26/01/2017 The One Show


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26/01/2017

Matt Baker and Angela Scanlon are joined in the studio by Reggie Yates, Team Brexit go on their first-fact finding mission and Marty Jopson does an experiment on a supercarrier.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to The One Show with Matt Baker...

:00:17.:00:18.

Alex, what could you possibly be calling in to tell us?

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Well I do have some news, our beautiful healthy little baby boy

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was born... APPLAUSE

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Congratulations. Thank you, we are absolutely delighted, and completely

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in love with him. Oh, it's the most wonderful feeling. What weight was

:00:59.:01:05.

he when he was born? He was 7lb 11, a lovely weight. It was all very

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straightforward, and it was lovely, actually. I mean Charlie was with

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me, mum and dad were waiting, because we didn't know whether it

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was a boy or a girl, so that was a lovely bit of news. The last four

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days have been heaven, we are in the bubble, the three of us, and it is

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just the best time. And where are you at with names? Or have you got

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there? Well, you know me, we are a bit behind on the name thing. We

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didn't know whether he would be a boy or a girl. We are delighted he

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was a boy, we thought when we see him we will know what he looks like,

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but it is is really really hard, so I don't know, maybe some help? OK,

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you want viewers' help? I know you can rely on the viewers. I tell you,

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every time we ask them they come up with the good, don't they. I thought

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what better way than to ask the viewers maybe for some suggestions

:02:04.:02:08.

at least. How about this? How about we ask the viewers who have had had

:02:09.:02:14.

baby boys to send in a few photos with names they have chosen? Yes,

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great idea. Lovely idea. Can you remember the address to send photos

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to? I can. Just. The One Show... Can I say a really quick thank you to

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all the viewers who sent in such lovely gifts for the baby, I mean he

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has got the best collection of cardigans and blankets ever.

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Everybody has been so kind. Lots of love to you, to little one and of

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course to daddy Charlie as well. Congratulations. Over the Monday for

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you. Keep watching for the name suggestions. I will be. OK. Thank

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you everybody. Take care. One more time.

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APPLAUSE So good. My cheeks hurt from

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smiling. Today the Government published

:03:10.:03:11.

the bill that will allow it to trigger Article 50,

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and the formal start of Brexit. So let's get straight to one

:03:15.:03:19.

of the big questions of the moment - what sort of trade deals will we end

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up with after leaving the EU? Alex Riley went to join The One

:03:23.:03:25.

Show's Team Brexit for their first This is our team. A range of

:03:26.:03:38.

opinions and thoughts. This land is sinking with the amount

:03:39.:03:41.

of people who are here. I want to see a free trade agreement with the

:03:42.:03:45.

European Union. Immigration to me is necessary. What about the costs of

:03:46.:03:51.

coming out of the single market? With one common goal. To ask on

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behalf of all of us the questions we want answered or Brexit. Today's

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topic is trade. In the EU currently that happens

:04:02.:04:05.

freely without any restriction, as part of the single market. Last week

:04:06.:04:10.

Theresa May announced she wanted to leave the single market and

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negotiation a new free trade agreement with the EU. So what do

:04:13.:04:18.

our team make of the news? Get going, got the SatNav on? You know

:04:19.:04:26.

me I don't need one. I am with Nigel at his commercial vehicles company.

:04:27.:04:30.

While we wait for Nora an John to arrive they talk trade. You haven't

:04:31.:04:35.

got a clue... Tread frauding blows with each other. How will it help

:04:36.:04:39.

trade coming out of this big group We are going to be a free country.

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We are a free country any way. We are not John.

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Our team come together and we call a truce and agree to tackle the topic

:04:50.:04:55.

of trade. I need to know what is a free trade agreement, and with who.

:04:56.:05:00.

Good one. What happens if we don't get a deal? We will have to stay at

:05:01.:05:07.

home and not buy anything. Can we get a better advantage dealing with

:05:08.:05:10.

