10/07/2017 The One Show


10/07/2017

Matt Baker and Alex Jones are joined by Christopher Eccleston to talk about The Leftovers. Plus Kieron Williamson, the 14-year-old artist who has sold paintings for over £50,000.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to the One Show with Alex Jones.

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We've got some impressive guests tonight.

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Seven years ago we met this chap, Kieron Williamson, who had just

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Now he's 14 and selling paintings for over ?50,000.

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And on our sofa is a man who has also dabbled in fine art,

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As well as starring in Our Friends In The North,

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Doctor Who and the A-Word, he's done a stint of nude modelling.

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It's - thankfully fully clothed - Christopher Eccleston.

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Obviously because viewers would expect it, we did intense research

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to see if we could find one of the pictures. But unfortunately, it was

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a fail. It was at the Slade School of fine art.

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If anyone at home can help us please feel free to send one along

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to our usual address, we'd love to show it.

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What are your memories of those times? Cold! That would be the first

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memory! Liberating? It was, slightly. Also could be quite hard

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on the ego because artists can be quite critical about the physical

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form. They would say things like see how he is fat and thin there. So

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ritual humiliation. I used to go straight to the pub once I'd got the

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money. Well we will see what we get in, it could be gold.

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Last time you were here, Chris, we spoke about your mum selling

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pastries in the stands at Old Trafford.

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That's right, she used to sell pies and T in the 50s when the Busby

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Babes were there. So we hope she's

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watching this next film. Kev Duala has been back to Liverpool

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to see how match day pies are helping to solve

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an affordable housing crisis. In the shadow of Liverpool football

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ground rov derelict terraced houses and at the end of thriving bakery

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run by and for the community. Home-baked, the a match day fixture.

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I never really ate pies before but we found this place and I was sold.

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I like the idea that helping the community. The staff are lovely and

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you get to know a lot of people who come in regularly. Seven years ago

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this bakery was scheduled for demolition and was shut down. But it

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flickered back into life by the skin of its teeth through the

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stubbornness and resilience of local people. Bridget is co-funder. I have

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to try one of these. Go for it. It is lovely. This is a story of brick

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and determination. Where did it start? There was a lot of demolition

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happening in our area and as a group of residents we came together and

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decided to open the bakery as a community business and managed to

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save it from demolition. How did you get the council to give you that

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reprieve? Baby by showing that it could be a viable business.

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Originally supported by grants, it now thrives on its products and

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wants to convince the council that it can expand. We have a flat above

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the bakery and were now refurbishing that. With affordable housing in

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short supply across the UK this business wants to turn the terrorist

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into shops and plans for the community for that they've already

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secured ?140,000 of lottery money to create a home out of this. My

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goodness! You have your work cut out. And the refurbishment will be a

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training project for three local apprentices, men poured by Paul. As

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you can see there is a lot to do, roofs, ceilings, floors, plumbing

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and electricity, everything. And once more after apprentices Dave,

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Bradley and Leanne, will have the option of renting a room. It is

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their own version of social housing. We've been learning from the

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builders and then we may be get to put that into practice. How

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important is it for you to be involved? Very much, because I would

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like to live here and it is giving back to the community. It does not

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stop there, they're also transforming a patch of land at the

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end of the terraced into a public square, building their own joinery

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classroom and greenhouse to grow food for local people. But it is

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affordable homes that the heart of this, only 28,000 funded by the

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government were completed last year. Down by half from 2011. With the

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huge housing crisis across the UK, what you're doing could be of help?

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I think it can. Over there we have houses just like those next to the

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bakery and they had been pulled down and what has been built now at the

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profit goes to private developers. We are offering to build houses by

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people and for people and the profit stays within the organisation and is

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reinvested in the neighbourhood. The benefits to the residents are plain

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to see. Sue Humphreys helped to set up the project. Her family have

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lived here for 100 years and she is seen first-hand the fabric of the

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community decline. It is sad to see the property is boarded up and left,

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something had to be done. Could this be a turning point to rejuvenate

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this community spirit? Yes, we're somewhere where the community can be

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together and rebuild that community. Make friends with your neighbours.

