25/01/2017 The One Show


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25/01/2017

Matt Baker and Angela Scanlon are joined in the studio by Olivia Newton-John and Neil Patrick Harris. Plus the woman who went in search of her grandmother's childhood.


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Hello and welcome to the One Show with Angela Scanlon.

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On our sofa tonight, two stars who share a passion for music,

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and in our warped imagination, this is how we think

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Summer Loving had me at last. Summer Loving happened so fast. I met a

:00:27.:00:43.

girl, crazy Flamini. I met a boy, tutors

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They also share no fewer than six names.

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Wait for it - Neil Patrick Harris and Olivia Newton-John!

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CHEERING That was amazing! You have to do it

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now. That wasn't actually real, if you couldn't work it out!

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Is there anyone you would love to duet with?

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This one! That would be amazing. And it would be fun, my kids listen to

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Frozen all the time, so Idina Menzel would be good, and also Elton John.

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I would love to sing with Rod Stewart. That could work! Raspy,

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gorgeous voice. I'm ready! Neil, you are a little bit jealous of a role

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that Olivia got to play, specifically the dancing? Yes, Gene

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Kelly is amazing. What was that like? It was amazing, he was so

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sweet. And he was older when you were doing this? Yes, he was

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fantastic, he wanted us to do it in one take, and I had never tap danced

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before, so I did three months rehearsal of basic tap, then we had

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to learn the whole thing, because he directed that segment and they did

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it in one sweeping move. There is something great about a guy that can

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dance like that and make it look so effortless. Tap Israeli technical.

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You did quite a lot of dancing yourself? I never took a dance

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lesson in my life. You just freestyle? I just stand in the front

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and get really talented dancers behind me that do incredible dancing

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while I stand there and do the hands. Jazz hands get you through!

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Sell it with conviction. Eyes and teeth!

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Let's meet some more people we'll be spending a bit of time

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Four people plucked from the ranks of One Show viewers who are going

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to be getting to grips with the biggest issue of our times.

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Meet Team Brexit, four One Show viewers who will be answering the

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questions that you want answered. Nora from Bolton has already made a

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few films for us in the past. This country of ours is called Great

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Britain, and it has become great because we have accepted

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multicultural people coming over who have integrated. Although fun Nora,

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that is not quite the end of the matter. We should have control over

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how many people do come into the land. We are sinking. This land is

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sinking with the amount of people who are here. So how does she feel

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about Theresa May 's speech last Monday? We are leaving the European

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Union, but we are not leaving Europe. We will pursue a bold and

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ambitious free-trade agreement. What I am proposing cannot mean

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membership of the single market. This is a lady who came new into the

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job. She had to scrape up an absolute mess that was plopped on

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the floor. She has gathered it altogether, and now she has laid out

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a plan that is easy for everybody to follow. Next up, Manchester cabbie

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John. He used to live in France, and now back in the UK, gives guided

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tours of Manchester foreign visitors. As a Mancunian, I am well

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used to meeting people from all over the world. What concerns me is I

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rely mainly on tourism for my business, and Wilfried of travel

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still be the same post Brexit? What's more, he thinks Britain is a

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better place to live because of immigration. I like to live in a

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multicultural society. We should be grateful that people want to come to

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our country because it is so good. Our last two members may also be

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familiar. Brothers Nigel and Ian gave their two opposing views on the

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One Show before the referendum. They followed their dad into the freight

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industry, and set up firms half a mile from each other in Nottingham.

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Older brother Nigel is now managing director of a truck sales and repair

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firm. I want to see a free-trade agreement with the European Union,

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and some control of our borders and immigration, but also the Prime

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Minister really cracking on to take us out of the European Union,

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trigger Article 50 and get it moving. And Nigel is confident about

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the future. We will lead the way with the future with free trade. But

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brother Ian doesn't agree. He runs a separate freight company that

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manages the movement of goods across Europe. What about all the costs of

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coming out of the single market? What about the effect on jobs and on

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people's income? At the moment, Ian's company enjoys free trade in

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Europe with no tariffs, and he is worried that him it is about to get

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a whole more complicated. There will be some cost is barriers, a risk

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that lorries will be queueing at the Channel Tunnel, that is bad for my

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business and bad for my customers. He also wants to know how long it is

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going to take to get a deal. My biggest worry is that there won't be

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an agreement within two years. We need that agreement. It is vital for

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us, but it is not so important for the European Union to get that

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agreement. So, that is Team Brexit, and here is their first mission.

