14/03/2018 The One Show


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14/03/2018

Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley are joined by composer Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, who explains why he has put songwriting on hold to finally pen his memoir.


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Hello and welcome to

The One Show with Matt Baker.

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And Michelle Ackerley.

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It's Wednesday which means Alex

and her team of incredible mums

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are over halfway through the Mother

of All Challenges for Sport Relief.

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They must already be looking forward

to a showstopping finale on Friday.

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And we know the man

who could write them one.

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He is - quite simply -

the most-successful British

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songwriter of all time.

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# It's so easy to leave me

# Don't cry for me Argentina

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# The truth is, I never left you

# The Phantom of the Opera is now

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# Your mastermind

#

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Amazing coloured coat

#.

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APPLAUSE

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Please welcome Lord

Andrew Lloyd Webber!

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

Your fans are in tonight.

Fantastic

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reception. Lovely to have you here,

and are you. We will talk a lot

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about your memoir. You have joined

joined when we have lost two of our

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greats, Jeremy Bowen and Stephen

Hawking. You must have met him?

I

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met him a couple of times at

parties. The only conversation I had

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with him was because music, thank

goodness, not sure I would have

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understood anything else.

What is

his taste of music

A wide taste in

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classical music, the Mozart requiem.

Which I share with imhad. I'm one of

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these people who can't understand

the concept of infinity.

It's a

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tough one that.

I'm hopeless when it

comes to understanding anything he

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was talking about.

We were happy he

was there to stand.

Extraordinary.

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Amazing person. Very engaging when

we talked.

Talking of talking and

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words here are inspiring words from

the man who unlocked the secrets of

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our universe.

Try to make sense of

what you see and wonder about what

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makes the universe exist. Be

curious.

Without imperfection you or

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I would not exist.

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I'm not afraid of death, I'm not in

a hurry to die, I've so much I want

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to do first.

Never give up work.

Work gives you meaning and purpose

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and life is empty without it.

It has

been a glorious time to be alive.

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The greatest enemy of knowledge is

not ignorance it's the illusion of

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knowledge.

People who boost about

their IQ are losers.

Life would be

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tragic if it weren't funny.

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tragic if it weren't funny.

So

remember to look up at the stars and

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not down at your feet. Thank you to

the Science Museum and the

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University College London. We are

joined by the BBC's science

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correspondent, Pallab Ghosh. You met

him many times?

I got to know him

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well. I have known him for 20 years.

It's a sad day. I remember the first

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time I met him. He was my Oied idol.

You can imagine how nervous I was

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when I came to meet him. When he

arrived, he smiled at me and

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immediately put me at my ease. I

think that's one of the reasons why

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people have taken to him so much. He

was basically a really nice bloke.

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That was the thing that came across.

For all his kind of complex

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intellectual ideas, he had a

wonderful charisma, warmth and

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humanitarian. That is what I

remembered about him.

That's lovely

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to hear. We all know of him as an

incredible scientists. Just how

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important is his legacy, in terms of

inspiring people in

Well, he said

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that when he was diagnosed with

motor neurone disease that was when

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he kicked off. He wasn't that

interested in his work. It was all

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too easy. He decided then that

everything else was going to be a

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bonus. Look at what he achieved. The

frontiers of science. The most

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famous scientists in the world

whole. If he could do that with that

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disability, what could the rest of

us do. Another word that is often

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used with Stephen Hawking is

"inspiration." Anyone that came

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close to him and saw what he did

could not fail to be inspired.

We

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heard him saying, life would be

tragic if it wasn't funny. This was

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something else, great wit and humour

that crossed generations, didn't it?

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He played a joke on me that very

first time I met him. We were

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filming an interview and the

cameraman wanted to change the

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lighting he said - is it all right

if I unplugged this. He did. All

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these sirens went off. We thought,

we've plugged something crucial to

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Professor Hawking's wellbeing. He

slumped over. It turned out he was

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laughing at our incompetence. He was

a huge joker.

On that point, Andrew.