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Home-baked is one of several projects regenerating rundown parts

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of Liverpool including selling homes for ?1. And the council is waiting

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for it to succeed. This is the deputy mayor. It is not about the

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council telling community is what should happen, it is about community

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is being fully engaged and their ideas coming forward, there are

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initiatives and passion driving these agendas. If the project

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flourish as it could be rolled out elsewhere. I'm born and bred in

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Liverpool and grew up in a really strong community. But what has been

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sad to watch is how the communities have been eroded. But what is great

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to see is what this company have done to rekindle that community

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spirit. And if they can do it may be other parts of the country can as

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well. Financial journalist

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Simon Read joins us now. As Kev said at the end of the film,

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can this happen elsewhere? Could this help with the housing

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crisis is right it is happening all over the country, communities

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getting involved to create this kind of projects to bring back affordable

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housing to the local community. Great to see Right On The Money back

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on our screens this morning. It's hosted by Dom Littlewood

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and Denise Lewis. You of course are an expert

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on the show, giving us tips What kind of stories do

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you come across this series? Well all kinds of people. We have

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sisters from London who started up a street food market. They're not

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making a lot of money. And one woman... They are too generous. The

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portions too big! A woman from Liverpool, the biggest financial

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problem is that she's too generous. And we met Nicky who just spends

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when she feels like it. And Nicky has lots of things beneath her

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stairs. Let's take a look. What is all this? Tea bag. How many,

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millions! 1100. Nicky looks like she is going into World War II with all

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those supplies underneath the stairs.

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Something you look at in the series is the idea of the sharing economy,

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where people make money out of renting things they already own.

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And we've got some people in the audience tonight

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Leticia, this is a picture of your house. It is upside down! What is it

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that you are renting? I rent out my drive space. I have three spaces, it

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is all done online and it has been a great moneyspinner for me. How much

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do you make per month? Roughly ?200. Not to be sniffed at. And Vicky,

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let's take a look. Is that your garden? A section of the garden up

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in Norfolk and we rent it out for camping. Self-catering accommodation

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for up to four people. So how much do you make per month? Around ?1000

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in peak season. The summer months. This is a really good game show! And

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Daisy at the end, I love this concept. This is shared and

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breakfast which we run in Bristol from the garden. It is shared that

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we lived in when we were renovating and now we'll run it as a bed and

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breakfast. How much to make per month? ?1400! Anyone with a

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shared... You have had some thoughts of what to do with your place? Yes,

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I heard about this scheme, people making their homes into art

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galleries. One of my closest friends is an artist. I keep trying to

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convince her to do an exhibition and so I'm going to do it in my house.

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It is a great idea. And theatre groups are doing the same thing,

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using people's homes. For me it is not really for the money but the

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interest, and my children being around art. I'm still thinking about

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that bed-and-breakfast, genius! You're going to inspire the nation!

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Thank you all for joining us and thank you Simon.

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Right on the money is on BBC1 at nine fifteen every morning

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It's been a special day at Wimbledon as we've seen all 64

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players left in the singles competition play today.

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And of course congratulations to Johanna Konta and Andy Murray

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who made it through to the next round.

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As well as their impeccable racquet-work -

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there's another kind of racquet you can hear on court.

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Tommy's been to see if grunting equals greatness.

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Last year almost 500,000 people came down to Wimbledon and sat mesmerised

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by a little yellow ball. Waiting patiently for the winning point.

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While today the wait is over. And here they come. And I have something

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that they have dubbed a secret weapon. Meet Jordan, research at the

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University of Sussex. He says he can predict the winner of a much longer

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for the last game. Unsurprisingly it all comes down to grunting. Some say

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grunting is a bit annoying. Others say it is part of the passionate

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five tennis but it can predict a winner? That is right, we did

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research at the University of Sussex and looking at players across

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matches that they had won and lost. We found in general the pitch of the

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grant is higher when the players lose them when they win. So then

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surely with a lower grade you're guaranteed to be a winner? Exactly.

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We found this right from the start of the match suggesting it is longer

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term factors at play, rankings, these things could affect how

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stressed or dominant we're feeling. And that can -- that can affect the

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pitch of the voice. Is it like an animal thing? Mail Red Deer war

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adage other and use that to assess the size of the other. So we see the

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same thing happening with humans. Let's put it to the test. How do you

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feel about grunting on court? It is a bit weird. It is a bit disturbing.

