20/01/2017 The One Show


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20/01/2017

Angela Scanlon and Fay Ripley chat to actor and extreme-fisherman Robson Green. Plus Pete Tong performs with the Heritage Orchestra, and a cameo from Woody Harrelson.


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Hello and welcome to The One Show with Angela Scanlon.

:00:18.:00:19.

And tonight, folks, we've all gone...

:00:20.:00:28.

Suddenly everything's going right for the veteran dance DJ who's come

:00:29.:00:43.

over all orchestral and become the hottest ticket in town.

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We'll be waving our glow sticks outside later,

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Please welcome the running man himself, Robson Green!

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Please, will you do it again? What and in true. Please! Smooth moves.

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My agent will be... Do you pull out those moves to impress the ladies?

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My dad was a champion ballroom dancer, but the genes were not

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passed on. I dance with a confidence that wholly unwarranted. I do the

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lip biter. We are delighted to have you back. The last time we saw you

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on television in the brilliantly titled Robson Crusoe, you were in

:01:50.:01:57.

bad old shape. I was really poorly. We were trying to recreate the story

:01:58.:02:03.

of Robinson Crusoe, who lasted on the island for 28 years in Daniel

:02:04.:02:08.

Defoe's writing. I lasted three hours. There was a headline in the

:02:09.:02:12.

Daily Mail, Robson Green mocked on Twitter because he has his own

:02:13.:02:16.

doctor. Twitter is for people who can't shut up even when they are on

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their own. And had there not been a doctor, I would have died,

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seriously. I wouldn't be here. We went back on and told the story. It

:02:25.:02:31.

was a delightful story about consideration in life, all I had to

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consider was water, food and shelter and it was a life affirming story.

:02:36.:02:37.

We are delighted you survived. Now the latest on a story that

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developed overnight, when a famous Hollywood

:02:41.:02:42.

actor was on the run Woody Harrelson, the star of Cheers

:02:43.:02:44.

and the Hunger Games movies, was eventually caught

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after a drunken rampage It happened in the early hours

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of this morning and was broadcast live to cinemas in what's

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being claimed to be the world's It's based on a true story. Here we

:02:56.:02:58.

go. Woody described it as one of the

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worst nights of his life. He got drunk, vandalised a taxi, got chased

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and caught by the police and spent a night in a prison cell. 15 years

:03:21.:03:25.

later, he's decided to restage the event on the streets of London, and

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he doesn't want our cameras anywhere near it. Where's Woody? I think it

:03:30.:03:36.

starts with a restaurant scene around the corner, and then there is

:03:37.:03:39.

supposed to be some kind of chase happening. We think it will end up

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on Waterloo Bridge. But this is guesswork. We would normally be

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welcomed on to film sets to meet and interview Woody. But not tonight. We

:03:51.:03:55.

are having to make it up as we go along. It's not long before I think

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we chanced upon one of Woody's sets. This spot, it's turning 2am and they

:04:02.:04:08.

have shut off one end of the street. Woody going into the restaurant.

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Something tells me our presence here isn't welcome. Can I ask you to move

:04:15.:04:20.

completely. We made to move on by the police and it looks like Woody

:04:21.:04:25.

is on the move well. They are filming in there, are they in a

:04:26.:04:34.

camper? In that van was Woody. He was in the camper van. It looked

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awesome. I think Owen Wilson was in there as well, very cool. We are

:04:39.:04:44.

heading to a nightclub called Crave. When we get there, it looks like

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it's all going Pete Tong. There we have it coming Woody Harrelson live

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on the streets of London being broadcast to more than 500 cinemas

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at this very moment in the states. Korea we are one hour into this

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movie. About 40 minutes to go. This is where you would imagine the pace

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will pick up. We've lost him. We were already quite a long way

:05:21.:05:23.

behind. We know they are going to Waterloo Bridge. Three people the

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other side of us. They are speaking on radios. Here it is. Yes, they are

:05:33.:05:37.

filming in that police van. That's where Woody is. There's his kid,

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Woody's actual kid, who I think as a part in the show. What an epic

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backdrop for a final scene. Wanted the people watching the

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action in a West End cinema think of it? It was amazing. Worth staying up

:05:59.:06:07.

for? Definitely. Did it work? In a manner of speaking. It was

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absolutely phenomenal. Every five minutes you go, this is still

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1-shot! And it never got broken the whole time! Not once. It was

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amazing. For Woody to do what he did, keep the energy from start to

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finish. It was awesome. It got better and better. I forgot it was

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live. The ultimate compliment. Looks like a good night out.