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We knew you did a clip for Comic

Relief.

Yes.

Were you auditioning to

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be Stephen's voice. Look at this.

Time to find my new voice.

Stephen,

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listen to my voice. It's deep, it's

sexy. It's got a tinge of...

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Physics.

I'm the obvious choice. I'm

intelligent, kind of, and I'm young

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and cool. Kind of.

Frankly, I think

your life is so important that it

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ought to be a musical. I'm

thinkingful something like K

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everybody's Hawk hawk. A really,

really big show.

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# Memory, you have photographic

memory... #

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Not a chance!

APPLAUSE

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Everybody's Hawking.

Terrible.

We

are thinking of all of Stephen's

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friends and family today.

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We're moving on now

to something we've talked

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about many times on the show

- single-use plastic.

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Because in yesterday's

Spring Statement, the Chancellor

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called for a consultation

on a potential plastic tax.

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It's the kind of co-ordinated

action that supermarkets,

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recycling companies and councils

have all been calling for.

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But where do the people who actually

make the plastic stand?

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We've been kind of demonised as

producers of this poison that is

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killing the country.

It seems to be

almost like a panic at the moment.

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These people all work in an industry

that almost overnight has become

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socially unacceptable.

I can't watch

the TV. I can't tell my friends who

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I work for. It can be pretty

embarrassing at times.

This

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family-run company has been making

plastic for almost 70 years and now

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produces 100 million single-use

plastic tumblers every year. I don't

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think it's the enemy. It's the way

that certain people misuse them. The

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salesman manager John Reeves

contacted the One Show to defend the

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industry. I'm here at his factory to

hear his argument that plastic need

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not be the environmental scourge

that some say it is.

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One of the core products we have is

the flexi glass. We can make a

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million of these glasses a day.

May

I?

Yes.

This is disposable.

Yes.

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Designed to be used one time only.

Yeah.

How is that defensivable given

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everything we know about plastic

pollution.

These are used at many,

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many different occasions. At

sporting events, music festivals.

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The reason it's used is that it's

absolutely fit for purpose and it

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doesn't present any danger to any

member of the public.

Why not use a

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paper cup?

The difficulty with a

paper cup is you are left with the

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same problem. A paper cup typically

has a plastic interior which means

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the product is difficult to recycle.

They know their market but it

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understand it is has a

responsibility to ensure the cups it

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manufacturers doesn't end up in

landfill.

We can get the cups back

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and recycle them and reuse the

material again. We work at large

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scale music events, festivals and

sporting arenas am we are designing

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recollection centres and recycling

centres that can go on the concourse

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of these grounds. We are scooping

the glasses up at the end of the

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events, bringing them back,

reprocessing them, remanufacturing

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and making the product into

something that can be useful. Our

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ultimate goal is to take the cup,

use it, it comes back here and we

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make it back into a cup.

This is

what is called closed loop

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recycling. Reprocessing used plastic

and remanufacturing it into other

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products. Although the company can't

yet do that itself, it recently

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started working with HAHN Plastics

in Manchester.

We manufacturer

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outdoor furniture, decking boards,

bollards, retaining wall structures,

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and all of them are made from 100%

recyclable plastic. If we use

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plastic cups as an example, it would

typically take 22,000 to make a

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garden bench and 48,000 to make a

typical picnic table.

But not all

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manufacturers are reusing plastic in

this way and recycling companies

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believe the government should be

putting regulations in place to make

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this happen.

The important thing to

remember with plastic recycling is

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everyone has a part to play. You and

I go into the supermarket and buy a

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shampoo bottle off the shelve and

put the bottle in the bin. We supply

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it to a client to

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it to a client to produce another

item. We need to get it right from

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the start and retailers and consumer

brands are designing products for

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repsychability. We should be saying,

if you are a consumer brand or

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retailer and you want to do business

in this country, you must include a

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minimum amount of row sighable

material in your packaging. It's a

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resource, not rubbish. We want to

keep it off our beaches and oceans

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and put it back in the British

economy where it belongs.