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Your first challenge is a big one. There is lots of talk about the

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single market and trade deals, but what is it all mean? Will we notice

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the difference, and if we do, what difference would it make? It is a

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big topic, so are you up for it? Let's go!

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Thank you to Alex and Team Brexit, they will be back tomorrow to

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cross-examine a former trade envoy. Good luck to all! Someone I would

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not like to cross-examine any time is Count Olaf, which is the

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character you play in Lemony Snicket's A Series Of Unfortunate

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Events. Yes, Netflix made this series, and I asked me to play him

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with all the prosthetics and looking nothing like myself, it is nice

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because since it is really to anyone, but for the eyes of ten or

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12-year-olds, I get to be unabashedly awful with no remorse or

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empathy, and it is rare that you get paid to be able to do that! We have

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a handy little scale of evil here, and we thought that perhaps you

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might like to place him on it. Cruella de Vil, Ursula Darth Vader.

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Who is the Richard Rotter? That is the child catcher from Chitty Chitty

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Bang Bang. Well, you can't go pure evil, you can't even really go Star

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Wars evil, because they possess actual powers, they could choke

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people out. Count Olaf thinks he is much more successful than he

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actually is. I would put him that way. He doesn't catch the child.

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Right there. Here? There he is, there! Leicester travel look at a

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little bit of proof, -- let's have a little look at your character. I am

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Count Olaf, your new guardian. You're welcome. Thank you. You're

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welcome. Please come in and mind you wipe your feet on the mat. And don't

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forget your enormous fortune. APPLAUSE

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Talking about seeing this through the eyes of children, but that

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baby... It talks about the Baudelaire children, and the

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youngest one is just supposed to have teeth that she chews through

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things and speak in words you can't understand, and then the older

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siblings do know what she means, but that is a hard thing to do with a

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little actor baby, because there is no actor baby school. We had this

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unbelievable girl named Presley who is super-talented. It was fun. She

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doesn't chew through the keys? She doesn't. We had prosthetic teeth.

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The wonderful thing is, you are playing a character that is playing

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characters, as well. We have some great pictures of all the different

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roles. Each book in the series, Count Olaf comes back in disguise as

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someone else to try and get the children's fortune, and the kids can

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see right through him, as I'm sure you can, but the adults can't,

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because again, from the point of view of kids, adults are too mired

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in their own obligated lives to be to take things seriously. So I play

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a guy who was bald and talks like this, and then an old pirate man,

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like a sort of drunk horny Sean Connery. They are magical

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characters! And Shirley, the secretary for an optometrist, so

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idea to Bette Davis with that. The show is on Netflix, which is nice

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because it is streaming so you can download the ball and see them all

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without commercials. We got it. Olivia, are there any characters

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from your childhood that stick out that you remember? Not

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necessarily... Not scary once. I used to read the Terrible Twin

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books, I think that is what they were called. We didn't have TV until

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later, so I used to go upstairs, books were my thing when I was a

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young girl. Absolutely wonderful. And for you as well, those

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characters? I read a lot of Roald Dahl, so I very much knew of Willy

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Wonka, this crazy magical man who was great and dealt with candy but

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also had a dark side, and you knew that if you crossed him you would be

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flushed down the toilet! There is a little bit of humour. Not many

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redeeming characters stick to Count Olaf. I think a dark sense of humour

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is great the kids. So often I find with our own kids, who are six, with

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duplicate them, talk down to them and talking baby speak, they zone

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out, and when things get to be a little acerbic and ironic, and they

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start to figure out what irony means, they are engaged. Lemony

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Snicket's A Series Of Unfortunate Events is an Netflix now.

