24/01/2017 The One Show


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24/01/2017

Film director Danny Boyle joins Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley in the studio to talk about the much anticipated Trainspotting sequel.


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Hello and welcome to The One Show with Michelle Ackerley.

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As with every show, we had to make a few decisions

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Choose some short films including one about 75 years

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Choose a guest to interview, a guest who has been one

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of Britain's most successful film directors for over 20 years.

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Choose someone who won an Oscar for Slumdog Millionaire,

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directed The Beach, 127 Hours, Steve Jobs.

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And opened the 2012 Olympics in style.

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So we could only really choose one person - Danny Boyle!

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Of course we did. Danny, Ray to have you here. So lovely to have you

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here. A bit embarrassed. We will be talking a lot more about what you

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have chosen to do with your life through this programme.

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Before we get onto that, the Oscar nominations were announced

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today and as predicted La La Land has done well, receiving 14

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What is it like for you to see a musical at the top of that list?

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It's fantastic. Any film director, the ultimate dream is to do a

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musical, an original musical, because it's the most difficult

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thing I think you can do. It's the greatest achievement you could hope

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for, really. Many of us spend our careers wanting and dreaming and not

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quite getting there. I've seen La La Land. When you've got an Oscar you

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are one of the ones that vote so you are not allowed to say even what you

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like. But I saw it, and I saw Hamilton as well on Broadway, you

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know the one that's coming to London. Because that's not in

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contention, I can tell you that is an amazing musical. Completely

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ground-breaking and I'm sure you'll be covering it. You must be really

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chuffed with Dev Patel being nominated, one of your protege 's. I

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don't know if you want to be called a protege any more, but dead chuffed

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about that, and Naomi Harris as well. They've got a whole few weeks

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of promotion still left to do, it is a whole circus you go on. But they

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are brilliant, great pair, and will do well.

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You won best-director for Slumdog Millionaire and this

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That is a great dance, really channelling trigger. My kids, when

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they were growing up, we used to watch the Oscars and I said if I

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ever went up there I would do it like Tigger, and I was joking, of

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course, such an impossible thing to ever think of. It happened and I

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thought I could either be dignified or keep my promise to my kids, so I

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kept my promise to my kids. They didn't even remember I'd said it,

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they were too young. It meant nothing to anybody. They were

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probably thinking, dad, what are you doing?

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If you've ever felt frustrated while helping your children

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with their maths homework because you're convinced

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an answer is right, but the book says its wrong,

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It might just be because the sums don't add up. Here's Joe.

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We'll know when it comes to exams every little bit of revision can

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really help. Which is why many parents are prepared to pay up for

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these study guides and revision workbooks designed to give their

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teenagers an extra edge. These books are produced by experts in the field

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who often work closely with the exam boards themselves. You'd expect all

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the questions and answers to be right, but you'd be wrong. We've

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carried out a prog-macro investigation and found that these

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revision guides can be littered with mistakes. Here at Fairfield high

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school in Bristol, pupils aren't convinced that every revision guide

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makes the grade. You expect to find the odd mistake, do you? Yes, and

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then you aren't sure whether to trust it. You get more confused. It

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really gets rid of your confidence. If you are stressed out from exams

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that can tip you over the edge. For the head of maths at this school,

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spotting and correcting those mistakes is all too often part of

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his job. You spot them, you tell children you will change it in your

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own but, next time at you give the heads up to the students. Is that

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good enough? These are trusted resources. If there were more than

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ten or 15 mistakes I would worry and consider using the publisher against

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point we wanted to know just how accurate these revision books really

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are, and better to help us out than our very own team of One Show

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experts. Doctor Matthew is from the Cardiff School of mathematics. We

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have given his team selection of GCSE and Scottish National maths

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revision books. A QA, Ed Excel, OCR, SQA and WJ EEC. We asked them to

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examine batches of questions from each book and they found mistakes

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from the outset. Some of which caused some real head scratching. In

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the answer they put eight, just in the top bit, that's not necessarily

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true. Notebook was 100% mistake free. Oxford University press

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workbook for the a QA exam had three errors in 174 questions. Perhaps

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more surprisingly whether three books endorsed by the exam boards

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themselves. The book for the OCR exam had eight mistakes in 1200

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questions. The Edexcel book had eight mistakes in 563 questions. The

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book endorsed by the Scottish exam board had five errors in 240.