The

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Government will be work with the

plastics industry to reform

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regulations and incentivise

producers to take greater

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responsibility for the environmental

impact of their products. Back on

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the factory floor, John is keen to

show me the finished product. Here

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they come, the end of the line he

with say it's the end of the line.

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You don't want it to be the end of

the line?

This is the start of the

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line, really. We want to make sure

we can get as many of these cups, if

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not all of these cups back, and get

them back into the recycling

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programme.

This could potentially be

big news for all of us as this type

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of low grade single-use plastic is

one of the most difficult to find a

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market for. So I hope we get bins

like this at major sporting events,

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concerts, festivals really soon.

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Thank you Lucy. Next week we will

look in more detail at how recycled

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plastic is being used to pave

Britain's roads.

Indeed. Andrew it's

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your 70th birthday next week and you

had a business busy time, a new

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album and a memoir Unmasked. We know

you as a prolific songwriter. Have

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you enjoyed the process of bright

wroo writing a I used to memoir.

Do

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the food reviews for the Daily

Telegraph. Writing is something I've

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enjoyed doing. I can't write lyrics.

I'm useless. You don't want to ask

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me about those.

Don't go there.

I

enjoy writing pros.

Did you think of

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doing a musical of your life?

As I

say in the introduction to the book,

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I'm the most boring person I've ever

written about.

Come on! Come on.

I

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highly doubt that.

You had an

eccentric house.

Yes.

We have a

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picture of your auntie with a monkey

on her shoulder. This is what you

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grew up -

My auntie didn't live in

the house. My father had a huge

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electronic organ. My mother took a

shine to a pianist and much

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supported him. He often was in the

house practicing away with loud

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music. My brother on the cello. I

wonder what the neighbours thought.

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They must have gone mad. I was

leaving the house with Tim Rice,

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Julian was playing away on his cello

the guy lefrpd leapt out saying, I

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don't mind the organ or the piano

but it obeo player I can't stand. I

0:14:080:14:19

got into musicals. My Fair Lady came

into town when I was nine years old.

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I saw My Fair Lady and West Side

Story back-to-back. Two different

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musicals. I fell in love with them.

With my aunt being in the theatre

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and me making glamorous people in

the theatre who she knew, the whole

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thing just... It grabbed me at an

early age. At a time when kids

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weren't into musicals at all. Is the

thing

That, isn't it

One show on

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Saturday night which completely

grabbed me. It was called Oh, boy,

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on ITV, shot by a guy who went on to

direct the Rockfella. Filmed in the

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Hackney Empire. It was live. They

used the theatre as if it was part

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of the set. When I was very young I

thought of rock music as theatre.

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That put me apart from the others

who were at that time doing The

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Boyfriend.

Yes.

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And these days, if you don't own

them, you work closely with those

0:15:200:15:25

theatres you grew up in. That must

be extraordinary now.

The first

0:15:250:15:29

theatre I went to to see anything

was the London Palladium, that is

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one of ours. The first theatre I saw

a musical was the Theatre Royal,

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Drury Lane, and that is one of ours!

My great joy at the moment is we are

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going to refurbish and reconstruct

the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. It

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closes in a year. That is

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closes in a year. That is going to

be great fun, make it for today.

You

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talk in your memoirs about stories

that might have been, some leading

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ladies that didn't end up playing

big roles, Judi Dench, Liza

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Minnelli.

Judi Dench was going to

play Grisabella in caps but she

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broke her Achilles tendon in

rehearsals and people often as me

0:16:080:16:13

what Memory would have been like if

Judi had some good, and almost like

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Edith Pier Avenue, if it makes any

sense. And Liza Minnelli, I have

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known her very wealthy years but she

has never done anything of my but

0:16:230:16:28

she did screen test for the movie of

Evita. I didn't have any control but

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I remember it was rather weird, she

had a blonde wig and didn't look

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great in a blonde wig. And then

Bette Midler, we cast Jesus Christ

0:16:360:16:42

Superstar and Robert Stig Wood, the

producer, Castellet in New York with

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a lady from the original album --

Robert Stig would. We got a

0:16:460:16:52

last-minute call from an agent who

said you must go and see this girl

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who has been singing in a swimming

baths in New York and I went at the

0:16:550:16:59

last minute and she sang I Don't

Know How To Love Him and it was to

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die for but we had cast by that time

and it was not to be.