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Woody said this morning that he would never do it again. You quite

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like being pushed out of your comfort zone. I do, but trying to do

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something like that, I would come out in a rash. He might have done

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the whole making a feature film live, but can he get a grand Slam?

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Tell us about that. I am a keen angler. In the world fishing there

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is a of honour for fishermen. It's called a Grand Slam, it's a chance

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to get into the world record books. The IGFA world record books. If you

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get three fish from a set list in a 24-hour window, you get into this

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record book. I achieved something in this adventure that only one other

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fishermen in the world has ever achieved. Since records began there

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has never been an actor in the record books. The record book comes

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out soon and we will see an actor in it. Let's take a look at you

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achieving this. He's taken it. We are in. That's one

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of the slammer fishery wanted. -- slammer fish we wanted.

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Good man. The mahi mahi. Polynesian, for very, very strong. You caught a

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fish. It looked a bit like you were on holiday. I am living the dream.

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It's an experience like no other. You know, Fay, acting, we suspend

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disbelief and pretend to be other people as actors. One thing you have

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to crack is fake sincerity. If you can fake sincerity commute cracked

:08:41.:08:44.

it as an actor. Were you not really excited then? That's really Robson.

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You are living in the moment, you are present, and life is good. You

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are not defined by time. I started fishing as a seven-year-old. Fishing

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today is just as joyous as it was then. That was the real deal, the

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joy in your face. Absolutely. To catch a species on that list. The

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Sailfish is their fastest in the world. A mahi mahi. And a tuna, a

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wahu. It is to fishing what Usain Bolt and Mo Farah are to athletics,

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the people lie -- people I was fishing with.

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Now, Robson, you've got a lot of other TV projects on the way,

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but you've got to earn the right to talk them up to our audience.

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In the water are nine well known people with fishy surnames,

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and for each three you name correctly, we'll let you talk

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Let's play I'm A Celebrity, Fish Me Out of Here!

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Love it, there's Nicola Sturgeon. Each of the fish are surnames, just

:10:14.:10:29.

in case you're struggling. There's a pike, is that actress out of Gone

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Girl. Rosamund Pike. Well done. He's got two. I've worked with this guy

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on Soldier Soldier. That is Colin Salmon. I got a Grand Slam! Where's

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my award! It wasn't easy. Does it feel as good as the real deal? It

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was good, quite exciting. I'm chuffed. You have earned the right

:11:03.:11:07.

to talk about another project. I'm going to nudge you in the direction

:11:08.:11:10.

of Tales From The Coast. But whatever you would like. I've always

:11:11.:11:15.

lived in Northumberland. I debate series called Tales From

:11:16.:11:22.

Northumberland which is really popular, and they've extended the

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brand to Tales From The Coast. It's going around the length and breadth

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of Britain celebrating these beautiful idyllic islands around the

:11:31.:11:37.

country. People don't know, but the Hebrides are the most idyllic places

:11:38.:11:44.

to visit. On a good day on the beach on one of those islands, it's like

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being in the Seychelles, it's that beautiful. You got to hang out with

:11:49.:11:53.

your old pal. We were talking about the Pembrokeshire coastline. I got a

:11:54.:11:58.

text on my good friend Jerome Flynn. He said, where are you. I said I was

:11:59.:12:02.

in Pembrokeshire. He said, I know, I round the corner! There must be an

:12:03.:12:07.

album or a TV series in this. We teamed up. It was absolutely

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delightful to spend a week with Jerome, who I hadn't seen in 14

:12:17.:12:21.

years. We keep in touch and face time but I hadn't seen the guy in 14

:12:22.:12:27.

years. Did you sing together on the canoe? No. The good thing about the

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singing all those years ago, we stopped! That was the good thing.

:12:31.:12:38.

You couldn't even tease us? There was that programme on television

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called animal Hospital and a woman brought on two guinea pigs called

:12:42.:12:46.