China and America. There a lot to think about. Let us speak to an

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expert. The man who thinks he has the answer

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is Lord Marland. Under David Cameron a British trade envoy. What is a

:05:22.:05:27.

trade agreement? Well a trade agreement is two countries agreeing

:05:28.:05:32.

on the terms of engagement of how they are going to sell goods and

:05:33.:05:35.

services to each other. Well that was easy enough. But if we

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left the EU tomorrow, without a trade deal, what would happen? There

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is is a World Trade Organisation, they have a benchmark of rules which

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will apply and we will be able to abide by. So why is a trade deal

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important? You don't need Government involvement to trade but there where

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there is no trade deal there can be extra hurdles like tariffs. If we

:05:58.:06:02.

leave the single market we become like America, Australia, New

:06:03.:06:04.

Zealand, every other country in the world. In some cases there aren't

:06:05.:06:10.

tariffs, in others there are, in agricultural there are tariffs

:06:11.:06:13.

imposed. A tariff is an extra charge put on

:06:14.:06:19.

imported products to help prevent consumers buying cheaper foreign

:06:20.:06:22.

produced goods over those produced locally. For instance, currently if

:06:23.:06:28.

we were to import trainers from an EU country, there would be no

:06:29.:06:31.

tariffs because the inisle market is a free trade area. But import those

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same ones the China or the US where we don't have a trade deal and there

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could be a tariff of up to 16.9% of the cost slapped on top. There are

:06:42.:06:46.

other hurdles too. Post-Brexit, exports to the EU could face delays,

:06:47.:06:51.

from new bureaucracy, like import licenses and customs checks.

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These guys will tell you, if they have to be checked at every border

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it will be frustrating. So as o consumer would we end up paying more

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for what we buy? The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders have

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said that a car in Britain could end costing ?1500 more, once we leave

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the single market. If tariffs are imposed it will make European cars

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more expensive. No-one is saying this is going to be easy. What about

:07:22.:07:25.

the world outside the EU? The Government says post-Brexit, we will

:07:26.:07:30.

have more freedom to be able to negotiate trade deals we couldn't

:07:31.:07:34.

before. What happens if we don't get trade agreements we are hoping to

:07:35.:07:38.

get? A I don't think that is likely. There are going to be trade deals.

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New Zealand have offered, Australia have talked about it, Donald Trump's

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referenced it so there are going to be trade deals. It is however not

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necessary. We have never had a trade deal with the US UK, and the reason

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is, because we are happy with the terms of engagement, and the trade

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that we have between our two countries. So have the answers

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helped our team? What do you typhoon feel you have learned? It is

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fascinating listening about how it is going to work with the rest of

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the world. I am clearer now I understand. I think what we have

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learned is how complicated this thing is and therefore how messy it

:08:18.:08:21.

will be if we don't play our cards carefully.

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Next time, the team take on our border, and investigate what leaving

:08:27.:08:27.

the EU will mean for immigration. And we'll be keeping our Team Brexit

:08:28.:08:34.

busy over the coming weeks - Now from Europe to the other side

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of the globe, because with us tonight is a man whose latest

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documentary took him on a eye-opening trip to Australia -

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it's Reggie Yates! APPLAUSE

:08:47.:08:56.

Welcome. Have you, you watch the start of the show, you know what is

:08:57.:09:02.

happening, the big news. Congratulations Alex, last time I

:09:03.:09:05.

saw her she was, there was a bump and a lump. We are doing baby name

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suggestions for boys. We have had over 1,000 in the first

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three-and-a-half minutes so we will need a lot of time. Any thoughts

:09:15.:09:20.

from you? Yes I think Reggie is a strong name. Jessica Ennis went for

:09:21.:09:28.

it for her little one. Mufasa is a strong name. If you haven't held

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your babe I up and sung The Lion King song I am disappointed. We have

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all done it. Let us get down to business and talk about this

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documentary series in Australia. We will start with, we have a bit of

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footage here of Aboriginal people. They are doing what you expect to

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see from traditional dancing, but it seems they were happy to show you

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this, but that is kind of where it ended. Kind of. In Australia, it has

:10:02.:10:07.

been an interesting series to make, when I came to the people, they are

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very protective when it comes to letting the cameras in because they