The book is a

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brilliant memoir, it is all in there

and it is quite a read, I must say.

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And while we are celebrating Lord

Webber's achievements, we can't

0:17:150:17:19

forget the hard work being done by

Alex and her team of mums for Sport

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Relief.

So far, they have swum

through the freezing waters of Loch

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Ness, they have climbed one of the

Lake District's highest peaks and

0:17:280:17:34

the Mother of All Challenges, it is

called for a reason.

And it is stage

0:17:340:17:37

three, time for them to get on their

bikes.

0:17:370:17:41

With two elements of our Mother of

All Challenges in the bag, we are

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feeling tired and missing our loved

ones.

There is quite sombre feel

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this morning brawlers. We are all

exhausted and missing home.

I think

0:17:490:17:55

he said mum for the first time over

the weekend and I wasn't there to

0:17:550:17:59

see it. So I am finding it really

hard.

Today, at that hour swim and

0:17:590:18:05

hike, we have a long-distance cycle

ride which will take us over three

0:18:050:18:08

of the toughest passes in the Lakes,

the Kirk Stone, the Hollister and

0:18:080:18:13

the new lands. That is 7,000 feet of

climb.

The first one will be Kirk

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stone pass, it will be a really

tough day.

Your legs will be a bit

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ropey, hopefully they will holdout

for the cycle today, especially for

0:18:240:18:29

the big hills, which will be

seriously hard.

We are absolutely

0:18:290:18:33

shattered but we can't put it off

any longer. Debbie and I have been

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chosen to cycle the first leg.

I

think today is going to be

0:18:380:18:42

ridiculously tough. And I have my

lucky heart from my girl.

I am

0:18:420:18:49

scared of the big hills. It is a

tough challenge for me and the Debs,

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who has suffered from depression in

the past.

I got to the stage where I

0:18:540:18:58

couldn't leave the house with my two

little girls, I was too scared.

What

0:18:580:19:02

was the Trigger for that?

It was the

trauma of Ed Leigh's birth, how'd

0:19:020:19:07

you carry on, what are people

thinking about me? And I thought, I

0:19:070:19:13

have got to get some help here.

And

thank goodness I did. That is why

0:19:130:19:20

Debbie, mall, Jodi and Leigh are

here pushing themselves to raise

0:19:200:19:24

awareness for other mums who may be

going through other situations. And

0:19:240:19:30

Debbie, up these hills, is really

having to push herself.

I can't...

0:19:300:19:36

You can do it, Debs.

You definitely

can. Keep driving, great work.

Think

0:19:360:19:42

of the girls.

I can't...

It is

really tough, but she doesn't give

0:19:420:19:50

up. Even after miles of cycling.

This is so hard.

0:19:500:19:59

This is so hard.

With little power

left in her legs,... This mum does

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not surrender.

That was truly

remarkable. That is some of the

0:20:080:20:17

bravest riding I have ever seen.

That is inspirational for anybody.

I

0:20:170:20:24

am not pushing you!

0:20:240:20:30

am not pushing you!

Jodi, Leigh and

Amal take on the next leg.

If I

0:20:310:20:35

think back to a year ago, I could

barely get out of a chair. And it

0:20:350:20:38

wasn't only for physical disability,

I just wasn't motivated to move.

0:20:380:20:42

This was an opportunity, a chance to

move forward beyond all of the

0:20:420:20:46

rubbish I went through, you know,

into a new life.

The flat stretch of

0:20:460:20:51

road soon runs out.

Oh, my guard!

Are you kidding?

The sheer gradient

0:20:510:21:00

of the harnessed pass claims its

casualty. -- of Coniston pass.