Robson and Jerome. She was asked what was wrong and she said, its

:12:47.:12:48.

Robson, he's not right! Robson's Grand Slam Fishing

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begins on Monday at 9pm Later on, Pete Tong

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and the Heritage Orchestra are turning the BBC into an 1990s

:12:54.:13:02.

Ibiza club. They're just warming up

:13:03.:13:04.

the light show as we speak. But first we're heading back

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another two decades, to the street where it all began

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for a 1970s pop legend. My name is Gilbert O'Sullivan. This

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is me at number one in the charts in 1972.

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# The moment I met you.... # I've had 16 hit singles across three

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decades in the UK and USA. But I think we can safely say I was a

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little out of step with the rock stars of the early 70s. Born Raymond

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Edward O Sullivan, lived in Waterford, moved my family to

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Swindon when I was nine. -- my family moved. This is the house, 44

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Frobisher Drive. It looks very different now. I'm kind of looking

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forward to going inside. Wow, so here we are. This is very different,

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very different. The television would have been just over there. A magical

:14:05.:14:10.

time for me as a youngster. This is a hold-up, gents. I became those

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cowboys. I became those Western heroes, in my after-school or on a

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weekend. The lasting memory of growing up is with my mother. We

:14:20.:14:24.

have very few memories of my father. I know we saw him when he was in

:14:25.:14:27.

hospital during the last weeks of his life. Luckily, my older sister

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Mary remembers more than me. We moved here in 1959, nay, because dad

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had stomach cancer. Of course, he didn't realise he was terminal. He

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never knew that? He never did but mother became protector, mother and

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father to both of us. Six children. When I wanted a drum kit, I got one.

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I remember when she got it. She knew you were determined with your music.

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I was a bit of an oddball. Mon just wanted you to dress ordinarily, she

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would call it. The last thing I wanted to do was to look like

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everybody else. Nothing has changed! Take care. My mum brought a piano

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into the house which ended up in the garden shed and it was the start of

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my songwriting career. This is where the garden shed was, at the top of

:15:18.:15:21.

the garden. Inside, the piano would be up against the back of the shared

:15:22.:15:25.

common here, with the window here. You can imagine every evening I

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would come out here for a couple of hours, singing and playing.

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# Look where it disappears. # Frankly, if I did not have access to

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the piano out here in the shed, I'm not sure what I would have done. At

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school, the one subject I got good marks in was so at 16, I came to

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Swindon College, where I studied painting in graphic design.

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So this is an example of one of the paintings I did in my last year at

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art school. That is a face upside down, actually Paul McCartney upside

:16:03.:16:07.

down. I'm quite proud of these. But I hadn't forgotten about music. It

:16:08.:16:14.

was through college I met Rick Davis and went on to form Supertramp. We

:16:15.:16:24.

were in a band called Rick's Blues. With the Bandai formed with Rick, we

:16:25.:16:28.

went to London to make a demo, to make a record. We did two of my

:16:29.:16:35.

songs. I was really happy with it. We felt that we had somehow made

:16:36.:16:40.

some impact in the world of music. I knew that music was what I wanted to

:16:41.:16:44.

spend my life doing but that meant leaving Swindon. At the tender age

:16:45.:16:48.

of 19, I went to London and just five years later, I had my first

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number one. But it all began with that piano in

:16:51.:17:00.

a garden shed in Frobisher Drive, Swindon.

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And you can see Gilbert on his 50th anniversary tour later this year.

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Now, we've moved outside to meet a man who we're guessing in his 25

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years on Radio 1 has never played a Gilbert O'Sullivan song.

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APPLAUSE You're wrong, actually, I have. I

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think it was at a school disco, like Get Down, his 91 before he soppy. It

:17:34.:17:38.

is such an honour to meet the catchphrase. Thank you. A household

:17:39.:17:44.

name. It is right where I work upstairs, it's not far, you should

:17:45.:17:49.

have asked earlier. Does it ever get annoying, Pete Tong? It's only ever

:17:50.:17:52.

been good. It was meant to be someone taking out of the Mickey --

:17:53.:17:57.

taking the Mickey out of me, and it upset my mum at the beginning but

:17:58.:18:01.