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It just shows they're putting in an effort. I play tennis and I do not

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grant. Not even a little noise when you're giving it everything? Let's

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do a family effort! That for me is a winning round. Do you grant in any

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situation? Only when Federer loses the point. Time to put the theory to

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the test. Here at the third round of the women's singles. Hill is going

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to win? -- who was going to win. If I had to pick someone it would be

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Diaz. Based on the grunting. The louder that your grunting and the

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deeper, the more likely you are to win. Let's hear it from you. That is

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more like it. She just lost the point. She did. So

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does grunting serve up the aces question mark is match point back on

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court 18. He did not get it right this time, but if you're listening,

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Andy, probably worth a shot! Now we're going to know which tennis

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players have watched this show because all the Test matches, the

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pitch is going to get lower. Chris, we've been watching some

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of your stuff, and you too can be Yes, but the question is,

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can you guess your grunt? We've got three grunts to listen

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to and one of them is yours. The other two belong

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to tennis players, you have My right to say that you have

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enhanced my grunt? No. It is definitely not number three.

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It's number two. He goes straight for it. Let's have a go. Number two?

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You say that that is you? Let's have a look. It was number two!

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APPLAUSE I would recognise my grunt anywhere!

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That leads us nicely to The Leftovers. You grunt them because

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your character is attacked. Series three is out now

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on Sky Atlantic and NOW TV - to take us back to the beginning,

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it's about on life on earth Phil us in for those people who have

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not seen the first and second series. It's originally from a

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novel, and it put forward the idea that I think, 2%, I've forgotten, 2%

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of the population of the world disappear on the same day. Some

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people claim it is the Rapture, as proper sized in the Bible and some

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people including my character, a man of God who feels he has not been

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chosen by God, deny that. That is why my character gets beaten so much

:17:32.:17:35.

because he is trying to discredit people who have apparently been

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chosen. So it is about faith but also is a character driven comedy

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drama. It is about something that we all experience, loss. It is about

:17:47.:17:52.

grief. The novelist wrote it, he was playing tennis one day with his son,

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the phone rang and he got the news that one of his parents had died. It

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was a beautiful summer day, she was happy, there had been a road

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accident, I know this sounds grim but three years later he found

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himself writing this novel, three years later he realised he was

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writing The Leftovers about his own experiences. He spent a lot of time

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with characters trying to make sense of life. The character you play in

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the novel was relatively small but you have played some part in

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developing him. I was tipped off that HBO were going to adapt the

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novel. I had read it and there was this character, a man of God, who

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isn't "Chosen". I thought that was a fantastic character for a drama. The

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writer, who wrote Lost, he also wrote The Leftovers. He heard I was

:18:49.:18:52.

interested and we met in London. He said, I wasn't going to put this

:18:53.:18:55.

character in this series, why do you want to play him. And he put him in

:18:56.:19:01.

the show. And it has really worked, in a way for me. Open some doors in

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America for me. Let's see a moment from the first

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episode of the new series where your character

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is delivering a sermon. I get a feeling in this place

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sometimes, the same feeling I got when my wife awoke from a

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three-year, the day that I brought her here. Mary. The same feeling I

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had after being told by countless doctors that Mary could not bear a

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child. But she did bear one here. Noah is a little shy, like his dad.

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My friends, I've got that feeling again so if something happens on

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October 14, you have all come to the right place.

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APPLAUSE We will leave it there as a teaser

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for everyone to enjoy because you have been incredibly busy. You have

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finished filming another series of The A-Word which is a passion of

:20:06.:20:10.

yours. BBC One show. It is brilliant, when is it back on. We

:20:11.:20:15.

think it will broadcast in October, we wrapped on Saturday and everyone

:20:16.:20:21.

is still hungover from the party. It is incredibly emotive. Yes, the

:20:22.:20:27.

central idea is communication, autism being a problem, the writer

:20:28.:20:32.

has made it a reality, as is dementia, those two things are real

:20:33.:20:37.

for families and families get on with it. They do not break down,

:20:38.:20:42.

they get stronger because of problems like the ones experienced

:20:43.:20:48.

by the boy in The A-Word. It is beautiful, I am so glad it is back.