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However, bottom of the class was Hodder's an endorsed book for the W

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J E C exam. Our experts found 90 errors, three out of 50 were

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inaccurate, which of course is 6% if you want to know the maths. Making

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that number of mistakes in an exam could spell the difference between a

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pass and fail. All the examining board said final responsibility for

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error-checking lay with the publishers. The publishers said they

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do have rigorous processes in place, but accepted errors had been made

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which will now be corrected. Pearson education added that it had already

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spotted and corrected the eight errors in its workbook, it is now

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being recalled and destroyed. But what about that workbook with 19

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mistakes? Liz is Hodder's managing director. Yes, we fell down, but we

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are human, we make mistakes. And this one has 90 errors in.

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Inexcusable. Where our process fell down which is of real concern to me

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and my team, there was not the final quality check that should have taken

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place. We simply missed a stage because of the pressure of getting

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the book out on time. Do you understand the stress and anxiety

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this kind of mistake could cause? I know of a family where there have

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been arguments, tears, fallouts, tearing their hair out, working

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together trying to solve this and get it right but they can't, because

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you've got it wrong. I absolutely understand that and sympathise

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completely, and that is our fault. We have caused that stress. And we

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are very grateful to the One Show for bringing these to our attention.

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New and hopefully correct versions of this book are being printed. And

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schools with this version are being told to bin it.

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It is head scratching, all of the books had mistakes. Absolutely, and

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a variety of mistakes. Sometimes you get the wrong answer with the wrong

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question, sometimes you don't get all the information you need to work

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out the problem. I've got some examples.

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Here's the first one which asks you to find the range

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An this isn't even a question, this is an example teaching children how

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to do it. It is the difference between the highest and lowest

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value. 27 is highest, five is the lowest, so 27, take away five, 20

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two. That's not what they give you, they say the smallest number is six,

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therefore the range is 21, so they've got the working wrong and

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the answer wrong, not good. And this one is published by Cambridge

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University press. Danny has seen this in the dressing room.

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Turn your thing round, Danny, show your working. It's not been checked

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by anybody. You have correctly found the prices. That is absolutely

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perfect. You have times the correct numbers. You come out with ?14.85.

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Danny, you got it right. Thank goodness! How pleased with yourself

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are you that you got the right and the? I'm delighted. The book

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actually says ?14.95. Oh, no. So it's 10p out. It's really close but

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it's still wrong. An able student might spend too long trying to work

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out why they got it wrong, less able student might just give up, and if

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it shoots their confidence the night before an exam, it's a problem.

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Frustrating and stressful. What happens to our high

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streets if you take away Steve's been to meet someone who's

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using some innovative thinking It's a real disappointment when you

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see them closing. Hard work competing with the big retailers.

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Supermarkets that do newspapers, birthday cards, butchery,

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everything. Little shops are going out of business. The future of the

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retail industry seems uncertain. Here in West Yorkshire one woman

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together with local shopkeepers think they've found a solution to

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take on those big businesses and revive the high Street. It brings

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the local independent shops together. You choose what you like

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from as many of them as you like, and you pick everything up from one

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place. Customers want everything in one place and convenience but we

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don't necessarily want to sell our principles or our soul or our town

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to get that convenience. How can an app Compleat like this on cost? I

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think it cost compete on cost. If I go to a supermarket I will end up

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spending twice as much as I intended with all the special offers. When I

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go to a local shop I get exactly what I need. Is it making a

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difference to footfall? We can estimate it has been between 200 to

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300 extra shop visits in the last eight weeks as a result of Shop

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Appy. That can make a tremendous difference to a town. It is really

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hard for independents to survive, so this will level the playing field

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and let local people have a choice. Traders say it is running background

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from supermarket click and collect services. Welcome to the butchers,

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how are you doing with white do you think shops having an online

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presence in this way can help build a community? I believe so because I

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think we've lost that community spirit. Something like this can

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bring back that community. If you haven't got time you can go on to

