see it

0:27:220:27:26

as well, is just around the figure and the head you can see...

0:27:260:27:30

with the ultraviolet, there's been some extra work done

0:27:300:27:33

to cut in and redefine the positioning of the figure.

0:27:330:27:36

Not that that necessarily makes one suspicious,

0:27:360:27:39

but it shows there's been some additional work on the canvas and particularly around the hand.

0:27:390:27:44

The artist has not been happy with it and has just shaded in more

0:27:440:27:47

to try and get the right definitions and the shape.

0:27:470:27:50

But that could have been done originally?

0:27:500:27:52

It could well have been.

0:27:520:27:54

The crucial thing is the authenticity of that signature.

0:27:540:27:57

Going further down, my hunch is that there's been a previous signature

0:27:570:28:02

underneath the signature that's on it just now,

0:28:020:28:05

which would suggest that this may have been painted by another artist other than Jawlensky.

0:28:050:28:10

So, let's have a quick look at that area in daylight, as well.

0:28:100:28:14

OK, just to the left of the signature there seems to be the

0:28:140:28:16

shapes of other letters tucked in on top of the white paint there, which

0:28:160:28:22

suggests to me at least that this signature may have been tampered with. It's still a good thing.

0:28:220:28:27

-Great!

-But it's not in the multiples of tens of thousands of pounds.

0:28:270:28:32

Are there any issues with having the signature Jawlensky on it?

0:28:320:28:36

Can you legally sell that? How does it work?

0:28:360:28:38

Normally, when it's being catalogued

0:28:380:28:40

-I would describe it as "bearing the signature".

-OK.

0:28:400:28:44

That is the sort of caveat which says it may or may not be.

0:28:440:28:47

-It's pretty much saying it's not.

-Yes.

0:28:470:28:49

That being said, are you happy to handle it through the auction here?

0:28:490:28:53

Yes. It can be properly catalogued, so it won't fool anybody as to what it really is.

0:28:530:28:59

They will appraise it and, hopefully, bid for it accordingly.

0:28:590:29:02

Oh, poor old Paul! Unearthing a lost masterpiece would be an absolute dream come true for any dealer,

0:29:020:29:08

but the silver lining is that the auction house have agreed to put the painting into their next sale.

0:29:080:29:13

There's no time for tears, though, because one of Charlie's items

0:29:130:29:17

has attracted the interest of one of his best buyers.

0:29:170:29:20

-Charlie!

-Ah, ha ha!

-Hi, Charlie!

-How are you?

0:29:200:29:23

-'And, true to form, The Charmer is one popular fellow around these parts.'

-Come on through.

0:29:230:29:29

-Hello.

-This is my favourite bit. Hi.

0:29:290:29:33

Hello. This is wonderful!

0:29:330:29:38

Hello, Tilly!

0:29:380:29:39

Have you met Tilly before?

0:29:390:29:41

-How do you do?

-'With the whole room thoroughly charmed, Charlie has a bit of a confession to make.'

0:29:410:29:48

-You know I said it was a letter opener.

-Yes, exactly.

0:29:480:29:50

-I think it's a page turner.

-A page turner?

-Yeah.

0:29:500:29:53

It's rather better than I thought it was.

0:29:530:29:55

Isn't it the most wonderful quality?

0:29:550:29:57

I thought, "Well, I know a man that likes quality".

0:29:570:30:00

-Well, absolutely.

-Are you interested in buying it?

-No, I am, very.

-Yeah?

0:30:000:30:04

I really would be interested in buying that. How much do you think?

0:30:040:30:08

I'd like £85 for it.

0:30:080:30:10

-No, that's too little.

-Too little?!

-I think it's worth more than that.

0:30:100:30:14

Well, I won't ask any more.

0:30:140:30:17

Hold the horses! Isn't the buyer supposed to haggle the dealer down, not up?

0:30:170:30:22

Either way, Charlie records today's first sale and, having virtually

0:30:220:30:26

doubled his money on the page turner, he's off to a flying start.

0:30:260:30:30

And he quickly follows up

0:30:300:30:32

by selling his advertising tray to a local pub for £20.

0:30:320:30:36

Both our experts are desperate to maximise

0:30:360:30:39

the profit potential of every item they bought at the antiques fair.