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have been misrepresented in the past, when I turned up, I was, I get

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choked up talking about it. I was heartbroken, the first thing I faced

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was a stereotype: They had drunk themselves into obliteration, it is

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heartbreaking, so please watch it on iPlayer. So you were hoping they

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would break all of those stereotypes, that you would find a

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different version, than what you had previously seen represented and you

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found kind of that it reinforced the stereotype? Unfortunately yes. The

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great thing is you know, making factual programmes you go on a

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journey, thankfully some of those were challenged and there were

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really interesting characters that show me a different side. And you

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ended up at a party with a family. Party is a strange way to put it. It

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was a gathering of a massive family, would be the men I met had 17

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children and his brother had about 18. So when hay got together, with

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their kids and their friends, it was unreal, and the things you see are,

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you know you see families coming together in a way any of us with

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families and our loves ones but when alcohol gets in the mix and drug,

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some of the symptoms of that are shocking and heartbreaking, but,

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there was one woman in particular I met, a lady called Monica who was

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unbelievable. Really broke down what she sees as being a Band Aid. The

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symptoms of trans generational trauma, she sees them as being a

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plaster to cover them. You found yours in some incredible situations,

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all over the world. Once or twice. How do you find is the best way to

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approach these situations so that people do actually open to you and

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tell the stories that are so important. I said it before and I

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will say it again. I am not a journalist, I am a guy who is

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interested in people. When I find myself in situation, what we end up

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is talk to people about their personal experience and through them

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and who they are. You have lived in prisons and Russia. You end up

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making issue-based films. At the core they are about people. That is

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what makes the films unique and special. Is there any place that

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you, when you left, you thought, wow, I never ever want to go back

:12:38.:12:43.

there again. Jail. That will do it. I made a promise to myself I would

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never go to prison and thankfully I have never been in trouble with the

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law and hopefully I never will. There is still time! Don't worry

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mum, joking. I found myself checking in, going into prison, I knew it was

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going to be really really difficult, but you know, you shake a man's hand

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you hook him in the eye and someone opens up to you, I thought it would

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be about bravado but really it was more about the internal battle these

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men have in themselves and the film ended up about the blurred line

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between mentality and criminality. You can see all those documentaries

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You can see all those documentaries online.

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"Reggie Yates: Hidden Australia" is available on BBC

:13:31.:13:31.

Later this year the Royal Navy's new ?3 billion super-carrier HMS

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Queen Elizabeth should be ready to enter service.

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She's the biggest ship we've ever had, and every detail

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has to be just right, even down to the very special paint

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that took some very big brains to get right.

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This is the HMS Queen Elizabeth. The Royal Navy's newest and largest

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aircraft carrier. This mighty lady is state-of-the-art

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and will be the heart of the Royal Navy's operation for decades to

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come. But early on the engineers of the Queen Elizabeth encountered a

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problem that could have landed this multi-billion pound vessel in hot

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water. The problem lay with the runway and the coating of protective

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paint covering it. It's tough, it's durable and it gives great grip

:14:30.:14:32.

which is perfect if you want to stop a jet plane quickly or prevent your

:14:33.:14:40.

crew from slipping into the sea. But this surface wasn't designed with a

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new generation of fighter jets in mind. It will be home to the

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lightning 2. The UK's new state-of-the-art jet fighter.

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Unlike normal fighters it can adjust its jet engines down wartsds,

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allowing it to land vertically. This creates tremendous amount of heat on

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the deck. Which is bad news for this stuff.

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To show me just how much damage the heat from the engines can do, I am

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meeting engineer Brian Alcock from North Shields. What we have is a

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sample of the conventional paint system and then what we will do, is

:15:26.:15:31.

simulate the jet engine landing on the deck paint. So that is a mini

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jet engine. Yes, That is going to meet that. Yes it is. Can't wait,

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let's do it. OK. Everybody good? Three, two, one...

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The jet heats the paint up to around 600 degrees Celsius.

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So, how did the conventional paint fare? Well, look at that! There's

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very little of the original coating left now. It is gone here. This is

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just one firing. Clearly this has to be repeated many, many times. That

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is clearly not going to work. No. Brian was tasked with finding a

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solution and quickly to avoid a costly delay to the ship's launch.