Havana film, rhyming slang, dictionary, loved by every cab

:18:02.:18:05.

driver. Now we do parties under that name. Happy days! This is quite a

:18:06.:18:10.

gear change, people who would have known you in a certain arena, dance,

:18:11.:18:16.

now at the BBC Proms, joining forces with an orchestra. Talk us through

:18:17.:18:19.

how this happened. Doing it properly! I was invited to do one of

:18:20.:18:23.

the BBC Proms in 2015 and we wanted to celebrate the kind of heritage of

:18:24.:18:28.

Ibiza and what the music meant to people and interpret those songs in

:18:29.:18:31.

a different way so that is what we did. People went crazy for it. It

:18:32.:18:36.

was a huge event. Look at the reaction, off the back of it, was

:18:37.:18:39.

incredible. We were halfway through the first song, and everyone in the

:18:40.:18:43.

Albert Hall got up and started clapping and going mad and never sat

:18:44.:18:46.

down the whole thing. The director came up to us at the end and said

:18:47.:18:50.

he'd never seen anything like it. How does it work on stage. Jules,

:18:51.:18:54.

you are used to commanding an orchestra and doing your own thing,

:18:55.:18:59.

and reading the crowd. I DJ him, send him looping. But it works! We

:19:00.:19:08.

both know who the real boss is! He tells me what to do, though. I do

:19:09.:19:13.

have to fit in with these guys. Is this the kind of music that you

:19:14.:19:19.

like? What is your era? I'll be honest with you, I listened to

:19:20.:19:23.

Pete's stuff but since Elvis passed away, there's been nothing, really,

:19:24.:19:28.

has there? Really? My degree I tried my best in the early 90s. What are

:19:29.:19:32.

you laughing about? Prince might have something to say about that.

:19:33.:19:39.

Either David Bowie and prints in the audience staring at me and Jerome,

:19:40.:19:44.

saying, "Who are those two nuggets?" But everyone else's reaction has

:19:45.:19:48.

been incredible, the album is going crazy, sold-out arena tour. Yes, we

:19:49.:19:52.

did three arenas that Christmas with was a highlight of my career, 18,000

:19:53.:19:57.

people at the O2. It captured people's imagination. It's an

:19:58.:20:01.

audience participation thing. The orchestra are amazing but everyone

:20:02.:20:05.

gets involved and it is just a mass party, really, like celebrating the

:20:06.:20:10.

great music of the past but very much relevant for people today as

:20:11.:20:14.

well. These guys, are you up for it? Yes! There's a huge tour coming up

:20:15.:20:22.

at the end of the and tickets are on sale. -- end of the year.

:20:23.:20:27.

Right, we'll let these lot warm up and get ready.

:20:28.:20:30.

Yes, and whilst they're doing that, here's top chef Tony Singh

:20:31.:20:32.

on a One Show mission to find an unsung kitchen hero.

:20:33.:20:35.

Be it at school, in hospital, or the regular work canteen, millions of us

:20:36.:20:41.

dig into food cooked by others every day. And some of those cooks go to

:20:42.:20:49.

exceptional lengths without any recognition. I think it's about time

:20:50.:20:55.

we did something about that. We want your nominations, those people that

:20:56.:20:59.

go the extra mile, cooks who work in care homes, hospitals, schools

:21:00.:21:06.

and... Community centres! Meet last year's winner of the food and

:21:07.:21:13.

farming awards version-macro, Dee Woods. She cooks up to 200 people at

:21:14.:21:17.

the Granville community centre in Kilburn, north London. It is fair to

:21:18.:21:21.

say she's pretty popular. She is a champion. She will be Romanet for

:21:22.:21:26.

her food, it's so good. She doesn't use recipes, she does it off the top

:21:27.:21:30.

of her head which is just incredible. An absolute star. So

:21:31.:21:36.

tell me what time -- con people come to this amazing food hub?

:21:37.:21:40.

Particularly from this area, a lot of people can't afford food or don't

:21:41.:21:44.

have access to it for various reasons. This hub is a key part of

:21:45.:21:51.

the community, then? It is. People describe it as a home from home.

:21:52.:21:56.

This area as almost 400 languages that are spoken and we have people

:21:57.:22:05.

from Tonga, to the Caribbean, from Ireland to Africa, East Africa, West

:22:06.:22:11.