0:30:390:30:43

Paul has sent his damaged sitar to a specialist dealer in Southall.

0:30:430:30:48

Step one is to get an expert's view on its value.

0:30:480:30:51

I know virtually nothing about sitars, I admit.

0:30:510:30:54

What exactly have I brought? Have I bought a Stradivarius?

0:30:540:30:57

Is it a long lost masterpiece like a violin?

0:30:570:31:00

It's just for learning purposes, or children could use.

0:31:000:31:02

-Right, like a beginner's violin.

-Yeah.

0:31:020:31:05

-A beginner's sitar.

-What's the condition like?

0:31:050:31:07

When I had a look at the sitar first, it's the pumpkin has been repaired before.

0:31:070:31:12

-So this is actually a pumpkin?

-This is a pumpkin.

0:31:120:31:15

It's been repaired before. You can see here someone's

0:31:150:31:17

tried repairing it themselves and not done really a good job.

0:31:170:31:21

So, can you give me sort of a ballpark figure? I mean, what would a beginner's sitar...

0:31:210:31:26

This one, when it was new, probably about £200, £250.

0:31:260:31:29

OK.

0:31:290:31:31

So, there you are. A nice guy, but some bad news there.

0:31:330:31:36

It's going to cost me £50 for that restoration. That bumps up my cost price to quite a lot.

0:31:360:31:41

I was hoping to get around the 200 mark for it, but I found out it maybe cost about that new.

0:31:410:31:47

So, there we are, a bit of thinking to do, I think.

0:31:470:31:50

Oh, the poor lad looks crestfallen, but that's not Paul's only problem.

0:31:500:31:55

In keeping with his honest approach to selling, he's told his potential

0:31:550:31:59

buyer, a local restaurateur, that the sitar cost him £25,

0:31:590:32:03

but it seems Mr Hayes has had a memory bypass because he forgot to mention that he was planning

0:32:030:32:09

to have it restored, so it's no wonder he's a little shocked by Paul's opening asking price.

0:32:090:32:16

If I was to ask you £150 for this?

0:32:160:32:19

Oh! £150?

0:32:190:32:20

I think that's way, way beyond my expectations of the budget.

0:32:200:32:24

-I thought more than half of that price.

-Would you give me a bit of profit?

0:32:240:32:28

-Because I have enjoyed it and I really want you to have it. Could we say £90?

-90 quid, yeah.

0:32:280:32:32

OK? So, shall we shake on that, then?

0:32:320:32:34

-All right. With one proviso.

-Go on, then.

0:32:340:32:37

-Can I have a ride in your bus?

-Yeah, come on, of course you can.

0:32:370:32:40

Look at this, it's amazing, isn't it?

0:32:400:32:42

Ouch! £90 less costs means Paul only makes seven pounds on the sitar.

0:32:420:32:48

Still, our blue-eyed boy has

0:32:480:32:50

a knack of getting over disappointment very quickly.

0:32:500:32:53

I bet you've never had a ride on a bus like this, Charlie!

0:32:530:32:57

You may well be right, Paul, but Charlie is certainly in the

0:32:570:33:00

driving seat in today's competition and he swells his coffers even further when he sells his set of

0:33:000:33:05

four silver bonbon dishes to another local contact.

0:33:050:33:09

Now, would you believe it, Paul has had some more bad luck with his bronze shield?

0:33:110:33:15

It turns out that the Plymouth Rock Chicken Club still consider

0:33:150:33:19

the shield to be their property and, being the man of honour

0:33:190:33:23

and all round good egg that he is, Paul took the time out to return it personally to the club secretary.

0:33:230:33:28

All right, nice to meet you.

0:33:280:33:30

Dear me, spitting feathers!

0:33:300:33:33

Paul's mood improved though when the Put Your Money games masters decided

0:33:330:33:38

to reimburse him the £110 he paid for the shield in recognition

0:33:380:33:42

of his good deed, but he's now one potential profit maker down.

0:33:420:33:45

What he needs now is a bit of good old-fashioned luck,

0:33:450:33:49

and that's exactly what he gets when he sells one of his Andrew and Fergie mugs to collector Stephen.

0:33:490:33:55

Have you got this exact one?

0:33:550:33:58

-No, not this very one, no.

-So, would you be interested in one of them, do you think?

0:33:580:34:03

Yes, I'll have one off you.

0:34:030:34:05

£15 profit is a result.

0:34:050:34:07

Now all Paul has to do is find a buyer for his other mug.

0:34:070:34:11

So far Charlie has sold three items and generated £100 worth of profit.

0:34:110:34:18

Paul has sold two items and has made just £22.

0:34:180:34:22

Charlie has a commanding lead, but with Paul's painting still

0:34:220:34:26

to go under the hammer and Charlie's rudder yet to find a buyer,

0:34:260:34:30

today's epic battle is far from over.

0:34:300:34:32

Charlie is taking a trip down Memory Lane with his next potential sale.

0:34:360:34:39

He's hoping to sell his pantograph to the dealer and collector

0:34:390:34:44

who gave him his very first job way back in - ahem - 1968.

0:34:440:34:50

Good to see there's nothing wrong with The Charmer's memory.

0:34:500:34:54

I remember there... I'm sure there was a pantograph in the old office.

0:34:540:34:58

Yes, I did have... I've had two.

0:34:580:35:00

-Have you?

-I had a little one.

-Yeah.

0:35:000:35:02

-And one that sort of size.

-Yeah. I'm going to reveal all here.

0:35:020:35:06

The ones I've seen, the wheels are damaged.

0:35:060:35:09

To have a wheel made for one of these, you'd know better than me,

0:35:090:35:12

but you wouldn't see any change out of 100 quid, I shouldn't think.

0:35:120:35:15

-I wouldn't think so, no.

-No. Having seen it, can I interest you in it?

0:35:150:35:19

Well, yes, at a price.

0:35:190:35:21

HE LAUGHS

0:35:210:35:23

I would like £300 for it.

0:35:230:35:25

Well, I was thinking of two.

0:35:250:35:28

-Were you?

-Yes.

0:35:280:35:30

What about meeting you halfway?

0:35:300:35:32

Well, I think a bit less than that. 225?

0:35:320:35:35

225. What a cunning offer.

0:35:350:35:39

I'm really...

0:35:390:35:41

If you could make it 235, David, I'll do a deal with you.

0:35:410:35:45

230.

0:35:450:35:47

-It sounds like a time of day rather than a price!

-Yes.

0:35:470:35:50

Having spent such a large slice of his buying budget on the

0:35:500:35:54

pantograph, Charlie might be a little disappointed with a profit

0:35:540:35:58

of just £35, but he's not about to push his old patron too hard.

0:35:580:36:02

Up in Morecambe, our family man, Paul, is also looking to the past for a bit of selling inspiration.

0:36:020:36:09

I grew up in an antique dealer's house.

0:36:090:36:11

My father was an antique dealer and the big snag was some days you could be sat at a table,

0:36:110:36:16

the next day it's gone, he had sold it! That's literally what happened!

0:36:160:36:20

I heard a story, that he sold my mum's bed once.

0:36:200:36:23

It was a big brass bed and she came home, she had no bed!

0:36:230:36:26

So, we've made it a rule not to have too many things around the house

0:36:260:36:29

because, A - you want to keep them and, B - I can't sell them from under Katherine's foot, or feet.

0:36:290:36:35

And Paul is hoping that his dealing pedigree will stand him

0:36:350:36:38

in good stead for his next sale because he's hoping to sell his stained glass to an old mate

0:36:380:36:43

of his dad's and one of the area's biggest antiques exporters.

0:36:430:36:49

-To be honest, Paul...

-Go on.

0:36:490:36:51

-It's not a bad looking window, that.

-Fantastic!

0:36:510:36:53

-I'm not keen on this.

-No.

-That...

0:36:530:36:56

What we could do with that, Paul, is what you call put a strap on it.

0:36:560:36:59

You would solder a piece of lead on there. It would make it look part of the pattern, you see?

0:36:590:37:04

So you disguise that.

0:37:040:37:06

-So rather than replace the panel, you'd repair that with lead?

-Yeah.

0:37:060:37:11

-Put a piece of lead down there.

-That's clever.

-And there.

0:37:110:37:13

That's easier than getting the glass out.

0:37:130:37:16

Oh, yeah, yeah. I wouldn't mind having a go, if the money's right.

0:37:160:37:19

Well, of course, yeah. Why don't I ask you £500 and see your reaction?

0:37:190:37:23

-Don't put your fist through it, will you?

-Why don't I bid you 220 quid?

0:37:230:37:27

Well, we've got a start, haven't we?

0:37:270:37:29

Where do you seriously see it?

0:37:290:37:31

One price and one price only, 300 quid.

0:37:310:37:35

You can't squeeze it a little more?

0:37:350:37:37

I do realise that's probably your limit, but you couldn't go for, 350.

0:37:370:37:41

I know it's being a bit cheeky, but you have known me a long time!

0:37:410:37:44

Yeah, well, I remember your dad, Pete's I Buy Anything.

0:37:440:37:47

-Pete's, Morecambe Street.

-That's right.

-Yeah.

0:37:470:37:49

-And he did buy anything.

-He bought anything, yes.

0:37:490:37:51

But nothing heavy. He was never into furniture.

0:37:510:37:53

No, he liked something he could put in his pocket.

0:37:530:37:56

-That's exactly what he says, "If it doesn't go in your pocket, don't buy it".

-Yeah.

0:37:560:37:59

I'll tell you what I'll do, mate.

0:37:590:38:01

I'll be generous, I'll give you three and a quarter...

0:38:010:38:06

and that's it.

0:38:060:38:08

325 quid.

0:38:080:38:09

That gives you a bit of a profit, I can get a few quid and,

0:38:090:38:16

hopefully, that will please you.

0:38:160:38:18

That will please me, and I think you've been very generous. Shall we shake on that, then?

0:38:180:38:22

Yeah, all right, mate.

0:38:220:38:23

Watch out, people, Paul is back with a bang!

0:38:230:38:26

And at £125 lands the biggest profit of the day.

0:38:260:38:31

This is shaping up to be a no holds barred race to the finishing line in today's competition.

0:38:310:38:37

The Charmer has received a letter from the North of England and it's all about his rudder.

0:38:370:38:43

Listen to this.

0:38:430:38:46

"Dear Mr Ross, I wish I could remember more of what happened in our rowing.

0:38:460:38:51

"You are very welcome to use the scraps I told you.

0:38:510:38:54

"I'm sorry that Collins may have gone ahead", another wonderful expression!

0:38:540:38:59

"I would like to have his rudder.

0:38:590:39:01

"Would £200 be enough to give you a bit of a profit?

0:39:010:39:04

"If it would, then perhaps you might let me know".

0:39:040:39:07

Well, are we going to let him know! Isn't that amazing!

0:39:070:39:11

That's a cracking sale for Charlie.

0:39:110:39:13

The item he picked out as his best buy doubles its money.

0:39:130:39:17

The only bad news is Charlie's cast iron table takes a

0:39:170:39:20

a bite out of his overall profit when it makes a loss of £25.

0:39:200:39:26

Paul's quest for victory receives a mighty boost when his restored

0:39:260:39:30

Charlotte Rhead plate delivers him a profit of £55, but it suffers

0:39:300:39:33

a setback when he fails to sell his second mug and his cameo brooch.

0:39:330:39:39

But it's not over yet for The Man From Morecambe.

0:39:390:39:44

Earlier, Paul put his painting into auction and now he's waiting with bated breath to hear the results.

0:39:440:39:50

Do you remember that Russian painting I bought?

0:39:500:39:52

It's gone into auction and will be sold any second now.

0:39:520:39:56

I'm waiting for a telephone call from the auctioneer to give me the result, good or bad.

0:39:560:40:00

It's just now to see whether I've made a profit on it. And here we go!

0:40:000:40:04

OK, here we are, wish me luck!

0:40:040:40:06

Chiswick calling Morecambe. Morecambe, come in, please. Can you hear me, Morecambe?

0:40:080:40:12

Will this phone call deliver the news that Paul wants to hear?

0:40:120:40:14

We'll find out shortly.

0:40:140:40:16

Either way, today's contest has been a real battle.

0:40:160:40:21

Charlie spent £730 at the antiques fair and a further

0:40:210:40:25

£10 on restoration, and he's sold all of his items.

0:40:250:40:29

Paul spent £580 and a further

0:40:290:40:31

£98 on restoration, but still has his painting left to sell.

0:40:310:40:36

All the money Charlie and Paul have made from today's challenge

0:40:360:40:40

will go to the charities of their choice, so, without further ado,

0:40:400:40:43

it's time to find out which of them has made the most cash and

0:40:430:40:47

who is today's Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion.

0:40:470:40:50

-Charlie.

-Mr Morecambe!

-How are you?

0:40:500:40:54

-Here we are.

-I'm very well.

0:40:540:40:55

-This is so heavy, do you know why?

-Why, go on?

-All my profit in it!

0:40:550:40:58

-It's full of money, is it?

-How did you get on?

0:40:580:41:00

Mine's only full of notes, so it's quite light!

0:41:000:41:02

You can't have got anything for that Russian painting.

0:41:020:41:05

There was a cold wind blowing here this morning, yes, that Russian painting.

0:41:050:41:10

-How did you get on with your letter opener?

-Oh, seriously well.

0:41:100:41:12

But you know it wasn't a letter opener, as I discovered?

0:41:120:41:15

-It was a page turner.

-OK.

0:41:150:41:17

-It made it even rarer.

-Is that right?

-Even more money.

0:41:170:41:20

-I want to see how much you made.

-Shall we find out?

-Yeah.

0:41:200:41:22

I want to win this one because the antique fair, should be my forte.

0:41:220:41:26

It should be. Oh, come on! Stop beating about the bush.

0:41:260:41:28

One, two, three. Go!

0:41:280:41:31

-Whay!

-Ohhh!

0:41:320:41:35

You can't have made that amount!

0:41:350:41:37

-Well done, mate.

-But we both did very well there.

0:41:370:41:40

-You did well. Come on.

-It was good fun though!

0:41:400:41:42

So, it's victory for The Man From Morecambe. Why?

0:41:420:41:45

Because original or not, a buyer loved his painting as much as Paul did.

0:41:450:41:51

-It made 380, hammer.

-Ohh, hoo-hoo! Fantastic!

0:41:510:41:55

-Is that all right?

-That's amazing, yeah.

0:41:550:41:57

It's cost me 170, so that gives me a good bit of profit.

0:41:570:42:00

And that £380, less fees, made Paul a whopping great profit

0:42:000:42:06

of just under £180.

0:42:060:42:08

It's been a rollercoaster ride for both our experts, but it's hats off

0:42:080:42:12

to today's Put Your Money champion, Paul Hayes.

0:42:120:42:17

So, there we are. I'm delighted to win the Swinderby challenge and to stuff that Charlie Ross.

0:42:170:42:22

It was all down to that Russian painting. So, there we are.

0:42:220:42:25

My ingenuity and my gamble paid off and I made some good money for my charity, as well.

0:42:250:42:29

Annihilated by Morecambe.

0:42:290:42:32

A fate worse than death!

0:42:320:42:34

But, I've made a few bob for my charity,

0:42:340:42:37

and I live to fight another day.

0:42:370:42:39

Well said, Charlie.

0:42:390:42:41

It's been an epic week of wheeling and dealing. With two wins apiece,

0:42:410:42:45

this week's Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion

0:42:450:42:48

won't be decided until tomorrow in the ultimate 48-hour dealing showdown.

0:42:480:42:53

We're here in record time.

0:42:540:42:57

I think that's Morecambe done. Off to Lancaster we go!

0:42:570:42:59

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:200:43:23

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:230:43:26

Two well-known experts from the world of antiques go head-to-head over a week of challenges to find out who can make the most profit buying and selling collectables, all of which will be donated to a charity of their choice. Our dealers are in a different buying location each day: an auction house, a car boot sale, a foreign antiques market and a UK antiques fair; they then sell their purchases for as much profit as possible. On Friday, the duelling experts compete to make the most profit in the ultimate dealers' showdown - a 48-hour buying and selling challenge. Once the deals are done, one expert will be crowned the Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is overall weekly champion.

Experts Paul Hayes and Charlie Ross need to keep their wits about them to score the best bargains at this Lincolnshire antiques fair, as he who makes the most profit wins this high-octane dealing competition.