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His clever idea was to look at the materials used to make the engines

:16:29.:16:35.

themselves. They contain metals that can withstand the extreme heat they

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produce. So, Brian set about trying to adapt this technology for his

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paint. The team cleverly mixed together two metals to get the

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benefits of both. On here is a coating, which is a mixture of

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aluminium and titanium. Aluminium is good at spreading heat over a large

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area and reducing hot spots, but it is not very strong, so it was

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struggle under the weight of the jets. To get around that problem

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they add titanium. Just a small apt of this metal in the mixture will

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give it the strength that it needs. Three, two, one... How does this mix

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of metals stand up to 600 degrees heat, generated by the jet engine?

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Look at that! There's no damage at all. So it is unscathed. You can see

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the differences in the coatings now and what they are capable of

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withstanding. How do you coat the carrier deck with these metals?

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Well, you need a special machine called an arc spray gun. It melts

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the two metals together and sprays them at high temperatures on to the

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deck, covering it in a thin, but sturdy layer.

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This is the final coating. Even though it doesn't look like much,

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thanks to Brian's technology, this is going to be here for as long as

:18:07.:18:10.

the Queen Elizabeth sails the seas. Thank you. I love his films.. That

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military theme fits nicely with another project... You are so

:18:22.:18:26.

smooth. Special Forces -Ultimate Hell Week. I have some irons in the

:18:27.:18:34.

fire at the moment. Hidden Australia is on BBC iPlayer now. Go and check

:18:35.:18:42.

it out. There is a new series I am fronting Special Forces ultimate

:18:43.:18:45.

hell. We have some of the bravest Brits you have ever seen, who think

:18:46.:18:50.

they are incredibly tough. We challenge them every week with

:18:51.:18:53.

different Special Forces experts from around the world. Back in the

:18:54.:18:58.

day when we were on children's TV together, I was with the marines and

:18:59.:19:04.

you were talking about pop music... I was thinking about this on the way

:19:05.:19:08.

over. I have only been nominated for a Bafta once and the person that won

:19:09.:19:13.

the children's Bafta when I was nominated is this guy over here. A

:19:14.:19:19.

little bit of tension here! We can have a Special Forces -Ultimate Hell

:19:20.:19:25.

Week right here! Arm wrestle! It feels like forever ago when we were

:19:26.:19:29.

doing the children's stuff. It is funny because the things we did then

:19:30.:19:33.

apply with what we're doing now. Some of the things we got the guys

:19:34.:19:38.

to do on Special Forces is not dissimilar. Only it is a hell of a

:19:39.:19:44.

lot scarier! Special Forces -Ultimate Hell Week starts on

:19:45.:19:49.

Sunday, 9pm, BBC Two. As well as Alex's baby we have another breaking

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news story to get to today. This is a story we have covered on The One

:19:54.:19:57.

Show for some years. About the sub-postmasters who lost their

:19:58.:20:00.

reputations, livelihood and some were sent to prison all because the

:20:01.:20:05.

Post Office computer systems said their books did not add up. They

:20:06.:20:08.

have spent years trying to clear their names. Nick Wallis has been

:20:09.:20:15.

our man in court today. Nick has rushed over from the City. Good to

:20:16.:20:18.

see you. To remind everybody what this

:20:19.:20:23.

sub-postmasters have been accused of. It is about the horizon computer

:20:24.:20:30.

system. It sits on the counter behind every counter window. Looks

:20:31.:20:33.

like a till, but it does the branch accounts. At the end of every month

:20:34.:20:40.

the sub-postmasters are meant to tot up their books. When they did not

:20:41.:20:45.

balance some sub-postmasters said it is down to glitches in the computer

:20:46.:20:51.

system. They say the Post Office instead of investigating the

:20:52.:20:53.

glitches went after them for that money. Some were sacked, some were

:20:54.:20:57.

forced to pay tens of thousands and we know people who were sent to

:20:58.:21:01.

prison, who they claim shouldn't have been. What happened today? We

:21:02.:21:06.

have been through a parliamentary investigation, through an

:21:07.:21:10.

independent investigation, we've had a Panorama investigation. And The

:21:11.:21:13.