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Shop Appy, if you've got time, pop in as well. Rosie, this has got to

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be the perfect setup for you? It's brilliant, you just go online, click

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the things I want and it's basically ready to pick up after I pick the

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kids up. So when I get here at 6pm I've got everything I need for the

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kids T. It's making my life a lot easier and I feel better because I

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can support local businesses. In not lead the pick-up point is the local

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pub. It's convenient and its social. Welcome to the tavern. Must be more

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people coming through the door? Of course it increases footfall. Not

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everybody who walks through the door will have a drink but even if they

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only have a lemonade it still brings extra income to the pub. Shops by a

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vital part in shaping the character of where we live. At in this modern

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world they need an edge. The only way to compete against cheap

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shopping online is to offer what it doesn't. Social interaction, and if

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you're lucky, a drink with some new friends. Cheers. Not a bad idea, is

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it? If it works, have a go, that's all you can do. We've got the lovely

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Danny Boyle with us. Let's talk about Trainspotting 2.

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We were chatting about this one being about time and how it affects

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people, what do you mean by that? Obviously it is the same four

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characters but 20 years later. So what they look like is alarming,

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really. Film is extraordinary, and television as well, it freezes

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people in time, it's easier now and if somebody loves you in the show

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they remember you like you are now and then they lose sight of you and

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then they get the chance to see you in 20 years' time and that an

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freezes time and brings the past image up to the present image. One

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thing it does with these actors, film stars, they are kind of our

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heroes, they rejoin us as ordinary people because we are all on that

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same passage. It human eyes is then. I was in two minds whether I would

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watch the first one before going, we went to the screening to see it and

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I thought I will not, because I want to hold those memories. And actually

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the long-term memories that you have from that first film and actually

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how they affect you emotionally, when you watch it and you are

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transported back through time, you can't help but make that comparison

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between your life and there's and I had singles. It has a real kick.

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Were you aiming for that effect? The latter the fifth way but that's

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the shoot of the characters, they do change, especially late on, there is

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an extraordinarily moving scene, and then with Renton and his father. If

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you betray them honestly do hope it will have the emotional effect on an

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audience. Everybody was so cautious about doing a sequel and then coming

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back and having the same impact. We were on this tower block, filming

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Spud on the top of the tower block, there is another tower block and a

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guy hanging out of the window, watching us as we are filming and he

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says, this better not be terrible, mate! What was it like on set for

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the first day? Getting everyone back together, what was it like, elated,

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nervous? It is sort of a school reunion, which is kind of intriguing

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that could be excruciating as well. Hopefully it wasn't. It wasn't for

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us, we all bonded well and they were raring to go, their appetite for it

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was enormous. It kind of gave me a kick in the pants because they were

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ready. They are hugely experienced actors now. As a film director you

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make one film every two years, they make one every year, or a TV series,

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they were raring to go once we started. For you aiming for the 20

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years, it is kind of 21 now. We missed it by about three weeks! We

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had a go at ten years, the script wasn't very good. Then John Hodge,

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the scriptwriter, we went up with him to Edinburgh for a week and sat

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with him in a room, and then he went away and he wrote something much

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more personal about himself, through the prism of these characters can be

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sent it and I thought, we will do that. And these guys will do it as

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well. We have got a lovely clip. Let's have a look at Renton, and

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Spud talking about her different their lives have become. I haven't

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heard that 100,000 times? Have you got 12 more steps from the? So be

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addicted to something else! Running until I feel sick? You've got to

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control it. Some people boxing. Boxing?! Is just an example. So what

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do you channel it into? Getting away. Absolutely brilliant. Some

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beautiful scenes of Edinburgh there. In the original one, a lot of it was

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focused in Glasgow but for this one, it was Edinburgh although they? Or

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the criminal to Glasgow and we didn't have any money so we couldn't

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afford to do it in Edinburgh. But this one we have more money so we

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thought, we have got to do it in Edinburgh, the original stories come

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from there. The film belongs to that town, really, so we decided to shoot

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it there and everybody is delighted to welcome us now. They didn't

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originally. There weren't as many fans originally, they thought we

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were just annoying. Film crews on your street. But now everybody was

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there with open arms. How did you know when it was finished? The

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second one? You have done the edit, the whole lot, you put it out there

:19:28.:19:30.

and you know you are not go to tinker with it any more. You track

:19:31.:19:35.

away kicking and screaming, you never really stop but there is

:19:36.:19:40.

always a turning point and this one was about four weeks from the edit,

:19:41.:19:44.

four weeks in, we watched it together me and the editor, John

:19:45.:19:48.