You

0:21:000:21:09

have got this, this is your

challenge, Amal!

And then the steep

0:21:090:21:16

incline proves too much for the

whole team.

Go on, girly.

This is

0:21:160:21:23

brutal out here. The fact you have,

this far is incredible.

Through

0:21:230:21:31

strain and injury, these mums ride

onto the top of their last hill.

My

0:21:310:21:37

back.

Don't look back.

That is so

much worse than I ever imagined.

0:21:370:21:46

Absolutely brutal.

We had all

planned to join up again for the

0:21:460:21:52

final leg but after 11 hours in the

saddle and dark most roaring in, the

0:21:520:21:56

decision was made to call it a day.

They have had an incredible day,

0:21:560:22:01

they have achieved a huge amount,

climbing over 7,000 feet, some

0:22:010:22:05

massive climbs throughout the day

but they just couldn't finish off

0:22:050:22:09

because of the safety aspect, and so

I have taken them off the road. What

0:22:090:22:13

I am really keen for them to do is

to remember what they have achieved,

0:22:130:22:16

something truly exceptional.

APPLAUSE

0:22:160:22:21

Very, very good effort.

Tomorrow, Alex and the team will be

0:22:210:22:28

caving in the Brecon Beacons.

To

support the Mother of All Challenges

0:22:280:22:31

and make a donation to Sport Relief,

you can donate £5...

0:22:310:22:42

Texts will cost your donation

plus your standard network message

0:22:460:22:49

charge and all of your donation

will go to Sport Relief.

0:22:490:22:52

You must be 16 or over and please

ask the bill payer's permission.

0:22:520:22:57

For full terms and conditions -

or to donate any amount online -

0:22:570:23:00

go to bbc.co.uk/sportrelief.

0:23:000:23:05

So, shall we have a little look and

see how much you have all donated so

0:23:050:23:10

far for this challenge? It is

currently standing at...

0:23:100:23:19

currently standing at... Thank you,

one and all and well done mums, keep

0:23:190:23:22

it up.

Team mum! And before they

started their challenge, Alex took

0:23:220:23:27

two of the team over to Kenyi to

receive your donations in action and

0:23:270:23:31

here is the first report -- over to

Kenya.

Kenya's capital city,

0:23:310:23:38

Nairobi. I have come to this

district with Amal and Debbie. It is

0:23:380:23:43

home to thousands of children.

How cute!

0:23:430:23:48

But delivering a child here is far

from straightforward. Each year in

0:23:480:23:56

Kenya, around 74,000 children die

before their fifth birthday. In the

0:23:560:24:00

UK, that figure is 3,000. For many

families, this can be due to poor

0:24:000:24:07

hygiene and sanitation.

It is quite an assault on

0:24:070:24:10

everything, the smell, the heat and

the human sewerage that is running

0:24:100:24:15

through this whole place.

And, sadly, there is another reason.

0:24:150:24:20

Not enough women go to a hospital or

clinic to have their babies.

0:24:200:24:23

Hello, are you Jane?

We have come to meet Jane. She has

0:24:230:24:30

lived here her whole life.

0:24:300:24:33

TRANSLATION: I gave birth at the

home and after two months, my baby

0:24:380:24:42

had rashes on its body and losing

weight and vomiting and then my baby

0:24:420:24:49

died.

0:24:490:24:54

died.

Jane, can I ask what your

baby's name was? Speaker Margaret. A

0:24:540:25:00

baby girl.

Oh, beautiful.

TRANSLATION: I think about her all

0:25:000:25:08

the time.

Talking to Jane brings

back difficult memories for Debbie,

0:25:080:25:13

who has miscarried twice and nearly

lost her own child Ellie.

It is

0:25:130:25:20

almost like looking in the mirror,

talking to her, but hers is a

0:25:200:25:24

million times worse.

It brings them

home.

They are precious the world

0:25:240:25:30

over, kids are precious.