:20:49.:20:53.

Shortly we're going to meet Kieron Williamson, the 14-year-old

:20:54.:20:55.

artist from Norfolk who has already become a millionaire by painting

:20:56.:20:58.

Before that Miranda's been to see a rare view,

:20:59.:21:05.

one that's so unique it can only be seen once every quarter century.

:21:06.:21:09.

Built in the nearly 19th-century for 200 years the Regents Canal has

:21:10.:21:15.

played a big part in linking London to the major industrial cities of

:21:16.:21:20.

the law. In its heyday the canal was strictly for business use but any

:21:21.:21:24.

one can enjoy these days and that means keeping the system in tiptop

:21:25.:21:30.

order. I am on my way to St Pancras Blocked just behind the railway

:21:31.:21:33.

station by a massive operation is underway. -- lock. Thousands of

:21:34.:21:41.

gallons of water are currently being pumped out. For the first time in 25

:21:42.:21:45.

years this part of the canal is being drained, in order to replace

:21:46.:21:52.

its enormous gates. This is no easy task and each gateway is three and a

:21:53.:21:57.

half tonnes. It needs the lock to be dry before they can be removed. The

:21:58.:22:02.

1500 locks to maintain the canal and River trust are kept constantly

:22:03.:22:06.

busy. Sarah Burns works for the trust. Welcome to St Pancras lockers

:22:07.:22:12.

you have never seen it before. It is beautiful, all this Victorian

:22:13.:22:16.

brickwork. This is the original brickwork put him in 1819 when the

:22:17.:22:20.

lock was built and it has been under water for 200 years, which has acted

:22:21.:22:27.

as a good preservative. Overtime water destroys the timber on the

:22:28.:22:31.

gates which is why every 25 years they need replacing. Each is

:22:32.:22:34.

made-to-measure as doing the initial construction there were no standard

:22:35.:22:38.

dimensions for canals and locks. They are on that boat and they will

:22:39.:22:45.

be put in once these have been taken out. Before this happens they must

:22:46.:22:49.

remove any debris collected over the years. What sort of things do you

:22:50.:22:55.

normally find? We always find lots of mobile phones and cameras and

:22:56.:22:58.

things like that but sometimes you find some unusual items. Previous

:22:59.:23:05.

clean-up operations have included saves, guns and even wartime

:23:06.:23:08.

explosives so there is no way of knowing what is in here until it is

:23:09.:23:13.

examined thoroughly. Do we literally just go through and get our hands

:23:14.:23:18.

dirty and see what we can find? All right. Joined by a team of engineers

:23:19.:23:22.

we surged to the right to see if they wouldn't find is. Gold, silver

:23:23.:23:28.

at least! So far all I have recovered is rubbish. Sarah however

:23:29.:23:36.

seems to be having more luck. The milk bottle or something? Beautiful.

:23:37.:23:44.

Very thick. United States. United dairies was formed during the First

:23:45.:23:48.

World War when the several smaller companies merged, supplying bottled

:23:49.:23:52.

milk to the doorsteps of London. And if you look hard enough there are

:23:53.:23:55.

other treasures found. Graham Smith is the site manager. What is that? A

:23:56.:24:04.

British rail button from and to Nick. Polished up that would be

:24:05.:24:10.

stunning. -- from a tunic. It probably dates back to the 1950s

:24:11.:24:15.

when British Railways as it was known then had been nationalised

:24:16.:24:20.

after World War II. An old Victorian coiner. 8099, brilliant. So there's

:24:21.:24:28.

a bit of treasure out there. Absolutely. Once the lock is cleared

:24:29.:24:32.

only one thing left to do, attach the new gates. A large crane is used

:24:33.:24:37.

to remove the old ones and with the new ones into position. -- move the

:24:38.:24:44.

new ones into position. And when the water level is restored the canal is

:24:45.:24:49.

back to being operational once more. Despite not uncovering any gold or

:24:50.:24:54.

silver today we have unearthed some treasures, we had access to this

:24:55.:24:57.

incredible piece of history which has stood the test of time and I

:24:58.:25:02.

hope it will be in use for another 200 years to come. A nice bath after

:25:03.:25:11.

that, I think. Definitely. Before we meet our next guest,

:25:12.:25:18.

let's remind ourselves of when Carrie Grant

:25:19.:25:19.

met him back in 2010 when he was just eight years old.