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This Friday, the world will mark Holocaust Memorial Day

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and there will be a range of commemoration events

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herself the challenge of honouring her grandmother and -

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amazingly - restoring the family fortunes.

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When I was a little girl, my grandmother would regale me with

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stories of her wonderful life in prewar Berlin. In the 1920s, she

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lived a life of luxury. She would say to me, when the ball Berlin Wall

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comes down, we will be rich. Some of her family dismissed her stories

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about an elegant old building and a life of luxury in Berlin as a fairy

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tale, but her granddaughter never forgot. She was determined to find

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out more about her grandmother's life and her own heritage. Nelly at

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Herbert ran a successful company in the heart of Berlin, but when the

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Nazis came to power in the 1930s, they were among tens of thousands of

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JUDY MURRAY: Has people forced to flee for their

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lives. Ten years later, Gina began her search. I managed to get hold of

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a 1920s business directory, and in there, there was an advert. That was

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the name of my grandfather. And I thought, that looks like it. Gina

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believed this might be the location of the business. But the building

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was in East Berlin, and she couldn't visit until the Berlin Wall came

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down in 1989. We passed checkpoint Charlie, and two blocks later, we

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stopped outside a huge building. It was bitterly cold, I was wearing my

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red duffle coat. I marched in through the doors and a gentleman

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came down and said, what do you want? I said I have come to claim my

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family's building, and he laughed at me. And I pulled out of my pocket

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the 1920s German business directory, and he said, oh, I think you had

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better come in. The man had recognised Gina's grandfather's

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surname. The building was still known locally as the Wolff building,

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and authorities had been waiting to save anybody would claim it. The man

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said, I have spoken to head office, and you are right. They told me they

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had been waiting for this to happen, but they didn't know if anybody had

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survived the war. Tell me your story. The Wolffs fled Germany in

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1933. Only one family member, Gina's uncle, stayed on to protect the

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family business. He said, I am German, I am staying. So what

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happened? The increasingly anti-Semitic laws meant that Jewish

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companies could not trade properly. In 1937, he was forced to sell it.

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Fritz, the last remaining member of the Wolff family was now alone in

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Berlin. He was eventually arrested and sent to Auschwitz. The legacy of

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what happened to the dues during the Second World War is all around us in

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Berlin. Her great uncle Fritz was killed at Auschwitz. Although she

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had tracked down the building, she now had an even bigger task ahead of

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her. I had to get land registry documents to prove we had actually

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owned the building. And not just leased it. I was fortunate enough. I

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did manage to get hold of land Registry documents to prove case.

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Dean managed to prove historical ownership of the building and the

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German government awarded her family ?8 million in compensation. Nellie

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would have said, do not forget the Holocaust was a genocide. We did not

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suffer as much as other families. I did not forget and did what I could

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to put things right. Bolivia, your mother's parents were

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in a similar position. Did they share any of those experiences with

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you? It was not talked about. My grandfather was a famous scientist

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in Germany. He left Germany quite early and took the family to

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Scotland initially. He helped to smuggle a lot of Jewish people out

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of Germany. He is a wonderful humanitarian. I am proud to be his

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granddaughter. I did not meet him. As a teenager I was too busy. He was

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an amazing human being. You were born over here, won't you? You were

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born in Cambridge when off over to Australia. An incredible music

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career. 50 years. This year and you have teamed up for a personal and

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special album. There is one common thing that has brought you together.

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It was inspired by the loss of my sister three years ago to cancer.

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She had a brain tumour. I have always found music to be healing. I

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asked Amy if she would help me to finish the song we started talking

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about the fact there was no music for people going through grief and

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loss. We asked Beth Nelson Chapman to join us. She wrote a song to

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explain the loss of her husband. We we recorded some of our songs we

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were known for. It is really an album of moving forward with hope

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and compassion. We have just done a couple of concerts, one in Dublin

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and one in Glasgow. It was incredible, the feeling from the

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audience. People all have those emotions. It is quite open, isn't

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it? You're in the early days of the tour. You are welcoming discussion.