Harris and it was like, we thought we made this film about time, that

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was our scenario. But actually it's about masculinity, about these guys

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who behave like boys, they have the irresponsible recklessness, they

:20:00.:20:03.

don't care about anything, in the first film. It's this movement

:20:04.:20:08.

through masculinity, they moved to manhood, the film is littered with

:20:09.:20:10.

children, some of whom they are the fathers of. Many of them are

:20:11.:20:16.

disappointed in their fathers and women who were also disappointed in

:20:17.:20:22.

them. A reckoning has to happen. Then I thought, that's the film,

:20:23.:20:25.

really. You don't know you have made that film and then you see it envies

:20:26.:20:32.

think, my God, it's about that! In a moment, we will be talking music

:20:33.:20:36.

with you. We know that is a big part of your life, vitally important to

:20:37.:20:37.

your films. could reveal to the nation that

:20:38.:20:46.

Margaret Thatcher was a fan of Beethoven, Nigella Lawson loves

:20:47.:20:50.

Eminem and that if Ian Hislop was stuck on a desert island,

:20:51.:20:52.

he'd insist on having a lifetime This weekend that show

:20:53.:20:55.

celebrates its 75th anniversary - You remember where you were every

:20:56.:21:06.

time you hear one of these pieces of music. It's where I don't know what

:21:07.:21:11.

to take refuge in something think the three different. One of Radio

:21:12.:21:16.

4's most best loved programmes, desert island discs, has captivated

:21:17.:21:22.

listeners since 1942. It cut through all boundaries. Castaways have

:21:23.:21:31.

chosen music to stir memories. We used to jive, this is tremendous. As

:21:32.:21:37.

a tribute, we're trying our own take on their winning formula but this

:21:38.:21:39.

time our castaways are members of the public. My favourite would be

:21:40.:21:46.

sitting on the dock of the bay. Bat out of hell. Sailing by Rod Stewart.

:21:47.:21:54.

And soon our islands are awash with memories.

:21:55.:22:08.

Love song from the 18 hundredths. It was a song I listened to with my

:22:09.:22:20.

grandmother. We were singing it on her hospital bed for the last week

:22:21.:22:24.

of her life. It was on repeat all day throughout the entire week.

:22:25.:22:33.

She was very much my best friend. Her personality was that of a

:22:34.:22:45.

teenager. It was the love song to listen to with her. I couldn't

:22:46.:22:48.

listen to it afterwards without crying or anything like that but I

:22:49.:22:52.

joined the choir, we sang that song, so I was kind of forced to adjust

:22:53.:22:57.

and adapt to it being part of my life. Since then I've even got a

:22:58.:23:02.

tattoo of the opening line, I am it's surely carrying it around with

:23:03.:23:06.

me. It gives me a lot of comfort having it on me.

:23:07.:23:15.

My desert island choice would be I'm Alive by Celine Dion. I'm originally

:23:16.:23:24.

by St Lucia, a tiny island in the Caribbean, quite beautiful,

:23:25.:23:29.

friendly, I wanted to go back. I struggled with the weather, I was

:23:30.:23:35.

feeling a bit sad, you have a lot to learn, food, style, it's like you're

:23:36.:23:39.

starting all over again and I remember singing it and feeling so

:23:40.:23:42.

exhilarated because I just felt, despite was alone in this country, I

:23:43.:23:47.

had no family member, I was alone, I still felt excited, I still was able

:23:48.:23:50.

to smile no matter what. It makes you just focus on the

:23:51.:24:04.

positive and move on with it, that's why it relates to my journey as a

:24:05.:24:06.

migrant in the UK. My favourite record is by Elvis

:24:07.:24:29.