Africa, North Africa. What sets Dee part is that she cooks dishes from

:22:12.:22:14.

all of those countries, helping people to reconnect to their roots

:22:15.:22:19.

through food. While some give a small donation, others can't afford

:22:20.:22:24.

to. Perhaps most impressively, Dee does all this as a volunteer. Why is

:22:25.:22:29.

it so important to you to do this kind of work? I think it is because

:22:30.:22:33.

I have a passion for food but I have a deep passion for people. It makes

:22:34.:22:41.

me angry and upset because a lot of the policymakers just don't get it.

:22:42.:22:45.

They don't see what I see every day, you know, and people tell you,

:22:46.:22:53.

well," I can't eat". We can all agree that Dee is a wonderful person

:22:54.:22:57.

but what makes her an amazing cook is she never knows what ingredients

:22:58.:23:01.

she is getting to work with. Why? Because with so little funding,

:23:02.:23:05.

virtually all of the ingredients come from surplus food donations.

:23:06.:23:08.

Today, her colleague Leslie is collecting from a supermarket and a

:23:09.:23:13.

local charity are dropping off surplus food they have picked up

:23:14.:23:19.

from nearby shops and restaurants. Dee, I have some cooking apples. Do

:23:20.:23:24.

you want them? Yes. She does not know what she's working with until

:23:25.:23:28.

it turns up on her doorstep and that requires a lot of creative cookery.

:23:29.:23:34.

White, Dee, this is what you've got. What are we making? We are going to

:23:35.:23:41.

make a beam tagine. What would you like me to do? Peel some potatoes. I

:23:42.:23:48.

can do that. Let's go. As I take on the role of sous chef, Dee and help

:23:49.:23:52.

and Lillian take the lead on this North Africa dish and prepare their

:23:53.:23:59.

own freshly baked bread. They serve three meals a week here, and the

:24:00.:24:02.

service makes the centre are very special place to be. It really is a

:24:03.:24:07.

community and it brings everybody together and we all enjoy each

:24:08.:24:14.

other's company socially. It is very welcoming and warm and I feel like

:24:15.:24:20.

I'm sitting with my family. Dee puts the final touches to the tagine and

:24:21.:24:27.

I'm on serving duties. It has been creative cooking and extraordinary

:24:28.:24:30.

effort but does the food gets the thumbs up for flavour? I love the

:24:31.:24:35.

food, personally. It's really nice. The food was lovely, really Devine,

:24:36.:24:39.

the right amount of spices and I loved the bread and the salad.

:24:40.:24:44.

Everything was just perfect. I can see what these guys mean. The food

:24:45.:24:50.

is wonderful, aromatic, tasty, healthy and with Dee's added TLC,

:24:51.:24:55.

perfect. So now it is over to you. If there's someone doing something

:24:56.:24:59.

incredible with food in your school, care home or community, this is your

:25:00.:25:02.

chance to nominate them for version-macro.

:25:03.:25:08.

Please, please if you know a cook who deserves this award,

:25:09.:25:14.

go to our website and tell us why, but be quick, because nominations

:25:15.:25:18.

for The One Show Cook of the Year need to be in by midnight

:25:19.:25:21.

It's cold and Robson and Fay are handing out some of Dee's food. What

:25:22.:25:29.

is it? A winter warming soup or stew. Leave a little bit for me. It

:25:30.:25:34.

was just a natural progression of my career, actor, fishermen, catering.

:25:35.:25:41.

Do you cook? I love cooking, did a nice beef Wellington at Christmas.

:25:42.:25:45.

And a bit of fish. When I was ill, it was the fish! What a killer!

:25:46.:25:51.

Grand Slam Fishing begins on Monday at 9pm on the Travel Channel.

:25:52.:25:55.

Now from their album Classic House, performing Right Here Right Now

:25:56.:25:58.

and Insomnia, it's Pete Tong and the Heritage Orchestra.

:25:59.:26:03.

Big fish, little fish, cardboard box, big fish,

:26:04.:26:07.

# Right here, right now, right here, right now

:26:08.:26:53.

Angela Scanlon and Fay Ripley chat to actor and extreme-fisherman Robson Green. Plus Pete Tong performs with the Heritage Orchestra, and there's a cameo from Hollywood-star Woody Harrelson.