One Show has been all over this for a long time. Still no-one has got

:21:14.:21:17.

any further into finding out what happened. Today, at the High Court,

:21:18.:21:23.

198 sub-postmasters asked for what they called a group litigation

:21:24.:21:29.

order. A technical term for a class action to sue the Post Office for

:21:30.:21:34.

money say they were owed. This will be a juicy case. It could cost the

:21:35.:21:38.

Post Office tens of millions in damages. There'll be revelations

:21:39.:21:42.

along the way. Today, we found out that the Post Office, who had always

:21:43.:21:48.

said that the computer system is only accessible by the

:21:49.:21:52.

sub-postmasters in their branches and they have said it on the record

:21:53.:21:56.

for a number of years, the barristers said this is a mistake.

:21:57.:22:01.

There are four ways you can get third party remoting success. This

:22:02.:22:08.

is -- remote access. If you accuse somebody and you have not

:22:09.:22:12.

investigated the possibility that somebody else has access to that

:22:13.:22:17.

system, then you are opening the door to miscarriages of justice.

:22:18.:22:21.

What did the Post Office say about this? They said they welcome the

:22:22.:22:26.

progress made but will not otherwise comment on live litigation. The

:22:27.:22:28.

starting gun has been fired on this class action. They are looking for

:22:29.:22:33.

potentially more sub-postmasters to come forward and it will go through

:22:34.:22:36.

the High Court over a period of years. This will take a long time.

:22:37.:22:41.

So you will be back and forward then... You are looking very smart,

:22:42.:22:48.

by the way. If you have grown-up children who are refusing to fly the

:22:49.:22:51.

nest give them a shout and get them to watch this film for inspiration.

:22:52.:22:57.

Mike has been watching a bird whose chicks leave quickly, even if at

:22:58.:23:00.

first it is not like the best decision. Sometimes the interaction

:23:01.:23:04.

between animals can be truly surprising. This clip shows a young

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tawny owl appears to see off a fox, that should have left with an easy

:23:10.:23:14.

meal. It seems the fox is too young, too

:23:15.:23:19.

inexperienced or simply too full to take its prize. What about the owl?

:23:20.:23:24.

Why has it left the safety of its nest before it can fly? It's

:23:25.:23:29.

definitely a juvenile tawny owl, it is highly likely it has fallen from

:23:30.:23:35.

its perch while carrying out this curious behaviour known as

:23:36.:23:40.

branching. It is the literal name of the first flightless for rays that a

:23:41.:23:43.

number of owl species made out of their nests and on to surrounding

:23:44.:23:46.

branches. I'm driving to Cheshire, where we've

:23:47.:23:51.

had news that in the last 48 hours two tawny chicks have left their

:23:52.:23:57.

nest site for the very first time. Dave is a naturalist, who has turned

:23:58.:24:03.

his garden on the river into the perfect high-tech haven for owl

:24:04.:24:07.

watching. We have got his cameras and ours trained on an active tawny

:24:08.:24:13.

owl nest. What brought the owls to his land? When I moved in it was a

:24:14.:24:20.

bit overmanaged, so I let everything thrive and grow naturally. It

:24:21.:24:25.

brought an abundance of song birds. Then you started to film the

:24:26.:24:30.

wildlife? I did. I started off with a few cameras and ended up with 16

:24:31.:24:34.

watching every bit that went on in that wood. Were there tawny owls

:24:35.:24:41.

here originally? 2010, pushing some sparrowhawks out here. It gave me a

:24:42.:24:46.

great opportunity to film the lives of the tawny owls. We find out what

:24:47.:24:50.

he has filmed this year. This breeding season we had four chicks.

:24:51.:24:54.