:25:20.:25:22.

when did you start getting into art. When I was five years old. I like

:25:23.:25:29.

painting boats, harbours, landscapes, water. How do you do

:25:30.:25:34.

this so quickly? I know what I'm doing! I do know what that he does

:25:35.:25:46.

know what he's doing. This is Kieron with his mum, Michelle.

:25:47.:25:48.

What did you think when you saw yourself just then! We have been

:25:49.:26:00.

astounded by some of your pieces. You were saying, Matt, cows... Cows

:26:01.:26:06.

and horses and dogs are incredibly difficult. I enjoy painting myself

:26:07.:26:10.

that it is just beautiful the way... The light and the tone you've got in

:26:11.:26:16.

these pictures. That one is beautiful. Thank you. Can you

:26:17.:26:21.

believe, Christopher, that this one in the middle, Kieron painted

:26:22.:26:29.

that... When I was five, I think. Five years old. Incredible.

:26:30.:26:36.

Impressionist. When you look at that which you did when you were five how

:26:37.:26:43.

do you feel about that work. You've got to give yourself credit at five,

:26:44.:26:53.

surely. No! OK. Parents will be thinking look at what their

:26:54.:26:55.

five-year-old draws in school and they love it that this is different.

:26:56.:27:00.

This has become a family affair. You and your husband are committed to

:27:01.:27:06.

working with Kieron and with your daughter. How does it work as a

:27:07.:27:12.

family. It is a full time job. Kieron's artwork dictates family

:27:13.:27:18.

life. Kieron will decide what he does from day-to-day, we plan our

:27:19.:27:21.

year around the exhibition, we spend as much time as we can in Cornwall.

:27:22.:27:26.

Kieron comes first. He has been in the driving seat since he was five.

:27:27.:27:34.

Coders school fit into this. I'm home-schooled, a retired head

:27:35.:27:37.

teacher teaches me for four hours every week, and I work on what she

:27:38.:27:43.

says during the week. Is that a bit of a break. Some days I look forward

:27:44.:27:50.

to getting stuck into homework! We said on the way that you have made

:27:51.:27:53.

an incredible amount of money doing this, what happens with all of that

:27:54.:27:59.

because you are only 14. How does that work, Michelle. We run as a

:28:00.:28:03.

limited company with a team of solicitors and accountants that

:28:04.:28:09.

support us. Keith and I can invest Kieron's money into things he wants

:28:10.:28:12.

to invest in so he has property and his own art collection. With the

:28:13.:28:17.

money you get to your Art Dubai and other art... It is a big passion.

:28:18.:28:23.

Which one of these is your favourite. The one in the middle. As

:28:24.:28:30.

Christopher said, the light on that is beautiful. A beach scene in

:28:31.:28:32.

Cornwall. Well if, like Kieron and his family,

:28:33.:28:36.

you have a favourite British beach Yes please, send us photos of

:28:37.:28:39.

you enjoying your favourite beach - with the family, with your pets,

:28:40.:28:45.

to the usual address and we'll show some on Wednesday,

:28:46.:28:48.

when we'll be live from Perranporth Thank you to all our guests

:28:49.:28:50.

for joining us tonight. The Leftovers is out to watch now

:28:51.:28:54.

on Sky Atlantic and NOW TV and Kieron's documentary,

:28:55.:28:57.

Mini Monet Millionaire, Tomorrow Angela and I will be joined

:28:58.:28:59.

by Sir Mark Rylance and Jack Lowden to talk about their new film,

:29:00.:29:03.

the hugely anticipated summer

:29:04.:29:07.

Matt Baker and Alex Jones are joined by actor Christopher Eccleston to talk about his TV series The Leftovers.

Plus Kieron Williamson, the 14-year-old artist from Norfolk who has sold paintings for over £50,000.