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We thought we would try at the first show to ask the audience if they

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wanted to share any of their experiences. Hands went up all over

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the audience and it was incredible. That must be quite difficult as a

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performer to go through that. This is brand-new. It is the first time

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we have performed together. It is an acoustic show. Best plays guitar.

:20:04.:20:10.

Amy plays piano. It is just us and the music. It's incredibly

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emotional, incredibly inspiring and moving. Yes, people have been

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sharing their experiences, which is very healthy. Talking about grief.

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People repress it. If it was such a new thing for you, how did it come

:20:27.:20:30.

about? Did it take you a while to fall into the right format or did it

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all just happen? It felt like a gift that came to us. One of the first

:20:37.:20:40.

mornings we were sitting together in a kitchen and Amy received a text

:20:41.:20:44.

from someone, the kind of text you do not want to get that a friend of

:20:45.:20:48.

hers had lost their child. She was saying, what do we say? I do not

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know what to safest B went to the piano and wrote the song in about

:20:53.:20:57.

five minutes. That is really how it was. It was an amazing experience.

:20:58.:21:07.

It has helped to heal us. I find myself getting really emotional when

:21:08.:21:10.

I sing them. That is part of it. It does not go away. There is a really

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positive message coming out of that. Has always been your mindset to find

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something really positive in a situation? We make our choices with

:21:18.:21:24.

our minds. We can choose to be this or that. I had breast cancer in

:21:25.:21:30.

1992. Was I going to be positive about it and get through it? I am

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very grateful that I did. Many people have been positive and not

:21:36.:21:41.

been as lucky as I am. Being grateful for every day and living

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long. That is what we have called the album. -- living on. There will

:21:47.:21:54.

be tracks on there that will mean a lock to you. Though I not many

:21:55.:21:58.

families who have not been affected in some way by cancer. I now

:21:59.:22:04.

understand why you have us both on foot I just talked about the awful

:22:05.:22:13.

things and canned Olav as a terrible person and this is like a ying and

:22:14.:22:18.

yang situation. In a kind of world we are living in today it is nice to

:22:19.:22:22.

have positive things which move us forward and get as thinking back to

:22:23.:22:28.

a direction of good. As humans, we all share these emotions and

:22:29.:22:33.

feelings. We all lose people at some time. It is really important to

:22:34.:22:37.

share and talk to someone about it because it gets you out of your

:22:38.:22:45.

pain. If our you hope people will get from this? I think just to show

:22:46.:22:53.

we have been through this and we are still here. People were crying but

:22:54.:22:58.

felt really good afterwards. It is a way of releasing it. A good cry is

:22:59.:23:04.

very cathartic. Are you going to take this as far as you can around

:23:05.:23:09.

the world? We have just started. We are doing a short tour in California

:23:10.:23:15.

in Washington State in February and we will see how it goes. It has been

:23:16.:23:21.

very well received. I have lost one sister and gained two. They are

:23:22.:23:28.

wonderfully talented people and beautiful singers. It has been a

:23:29.:23:34.

great experience. It is wonderful that all three of you will be

:23:35.:23:41.

performing for us live. Berry excited about that. Have your kids

:23:42.:23:49.

being to London with you? A couple of months ago we were on our way to

:23:50.:23:54.

France. We stopped over so the jet lag could recover. We were on a

:23:55.:23:58.

double-decker tour. I love it here. The people are nice and the food is

:23:59.:24:04.

great. The pound- dollar rate is good.

:24:05.:24:07.

Before Olivia sings for us with Amy and Beth here's an update on a story

:24:08.:24:11.

Yes, it's either going to be a victory for common-sense

:24:12.:24:16.

or a reason to throw something at your TV.

:24:17.:24:18.

Last October, I met a man whose story touched a lot of heart. Philip

:24:19.:24:35.

had been keeping geese on this plot of land in Ilkley in West Yorkshire

:24:36.:24:45.

for 79 years. Who is this? Then it looked like red tape would bring

:24:46.:24:50.

this lifelong passion to an end for the one person complained. No one

:24:51.:24:55.

knew who it was but it resulted in the council issuing fillip with a

:24:56.:25:00.

noise abatement order. They went to court to fight it. Lose and the

:25:01.:25:04.

geese would have to go. He is frightened of losing his pets. If

:25:05.:25:07.

you did not have that he would not have the excuse to do the daily

:25:08.:25:11.

exercise. That would be really detrimental to his health. Three

:25:12.:25:15.

months on and the court has made up its mind. I have come back to meet

:25:16.:25:18.

Philip to find out what the verdict was. Hi, Philip. What was the

:25:19.:25:28.

outcome? It was very good. The abatement has been dropped. I am

:25:29.:25:32.

very pleased with the result. That is brilliant news. You happy? The

:25:33.:25:38.

geese have been here for so long, nearly 80 years. They did not

:25:39.:25:43.

believe the noise had increased significantly over this period of

:25:44.:25:54.

time. What has that like for you? I am glad it is over. Neighbours

:25:55.:26:00.

rallied round Philip at the time was that she is also happy. Absolutely

:26:01.:26:06.

delighted. We all are. A lovely perk. Made me feel very happy about

:26:07.:26:12.

it. Isn't it nice having nice neighbours? Yes, it is fantastic. In

:26:13.:26:21.

a way, it has brought us all closer together. Common sense prevails.

:26:22.:26:22.

Thank goodness. Thanks to Neil and

:26:23.:26:25.

Olivia for joining us. Lemony Snicket's A Series

:26:26.:26:27.

of Unfortunate Events And Olivia's album

:26:28.:26:28.

Liv On is out now. But we leave you now

:26:29.:26:36.

with Olivia Newton-John, Beth Neilson Chapman and Amy Sky,

:26:37.:26:38.

singing Stone in My Pocket. # There's a stone in my pocket

:26:39.:26:40.

that bears your name # There are tears that will not

:26:41.:26:44.

stop once they start # In the stone

:26:45.:26:51.

in the pocket of my heart # In a world here

:26:52.:26:57.

without you every day # I'm telling everybody that

:26:58.:27:00.

I'm OK # With the weight

:27:01.:27:05.

of an anchor in the dark # Like

:27:06.:27:10.

a stone in the pocket of my heart # Looks like this

:27:11.:27:16.

pain is here to stay # I can't lose it,

:27:17.:27:25.

I didn't choose it # Well meaning people

:27:26.:27:28.

they try to help me # There's a stone in my pocket

:27:29.:27:43.

that bears your name # There are tears that will not

:27:44.:27:46.

stop once they start # In the stone

:27:47.:27:50.

in the pocket of my heart # There's a tear in my

:27:51.:27:58.

jacket, a nail in my shoe # Got a hole in my soul

:27:59.:28:01.

you could drive a truck through # It's a new kind of normal

:28:02.:28:04.

in an old shade of blue # I'm a mess but I guess

:28:05.:28:08.

it's the best I can do # With a stone in my pocket

:28:09.:28:11.

that bears your name # I walk around dragging

:28:12.:28:15.

this ball and chain # There are tears that will not

:28:16.:28:19.

stop once they start # In the stone in

:28:20.:28:23.

the pocket of my heart # There's a stone in my pocket

:28:24.:28:33.

that bears your name # I walk around dragging

:28:34.:28:45.

this ball and chain # There are tears that will not

:28:46.:28:47.

stop once they start # In the stone in

:28:48.:28:50.

the pocket of my heart # Baby, like it or not,

:28:51.:28:52.

gotta roll with the rock # It's a stone in the

:28:53.:28:55.

pocket of my heart.#

:28:56.:28:57.

Matt Baker and Angela Scanlon are joined in the studio by Olivia Newton-John, who sings, and star of How I Met Your Mother Neil Patrick Harris.

Plus the story of a woman who went in search of her grandmother's childhood in Berlin before she fled the Nazi regime for Britain.