The good

news is that Jane is pregnant again

0:25:300:25:35

and is getting help from community

health worker Lorna, who encourages

0:25:350:25:38

mums to receive care at the nearby

Kibera health Centre, supported by

0:25:380:25:45

Sport Relief donations. Through this

project we visiting today, they are

0:25:450:25:52

trying to do that, to educate these

women and help them realise it is

0:25:520:25:56

much safer for them to give birth in

the clinic where they have

0:25:560:26:00

professionals that can help.

In this clinic, they do absolutely

0:26:000:26:07

everything. Women come here to give

birth, they do immunisations, they

0:26:070:26:12

do postnatal care on the mothers.

Without this establishment and the

0:26:120:26:15

care and facilities they provide

here, it would be a very different

0:26:150:26:19

scenario for women and babies.

Helen is the nurse in charge and

0:26:190:26:23

helps to keep the centre running.

How many women do you see on average

0:26:230:26:30

every morning here, then?

We see up

to 40 children every day, those who

0:26:300:26:36

come in for immunisations. Then we

have those that come for growth. So

0:26:360:26:42

sometimes 60 children.

How many

staff would serve 60 or so children?

0:26:420:26:50

Two people, a nutritionist and a

nurse.

I get stressed if I have to

0:26:500:26:55

see ten plus patients in a morning

clinic. I cannot imagine having to

0:26:550:26:59

get through 60 patients on my own.

Every mother who comes here will be

0:26:590:27:04

seen, regardless of the staffing

ratios.

0:27:040:27:06

But this clinic's work is not just

about women. Men play an important

0:27:060:27:12

role to. Having sadly lost two wives

and four children, Lucas's job is to

0:27:120:27:18

educate fathers and their families

on natal care.

I do educate men. If

0:27:180:27:24

your wife is pregnant, she should go

to clinic, she should take a

0:27:240:27:30

balanced diet. We tell them about

hygiene, boiling water, drinking

0:27:300:27:34

water.

Are you seeing a difference?

Before, they are very bad but now,

0:27:340:27:41

they catch up.

This improved education of parents

0:27:410:27:45

has helped mums like Jane, who is

now able to visit the health centre

0:27:450:27:50

with health worker Lorna, securing a

better chance for a healthy future

0:27:500:27:53

for her new baby.

The clinic seems so busy and,

0:27:530:28:00

obviously, the babies are very

healthy and doing well. What sort of

0:28:000:28:03

things would help you?

New

infrastructure and, of course,

0:28:030:28:09

training, for health care workers.

You need a few more Helens.

When the

0:28:090:28:14

mother smiles at me and says thank

you, that is it, I am satisfied.

0:28:140:28:19

No one should have to go through

what Jane did and lose a baby.

0:28:190:28:23

Projects like this one can help save

lives.

0:28:230:28:29

£10, just £10 will buy equipment to

help newborn babies that are

0:28:290:28:34

struggling to breathe.

And £20 will

help provide training for hero

0:28:340:28:38

community health volunteers like

Lorna to help keep mothers and

0:28:380:28:41

babies safe.

Honestly, your money

will help so many mothers and so

0:28:410:28:45

many babies in this area. Just

donate what you can, thank you.

0:28:450:28:50

Thank you.

And that is exactly what

is driving them on that challenge,

0:28:500:28:55

pushing themselves to the absolute

limit so they can give opportunities

0:28:550:28:58

to others.

We will have more from Alexandre

0:28:580:29:01

mums' visit to Kenya tomorrow.

And

that is it, thank you to our guest

0:29:010:29:09

Andrew Lloyd Webber.

0:29:090:29:11

His memoir Unmasked is out now.

0:29:110:29:12

And Unmasked: The Platinum

Collection - an album

0:29:120:29:16

Angelica is back tomorrow and we

will find out while Debbie McGee has

0:29:160:29:19

swapped her

0:29:190:29:20

Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley are joined by one of Britain's most successful composers, Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, who explains why he has put songwriting on hold to finally pen his memoir, after more than 50 years in showbusiness.