Presley, Bridge Over Troubled Water. He just sings it was such emotion

:24:30.:24:33.

and feeling. It's just a beautiful song, I've listened probably every

:24:34.:24:35.

day for a long time. Elvis's music gets me through a lot

:24:36.:24:49.

of bad times and good times, makes you feel good, it really does. I

:24:50.:24:54.

remember when my mother got divorced, mind and stopped me

:24:55.:24:57.

playing Elvis for a while because it was too upsetting. The man's voice

:24:58.:25:06.

is pure emotion. Simon and Garfunkel were good, but he sang it better!

:25:07.:25:13.

There is a reason why Desert Island Discs has endured for 75 years.

:25:14.:25:20.

Music brings memories flooding back. We are being flooded! My feet are

:25:21.:25:28.

getting a bit wet. But you can see where they do it as a radio show.

:25:29.:25:34.

75 years and still going strong! You were loving that film. The guy

:25:35.:25:40.

talking about is grandma, that was very moving. They ask you for eight

:25:41.:25:46.

tracks, you talked about doing it before, it's such a challenge for

:25:47.:25:51.

you to choose. I couldn't go on. It would be to narrow it down to eight

:25:52.:25:56.

tracks. We're going to ask you to narrow it down to one! You have come

:25:57.:26:01.

up with a track for us, special children for you. Actually there's a

:26:02.:26:06.

bit of it in the new movie, because I finally found a place for it, and

:26:07.:26:19.

it's by the Watford clash. White Man In Hammersmith Palais. When I was a

:26:20.:26:25.

kid, my dad used to buy the original Beatles songs, I have that as an

:26:26.:26:31.

early shaping experience, when I was 18, punk happened, so it was a big

:26:32.:26:35.

part of my life to be part of that movement. I used to go and watch the

:26:36.:26:41.

Clash, when Joyce, passed away, I had never met him, I was so upset.

:26:42.:26:50.

-- when Joe Strummer passed away. So that is a huge thing in my life,

:26:51.:26:55.

that song, it is used in the film than they desperately try and

:26:56.:26:57.

recreate the past, which is appropriate. The music in all your

:26:58.:27:04.

films are so emotive, it evokes memories, how far in the process

:27:05.:27:07.

does it come, do you think about the music you want to use at the

:27:08.:27:12.

beginning? Sometimes, and it often doesn't survive because it's the

:27:13.:27:15.

moral of going through it, you abandon it, really. It's more stuff

:27:16.:27:21.

that goes on late on in the shooting or when you are working with your

:27:22.:27:26.

editor and begin to see scenes from in front of you. One of the

:27:27.:27:29.

tragedies of getting older is that I'd used to have an automatic access

:27:30.:27:34.

to all music, I knew everything and suddenly you find you don't, you are

:27:35.:27:40.

out of touch. You think, when did that happen? Now I do it through my

:27:41.:27:43.

kids, they put me in touch with a lot of stuff in the new movie stuff

:27:44.:27:52.

by Wolf Alice, and the Young Fathers, who won't recommend to

:27:53.:27:59.

anyone. Is it right that you keep your Oscar under your bed? Yes... I

:28:00.:28:06.

did have it out for a bit, and you can't look at it every day. It's

:28:07.:28:12.

just like, oh, please! You got to live an ordinary life so keep it in

:28:13.:28:16.

a box under the bed. Or maybe it's under the bed! In case a burglar

:28:17.:28:22.

breaks in! When was the last looked at it? A long time ago. You don't

:28:23.:28:30.

get it out at night? No, it's a wonderful thing, it's an

:28:31.:28:34.

extraordinary thing and it's a wonderful process to go through, but

:28:35.:28:40.

you have got to get on yourself. You are modest man, Danny, thank you so

:28:41.:28:42.

much for coming in. Tomorrow we'll be joined

:28:43.:28:48.

by two huge musical stars. From Broadway - Neil Patrick Harris

:28:49.:28:50.

and 'she's the one that we want' - The Robshaws are going

:28:51.:28:54.

back in time again.

:28:55.:29:13.

Film director Danny Boyle joins Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley in the studio to talk about the much anticipated Trainspotting sequel. Plus details of a special investigation into mistakes in maths revision guides.