One of the chicks rushed forward to the entrance hole. Mum was outside

:24:55.:24:58.

calling with the food and he went just too quick and fell out of the

:24:59.:25:03.

nest and we just lost him. That left us three. One of them, got a bit

:25:04.:25:08.

weak and sadly we lost another one. What kind of food has the parents

:25:09.:25:14.

been bringing in? Obviously we have loads of voles and wood mice being

:25:15.:25:19.

brought in. We have blackbirds, sparlings but the female, she will

:25:20.:25:26.

take bigger prey like wood pigeons and magpies are even brought in. So

:25:27.:25:31.

what about the branching? Well, this is the moment the very first time

:25:32.:25:36.

that they left the nest. So they are at the entrance to the nest hole

:25:37.:25:39.

there. You can see they are nervous and excited. There they go... A

:25:40.:25:49.

half-metre jump. Wow! Look at that. Of course they are flapping like

:25:50.:25:53.

crazy. They cannot fly. They cannot fly very good at all. Just a few

:25:54.:25:57.

metres. That is the moment it leaves. That is it. It will be

:25:58.:26:01.

several weeks before they can fly, so they must be nearby. We set off

:26:02.:26:06.

to find them. Almost immediately we are in luck.

:26:07.:26:16.

Oh, Dave! There's a big grey downy ball halfway up that tree and it's

:26:17.:26:21.

totally stopped still. That is terrific! It's not been out of the

:26:22.:26:27.

nest for 24 hours. That is awesome! On a nearby branch, the second

:26:28.:26:31.

chick. We have branching tawny owls! We've

:26:32.:26:36.

been incredibly well to catch both chickses and they have not -- chicks

:26:37.:26:42.

and they have not moved a muscle. We will set up the hide and wait until

:26:43.:26:49.

dusk. We have a wildlife camera man. This is a tawny owl watch out. An

:26:50.:26:57.

hour later we spot one of the chicks, but it is obscured from

:26:58.:26:58.

view. Then, just before we lose the light,

:26:59.:27:13.

one of the chicks climbs into view. Flaps its wings... Teethering on the

:27:14.:27:18.

edge of adolescence. Just address the light was going,

:27:19.:27:23.

the young chick branched right into view. A brief glimpse of an ill lu

:27:24.:27:30.

sieve event which happens just once in their lifetime.

:27:31.:27:33.

More excuses to go ah now! From baby owls we go to baby Joneses. Thank

:27:34.:27:42.

you so much for all of the baby photos you have sent in. We've had

:27:43.:27:47.

over 2,000 that have come in to us on tonight's programme. We will

:27:48.:27:52.

e-mail and send them all on to Alex... Just to confuse her more.

:27:53.:27:59.

Baby names. This is little Elliot. Sent from his mum and dad. Cuteness!

:28:00.:28:05.

All born this week. This is Sarah's twin boys. This is Henry, Alex,

:28:06.:28:11.

Henry, what do you think of that? Or maybe Arthur? This is Lindsey's new

:28:12.:28:18.

grandson Jackson. He's incredibly cute. Look how small he is compared

:28:19.:28:27.

to the thumb. It is very cute. This is Pamela's little boy, gorge... Oh,

:28:28.:28:33.

look at his -- gorge, oh, look at his smile! This is Oakly, who has

:28:34.:28:42.

been told he looks like there is a glitch on his account. Huge

:28:43.:28:47.

congratulations, this is David's new son, Hugo.

:28:48.:28:52.

Ah! There we are. Listen, once again, thank you for all of your

:28:53.:28:57.

efforts. Sorry we couldn't get to the other 1,994! Reggie Yates,

:28:58.:29:05.

everybody. Special Forces ultimate hell night started on BBC Two on

:29:06.:29:15.

Keeping me company tomorrow will be Michael Ball,

:29:16.:29:18.

We know you understand the risks associated with your pregnancy.

:29:19.:29:28.

Because I'm smaller, people think my hopes are not so great.

:29:29.:29:33.

You know what it's like when help is needed. You just jump in.

:29:34.:29:37.

Matt Baker and Angela Scanlon are joined in the studio by DJ turned documentary maker Reggie Yates, Team Brexit go on their first-fact finding mission and Marty Jopson gets to do an experiment on the Royal Navy's new supercarrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth.