Grandma, By the Sea, Hector Film 2015


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Grandma, By the Sea, Hector

Claudia Winkleman and Danny Leigh give their verdict on the week's big film releases, including relationship drama By the Sea, starring Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie Pitt.


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We'd like to hear from you, so please do tweet us.

:00:28.:00:31.

On tonight's show: Growing old disgracefully.

:00:32.:00:39.

Lily Tomlin packs a punch in "Grandma."

:00:40.:00:46.

Some people should not grow beards, your face looks like an armpit!

:00:47.:00:54.

Brad and Angelina embrace happiness and heartbreak in "By The Sea."

:00:55.:00:58.

And a long time ago - in a galaxy far, far away? We look

:00:59.:01:08.

back to the birth of "Star Wars." Plus, keeping a sense of humour

:01:09.:01:11.

British movie Hector, starring Peter Mullan and Gina

:01:12.:01:14.

And joining us is the Independent's critic Ellen E Jones.

:01:15.:01:20.

Hello. Hello. Hello. But, that went well.

:01:21.:01:28.

Actress, stand-up comedienne and all-round super-star.

:01:29.:01:30.

If she were British, she'd be a Dame by now.

:01:31.:01:33.

Once a favourite of top-indie director Robert Altman,

:01:34.:01:34.

now she's winning fresh acclaim in indie comedy Grandma,

:01:35.:01:37.

When? When are you going to have to ask is? Now. You are asking? Yes,

:01:38.:01:51.

you are disturbing the customers. I am a customer, do you know what a

:01:52.:01:55.

customer is. A customer pays for your services so I am a customer.

:01:56.:01:58.

What other customers are we disturbing? Them? Ozzie and Harriet?

:01:59.:02:06.

Yes. Else is a lesbian feminist poet and her granddaughter shows up on

:02:07.:02:12.

her doorstep and her granddaughter is in a tight place, she needs

:02:13.:02:18.

money. I need $600, 603. For what? I am pregnant. And so Elle joins her

:02:19.:02:25.

on a road trip to find the money for the abortion.

:02:26.:02:31.

Do you think I am a shut? No, no. But I don't want you using that word

:02:32.:02:34.

again. It is a comedy drama which makes one

:02:35.:02:41.

cringe, the hardest film to do correct me, the success ratio is

:02:42.:02:46.

low. But at the same time, some of my favourite films like the graduate

:02:47.:02:49.

that. You have to take responsibility for that. Why did you

:02:50.:02:54.

not use a condom or for the sake of humanity, get a vasectomy! Who is

:02:55.:03:02.

this? She is my Grandma. In some ways, she is conventional. The grand

:03:03.:03:05.

daughter is making a mistake she might have made. Get out of my

:03:06.:03:10.

homecoming you crazy old... I liked your boyfriend, he is special.

:03:11.:03:17.

Nobody is able to be as aggressive. And yet as charming and funny as

:03:18.:03:21.

Lily. She is already pregnant. Grandma! Just saying! The character

:03:22.:03:29.

is gay. The character is in her 70s. There is ageism and transgender

:03:30.:03:36.

character played by Laverne Cox. Your Grandma helped me out a long

:03:37.:03:40.

time ago. That is some sort of essence of what the movie is about.

:03:41.:03:45.

Don't reduce people. I am assuming you went to her for money but she

:03:46.:03:49.

doesn't have any money either so of course you came to me. I figure

:03:50.:03:55.

Conservative America will not love the film! That has been borne out!

:03:56.:04:01.

Most of them do not see the film. There has been stupid stuff on the

:04:02.:04:04.

internet about it. A presidential election is coming up and the old

:04:05.:04:09.

Raft of Republican candidates have made political hay out of this issue

:04:10.:04:14.

and lies have been spread around. You need to be able to say, screw

:04:15.:04:19.

you sometimes. I say that. You did not say that about little creep back

:04:20.:04:23.

there. Screw you, Grandma! Not bad. The movie is a welcome

:04:24.:04:28.

change of the issues and the way it is handled and the way people

:04:29.:04:33.

relate. What about those can Dons I got you? We used them. You can get

:04:34.:04:40.

more. -- condoms. I know, you do not have to yell at me! This is not

:04:41.:04:46.

yelling, I will show you yelling. It is not pro-abortion, I cannot think

:04:47.:04:50.

of anybody who is. They are pro-choice. This young woman is in a

:04:51.:04:56.

dilemma and she clearly is not in a position to be a parent. Any aid it

:04:57.:05:01.

can seat you need to be supervised, right? -- idiot. You saying I am any

:05:02.:05:07.

idiot? What do you one? A kiss. I am going

:05:08.:05:13.

to be there because this is my granddaughter. What do you think,

:05:14.:05:24.

acquitted? This is a Paul Weitz movie and he made American Pie but

:05:25.:05:29.

this is more of an American indie, low budget feel. This is about

:05:30.:05:35.

abortion, two women going to get an abortion. We're watching it in the

:05:36.:05:40.

UK and thankfully in this country abortion is not a fraught issue and

:05:41.:05:43.

it takes on a different tone, it is more about the granddaughter and

:05:44.:05:47.

grant parent relationship. -- grandparent. In many movies, she is

:05:48.:05:53.

a caricature but she gets to be a character and that is interesting. I

:05:54.:05:57.

could just watch her and you realise it is really tight, it is succinct

:05:58.:06:02.

and she is so fantastic as a character that if they made a film

:06:03.:06:05.

just about her going shopping let alone what they have to do, I would

:06:06.:06:11.

watch that. Lily Tomlin is fantastic, I have been scared of her

:06:12.:06:15.

since All of Me in 1984 and I was 12. New cow in the best way and that

:06:16.:06:19.

is a condiment. She still has that, she is why a wall on legs. A 70

:06:20.:06:25.

something punk rocker. It works well as a buddy movie and you need two

:06:26.:06:29.

people and Julia Garner who plays her granddaughter is great and they

:06:30.:06:33.

have a great dynamic. It should not make sense as she is frail and

:06:34.:06:37.

serial, hop on Marks blonde curls, but she is a top cookie and that is

:06:38.:06:41.

one reason that the -- the film works. A lot of fantastic actors

:06:42.:06:47.

appear. You think, that was a day and a half of work. That did not

:06:48.:06:51.

cost a lot of money. Each interaction is meaningful. In this

:06:52.:06:55.

kind of movie, people coming in and out. Several great scenes in this

:06:56.:07:01.

movie, Sam Elliott is another great character to who plays an old flame

:07:02.:07:07.

of the character of Lily Tomlin. And Marcia Gay Harden. She is fantastic.

:07:08.:07:12.

It is perfect sense because Little Miss sunshine was a perfect movie

:07:13.:07:17.

but had unfortunate consequences like American indie movies, you get

:07:18.:07:22.

half a dozen random people and each has a quirk and they like a family

:07:23.:07:26.

and it makes no sense but the family makes sense. They even look quite

:07:27.:07:33.

alike. Lily Tomlin, it makes perfect sense and Marcia Gay Harden is a

:07:34.:07:38.

driven woman and her daughter is Julia Garner who is a slightly

:07:39.:07:43.

uncertain character. We needed a film about the relationship between

:07:44.:07:47.

that hippie generation and their children. And not the usual Grandma.

:07:48.:07:55.

And not just the one that has toffees and is sweet and knitting,

:07:56.:08:00.

but also very grumpy, she isn't a mixture. She is a smart, she is a

:08:01.:08:04.

rocker and she is soft and she changes. It has the American

:08:05.:08:09.

trappings, chapter headings in lower case. You think, could it not be

:08:10.:08:14.

capital letters? It does not push that too far, there is no ukelele

:08:15.:08:17.

and I always breathe a sigh of relief. Grandma does not need a

:08:18.:08:23.

ukelele. Not expensive, a contention for the wards? Lily Tomlin might be.

:08:24.:08:30.

A lot of good feeling for her. , cost $600,000 and the funny thing

:08:31.:08:34.

about awards and we are about to enter that corridor of hysteria,

:08:35.:08:38.

awards season, and if you make films that are not blockbusters, that is

:08:39.:08:41.

history were because you have to make nominations. I do not think

:08:42.:08:46.

that is bad in the case of Grandma, it fits the movie. Tangerine was

:08:47.:08:50.

another film benefiting from not having as much money. But you

:08:51.:08:54.

realise you have to do that if you do not get the film industry

:08:55.:09:00.

economy, if you do not get nominations, you make a film in a

:09:01.:09:03.

cover shop with no extras for half $1 million.

:09:04.:09:05.

Written and directed by Angelina Jolie, she stars

:09:06.:09:08.

with her husband, Brad Pitt, as an unhappily married couple

:09:09.:09:10.

trying to save their relationship in the South of France.

:09:11.:10:06.

Can I just say, there was only one screening of this and I could not go

:10:07.:10:25.

because I had to do other stuff. I have not seen it. People have been

:10:26.:10:31.

vile about it. In my world, she can do no wrong. With that, Danny.

:10:32.:10:37.

Delightful as that clip was, we need to put flesh on it. The film is

:10:38.:10:43.

directed by Angelina Jolie and about a pair of ridiculously good-looking

:10:44.:10:46.

married couple played by Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt. She is a famous

:10:47.:10:51.

dancer and he is of course a famous writer but despite their success and

:10:52.:10:55.

good looks, they are not happy, the marriage is going bad. They fetch up

:10:56.:10:59.

in the French Riviera in the South of France in a beautiful Andy Dilip

:11:00.:11:05.

result. They get stuff unpacked and spend the rest of the film having

:11:06.:11:08.

rows, drinking gin for breakfast and having mascara running down their

:11:09.:11:13.

cheeks. It is very self-indulgent and in places shrivelling great goal

:11:14.:11:19.

but I quite like it. It is also smite and self-aware and it has

:11:20.:11:25.

slight whipped -- smart. It is a based around these beautiful perfect

:11:26.:11:30.

people stricken with Ms Rhee, even luggage is perfect and even though

:11:31.:11:35.

the room is perfect and Brad Pitt's slacks, they are perfect and

:11:36.:11:40.

Angelina Jolie's lips, they are perfect on her big and bubbly head.

:11:41.:11:46.

It is not big and bubbly, it is perfect. Continue as you are! That

:11:47.:11:50.

is a condiment. They are consumed with self loathing. Why have people

:11:51.:11:59.

been so mean? People are confusing a beautiful film made by a beautiful

:12:00.:12:03.

woman with a vanity project. The character is quite vain but it is

:12:04.:12:07.

not a vanity project because there is more than her showcasing her

:12:08.:12:11.

beauty and talent. Good ideas as well. And she is quite smart to

:12:12.:12:15.

focus on the beauty because if you cast Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie,

:12:16.:12:20.

they cannot just stand in a garage forecourt, they have to be in a

:12:21.:12:24.

beautiful location, it makes sense. It is tradition for the director to

:12:25.:12:27.

fall in love with the leading lady even if the director is the leading

:12:28.:12:32.

lady! What is weird is me listening to you two, I think of course I will

:12:33.:12:37.

see it but having read the reviews, you'd two come at it from a

:12:38.:12:42.

different angle. It is far too long. Seven days long? It is getting

:12:43.:12:48.

there! Neither of us wants this on our epitaph, I liked By The Sea. It

:12:49.:12:54.

is too late! There is a lot to stick up for. So many interesting ideas.

:12:55.:12:59.

For Angelina Jolie, she is self-aware and she knows she is one

:13:00.:13:04.

of the world's most sought-after actresses and she makes herself a

:13:05.:13:08.

peeping Tom. There is a hole in the hotel room wall and she is the one

:13:09.:13:11.

looking at the couple next door, that is interesting. What are my

:13:12.:13:16.

favourite scenes is short, it is her and him ready to go out together and

:13:17.:13:20.

they look in the mirror and she puts lipstick on with a cigarette hanging

:13:21.:13:25.

out and it is fabulous. You said vanity project but everything is a

:13:26.:13:28.

vanity project. We do not normally notice because it is normally a

:13:29.:13:33.

director's project and we do not recognise their name. Actors

:13:34.:13:37.

constantly, even when they do not direct, like she has, they

:13:38.:13:42.

constantly make vanity projects because everybody is dependent on

:13:43.:13:45.

that to get the finance. Writers and direct has turned into skeletons

:13:46.:13:50.

waiting for Ryan Gosling to say yes to their movie. Every film is a

:13:51.:13:57.

vanity project. Let of Angelina! -- lay-off.

:13:58.:14:00.

It won seven Oscars, ranks as one of the world's top

:14:01.:14:03.

grossing films and is, quite simply, the stuff of movie legend.

:14:04.:14:06.

Nothing was the same again after Star Wars.

:14:07.:14:08.

But we've waited more than 30 years to find out what happened

:14:09.:14:10.

to Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Hans Solo.

:14:11.:14:12.

On the eve of the new Star Wars release, we go back to 1977

:14:13.:14:16.

and Star Wars fever, first time around.

:14:17.:14:17.

Star Wars THEME. Make sure your seats are securely fastened. For the

:14:18.:14:33.

most part, like any fairy tale, it is timeless. Just making a movie

:14:34.:14:39.

that I thought would be enjoyable, that I wanted to make, telling a

:14:40.:14:41.

story I wanted to tell. Now, Star Wars is a world-famous

:14:42.:14:58.

brand but in 1977 it was an unknown quantity. The sci-fi B-movie

:14:59.:15:04.

directed by a relative newcomer starring a cast of unknowns.

:15:05.:15:11.

Expectations were low. My agent said there was an American making a cheap

:15:12.:15:15.

little budget science-fiction movie where the money was going on the

:15:16.:15:19.

sets and costumes and special effects. He wanted to see me for the

:15:20.:15:27.

part of... And she paused, a robot! Don't take that look with me! I said

:15:28.:15:33.

no! We thought it was a bit of a turkey. It blew everybody's mind,

:15:34.:15:39.

what I was doing. Not very reassuring! George's style of

:15:40.:15:45.

film-making was difficult, he never said anything, he never asked me to

:15:46.:15:49.

do a scene in a particular way, he would just say action and cut.

:15:50.:15:55.

Sometimes he would say terrific. Often he said nothing. I have a very

:15:56.:16:02.

bad feeling about this. We were several weeks behind schedule and

:16:03.:16:06.

the studio cut us off. We ended up with the 80% shot movie. It looked

:16:07.:16:20.

like the ship had sunk. Hello there. Is it true that you didn't know what

:16:21.:16:23.

character you were playing in Star Wars? I don't know quite what he was

:16:24.:16:31.

meant to be come I must admit that. Darth Vader, now that's a known I

:16:32.:16:35.

have not heard in a long time. -- Obi Wan. I thought oh, grams. Star

:16:36.:16:45.

Wars, science-fiction, not for me! We will have no more of this Obi Wan

:16:46.:16:50.

Kenobi gibberish. I feel something terrible has happened. The dialogue

:16:51.:16:55.

was pretty childish. That's the real trick, isn't it? I said to George,

:16:56.:17:00.

you can type this shit but not say it. And it's still true. There is a

:17:01.:17:10.

bit of a trick to say" it will take a few moments for it to get the

:17:11.:17:17.

coordinates". At the rate they are gaining? It isn't like dusting

:17:18.:17:25.

crops, boy! I thought, who talks like this? Do you know what he's

:17:26.:17:33.

talking about? Star Wars was pretty difficult to read as a script

:17:34.:17:37.

because a lot of the description was of special effects and it looked

:17:38.:17:40.

like a description of something that was impossible to create. I don't

:17:41.:17:45.

think George thought of them as a special effects, he wanted to make

:17:46.:17:49.

his movie. It took 6-8 months to get that stuff functioning. It was very

:17:50.:17:54.

difficult to make the schedule. It hadn't been done before. George is

:17:55.:18:01.

like a great builder. When he has it in his mind that going to make these

:18:02.:18:07.

Star Wars, you know, I'm told billions of dollars, nothing is

:18:08.:18:12.

going to stop him. George created his own world, his own industry in a

:18:13.:18:17.

way. You wonder what it's going to be in the future in terms of an

:18:18.:18:23.

injury, going to visit George at the ranch. A piece of junk! I hate great

:18:24.:18:30.

confidence that we would make it -- had great confidence. Even by the

:18:31.:18:36.

standards of Hollywood, a place where nothing succeeds like success,

:18:37.:18:41.

Star Wars is phenomenal. It is already the biggest box office hit

:18:42.:18:45.

in cinema history. One reason for this is that it somehow combines

:18:46.:18:49.

elements of the best loved themes of romantic adventure, from Arabian

:18:50.:18:52.

nights to the Western, science-fiction and fantasy. We did

:18:53.:18:59.

it! We did it! Fantastic imagination. I didn't like it when

:19:00.:19:04.

the man chopped off that persons arm. Why not? Because there was

:19:05.:19:11.

blood! I think a lot of people feel that George and Star Wars

:19:12.:19:15.

transformed the industry. It transformed the exhibition, allowing

:19:16.:19:18.

a film to be released into Morse in the Mars than anybody had put a

:19:19.:19:23.

movie before. People love the movie, not only for the content but what it

:19:24.:19:30.

represents, in their minds, ushering a new era merchandising driven

:19:31.:19:37.

movies. With the success of the film, the country goes Star Wars

:19:38.:19:42.

crazy. Star Wars pretty much created merchandising in movies. Did I

:19:43.:19:50.

enjoyed that? Yes. There was a shampoo where you could twist my

:19:51.:19:56.

head and pour liquid out of it. Yes, the Force can be with you at

:19:57.:20:03.

breakfast! The problem is, you make a film, people take it, especially

:20:04.:20:06.

if you are successful, and they use it however they need to. Many people

:20:07.:20:11.

used it emotionally and intellectually and some people used

:20:12.:20:12.

it, surely. But that was a long time ago, and

:20:13.:20:26.

far, far away. Now a new generation of fans will get to feel the Force

:20:27.:20:33.

once more. Camera, action! When Star Wars the Force Awakens hits in a

:20:34.:20:40.

Mars next week. -- hits cinemas. These characters come and they know

:20:41.:20:44.

it is in a galaxy far away, a journey that people can relate to. I

:20:45.:20:49.

have been a Star Wars fan as an adult and a child. Oh, my gosh.

:20:50.:20:55.

That's something that George Lucas started and we are definitely

:20:56.:20:59.

carrying it on. He has signed his action figure! Ciabatta! We are

:21:00.:21:10.

home. -- Chewbacca. It is the characters that people love, a world

:21:11.:21:14.

we want to go back to immediately. We are going back to the stories

:21:15.:21:16.

that people feel intensely about. And we'll be reviewing "Star Wars:

:21:17.:21:23.

The Force Awakens" next week. Next, Hector, starring Peter Mullan

:21:24.:21:26.

as a homeless man in search Early Christmas present coming up.

:21:27.:21:44.

Lovely Hazel, looking after my bank. What else have I got? For you, for

:21:45.:21:54.

being such a lovely dog. And I almost forgot, Lord Douglas, for

:21:55.:22:01.

being a clever old bastard. You are a locking MAC Gold mind reader.

:22:02.:22:08.

He has been homeless for 15-20 years and he has embarked on an annual

:22:09.:22:15.

pilgrimage to a homeless shelter in London. It is a kind of Odyssey, you

:22:16.:22:23.

know. Who he meets on his journey and what he encounters on the

:22:24.:22:28.

journey. Just passing through? Have you got a girlfriend? A few years

:22:29.:22:37.

ago I did some volunteering work for Christmas and I met some

:22:38.:22:41.

extraordinary people with amazing stories, including a particular man

:22:42.:22:48.

who travelled and came to stay in the shelter. I came to realise that

:22:49.:22:56.

it was a story. Hey, you! Nearly gave me a heart attack! We were on

:22:57.:23:01.

location in the middle of the Scottish winter, it was never going

:23:02.:23:06.

to be easy. It was cold but you know, you are an actor. You wear

:23:07.:23:15.

jumpers. It's not working down a mine. It isn't sleeping rough on the

:23:16.:23:20.

streets certainly. Private contractor for the council. Driving

:23:21.:23:24.

one of those trucks for the recycling. RU a bin man? Lock off!

:23:25.:23:36.

Recycling, doing my bit for the planet. Some people, Hector being

:23:37.:23:47.

one of them, you could argue that he has chosen this particular way to

:23:48.:23:52.

live. When somebody has a mental breakdown and cannot face the

:23:53.:23:56.

responsibility of keeping a job, I for one cannot condemn that person

:23:57.:24:03.

for making the choice. Nobody willingly wants to sleep on the

:24:04.:24:12.

street. Slow down, OK? I can't, the brakes have gone. It is sometimes a

:24:13.:24:19.

hard watch. Introducing a bit of humour, it is true to life but it

:24:20.:24:23.

makes the difficult things easier to watch. Trying to change the subject?

:24:24.:24:35.

Yeah. Let's go. You are my family now, that's the way it is. Want my

:24:36.:24:44.

cracker? Danny? One of the things I liked about Hector, it reminds us

:24:45.:24:47.

that Peter Mullan is more than a monster. He was great previously but

:24:48.:24:55.

he was also a bully, he was very good in it. He keeps being cast in

:24:56.:24:59.

those roles but this is a reminder that it wasn't always like that, it

:25:00.:25:04.

doesn't have to be that Peter Mullan arrives and almost the Jaws music

:25:05.:25:10.

arrives. In 1842 when he made my name is Joe with Ken Loach, it was a

:25:11.:25:15.

different Peter Mullan. There was the gentleness and these and see, so

:25:16.:25:18.

it's nice to be reacquainted with that. Yes, he has the twinkle in his

:25:19.:25:24.

eye. I like the fact that it shows as a different side to the British

:25:25.:25:27.

motorway that we don't normally see. A lot of films about American roads,

:25:28.:25:33.

very romantic but you don't often see a nice roundabout, nicely shot!

:25:34.:25:38.

I found it incredibly... It may be the perfect Christmas movie because

:25:39.:25:45.

it feels like it's about kindness and I thought I would like to take

:25:46.:25:49.

my 12-year-old to that. That's a better way to judge it rather than a

:25:50.:25:54.

Peter Mullan movie rather than a social realist movie. It isn't

:25:55.:25:58.

really about homelessness, it is about a homeless guy and lots of

:25:59.:26:02.

nice things happen to him so it is a bit schmaltzy if you are wanting

:26:03.:26:07.

gritty social reality. Difficult to make films about goodness and so on.

:26:08.:26:14.

A previous firm has done the same thing, making drama out of goodness

:26:15.:26:20.

and decency, really tricky stuff. We mentioned in Granma, we talked about

:26:21.:26:24.

how lovely it was, brilliant people popped up and the same thing happens

:26:25.:26:29.

here, Keith Allen, and so on, they may have only worked for two days

:26:30.:26:33.

but they are strong. Yeah, if you watch a lot of telly, there are many

:26:34.:26:41.

good TV actors, you have the hostel worker who everybody is the spirit

:26:42.:26:46.

of Christmas. We are running out of time. Film of the week? I'm going

:26:47.:26:52.

with By The Sea. Are you? The only person! I'm going with by the CX is

:26:53.:27:00.

Mac but I'm also talking about Reflecting Skin which has come out

:27:01.:27:05.

on DVD and Blu-ray, people should see it.

:27:06.:27:06.

Playing us out tonight is the late, great Nora Ephron's rom-com classic

:27:07.:27:11.

When Harry Met Sally, which is re-released

:27:12.:27:12.

Most women at one time or another have faked it. Well they haven't

:27:13.:27:24.

with me. How do you know? Because I do. Right. I forgot. You are a man.

:27:25.:27:37.

What does that mean? Nothing, all men are sure that it does not happen

:27:38.:27:41.

to them and most women have done it. You don't think I can tell the

:27:42.:27:42.

difference? No. Get out of here. MOANS SOFTLY. Are you OK? Oh, God.

:27:43.:28:23.

Oh, God! Ooh! Oh, God! Oh, yeah, right there! MOANS WILDLY. Oh, God,

:28:24.:28:33.

yes, yes! Yes, yes! Sir! Oh, yes! Yes, yes! Yes, yes, yes,

:28:34.:28:57.

yes! Oh, oh! Oh, God. Ooh...

:28:58.:29:02.

Claudia Winkleman and Danny Leigh give their verdict on the week's big film releases, including relationship drama By the Sea, starring husband-and-wife team Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie Pitt. Plus Lily Tomlin stars as an unusual role model in Grandma, and we take a look at the enduring appeal of Star Wars.

Joining them in the studio is critic Ellen E Jones.